IMPACT Magazine's 30th Anniversary Issue

Page 1

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

THE 30TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE From left to right: Philip Ndugga, Kyle Shewfelt, Tanya Dubnicoff, Simon Whitfield, Jon Montgomery, Brian McKeever, Mark Tewsbury, Jessica Zelinka.

impactmagazine.ca

30

YEARS of Inspiration

Follow us


From left to right: Kurt Browning, Jennifer Botterill, Joanne Malar, Lauren Toyota, Cindy Klassen, Beckie Scott, Geroy Simon.

30

YEARS of Inspiration

Athletic Shoes:

Décathlon Canada


A NEW KIND OF SPORTS STORE With more than 1,700 stores in over 60 countries around the world, Decathlon is a world-renowned brand that designs, manufactures, tests, and sells apparel and equipment for over 65 different sports. In keeping with its mission to make sports accessible to the many, Decathlon offers year-round fair pricing on its products and provides a complete sports experience through in-store gyms, product test areas, sports classes and activities for the community.

LOCATIONS ACROSS CANADA

NOW OPEN IN

CALGARY, AB

OPENING NOV 26

BRAMPTON, ON


CONGRATULATIONS

TO IMPACT MAGAZINE ON 30 YEARS OF ELEVATING THE ATHLETES Dave Holland

The Canadian Sport Institute Calgary is a non-profit organization dedicated to building, creating and educating Olympic and Paralympic athletes, coaches and sport science professionals. We aspire to make sure everyone who works with us receive the support they need to succeed in sport and life. Learn more about the athletes' journeys at the Canadian Sport Institute Calgary and how to donate by scanning the QR code below.


HELLYHANSEN.COM

PROFESSIONAL GRADE. RESPONSIBLY MADE. LIFA INFINITY PRO™ is our most innovative and sustainable waterproof/ breathable technology to date, made without any chemical treatments. Developed with professionals around the world to protect them from the elements while keeping environmental responsibility in mind.

WATERPROOF

BREATHABLE

RESPONSIBLE

KAYLIN RICHARDSON / PROFESSIONAL SKIER


CONTENTS Cover photography by Todd Duncan, HarderLee, Dave Laus, Kevin Light, Liz Tremblay.

30

th

Features

ANNIVERSARY EDITION

49 30 Years of Covers – The Story

102

A look back at thirty years of inspiration

44 She Is a Publisher

Where it all began with Publisher, Elaine Kupser

72 The Evolution of the Running Shoe An extensive history of our favourite footwear

66 Travelling the World with IMPACT 30 destinations from the past 30 years

Inside Every Issue FIRST IMPACT

H E A LT H & W E L L N E S S

18 World Records that Fell During IMPACT's Rise

78 Yes, You’re an Athlete 92 How Food Can Help Save Our Planet

FINAL IMPACT

SPORTS MEDICINE

116 Martin Parnell's 10-Year Journey with IMPACT

82 Muscle Matters 86 Static Stretching for Sport Performance

GEAR

22 The Future of Wearable Health Technology

OOD & NUTRITION F 88 The Top Must-Haves for your Kitchen 94 The Science of Food & Nutrition

WORKOUT

RECIPES

26 Back to the Future 30 Build Your Personal Fitness Fortress

98 Waffles with Mushrooms 100 Vegan Bannock 102 Portobello Burger 104 Paprika-Spiced Chickpeas 106 Vegetable Chili with Cornbread 108 Nutty Protein Bowl 110 Rainbow Noodles with Hot Sauce 112 Double Ginger Cookies 114 Zesty Lemon Blueberry Muffins

FITNESS

36 The Future Of Fitness 40 Parasport Taking Centre Stage TRAINING

76 Reach Your True Performance Potential

8 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

66


49

22

26

78 IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 9


30TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

VOLUME 31, ISSUE 1 A leader in the industry for 30 years, IMPACT Magazine is committed to publishing content provided by the best experts in their fields for those who aspire to higher levels of health and fitness.

VANCOUVER • CALGARY • TORONTO PUBLISHER & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Elaine Kupser elaine@impactmagazine.ca GUEST EDITOR Chris Welner cwelner@telus.net CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Louise Hodgson-Jones corsa.communications@shaw.ca Marissa Tiel marissatiel@gmail.com GUEST ART DIRECTOR Logan Johnson hello@loganjohnson.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Rico Marques design@impactmagazine.ca VP BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Janet Henderson janet@impactmagazine.ca VP PARTNERSHIPS & MARKETING Rhyan Pietromonaco rhyan@impactmagazine.ca COPY EDITOR Tom Lundteigen LEGAL COUNSEL Gregory Forrest PRINTING DISTRIBUTION

Dollco Print Solutions Group Media Classified Streetbox Media

CONTACT IMPACT Magazine Head Office 2007 2nd St. S.W. Calgary, AB T2S 1S4 403.228.0605 ADVERTISING advertising@impactmagazine.ca SUBSCRIPTIONS $45 for one year, or $70 for two years (includes GST) impactmagazine.ca/subscriptions WEBSITE www.impactmagazine.ca

10 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

CH

IEVE

MENT IN PU

BL

ING

© 2021 Impact Productions Inc.

impact-magazine

ISH

The opinions expressed in IMPACT Magazine are the writers’ and not necessarily those of the publication. IMPACT Magazine advises you to consult your physician if you do not follow a regular fitness program. All content is the property of IMPACT Productions Inc. and cannot be reproduced in any form without written consent of IMPACT Productions Inc.

A

SOCIAL impactmag  impactmag

2 013

impactmagcanada

EL

AIN

E KUPS

ER


A Destination Unlike Any Other

Skiing | Catskiing | Nordic skiing | Fat biking | Snowmobiling Winter lodging specials and packages are available to book now.

Just three hours southwest of Calgary, Fernie, BC is an idyllic and friendly mountain community known for its champagne powder snow and cool local vibe. Explore the vast and uncrowded winter wonderland, visit our Historic Downtown with its shops and cafes, great places to dine, quaint attractions and spas.

Over 30 Ft of Snow Annually I 3,550 Vertical Ft I Top Elevation 7,000 Ft 2,500 Acres of Lift Access Terrain & Thousands of Acres for Catskiing

experiencefernie.com | #ferniestoke


CONTRIBUTORS TRUDIE LEE & BRIAN HARDER Trudie and Brian (HarderLee) have been shooting for IMPACT since before this great headshot was taken decades ago. Trudie was the coordinating photographer for our gatefold cover photo. They are based in Calgary. HARDERLEEPHOTO

TRUDIELEEPHOTO

WWW.HARDERLEE.CA

GRAHAM MCKERRELL A Calgary photographer, Graham is a devoted skier and cyclist. He photographed publisher Elaine Kupser for her feature profile. MCKERRELLPHOTOGRAPHY

GRAHAM.MCKERRELL.9

KHYBERRIDER

WWW.MCKERRELLPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

CHRIS WELNER Editor of IMPACT from 2010 to 2018, Chris served as Guest Editor for this 30th Anniversary Issue. In retirement, he is excited about being a grandfather and spends time volunteering and on freelance writing and editing projects in Calgary. CRYSWRITING

CHRISWELNER

WWW.CRYSTALWRITING.CA

LOUISE HODGSON-JONES Louise is a communications consultant in Victoria, B.C. and a former editor of IMPACT. Read her extensive article on the history of the running shoe. LOUISEHODGSONJONES

LOUISE.HODGSONJONES

LOUISE.HODGSONJONES

T. COLIN CAMPBELL Dr. Campbell has been dedicated to the science of human health for more than 60 years and is largely known for The China Study — one of the most comprehensive studies of health and nutrition ever conducted. NUTRITIONSTUDIES

NUTRITIONSTUDIES

TCOLINCAMBELLF

WWW.NUTRITIONSTUDIES.ORG

EMILY VON EUW Emily, from Vancouver, is the creator of the award-winning recipe blog This Rawsome Vegan Life and author of multiple cookbooks, including the bestselling Rawsome Vegan Baking. THISRAWSOMEVEGANLIFE

THISRAWSOMEVEGANLIFE

RAWSOMEVEGAN

WWW.THISRAWSOMEVEGANLIFE.COM

CONTRIBUTORS

Danielle Arsenault, David Behm, Patrick Bernat, Shira Blustein, Brendan Brazier, Gabriel Cabrera, T. Colin Campbell, Pete Estabrooks, Hannah Fletcher, Benoit Huot, Logan Johnson, Matthew Kenney, Brian Luptak, Simon Marshall, Martin Parnell, Lesley Paterson, Stuart Phillips, Anna Pippus, Ocean Robbins, Shayla Roberts, Brian Skinner, Marissa Tiel, Sasha Williams, Calvin Zaryski. PHOTOGRAPHY

Richard Alois, Brian Buchsdruecker, Shawn Clover, Todd Duncan, Dave Holland, Charles Hope, Jonas Jorneberg, George Kourounis, Dave Laus, Kevin Light, Christel Saneh, Leo Tamburri, Liz Tremblay, Katy Whitt, Bob Young.

12 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE


Beyond

SMILE

®

LASIK: is PREMIER LASER VISION CORRECTION Experience freedom from glasses with minimally invasive SMILE® vision correction that can normally return you to full visual recovery within just a few days.

403-547-9775

smile.westernlasereye.com


MEMO

Thank You for 30 Years

W

e made it. In the fall of 1991 the first issue of IMPACT Magazine was launched - and I haven’t looked back since – well, of course, with the exception of putting together this epic anniversary issue. Where does one even start? At the risk of sounding like an actor reciting their winning speech at the Academy Awards, I would like to start by thanking absolutely everyone I have ever worked with over the years. I started IMPACT Magazine out of a passion for the fitness and health industry, and a true desire to help people live healthier lives. The community that we have built over the years is astounding – from team members and expert contributors, to the business community and of course the readers, IMPACT has become much bigger than me, much more than I had thought possible. It has created a life of its own. It is inspiring, educational, transformative, purposeful, entertaining, and genuine. This only happens because of the thousands of people who have shared their stories, expertise, vision, advertising support, loyalty, time and love. Changing careers from the fitness industry to entrepreneurship in the publishing industry allowed me the ability to create and contribute in both realms. I knew there was a need for a publication that could carry the message of better health and fitness through credible editorial, and a trusted place for the business community to promote their passions to a health-conscious reader. We kick off this journey through 30 years with an incredible front-cover dedication to our athletes and to those who have graced the 180+ covers over this time. This spectacular gatefold cover wouldn’t have been possible without the support of Decathlon, who also shares our vision of promoting a mindful way of living through fitness and sport. I wholeheartedly thank all our advertisers now and throughout the years who have continued to choose IMPACT.

A special thank you to Chris Welner, my former editor of many years, for coming out of retirement to write my IMPACT story. I must admit that it feels a little uncomfortable seeing myself taking up that much print space, but he did a beautiful job. Other former IMPACT editorial team members came back to contribute to the production of this issue too – thank you Louise Hodgson-Jones, Logan Johnson, Marissa Tiel, Charles Hope and Trudie Lee. Thank you to my full-time team - Janet Henderson and Rhyan Pietromonaco, who have unwaveringly dedicated their careers to IMPACT as if it was Elaine Kupser, their very own. They helped me Publisher & Editor-in-Chief bring 2021 to the finish line. Circa 1980's pre-IMPACT Magazine. Lastly I would like to thank the two people that mean the most to me – my beautiful daughter, Lindsay, who has been here and supported me for 29 of the 30-year ride; and my wonderful husband, Tom. Incidentally, both have offered up thousands of hours of support behind the scenes. I have thoroughly enjoyed publishing all 180 issues of IMPACT Magazine, and meeting and working with everyone I have met along the way. I appreciate each and every one of you and I am moved that IMPACT has made a difference in people’s lives over the years. To the future of fitness and health for all of us!

DIGITAL EDITION Didn't get your hands on a favourite edition of IMPACT? Or maybe your best friend secretly borrowed it from you? No worries. Subscribe to our FREE newsletter and digital edition online at www.impactmagazine.ca.

14 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE


PRE-ORDER EVENT RECEIVE

GET THE CADILLAC YOU REALLY WANT.

IN SPECIAL EVENT OFFERS + OEM CADILLAC OFFERS

+ 4 YEARS / 80,000 KM** PREMIUM CARE MAINTENANCE

CALL: (403) 265-7690 1720 BOW TRAIL SW CALGARY, ALBERTA

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF PRE-ORDERING YOUR CADILLAC WITH OUR EXCLUSIVE $1,000 IN ADDITIONAL OFFERS EXCLUSIVE TO WOLFE CADILLAC CALGARY IN ADDITION TO MANUFACTURER DISCOUNTS. OFFER ENDS DECEMBER 31ST, 2021.


IRONMAN CANADA

RETURNS TO PENTICTON

PHOTO: Athletes enjoy beautiful Okanagan views.

L EGENDARY T RIAT HLON R ACE GOE S BACK TO I T S ROOT S

A

fter a decade away, a popular longdistance triathlon is returning home. This summer, IRONMAN Canada will be back in the heart of the Okanagan. It’s a welcome homecoming for race director Susie Ernsting, who last raced in Penticton in 2010 and is returning in 2022 at the helm of race operations.

It’s one of the rare bike courses these days that features just one loop. The transition is located in Okanagan Lake Park, right at the water. Beyond that, it’s incredibly spectator-friendly with the start and finish lines, and transition zone, and IRONMAN Village all within a few blocks of each other in downtown Penticton.

Never will you feel as welcomed as an athlete, as a volunteer, as a race organizer, as you will in Penticton. SUSIE ERNSTING | IRONMAN CANADA R ACE DIRECTOR

“They have so much ownership and pride in the history and the importance of IRONMAN Canada,” says Ernsting. The race has existed in some form since 1983 and received its IRONMAN race licence in 1986. It’s one of the first IRONMAN races to be located outside of Kona. The race ran successfully in the Okanagan Valley until 2012 before moving to Whistler’s coastal mountains for eight years. Now, IRONMAN Canada is returning to its roots. Penticton is a legendary course in the triathlon community, known for a challenging, hilly bike course, stunning scenery and hot desert-like temperatures.

Unlike previous years, there’s a brandnew run course that replaces the dark and lonely run out to Okanagan Falls and back with an out-and-back section on the Kettle Valley Rail Trail and through town before the historic finish on Lakeshore Drive. “We brought the run course all into town and highlighted some of my favourite parts of Penticton and really made it a spectatorfriendly course,” she says. “There’s lots of little out-and-back sections. Your friends and family can see you six or eight times on the run course without having to move.” Ernsting says they are finding ways to honour the race’s storied past and traditions. Most will happen during the opening ceremonies, but there will be a few changes.

Sponsored Content

In the past, the race has offered a pasta dinner. It’s grown so much, that feeding thousands of athletes just isn’t feasible anymore, so instead, racers will receive vouchers to use at the restaurants in town. “It’s a great way to encourage visitors of Penticton to try something new,” she says. “It also gives our community restaurants a chance to be involved and be part of the event.” Also returning to the announcing team is the legendary Steve King, who’s been at the race in Penticton even before it received IRONMAN designation. Ernsting says the race is definitely a “bucket list item.” “You will feel so welcomed,” she says. “There’s so many people that are invested in that community into your success and making sure you have the best day.” When the athletes line up for the start next to the giant peach at Rotary Park on Aug. 28, 2022, Pentictonites will be ready for them. Welcome back, they’ll say. Welcome home.

REGISTER FOR PENTICTON 2022 AT: WWW.IRONMAN.COM/IM-CANADA


More than just smiles. We focus on healthy bites. + 30 years Early Childhood Assessment

3

Delivering lasting results since 1990. Teen-Friendly

Locations

For your convenience

Non-intrusive Care for Adults

Experience & Innovation seasoned specialists and assistants is led by Dr. Mark Antosz and Dr. Robert Vincelli. Together, we provide comprehensive orthodontic care and treatment using the most available to give our patients healthy bites that last a lifetime.

Visit avortho.ca to learn about the AVO advantage and our flexible payment options. Book your complimentary first consultation and assessment today online or by calling 587-355-8772.

Chronic Pain Treatment

Invisalign Experts

Our experienced team of

advanced techniques and technology

Aspen Landing Market Mall Canmore

Fun for Kids & Teens


FIRST IMPACT

World Records that Fell During IMPACT's Rise Tracking the evolution of major running records over 30 years of Canada's best fitness magazine CHRISTEL SANEH FOR WORLD ATHLETICS

A

lot has changed in the health and fitness world over the 30 years since IMPACT was born. Better training, nutrition, equipment, coaching and therapies are taking athletes, both elite and weekend warriors, to new heights. In 30 years, the women’s marathon world record has dropped more than seven minutes. The men’s marathon record is five minutes faster. Here is a look at how world records have changed — or not — in key running disciplines over the past three decades.

EVENT

1991

2021

CURRENT RECORD HOLDER (YEAR OF RECORD)

Usain Bolt, right, is the world record holder in the

Marathon Women

2:21:06

2:14:04

Brigid Kosgei, Kenya (2019)

men's 100 and 200 metres, while Letesenbet Gidey,

Marathon Men

2:06:50

2:01:39

Eliud Kipchoge, Kenya (2018)

below, holds the record for the women's 10,000

10,000 m Women

30:13.74

29:01.03

Letesenbet Gidey, Ethiopia (2021)

10,000 m Men

27:08.23

26:11.00

Joshua Cheptegai, Uganda (2020)

5,000 m Women

14:37.33

14:06.62

Letesenbet Gidey, Ethiopia (2020)

5,000 m Men

12:58.39

12:35.36

Joshua Cheptegai, Uganda (2020)

1,500 m Women

3:52.47

3:50.07

Genzebe Dibaba, Ethiopia (2015)

1,500 m Men

3:29.46

3:26.00

Hicham El Guerrouj, Morocco (1998)

800 m Women

1:53.28

1:53.28

Jarmila Kratochvilova, Czech Rep. (1983)

800 m Men

1:41.73

1:40.91

David Rudisha, Kenya (2012)

400 m Women

47.60

47.60

Marita Koch, East Germany (1985)

400 m Men

43.29

43.03

Wayde van Niekerk, South Africa (2016)

200 m Women

21.34

21.34

Florence Griffith-Joyner, U.S. (1988)

200 m Men

19.72

19.19

Usain Bolt, Jamaica (2009)

100 m Women

10.49

10.49

Florence Griffith-Joyner, U.S. (1988)

100 m Men

9.86

9.58

Usain Bolt, Jamaica (2009)

and 5,000 metres.

18 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE



Sponsored Content

PRODUCTS, LEFT TO RIGHT: InBody BP170B, InBody H20N.

InBody at Home Chart your health and fitness goals accurately with InBody’s at-home products DO YOU FEEL you are hitting a plateau with your fitness goals? Are you feeling overweight and think that losing a few pounds will be the answer? Many of us think that shedding some weight will magically be the solution but that is often not the case. Initial weight loss may initially make you feel and look good, but this is not an accurate measurement of how healthy you are. Just as you would have a training plan for a 10K run, you should have a plan for your overall health and well being. This way you can track your progress while making achievable fitness goals knowing that you are in charge of your body. One of the key components of this plan is not just to keep track of your weight but to know your body composition. Muscle mass, body fat, BMI and metabolic rate are all important components that make for a healthy body. Regularly monitoring your blood pressure can also alleviate any issues you may have particularly if you have a family history prone to high or low blood pressure. Having a plan means you can make any adjustments yourself to your

goals whether it is to increase your muscle mass or decrease body fat. InBodyCanada is making it easier for individuals to chart their healthy course with two products recommended for home use.

InBody H20N SMART WEIGHT ANALYZER

The H20N measures whole body composition including weight, skeletal muscle mass, body fat mass, BMI, percentage of body fat, and basal metabolic rate. This is done quickly and accurately with the data recorded and synched to your phone so you can share with your personal trainer or medical professional. The data is easily stored showing a history of your test results.

InBody BP170B CLINICALLY VALIDATED AUTOMATIC BLOOD PRESSURE MONITOR

This blood pressure monitor records a user’s systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and pulse. It is accurate and user friendly with an easily wearable patented one-touch cuff. Recommended by Hypertension Canada (Gold rating) it can detect hypertension and an irregular pulse rate. Just as with the H20N, the results from the blood pressure monitor can be downloaded to a mobile device for easy reference via Bluetooth® connection. InBody products are used globally by medical institutions and health professionals and have a reputation for producing accurate and reliable results. With their devices now adapted for consumers, never has it been so easy to keep your own health records, and all in the comfort of your home.

LEARN MORE AT: www.inbodycanada.ca


Congratulations IMPACT! Partners in Wellness for over 30 years! the is & Lou n boots so Han started that all! it

Pro Fitter Ski Trainer

Master Your Agility & Strength The Classic...it’s still Awesome!

Est. 1985

Work(out) Smarter... Play Harder! In your home or office, we can

help you work & workout Better!

Evolve your workplace into a health asset. When you Active Sit / Stand you improve core strength & reduce the future risk of injury. Use Fitterfirst products daily for Better Balance! Born & Raised in

the Canadian Rockies

Balance Boards 16” & 20”

Ankle ROM & Injury Prevention Tri-level design to keep you improving

Active Office Board (AOB) Work smarter with the dynamic, adjustable AOB

DuraBall® Exercise Balls

Core Strengthening and Stability World’s Strongest Exercise Ball Chair

No to Pivot

Yes to Float

“Simply the most versatile standing platform ever!”

Special Offer 20% off all AOB orders! use code: IMPACT Exp 01/31/2022 Extreme Balance Board Pro

Our most Challenging 2-level 3D Board Built to Club Quality Standard

www.fitter1.com sales@fitter1.com • 1.800.fitter1

100’s of Quality Products for Home, Office, Club & Clinic


IMPACT PICKS

The Future of Wearable Health EDITOR'S PICKS

KATY WHITT

I

n previous issues we’ve looked at performance-driven technology. This feature introduces the prominent players in the area of health that will give you real-time data to help you take your health and fitness journey to the next level.

Polar

VERITY SENSE & M2 ARMBAND Polar Verity Sense is a versatile high-quality optical heart rate sensor that measures heart rate from your arm or temple with maximum freedom of movement. $129.99  I WWW.POLAR.COM

Hexoskin

PRO SMART CLOTHING This best-in-class smart garment comes with a comfortable base layer smart shirt with integrated sensors. Data can be visualized in real-time with the Hexoskin App on iOS and Android smartphones and tablets. $730.00  I WWW.HEXOSKIN.COM

TrueLight

Stryd

TrueLight® utilizes ground-breaking LED technology to safely and effectively help stimulate cellular healing, muscle recovery and collagen production. Pulsating or steady light options assist in healing and pain relief. $60.70-$122.00  I WWW.TRUEDARK.COM

Stryd tracks your running power – the fastest way to your next personal best. Running power accounts for your speed, slope, run form, fatigue, and wind to deliver improved pacing wherever you run. $299.00  I WWW.STRYD.COM

LIGHT THERAPY EYEWEAR

22 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

POWER METER


Muse

MUSE 2 HEADBAND Muse is a brain sensing headband and the first widely available consumer tool to provide users with real-time biofeedback on your meditation state using auditory cues helping you better relax, meditate, and rest – allowing you to refocus during the day and recover overnight. $299.99  I WWW.CHOOSEMUSE.COM

Hapbee

Garmin

A truly innovative wellness wearable that allows you to control your sleep, your energy, your focus or your anxiety by means of a headband controlled by an app. $500.00  I WWW.HAPBEE.COM

An easy-to-use GPS smartwatch designed for people of all skill levels. Health features include stress tracking, Body Battery energy monitoring, intensity minutes, fitness age, respiration tracking and women’s health tracking. $199.99  I WWW.GARMIN.COM

SMART WEARABLE

FORERUNNER 55

Oura Ring

OURA RING GENERATION 3 This wearable health platform delivers accurate personalized health data, insights, and daily guidance. The ring tracks all stages of sleep and accounts for daily activity to provide practical steps for long-term improvement. $299.00  I WWW.OURARING.COM

Biostrap

RECOVER SET Utilizing a clinically reliable biosensor, the Biostrap wrist-worn device captures advanced biometrics, analyzes sleep quality and provides actionable insights to empower users to optimize their sleep, recovery and overall performance. $385.00  I WWW.BIOSTRAP.COM

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 23


Sponsored Content

HARMONY ADVENTURES FOR AN ACTIVE LIFESTYLE A new residential development in Springbank

is focusing on creating recreational amenities for all the family Are you seeking a more active lifestyle? to a regional pathway system, incorporating Or thinking of opting out of the big city the historic Old Banff Coach Trail. for a smaller community? Then consider Kids of all ages can play freely in Paint re-locating to Harmony, a new, stunning, Brush Park or Sunset Cove Park. The parks vibrant community in Springbank, west of feature playgrounds, half basketball courts Calgary, co-developed by Bordeaux and large greenspaces for kite flying, Developments and Qualico Communities. playing soccer, or a game of tag. Harmony’s village-style concept For those craving a beach lifestyle offers a variety of residential Harmony has that too! The first of two properties, with future retail and lakes is completed, perfect for swimming, existing recreational amenities right paddleboarding and kayaking. The 40on its doorstep. Perfect for active acre lake has a sandy beach that all the families who enjoy the great outdoors, family can enjoy, from relaxing in the sun Harmony embraces an all-year-round to building sandcastles. Construction on lifestyle with an adventure park and lake the second 100-acre lake is planned to at the heart of the community. start in 2022 which includes additional Currently in phase lakefront property one, the 1.75-acre and beaches Adventure Park Golfers will features a skate revel in the 18-hole LAUREL LAPOINTE, MARKETING MANAGER park, pump track, Mickelson National Ninja obstacle Golf Club which course, beach volleyball, skating ribbon presents a challenging course with and a toboggan hill. A hockey rink, stunning views. As a bonus Harmony festival zone and playground are planned residents receive a Social Membership for phase two. to the golf club with includes reduced Walkers, runners, and cyclists will green fees on four rounds per year, enjoy the 15 kilometres of paved pathways discounted rates at the driving range throughout the community. with an and access to the upcoming clubhouse additional 10 kilometres still to come. Harmony is all about community. The pathway system will eventually connect In addition to the recreational amenities,

It is a very close-knit community.

residents are creating their own activities. “It is a very close-knit community,” says Laurel Lapointe, Marketing Manager, Bordeaux Developments. “Everybody knows everyone and there is a wine club, book club and a boot camp.” It is the feeling of space that has buyers interested in Harmony, Lapointe says. “COVID has created a need for us to want more space. Harmony offers larger lots and the room to move around in a clean, open environment and it is so easy to get where you need to be.” With 1,700 sq ft townhomes starting at $460,000 Harmony is an affordable option for those wanting to downsize, not be in a large city and want easy access to the mountains. Residents think nothing of driving to Canmore for dinner, says Lapointe. The developers are very environmentally conscious and when the community is finished 17,000 trees will be planted. Harmony also has its own waste -water treatment plant which goes through several ecological filters before being used irrigate the golf course . Harmony is truly an adventure playground. “We are focused on creating a place that people want to live in and who care about how they spend their daily life,” says Lapointe.

Find directional maps, information and more at LiveInHarmony.ca


CHOOSE YOUR ADVENTURE WITH A HEADLAMP SERIES TO FIT YOUR B U D G E T // A C T I V I T Y // M O V E M E N T

EXPLORE 4 EXPLORE SERIES was created for adventures – on land as well as water. 400 Lumens and 100% waterproof (IPX7). In addition to white light, the headlamp has a red light mode that preserves your night vision and an orange mode that is optimal for map reading. Choose Explore 4RC if you prefer rechargeable batteries, or choose the Explore 4 if you prefer 3xAAA batteries that you can change during longer adventures.

TRAIL RUNNER FREE TRAIL RUNNER FREE SERIES is designed for running, any type or duration. 400 Lumens and 3 different battery options. The basic Trail Runner Free includes 3 x AAA batteries and the Hybrid battery case. The Trail Runner Hybrid comes with a rechargeable Hybrid battery (1.15Ah) and the Hybrid case. The Trail Runner Ultra comes with a rechargeable 4.0 Ah battery as well as the Hybrid case. The power cord is integrated into the headband creating a comfortable headlamp experience without distracting cords or tangled wires.

CROSS TRAIL 7 CROSS TRAIL SERIES is for the true “all around’’ sports enthusiast. 600 Lumens and a dual light beam with Flow Light make these compact headlamps perfect for running, but also biking and skiing where more light is necessary for higher speeds. The Cross Trail series uses a rechargeable battery and includes accessories that allow you to wear the headlamp on your head, helmet or bicycle handlebar.

TRAIL SPEED 5 TRAIL SPEED SERIES is the ultimate headlamp for endurance athletes looking for a powerful, yet small, compact and lightweight headlamp. With 1200 Lumens, the Trail Speed series allows you to move at high speeds in demanding terrain. All headlamps in this series are powered by a rechargeable battery and includes accessories that allow you to wear the headlamp on your head, helmet or bicycle handlebar.

SCAN TO FIND THE HEADLAMP SERIES FOR YOU


WORKOUT

I

t’s been quite an interesting year in the fitness industry. As a result of the pandemic, fitness companies were pushed to pivot fast; the future we thought we’d see five years from now has arrived! Here we are, virtual and in-person fitness trainer hybrids! Personal trainers are busier than ever as technology continues to advance, and the importance of health and wellness continues to trend. In this high-tech world people are sitting more and more and it’s becoming increasingly important to counter this and build up that posterior chain! Let’s create a better future for you and focus on the back side of the body now.

Back to the Future A futuristic 30-minute posterior focused functional workout! BY HANNAH FLETCHER  TODD DUNCAN 2018/2020 Impact Magazine Canada’s Top Fitness Trainer. Vancouver, B.C. HANNAHFITNESS

HANNAHFITNESSPAGE

SHOOT LOCATION: CMMNGRND, Vancouver, B.C. CMMNGRNDY VR

CLOTHING COURTESY: LOLË LOLE

26 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

Warm-up (6 minutes) 45 seconds of each exercise including: bridges, inch worm to plank walk-outs, spiderman lunges with T-spine rotation, alternating scorpion stretches, alternating single-leg hip hinges, alternating 90/90 stretch, supermans. Circuit (rep-based) • Exercise 1 x 30 reps • Exercise 2 x 10 reps • Exercise 3 x 30 reps • Exercise 4 x 10 reps per side • Exercise 5 x 20 reps • Repeat 4 times Do you want to add intensity? Try timing yourself on your first set, start to finish, with no rest. Then on your second, third and fourth sets try beating that time as much as you can. Your reward is applying that time difference to your rest period! *Note: don’t compromise your form or range of motion for speed.


1

HIP THRUST

(medium to heavy weight) Start with your back on the bench. Place yourself so the bottom of your shoulder blades hit the edge. Get into a bridge position with your hips high and your spine straight. Tighten your core and hold this straight-spine position for the duration of the exercise. With the weight on your hips, squeeze your glutes as hard as you can and lower your hips halfway. Continue to squeeze your glutes and engage your core as you press those hips back up. Repeat. *Regress this exercise by doing it weightless or switch it to a bridge on the floor.

2

BENT-OVER REVERSE FLY TO FRONT RAISE

(light weight) With your feet hip-width apart, hold the dumbbells at your side. Keeping your spine neutral, hinge your hips back. Allow the legs to bend slightly (as needed) and contract your hamstrings, glutes and core as you hold this position for the duration of this exercise. Add a reverse fly: lift your arms out to the side while keeping them aligned to your shoulders with a micro bend at the elbow. Pull the arms back just past your shoulders squeezing your rear deltoids and then release the arms back down slowly. Maintaining this same isometric hold in the body, switch to a front raise: the arms stay straight and reach up to the front at about shoulder height. Continue to alternate these two arm positions. *Regress this exercise by using a light, long band. Place the middle of the band under your feet and hold on to the ends. Adjust the tension as needed.  ➝

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 27


3

KNEELING HIP THRUST WITH DUMBBELL SWING

(medium weight) Start with your knees hip-width apart on a mat in a tall position with dumbbells at your side. The feet can be flexed or relaxed. Keep your spine neutral and contract your core, glutes and hamstrings as you hinge your hips back. Thrust the hips forward to the same tall position you started with. As you thrust, let the arms swing forward (the swing is generated from the power of the hip thrust). Repeat. *Regress this exercise by practicing without weights.

4

BENT-OVER SINGLE-LEG SQUAT INTO DONKEY KICK WITH NARROW ROW

(medium weight) Start with your feet hip-width apart and hold the dumbbells at your side. Shift your bodyweight to the right leg by either lifting your left foot back or by resting the left toes gently on the ground. Keep your spine neutral, hinge your hips back to a 45-degree angle and squat down. Hold and lift the left leg back into a donkey kick (contract your core, glutes and hamstrings). Hold the leg at the top and add a bent-over row. Pull the shoulders down from the ears and squeeze the shoulder blades together. Pull your arms back keeping the elbows tight to the body. Then as you lower the arms back to your sides, lower the donkey kick leg to its resting position. After completing 10 reps, repeat on the other side. *Regress this exercise, place your hand on a bench to support your balance and do one arm at a time.

5

FROG REVERSE HYPER HOLD OPENERS

Lay on a box or bench with your hips off the edge (align to where the hip hinges). Hold the box tight with your arms, contract your core and bend your legs so there is no contact with the floor. Squeeze your glutes as hard as you can and lift the legs to hip height (or as high as you can). Hold the legs here, and glide both the knees and feet open, and then bring them back into hip width apart. Slowly lower the legs, without touching the floor, and repeat.

28 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE


then...

now...

CONGRATULATIONS IMPACT

MAGAZINE ON 30 YEARS! Our community of Members, Sport Partners, and guests show tremendous strength in their pursuit of a lifelong commitment to being active. We’re here to help you in this pursuit of being courageous with your mind and body.

Visit repsolsportcentre.com for Memberships & Admission prices.

forever active. forever strong.


WORKOUT

Build Your Personal

Fitness Fortress 30 years of exercise fundamentals that will last you a lifetime

BY PETE ESTABROOKS  BOOKSTRUCKER Pete is one of IMPACT Magazine’s all-time great trainers from Calgary, AB. FITGUY1959

PETER.ESTABROOKS.5

THEFITGUYCANADA

I

t is halfway awesomeness and halfway pressure-cooker to come up with a workout for the 30th Anniversary of an industry icon like IMPACT Magazine, but I am so ready. Hundreds of the wisest trainers have, over 30 years, contributed their very best to keeping you on track with your exercise programming. I looked back

30 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

over the years of work from the best of the best with an eye to which exercises have stood the test of time and with the intent to — in one workout — create those combinations of exercises with the biggest impact on your fitness, whether that’s today, 30 years ago, or 30 years into the future. We are targetting the fundamentals of fitness.


Increased Muscle Mass and Strength: Provides a solid base for everyday life, while increasing ligament, tendon and bone strength. Increased muscle mass enhances metabolism and protects you from falls, sprawls and mishaps. Squats, deadlifts, pulls, presses and full-body resistance training are key. Strength is the domain of heavier weights, fewer repetitions, more rest. Try compound movements involving multiple joints and muscles.

1

VASA OVERHEAD (PICTURED LEFT)

Vasa trainer or bench with fixed resistance tubing • Lie on back, core solid, arms extended to handles, legs bent or piked. • Maintain supported core, draw arms from overhead to hips in dynamic fashion. • Control release to position — repeat.

Decreased Fat Mass: Excess fat mass is linked to increased mortality risk. A combination of resistance training, interval training and moderate intensity continuous training is your ticket to better health.

2

Improved Cardiovascular Capability: Cardiovascular fitness reduces heart and circulatory trauma. Include activities that involve the large muscles, are rhythmic and challenge your heart and lungs to work harder. Running, cycling, swimming, and skipping are but few of your options in this category.

SAMSON PILLAR PULL

• Kneeling, grip wide cables or fixed resistance tubing. • Grab handles higher than shoulder height, stabilize core, pull elbows tight to ribs. • Release to start position — repeat.

Agility: This is the ability to move at an accelerated pace in one direction, decelerate and shift positions. Any number of jumps, multi-directional movements fit that bill, including hops, skipping, speed ladders and plyometrics. Flexibility: The ability to move both larger and smaller joints through a full and unrestricted, pain-free range of motion. Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, yoga, Pilates and or Tai Chi are all pathways to improvement on this pillar. These building blocks are foundational pieces of your personal fitness fortress. The only way you’ll age gracelessly, be an outlier, shake the status quo is to regularly explore this kingdom. Take classes, find a trainer or gently immerse yourself in self-study. It is never too late to start and always too early to quit. 30-plus years in the sweat trenches has taught me that the best exercises are the ones you get to do, not have to do. To that end, my regular workout this month is a blast of fitness that lights me up on a regular basis. Let’s do this! Warm up: 5 x 2-minute skipping Workout: Five sets of 20 reps

3

FIT BALL PUSH-UP AND TUCK

• Plank position, ankles on fit ball, hands under shoulders on floor. • Draw knees to chest, elevate hips, toes on fit ball. • Extend to plank position. • Perform a perfect push-up — repeat.  ➝

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 31


4

CABLE CHOP

• Use an overhand grip on rope facing high cable. • Step right foot diagonally back. Rotate torso with straight arms. Swing cable over left shoulder. • Step back to start position. • Repeat stepping left foot back, swing cable over right shoulder — repeat.

5

INDO BOARD SQUAT + ALTERNATING SHOULDER PRESS

• Stand on an Indo Board or balance device of your choosing holding two dumbbells, palms facing shoulders. • Squat low. As you stand. push one dumbbell high overhead rotating palm forward. • Return hand to start position. • Repeat on opposite side then repeat both sides — repeat.

6

BENCH WALK

• Assume high plank position, perfect body alignment, hands under shoulders on bench. • Take right hand to floor then left, right hand up, then touch bench with left hand. • Take left hand to floor then left, left hand up, then touch bench with right hand — repeat.

32 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE


richmondoval.ca/about IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 33


Sponsored Content

Neurvana Naturopathic Medicine

– Offering natural solutions to women’s health issues Hormonal Imbalance is very common and can occur at any age

F

inding natural solutions to chronic

A common cause of hormonal imbalance

secreted, due to constipation, this will cause

health issues is the foundation

are xenoestrogens which are compounds

of the work conducted by

that are present in the environment that can

Neurvana Naturopathic Medicine.

alter hormonal health by increasing estrogen

many forms and is dependent on the cause.

The Calgary-based clinic treats degenerative,

in the body. “Xenoestrogens can be found in

An initial consultation will gather the patient’s

neurological, and skin conditions as well

pesticides, packaged or processed foods and

health history. What are the underlying issues?

as addressing pediatric issues and overall

unfiltered water,” Smith says. Even drinking

Is it stress, thyroid or other factors? If it is

pain management. But it is in hormonal

water from a plastic bottle can expose you to

too much estrogen, supplements, a change

health that the clinic is seeing a rise in,

xenoestrogens, she states.

in nutrition and exercise will help metabolize

says Dr. Alexandra Smith, one of Neurvana’s

Hormonal imbalance in a younger age

an excess of hormones. Treating hormonal imbalance can take

the estrogen, and for thyroid: cofactors such

group can also cause acne and facial hair

as selenium can help boost overall thyroid

growth as well as blood sugar issues leading

function and support the immune system.

Smith states that hormonal imbalance can

to lack of energy. Stress is also a huge factor

For stress, nutrients such as B vitamins,

cause weight gain, and this is a common

in weight gain. When cortisol (the body’s main

magnesium and herbs can help balance

complaint in any age group, not just in post-

stress hormone) is high it increases blood

cortisol levels.

menopausal women. Even younger women

glucose and fat storage. “We store fat, but the

who exercise daily face weight management

body can’t tell the difference between the

three-four weeks and once the treatment

issues. “A lot of women work out but are

different stresses we may be under,” says Smith.

is determined patients can expect to see a

still not able to lose weight and constantly

There is also a link between hormones

change within three months. A three month

and the gastrointestinal health, in particular

and six month follow up is then scheduled.

the way hormones are re-cycled. Hormones

Quite often a long-term supplementation

are broken down in the liver; the liver then

is diagnosed.

three naturopathic doctors. With a focus on female health,

struggle with weight gain,” she says.

Consultation and testing can take

processes them into bile which is secreted

With so many pollutants and plastics in

into the gastrointestinal tract. If they aren’t

our lives hormonal imbalance is very common, says Smith. “Patients are keen on following our advice and a plan. Once they know why

Calgary-based Naturopathic Doctor Alexandra Smith

these imbalances are happening, they want

enjoys an active lifestyle.

to be able to take control of their bodies. Women are looking for answers.”

NEURVANAHEALTH.COM

|

(403) 768-3407

2020 4 St SW #330, Calgary, AB T2S 1W3


READY TO TALK GROWTH? Rocky View County has a solid economic recovery strategy. Now is the time to plan for the future and invest. Cultivate your company’s success in Rocky View County.

Business & Economic Development

Rocky View County has the 5th largest tax base in Alberta and grew commercial and industrial assessment by 15.2% last year. Rocky View County has grown its commercial and industrial tax base by 379% since 2001.

THIS IS THE ROCKY VIEW ADVANTAGE.


FITNESS

TOP 20 WORLDWIDE FITNESS TRENDS FOR 2021 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Online training Wearable technology Body weight training Outdoor activities HIIT Virtual training Exercise is medicine Strength training with free weights 9 Fitness programs for older adults 10 Personal training 11 Health/wellness coaching 12 Mobile exercise apps 13 Employing certified fitness professionals 14 Functional fitness training 15 Yoga 16 Exercise for weight loss 17 Group training 18 Lifestyle medicine 19 Licensure for fitness professionals 20 Outcome measurements

The Future Of Fitness “Finding the quality in qualified” BY PATRICK BERNAT WRKOUT AND BEN OWENS PHOTOGRAPHY Patrick Bernat, MSc CSEP is a Clinical Exercise Physiologist and High-Performance Specialist at the Centre for Health, Wellness and Performance, Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Studies, at the University of Regina.

36 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

PATBERNAT

F

itness has been through many evolutions in the past three decades. We’ve gone from high impact to low impact workouts, leg warmers to wicking fabrics, high intensity interval training to the controlled movement of Pilates and yoga. Spin and barre classes have taken over from step aerobics. The use of wearable technology has grown by leaps and bounds. They all have one goal in mind. To get you fitter, healthier and happier.


As IMPACT Magazine celebrates its 30th Anniversary, they asked me to peer into my crystal ball as a relatively recent kinesiology graduate and clinical exercise specialist to ponder what the future of fitness holds. After all, this will be my career for the next 30 years. The COVID-19 pandemic caused some seismic shifts in the way we exercise. With gyms closed, people turned to online training and coaching to stay fit. But the pandemic has also shown us that it can be difficult to separate fact from fiction, even while possessing advanced training and education. There is no shortage of so-called experts and gurus and it can be difficult to find a credible source for advice on physical health and fitness. The pandemic has also made it clear that

the ability to communicate science is both an art and skill that requires training and refining. The American College of Sports Medicine releases an annual report outlining the top health and fitness trends from around the world. The No. 1 trend for 2021 was online training, moving up from the 26th place from the previous year. There is no doubt that online exercise is here to stay, however another trend is emerging. As pandemic restrictions are being lifted and safety precautions are taking place, we are seeing a desire to return to in-person activities led by qualified and educated exercise and health professionals. Future-forward trainers, kinesiologists and exercise physiologist need superior

interpersonal and communication skills complemented by knowledge of scientific principles to set the stage for such evidence-based practice. The essence of this is a powerful factor that can separate adequate health and fitness professionals from those who are exceptional. I remember hearing the notion that to truly demonstrate that you have a comprehensive understanding of a subject, you should be able to explain it so a five-year old can understand. As we return to face-to-face fitness, seeking advice and consultation from qualified and educated fitness professionals will be among the most important trends to watch. Online exercise is great, but people still seek the personal connection that doesn’t exist in the virtual realm.

See you at the CANMORE NORDIC CENTRE

M AST E R S WO R L D C U P 2 0 2 2 MARCH 3 - 11 • MORE INFORMATION MWC2022.COM •

@ALBERTAWORLDCUP

JOIN US! At the Masters World Cup CROSS-COUNTRY SKI in CANADA’S ROCKY MOUNTAINS! The Canmore Nordic Centre trails will be open during the event — you can check the trail conditions report before you go for the latest updates.

FEDERATION:

PROUDLY SUPPORTING SPORT AND WINTER TOURISM:

OFFICIAL PARTNERS:

EXCLUSIVE AND OFFICIAL AIRLINE PARTNER:

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 37




FITNESS

Parasport Taking Centre Stage #Wethe15 aims to eliminate discrimination in sport BY BENOIT HUOT  DAVE HOLLAND Benoit is the winner of 20 swimming medals in five Paralympic Games and 32 medals in six World Championships, from Longueuil, QC. BENHUOT

W

BENOITHUOT84

BENHUOT

hen I was 16 years old, I competed at my first of five Paralympic Games. They were held in Sydney, Australia, the same city that hosted the Olympic Games a couple of weeks earlier. That Paralympics, in 2000, was an afterthought in Canada. There was no media at the Games, no TV coverage and newspaper stories were mostly relegated to the digest section, if we were lucky.

Most of the public had never heard of the Paralympics. Fast forward to 2021, and it’s a completely different world. The recently completed Paralympic Games in Tokyo received more widespread coverage than ever in Canada. Most sports could be streamed live, and CBC and Radio-Canada provided up to three daily update shows, including a primetime slot for the first time on CBC Sports.

40 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

And Canadian athletes such as swimmer Aurélie Rivard and wheelchair racer Brent Lakatos were trending in the news across the country as Canadians expressed their pride and joy in our Paralympians through social media. Since before the turn of the century, many Canadian national sport organizations have integrated Para sport into their programs. For example, the Canadian Swimming


Championships and the Canadian Track and Field Championships are both integrated events. The top Para athletes also train in national training centres, have access to the same facilities and government funding as Olympians, and are guided by certified coaches. Paralympians are high performance athletes. But there is still work to be done on a global level. To launch the Tokyo Games, the biggest ever human rights movement to end discrimination was launched. #Wethe15, a nod to the fact that 15 per cent of the global population has a disability, aims to transform the lives of the world’s 1.2 billion persons with a disability and is a message that the world is ready to accept their differences and encourage them to pursue their dreams. Hopefully this is also another step to encourage those with a disability to access their neighbourhood gyms. It is still a relatively uncommon sight to see a person in a wheelchair at a fitness club and those with a disability typically need to do advance homework to see which clubs provide the proper accessibility and adaptable equipment. It is much more fun to work out with friends or in social environment, which makes it even more important that gyms and sport organizations emphasize inclusion and accessibility so more people of all abilities can be active. Only five per cent of Canadians with a disability are involved in sport in general, which leaves a large population to tap into.

Para hockey goalie Adam Kingsmill and wheelchair rugby athlete Zak Madell work hard at the Winsport Performance Training Centre in Calgary. Fifteen per cent of the population has some form of disability.

I consider myself lucky that my career in Para sport has occurred in a progressive period for the Paralympic Movement. I’ve been able to follow the lead of great Canadian role models such as Terry Fox, Rick Hansen and Chantal Petitclerc who laid the groundwork so that athletes of my generation could avoid the hurdles they faced in their careers. Governments and businesses in Canada are making it more and more of a priority to provide essential services and

demanding accessibility for all its major projects whether it’s in new train cars or wheelchair ramps in buildings. In the end, each of us must have an open mind to understand that each individual faces various challenges, but regardless of anyone’s disability, that doesn’t equate with limitations. They’ve also overcome many challenges that can bring a new dimension and a new viewpoint to the world. Don’t believe me. Just watch the Paralympic Games.

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 41


SNAP. CRACKLE. POP! This would explain the feeling that rushes through my body at the end of my workouts. The rejuvenated and clear mind that precedes my session prepares me to tackle the rest of my day head on. My health and wellness journey first began at a young age and quickly evolved into my passion that allows me to escape and deeply connect with my mind, body and soul. I believe that where I am at in my personal and professional life is primarily because of my love for fitness. I can have the weight of the world on my shoulders entering into a workout and when I am finished, I leave with a distinct ability to plan the rest of my day with a positive outlook, unstoppable drive, and a grateful heart. The peak of my fitness journey began 10 years ago when I made the decision to qualify for the Boston Marathon. The grueling conditioning and strength that was required in preparation to qualify led me to my dedicated and inspirational personal trainer, Philip Ndugga. Philip not only turned my dream into a reality, but his love of fitness was admirable and inspired me to become a better version of myself each day. It is with the encouragement, motivation, and dedication that Philip has made me realize the depths to my own strength, both physically and mentally. It is with great joy that I have been able to watch my daughters, Ophelia and Ruby grow and evolve alongside Philip. My wish is for everyone to understand that living a healthy, well-balanced, and active lifestyle is truly the key to discovering your inner strength physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually. I would also like to congratulate Philip on his achievements as being recognized as one of IMPACT Magazine's Canada’s Top Fitness Trainers. It is through sharing his story of resilience, passion and philanthropy that truly speaks to the incredible person that he is. This world is lucky to have you! With gratitude,

Sponsored Content

www.tanyaeklundgroup.ca | (403) 863-7434



Actually,

She is a

Publisher Elaine Kupser celebrated as IMPACT Magazine turns 30 BY CHRIS WELNER  GRAHAM McKERRELL Chris Welner served as editor of IMPACT Magazine from 2010 to 2018. CRYSWRITING

CHRISWELNER

44 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE


SET ASSISTANT: REBECCA REINHART SHOOT LOCATION: FAIRMONT PALLISER, Calgary, AB FAIRMONTPALLISER

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 45


I

MPACT Magazine was the brainchild of a young fitness club manager and leading aerobics instructor of her day in Calgary looking for ways to unite, promote and market the fitness industry while educating the community to a healthier life. Thirty years later, Elaine Kupser hasn’t wavered from her mission.

As COVID-19 took hold of the world in 2020, small businesses everywhere were suffering. Gyms and health clubs shut down and trainers were tossed out of work. Race events were cancelled and after 29 years of uninterrupted publishing, IMPACT itself was in danger of closing down as its lifeblood of advertising revenue dried up. So what did Ms. Kupser do? She reached out to help others, offering free advertising to any affected business and published an award-winning 138-page digital only edition of IMPACT. She gave trainers across Canada a platform and audience to showcase their online workouts on Instagram. She hosted virtual conferences for people in the fitness and race industries and brought businesses together. Those connections helped both industries on the road to recovery. “I kind of jumped into community service mode. I did a town hall for the fitness industry and brought key people together and we just talked. Then I hosted additional town halls for the race industry to see what we could do to support them,” says Elaine. “Out of the town halls a new advocacy group was formed for race directors (the Canadian Endurance Sports Alliance). That was a definitive feel good moment for me during COVID. It brought the industry together and they’re still connecting.” If you’ve been reading IMPACT for the past three decades, three years or three months, you have been following Elaine’s life story. The magazine is her personal journal. Her personal journey. A memoir made public for thousands of readers with a new episode every two months.

Since IMPACT first appeared on newsstands in Calgary in 1991, Elaine has been the one constant force at play in the magazine, there to give it life and to sustain it through hell or high water. First, she was a fitness club manager. She wasn’t a publisher. She was a fitness instructor. She wasn’t a publisher. Then she was a single mom. She wasn’t a publisher. Actually, at 29, she was a publisher and all those other things, too. Being an independent publisher means sometimes you are the editor, the writer, or the copyeditor. You do page layout sometimes and art direct a photoshoot. You run contests, and host celebrations. You cry tears after another all-nighter to make a deadline so your printer doesn’t threaten you with divorce. You party when the last ad is placed and the magazine is finally put to bed. Then you take a breath and wait like an expectant mother for the glossy pages that smell of fresh ink to arrive on your doorstep. Some days you haul boxes of magazines in your car to distribution points. And you sell, you definitely sell, because advertising is the only way bills are paid and the boss does most of the selling. For 30 years, those sales have ensured that no reader has ever had to pay for a copy of IMPACT Magazine. “Everyone was so excited about the launch of IMPACT. It was new and there were no other magazines promoting health and fitness,” she says, remembering the early days of her magazine, after emptying the $5,000 from her bank account to take on a new career. “I was a fitness industry professional putting out a magazine. It took a couple of decades to get through the imposter syndrome of actually being a publisher. My people are the fitness and

46 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

sports people and publishing has always been a venue for our industry to help others and tell great stories.” “Readers buy what we’re selling because it’s good for them. It’s relevant, current and credible.” The concept for IMPACT is simple. Provide a platform for the best experts in the fields of health, fitness and nutrition to share their knowledge. Inspire readers with the exploits of people such as Olympians who are at the top of the mountain and ordinary folks who do extraordinary things through sport and fitness. Elaine introduced herself to people who would form the magazine’s first advisory panel, experts who contributed much of the content in the early days. They included the likes of track and field star Diane Jones-Konihowski, fitness pros Helen Vanderburg, King Dunn, Neil Speirs and Charlene Prickett, broadcaster Grant Pollock, medical, nutrition and physiology experts Dale Birdsell, Dave Crossman, Frank Young, Tish Doyle-Baker, Craig Gattinger, Liz Longmore and Shona Lowe. Add on a single Mac Classic computer, floppy disks, black and white page proofs and a fax machine — it was all before the Internet — and IMPACT was in business, quickly gaining readers and credibility. Grant Pollock was instrumental in connecting Elaine with Alberta’s top sports stars who were the first featured cover athletes. Volume 1, Issue 1 had baby-faced hockey player Theoren Fleury on the cover in September 1991. Football quarterback Danny Barrett, figure skater Kurt Browning and Olympic champion skier Kerrin Lee Gartner were all featured in Year 1. “Grant was so generous and laid back and eager to help,” says Elaine. “I don’t think he realizes how important he was for the formation of the magazine.” Grant says it was easy to see that running and fitness were important to Elaine, and “that authentic approach came through in every issue. I still get excited when I see a new copy of IMPACT.” Elaine’s other baby was born in March 1992, her daughter Lindsay. Single mom, new business, new baby. “I spent a lot of time at the office over the years,” Lindsay recalls. “We couldn’t


afford a nanny or full-time care, so I just tagged along to IMPACT most days. I’d set up shop in the boardroom with Barbies, a colouring book and snacks and books. Those days really developed my sense of imagination,” says Lindsay “Kay” Kupser, a singer-songwriter working on her Master’s degree in Paris, France. And watching her mother work developed the independent nature that guides her career today. “I have an entrepreneurial spirit and a drive to make things happen for myself; to create my own thing where I am the boss of me, where I get to design my own career and my own life in the way that I want,” says Lindsay. “I get that from my mom, from watching her run this business on her own terms. Despite being incredibly busy, she never missed a guitar recital, singing performance or a figure skating practice. She was at every single thing I did when I was a kid.” IMPACT’s evolution has been constant since it was formed. It grew and matured as technology evolved allowing for more sophisticated design and presentation. The internet opened up myriad new ways of conducting business and social media and its online presence is broadening the reach of the magazine to places it’s never been before. Editorial direction grew from fitness to health, to sport performance, to nutrition, providing a platform for advocacy on issues close to Elaine’s heart. In 2016, Elaine made IMPACT the country’s only health and fitness magazine to exclusively promote plant-based food and nutrition for sport performance and overall health. She believes this to be the future for the health of our bodies and our planet. “We just present beautiful food that is very good for you,” she says. “It’s not about why you shouldn’t eat certain things, it’s about what you could eat a little more of in order to improve your health…

let’s face it, everyone could use additional whole foods and plants in their diet.” As a marketing tool, Calgary’s fitness industry pulled on their spandex and bought in completely almost from day one. The race event market was next. In 1993, IMPACT published its first RACE SOURCE GUIDE. Those were the days when runners would need to stop at their local running store to pick up an entry form for events such as the Calgary Marathon. The RACE SOURCE GUIDE was packed with advertisements and was essentially a onestop shop to enter events. Readers would tear out the entry forms from IMPACT and mail them into the races. It has been published every spring since 1993 and instead of tear and mail, runners simply click a link to enter their favourite races all over North America. It remains the biggest and most popular issue every year.

Over 30 years, more than 12 million copies of 180 magazines have been read by an estimated 32 million readers. “Thirty years is a long time. When you’re that young you never think that far ahead. I was living for the moment,” says Elaine. “I’m very, very proud of what the magazine has become and what it has been throughout the years. I don’t think I fully appreciated it because I never knew if it was good enough, but I do now. I know that it’s always been good enough. From the beginning every detail, and every word on every page has been carefully crafted with the best of intentions.” A graduate of Mount Royal University, Elaine was raised in Kelowna, B.C. on an orchard run by her parents George and Lucy Sherstobitoff. Her older brothers, Walter and John were athletes, and Elaine had to work hard to keep up. When she wasn’t helping in the orchard, she was figure skating, in high school sports or taking music lessons. “My parents were very hard workers. I learned the value of working hard, saving money and being kind to others,” she says. “They started with nothing and provided for three children. My dad worked a full-time job as a construction foreman and ran an orchard. He worked from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m. every day. My mom also ran the orchard and took care of our family and home.” Elaine puts in the time, too. She has been described as the hardest working publisher in the industry. But she will be the first to tell you that the reward is in the number of people she has had the opportunity to meet and the number of lives she hopes she has been able to change for the better. IMPACT was the first Canadian magazine to put Olympians front and centre, raising their profile long before they had the support of national sport programs. Connecting with superstars such as swimmer Mark Tewksbury, figure skater  ➝

From the beginning every detail, and every word on every page has been carefully crafted with the best of intentions. As the magazine grew and attracted the attention of major national brands, IMPACT began publishing its British Columbia edition in 2005. In 2012, IMPACT Ontario was christened in Toronto. One of the latest and most successful brand extensions is Canada’s Top Fitness Trainers, and Canada’s Top Fitness Instructors, an annual opportunity to champion people who are key in the health and fitness food chain. “I am fortunate to have a platform that can bring recognition to those in the fitness industry who have given their all to help others.” It’s all a serving of nutrient-dense goodness, helping people live their best lives.

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 47


Elaine and her daughter, Lindsay, in the Alberta Prairies - a gift of time together during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Kurt Browning, marathon champion Lanni Marchant, inspirational triathlete Jannelle Morrison and world wrestling legend Bret Hart was a thrilling part of the job. (You will have to read the three decades of magazine cover features to see the other hundreds of names on a list too long to record here.) Having the opportunity to run destination marathons, visit California’s trendiest fitness clubs, or discover a Mexican spa have been among the job’s perks. But the real joy has been connecting with people and making lifelong friends. Sandra Bueckert was the first personal trainer in Calgary and one of IMPACT’s original advertising clients. Longtime fitness editor Pete Estabrooks, who still contributes to the magazine decades after he first came on board, is another of Elaine’s best friends. As editor of IMPACT for eight years, I count myself in that camp as well. Both Sandra and I were privileged to join a small group of friends and family at Elaine’s 2018 wedding to the marvellous Tom Lundteigen in Maui. The next generation is now taking its seat at the IMPACT table with people such as trainers Hannah Fletcher, Philip Ndugga and Scott Salling leading the way. “IMPACT brought me to the forefront and helped my business grow,” says Sandra. “Through thick and thin, she’s still standing. That girl is a fighter and a survivor. I have a huge depth of respect for that keepgoing attitude even when things go to shit. You aren’t born with her kind of perseverance, you develop that. She has my respect.”

Pete and Elaine knew each other as aerobics instructors since the late 1980s. “When I saw her magazine, I floated the idea of putting workouts in IMPACT. It’s been onward and upward since,” says Pete. “It’s an awesome achievement to keep your eye on the prize with something you live and you love for 30 years. And having the ability to share that with hundreds of thousands of people is amazing.” She has the industry’s respect too as recipient of the 2013 Alberta Magazines Publisher of the Year, and she sits on the AMPA board. She’s also a 2021 inductee to the Calgary Marathon Hall of Fame. IMPACT recently won a Gold and Silver at the 2021 Canadian Online Publishing Awards. “Magazine publishing is not for the faint of heart,” says Suzanne Trudel, AMPA executive director. “A successful publisher understands audience and commits to deliver on its promise. The IMPACT team has positioned the magazine to reach growing numbers of readers, through a variety of channels – all in an increasingly crowded marketplace. The beautifully crafted magazine with clear writing and strong photography, continuously develops content that is laser focused on the needs of its audience – those who aspire to be fitter and healthier. It's like a trusted coach: it motivates and inspires.” “I met Elaine in 2011 and remember how warm she was and how much she wanted to help,” says Kirsten Fleming, executive

48 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

director of Run Calgary. “She’s been a mentor and a friend. And the magazine has been a significant part of my own fitness journey. I hope it goes for 30 more years.” Elaine realized long ago that being an independent publisher was not an avenue to monetary wealth. She’s made a good living, but publishing has been a personal passion project for half of her life. And with just a handful of staff, often operating out of the basement in her home, she created a magazine to rival the best of publications anywhere. Her readers tell her they approve every day, always anxious to see that the new issue of IMPACT has arrived. No one knows Elaine’s passion for the magazine better than her daughter. “I was in Calgary for part of the pandemic and I watched my mom work her ass off to keep this magazine going, not only for herself but for her community, her employees, her readers. I saw how much sleep she didn’t get,” says Lindsay. “Thirty years of IMPACT is really, really, really amazing. I’m very proud that my mom has reached this incredible milestone. Of course one day I hope my mom will take a step back and enjoy the fruits of her labours, but I grew up with IMPACT and it’s hard to imagine a world in which the magazine doesn’t exist.” In every magazine, the publisher gets the last word on what makes it into print: “I’m proud I’ve been able to persevere because it’s not an easy industry. It’s extremely difficult, in fact. You have to have a deep passion for the ‘why’ and I love the magazine so much that I’m not ready to retire quite yet. I feel that I have more work to do to help more people live their best lives. It’s part of my identity and I finally feel like I’m extremely good at publishing magazines! It’s taken 30 years to get here, and I certainly haven’t done it alone. It’s always been a team effort and I’ve been fortunate to have some of the best people in the industry by my side all along the way. “Perhaps one day I will find a new generation of fitness professionals with an interest in or curiosity for publishing to take this on for decades to come. Wouldn’t that be incredible?”


THE

COV ER S THE

STORY Honouring the faces that have inspired IMPACT readers for 30 years

www.impactmagazine.ca

BY CHRIS WELNER |  DESIGN BY LOGAN JOHNSON

S WesTeRN CANADA’s BesT sOURCe OF iNDePeNDeNT sPORTs iNFORmATiON sePTemBeR/OCTOBeR 2011

ince 1991, IMPACT Magazine has been about inspiration. From the workouts to the feature stories, from the recipes to the Final IMPACT editorials, every word and picture has been designed to inspire our readers to live their best life. And nowhere is that inspiration more evident than on IMPACT’s front cover for more than yoga 17 8 180 issues where we have been allowed ice to sharefire the faces of some of the world’s RUNNINGpersonalities. ISSUE most amazing athletesTHEand From the legendary feats of Terry Fox FIT Rick Hansen; to wrestler Bret Hart and ACTION WesterN caNaDa’s best source of iNDepeNDeNt sports iNformatioN

Western Canada’s best sourCe of independent sports information

November/December 2011

January/February 2012

Western Canada’s best sourCe of independent sports information

Western Canada’s best sourCe of independent sports information

MARCH/APRIL 2012

may/june 2012

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION

SHAPE Fitness Diva Trish Stratus

THE

CAPTAIN & THE KID

STUNT ACTORS WORKOUT

ON THE SUNSHINE COAST

CALGARY FLAMES

8

FAT

FOODS

BIKING

TORONTO’S

PODCASTS

FAST MARATHON

FOR RUNNERS PLUS IMPACT’S NEW GUIDE TO

HEALTH PRODUCTS

16 5 TRA

THE SUMMER SPORTS ISSUE

IL SHO REVIE ES WED

TURES ADVEN IN THE

BADLANDS

THE

ISSUE

BRITISH COLUMBIA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

ALBERTA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2015

HEALTHY

INDULGENCES

6

TOP

R TRAINE OUTS WORK

MEAT FREE

PAUL McCARTNEY

THE

WINTER RUNNING AND SPORTS ISSUE

ALBERTA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015

www.impactmagazine.ca MAY/JUNE 2011

3

TOP

TRAINER OUTS WORK

THE

WINTER RUNNING AND SPORTS ISSUE

BRITISH COLUMBIA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

TRY THESE

OLYMPIAN WORKOUTS

SEVEN SUPERFOODS TO BOOST YOUR DIET

7

8

WINTER RUNNING & SPORTS ISSUE

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

THE

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

The Motivation & Inspiration Issue

IMPACT’S TOP

MOTIVATORS •UNLOCK YOUR POTENTIAL •25 REASONS TO GET FIT

MOTIVATION & INSPIRATION ISSUE

Personal Trainer

Alicia Bell

18

PIANS OLYMWATCH TO

CANADA'S TOP

FITNESS TRAINERS

18

PIANS OLYMWATCH TO

Follow us

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

CANADA'S TOP

FITNESS TRAINERS Follow us

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2019

18

PIANS OLYMWATCH TO

Follow us

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

impactmagazine.ca

impactmagazine.ca

impactmagazine.ca

The Food & Fitness Issue

The Winter Issue

The Inspiration Issue

TOP CHEFS Including vegan restaurant pioneer Matthew Kenney (ON THE COVER)

DELICIOUS VEGAN RECIPES

6

OUR FAVOURIT

Follow us

OUTDOOR & MULTISPORT ISSUE

CANADA'S TOP

FITNESS TRAINERS JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2020

PHILIP NDUGGA Featured as one of Canada's Top Fitness Trainers 2020

1,30 0 + E V E N T S

Cycling

MEN'S HEALTH

Follow us

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

Functional

WORKOUTS RECIPES

to Pack & Go!

10

SHOES HIKING Trails Happy for

Featuring Indoor Mile Record Holder

Kate Van Buskirk

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2020

The BEST CANADIAN

Outdoor Photographers Follow us

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

impactmagazine.ca

impactmagazine.ca

The Inspiration Issue

The Inspiration Issue

e's Magazin IMPACTE FAN Contest ULTIMAT

A TRIP WIN PER U! TO SEE PAGE

PIZZA

… for breakfast! Adventure to

Argentina

Canada's Greatest Sports Hero

Terry Fox

Faye

Stenning

TO WATCH IN RIO

16

25 Y E A R S OF IMPAC T

Mountain bike star Emily Batty

THE

SUMMER SPORTS ISSUE

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPAC TMAGA ZINE.C A | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPAC TMAG | T WIT TER.COM/IMPAC TMAG

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

The Outdoor Issue

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2020

The Summer Issue Featuring Women's Health

SERENA

WILLIAMS

Empowering Women

IN SWEDEN

BARRE & BOXING

1,500+ EVENTS

Training Plans 10K, Half, Marathon, Ultra

WORKOUTS Stairs & Strength Laps

ENDURING THE WILD IN

MADAGASCAR

YOGA

GOING LONG

Food to Run

COUTURE & KIDS

with Brent McMahon

THE RIGHT WAY TO RECOVER

THE WINTER RUNNING & SPORTS ISSUE ALBERTA EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

ALBERTA EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | MARCH/APRIL 2017

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | MAY/JUNE 2017

THE MOTIVATION & INSPIRATION ISSUE

BY SIMON WHITFIELD

Marathon Men Eric Gillis & Reid Coolsaet

THE RUNNING ISSUE

WORKOUTS are Good Medicine OREGON is O’mazing Ride a GRAN FONDO in 10 Weeks JUICE Your Veggies Don’t Fear OPEN WATER

REVIEWS

Athletics Superstar Brianne Theisen-Eaton

TRAINING

Obstacle Racing Canine Cardio 8 Great Trail Tips

TRAVEL

Made in Taiwan High on Squamish PAN AM & PARAPAN GAMES Workout with Damian Warner The Canoeist Cookbook Building Canada’s Legacy

THE MULTISPORT ISSUE

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

FOOD

Get Grilling Best Hummus Ever

THE SUMMER SPORTS ISSUE

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JULY/AUGUST 2017

INSPIRING ADVICE

RECIPE IDEAS

Ryan Straschnitzki

TOP FITNESS TRAINERS

Holiday Recipes WINTER FITNESS

Get ready for snow sports

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

Follow us

Follow us

is Cool

PLUS:

in 7 minutes a day

Follow us

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

The Outdoor & Adventure Issue

The Hot Issue

The Food & Fitness Issue

Fit in Vegas

Pro Rock Climber

Sonnie Trotter

fit

PLUS:

Gold Medal Olympian

Fuel up with a

On the Trail • 15 of the Best Day Hikes

Erica Wiebe

Follow us

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2018

SHOE REVIEWS

+ Running Fashion

Let's Do

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

Martine Yzerman Fitness Instructor

HOT Go-to

Get fit with Joga founder

Jana Webb

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

The Inspiration Issue

Paul Zizka

Run Local

STYLING & WARDROBE Crystal McKenzie, HBC, RW&Co, Outlooks Menswear Follow us

MARCH/APRIL 2020

FASHION Layering up

WINTER WORKOUTS

Follow us

DELICIOUS & HEALTHY RECIPES

+

PLANT-BASED NUTRITION

+

EXPERT TIPS & ADVICE

impactmagazine.ca Follow us

What Makes a

Healthy Community? MEAL PREP

Simplified FASHION

For The Gym

Stay in shape this season!

Follow us

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

2020 DIGITAL EDITION

impactmagazine.ca

Food & Nutrition

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

impactmagazine.ca

NOVEMBER 2020

What Makes a

Healthy Community? MEAL PREP

Simplified

WORKOUTS

To Get Fit Quick

Follow us

THE

Business of Fitness Innovating for future success

Healthy Community?

CANADA'S TOP FITNESS

INSTRUCTORS

MEAL PREP

Simplified FASHION

For The Gym

Follow us

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

impactmagazine.ca

NOVEMBER 2020

TASTY VEGAN RECIPES

Wrap Them Up!

Follow us

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

impactmagazine.ca

NOVEMBER 2020

Olympic Hopeful HALEY DANIELS OPENS UP ABOUT

TREVOR HOFBAUER IS OLYMPIC BOUND

TOP HIKES

RACE INDUSTRY Exploring the challenges events are facing as a result of COVID-19

200+

100% S OF PAGE T-BASED PLAN DNESS! GOO

Taking Care of YOUR HEALTH • Top 10 Foods to Boost Immunity • The Science of Sound • Resilience Practices

Sharpen Your Knife Skills

Plant-Powered Mains

Beautiful Desserts

pg. 14

pg. 106

pg. 164

TO KEEP YOU ACTIVE

Follow us

NATURE

Plant-based

RECIPES

SAM EFFAH ON TRAINING FOR THE

Olympic qualifiers

TOP HIKES

PLUS – Women's Health

The Summer Issue

Follow us

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

impactmagazine.ca

DECEMBER 2020

impactmagazine.ca

Fitness Instructors

THE INSPIRATION ISSUE

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

impactmagazine.ca

Canada’s Top

Fitness Instructors

Olympics & Life

MARK McMORRIS

TOP HIKES

Cinnamon Buns & Festive Vegan

The State

The State

Fitness Industry

Fitness Industry

Cold Weather

STRETCHING for OPTIMAL MOVEMENT

2021

— of the —

2021

— of the —

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 49 TO KEEP YOU ACTIVE

Plant-based

TO KEEP YOU ACTIVE

Plant-based

HOLIDAY RECIPES

to warm you up

to warm you up

RECIPES

RUNNING

WORKOUTS

WORKOUTS

WORKOUTS

RECIPES

with Canada’s Top Fitness Trainers

Follow us

with Canada’s Top Fitness Trainers

Follow us

Motivation

STRETCHING for OPTIMAL MOVEMENT

NAOMI KEANE Featured as one of Canada’s Top Fitness Instructors

KIM HARVEY Featured as one of Canada’s Top Fitness Instructors

Core for the Outdoors

Follow us

Follow us

24

TRAIRELV SHOE IE WED

S

Follow us

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

THE COMEBACK KID

Lindsay Webster

3x Obstacle Course Racing World Champion

Vegan Nutrition

The Best Burgers + Raw Treats Plant-based Collagen Boosters

PLUS – Spring Salad Recipes

1,000+ E VENTS

Follow us

to warm you up

Follow us

Trail Running • What's SUP? Swimwear • Active Vacations

Build Your Legs & Core Strength Dayna Pidhoresky 2020 Olympic Hopeful

WORKOUTS with Canada’s Top Fitness Trainers

1,000+ EVENTS

KATE WRIGHT’S JOURNEY TO THE

MENTAL HEALTH

SUMMER FITNESS

EXPLORE

The Chilkoot Trail & Adventure Apparel

WORKOUTS

CANADA'S TOP FITNESS

INSTRUCTORS

Canada’s Top

Canadian Climber / Olympic Qualifier Alannah Yip

A CHANGE OF COURSE FOR THE

MARATHONER

MAKE THIS SAUCE pg. 123

CANADA'S TOP FITNESS

INSTRUCTORS

For 5K, 10K, Half & Marathon

What Makes a

Special Summer Edition

B E ST OF

The Running Issue

TRAINING PLANS

RECIPES COOKIES TARTS BARS DRINKS

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

The Outdoor Issue Mountain Landscape & Adventure Photographer

Healthier Holiday

Meet Canada's Top

Adventure

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JULY/AUGUST 2019

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

The Running Issue

Greg Hetherington Fitness Instructor

IDEAS FOR

Winter

Follow us

2017-08-31 10:57 AM

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | MAY/JUNE 2019

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

The Inspiration Issue

Tommy Europe Fitness Instructor

Top blender brands battle it out

GET SHREDDED

with a new routine!

VEGAN

Follow us

Follow us

SO17-BC.indb 1

BLEND-OFF!

5

Workouts

Athletes

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

Influencers

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | MARCH/APRIL 2019

Canada's Winter Male Athlete of the Year

BLOCK PARTY!

HOLIDAY

Vegan Canadian

Follow us

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2019

EURO RUNS

Recipes Share 8 toGreat

Delicious

Recipes

10

The Top

Succulent, satisfying & sustainable

Summer Activities

WORKOUTS

PLANT-BASED RECIPES

2017

The BEST

Men Summer Training Tips

Follow us

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2019

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

The Inspiration Issue

Heat Up Your

For Outdoor Fitness

Sonnie Trotter, Bruce Poon Tip & Simon Donato

Tatum Monod

SPA

The World's Best

S SHOE REVIEW

FEATURING CANADA'S

Mountain

• Essential Hiking Gear

1, 3 0 0 + E V E N T S

Follow us

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2019

Brian McKeever

Brunch!

Freeski Star

to a Luxury

Destinations

Trail

SPROUTING!

Get

18

The Cool Issue Escape

INCREDIBLE

Take a Swing at Boxing

For 10K, Half & Marathon

Lauren Toyota

For Every Body

Smoothie Bowl

TRAINING PLANS

Couples

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

YouTube Sensation

Workouts

Beyond the Strip

Peanut Butter Jelly Time!

Vegan Triathlete Madi Serpico Whalen

AMAZING

Plant-based recipes

PLANT-BASED NUTRITION +

Follow us

Yoga

KILLER ABS

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

Food & Fitness Issue

POST-RUN RECIPES

HANNAH FLETCHER Featured as one of Canada's Top Fitness Trainers 2020

The Running Issue

Featuring 800M Runner

Melissa Bishop

Fashion

THE ATHLETIC SHOES PARTNERSHIP COOL ISSUE Décathlon Canada 8

WORKOUTS + TRAINING PLANS 10K, Half Marathon Marathon

CANADA'S

DELICIOUS

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

Sh Shawn Booth B h aand Bachelorette nd Bachelorette Kaitlyn Bristowe

YOGA

Sweat Together, Stay Together

2020 SPECIAL EDITION

FOR PRE, DURING & POST WORKOUT

HUMBOLDT BRONCO

Raising the bar in obstacle racing

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

To Get Fit in 2020! INSPIRING ADVICE

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

The Inspiration Issue

For busy travellers

TRAIL RUNNING

Shoe Reviews

impactmagazine.ca

CASSIE DAY

Follow us

WORKOUTS

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

MAKEUP ARTISTS Adrienne Furrie, Julie Mann, Valeria Nova, Nicole Saxton

Training & Adventures

WHY WE RUN

Reasons to Spin

NUTRITION

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JULY/AUGUST 2018

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

Outdoor Enthusiast

Ricky Forbes

ROAD SHOE REVIEWS

NUTRITION TIPS

For Fueling & Recovery

7

Say hello to

• Running Fashion • 24 Shoe Reviews • Workout & Yoga

CANADIAN OLYMPIANS

Ryan Atkins is

THE KING of

OCR

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

INSPIRING ADVICE

E

Kitchents Produc BACK TO FITNESS

• The best fitness apps • Fast, full-body workouts • Off-season training tips

IMPACT RUNS WILD

THE FITNESS ISSUE

PHOTOGRAPHY Todd Duncan,25 HarderLee, Dave Laus, Kevin Light, Liz Tremblay

Featured as one of Canada's Top Fitness Trainers 2020

Olympic Ice Dancer

TESSA VIRTUE

MOUNTAIN ATHLETE

WHO INSPIRE

ONTARIO EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2016

• A Taste of Brazil • Deliciously Raw

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | MAY/JUNE 2018

The Running Issue

20

FASHION

PERU

THE

For 10K, Half, Marathon

Yoga Studio An Adventure To

Trail Food

PLANS

Our Favourite

Comfort Foods

RUNNING ISSUE

MAKE & TAKE

TRAINING

Comfort Foods

Our Favourite

PERU

THE

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

The Motivation & Inspiration Issue

FASHION

An Adventure To

RUN TESTED RUN RATED

APRICOT ICE CREAM GRAPE FIZZIES

to Lose Weight

• RUN, RIDE, RIO • ACTIVE EDMONTON

•GIRL POWER •STAGE RACES •CES2016 TECH

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | MARCH/APRIL 2018

Yoga Studio

Our Favourite

30

SHOE REVIEWS

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

Scott Salling

Comfort Foods

8 Top Socks

+ SWEET CORN SOUP

THE WORLD'S

ULTIMATE

HEROES

Run Slow

Travel

RUNNERS’ BEST

Breakfasts

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

The Motivation & Inspiration Issue

OCR & TRIATHLON

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

Personal Trainer

FASHION

Workouts

5K, 10K, HALF & MARATHON

Pop Star WINTER

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

1,300+ EVENTS

Train to Run

HOW FOOD SAVED A

RUNNING SHOES

Yoga Studio

GET FIT WITH

brent bishop

EAT LIKE A LOCAVORE

IMPAC TMAGA ZINE.C A

in India

for Winter

Jeff Aker

PERFECT ROUTES THE PAIN TRAIN

BRITISH COLUMBIA EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

TRAIL SPECIAL

25

CANADIAN ADVENTURES

YOGA

TOP GEAR

Personal Trainer

SUMMER SPORTS

+ OFF-ROAD FASHION

RUN FAST

KILIAN JORNET

SPORTING

Aerial Yoga Sweet Honey $99 Home Gym Explore Napa Our Gift of FITNESS

15

Trail Shoe

PRO TIPS

Celebrating

Great Glutes

WHY YOU SHOULD SKI

THE

Snowshoes Treadmills Fashions

all-day superfood

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | JULY/AUGUST 2015

14

Triathlon

AGE SLOW

TIME TO

RUN

GO THERE, DO THAT

kawartha lakes

THE MULTISPORT ISSUE

ALBERTA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | MAY/JUNE 2015

25of YEARS

Pan American Games 1500m Bronze Medallist Sasha Gollish

Ray Zahab

GET

HEALTHY Holiday Treats

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018

GOOD AS GOLD

ALBERTA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

29

SHOE REVIEWS

on $10 a Day!

TREATS

ROCKING THE GYM

REVIEWED

TIPS

Two-time Olympic Bobsleigh Champion Kaillie Humphries

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

THE

GLUTEN-FREE

PLUS

SHOES

TRAINING SCHEDULES

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | MARCH/APRIL 2015

EAT

PROTEIN

WEEKS TO GET GRAN FONDO FIT

ULTIMATE TRIATHLON KIT

CROSSFIT

RUNNING

FOR EVERY RUNNER

THE MOTIVATION & INSPIRATION ISSUE

ALBERTA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2015

Speedskater Gilmore Junio

The Face of Fitness

RUN TRAIL

ALBERTA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2014

FITNESS TECH TOYS

BLUEBERRIES

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | JULY/AUGUST 2016

22

THE BIG CHILI

TRI TRAINING

THE

GUIDE

BACKCOUNTRY IN THE

THE WINTER RUNNING & FITNESS ISSUE

ALBERTA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA ALBERTA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2014

JILLIAN MICHAELS

TRAIN FOR A MUD RUN

ONTARIO EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | MAY/JUNE 2016

RACE SOURCE

HOT FOR YOGA

ATHLETES WITH IMPACT

THE THE FITNESS FITNESS ISSUE ISSUE

BRITISH COLUMBIA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA

WORLD’S TOUGHEST TRAIL RACE

ISSUE

ALBERTA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

TIPS

8

BOSTON STRONG RUNNERS STAND UNITED

FEATURING THE 2013

NUTRITION

INSPIRING

TRAVEL & TRAILS

THE FITNESS ISSUE

GET DOWN GET DIRTY

LANNI MARCHANT CANADA’S FASTEST FEMALE MARATHONER

THE RUNNING ISSUE

TOP OF THE

FITNESS

IDEAS

DEMYSTIFIED

GOT HEMP?

PODIUM FASHION

THE OLYMPIC & PARALYMPIC ISSUE

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | MARCH/APRIL 2016

Winter Run TRAINING

www.impactmagazine.ca

HOPE

PAUL McCARTNEY

THE RUNNING ISSUE

GUTS, GRIT & GRACE

BRAZIL, PENTICTON & ARUBA

BARKLEY MARATHONS

YOUR NEW SUPERFOOD

19 RUNNING SHOE REVIEWS

GOLD MEDAL

HEROES

WICKED COOL WINTER FASHION

4 MINUTE WORKOUT

TRAIL SHOES REVIEWED

Canada’s Fastest Marathoner

Devon Kershaw & Alex Harvey

Jon Cornish

Puts His Stamp On Fitness

DEMYSTIFIED

THE OLYMPIC & PARALYMPIC ISSUE

MAY/JUNE 2013

Hesjedal leads a riding revolution

Dylan Wykes

Janelle Morrison

Kings of the Hill

UFC WORKOUT Get Fighting Fit

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | JULY/AUGUST 2014

15,000+ EVENTS

TRAINING SCHEDULES

5K | 10K | 21.1K | 42.2K

AL MEDFULS

MEAT FREE

1

2014 RACE SOURCE GUIDE

52

INDULGENCES

www.impactmagazine.ca MAY/JUNE 2011

L INAUGURA ONTARIO EDITION!

GOLD

FAT BIKING

HEALTHY

THE mulTisporT issuE

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | MARCH/APRIL 2014

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION

No Ordinary Ryder IMPACT HERO

FAMILY FOOD FAVOURITES

FROM THE ARCTIC TO THE ATLANTIC

1

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2014

DEFENDING CANADIAN

CANUCK KESLER IN GAME SHAPE

GLUTEN-FREE

SUPER

TRAIL RUNNING

FASHION

the motivation & inspiration issue

FOR

MARK GIORDANO SEAN MONAHAN

TRAINING ON

TRAILS

GO THERE DO THAT

hit the high marK

gran FOnDO raw food appeal PLUS: food myths busted

POSTER INSIDE

HOW CELEBRITIES STAY FIT

FALL IN LOVE WITH

heroes

1

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

pre-race meal

COMMEMORATIVE

STAR

Sky Runner

Adam Campbell

imPact

10K Ace Kip Kangogo

your perfect

aLberta edition

the winter running & fitness issue

www.impactmagazine.ca MAY/JUNE 2011

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

JULY/AUGUST 2013

imPact hero rick hansen with rick mercer

aLberta edition

Speed Skater Christine Nesbitt

british columbia eDitioN

Catriona le May Doan and Bret hart readers’ top female & Male Cover athletes

urban workout

www.impactmagazine.ca

oN

MARCH/APRIL 2013

OVER BAREFOOT

Geroy Simon

gEt Fit FOr a

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2013

REVAMPED

BRAZIL, PENTICTON & ARUBA

GOLD MEDAL FOOD For All Your Games

mud run

RunninG Shoe ReviewS

Parkour

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012

WHY WOMEN SHOULD LIFT WEIGHTS

4 MINUTE WORKOUT

MEET A DOZEN WESTERN CANADIAN OLYMPIANS FOCUSED ON THE PODIUM

tri training dig in to a

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION

TRAVEL & TRAILS

for 2012

triple threat

music to run with

THE BATTLE

REVIEWS

Fitness in the Lion’s Den

PLUS: watch out for wildlife

build your core Get your groove on!

www.impactmagazine.ca

ComFoRt FooD to warm your winter run

www.impactmagazine.ca

impactmagazine.ca ALbertA eDItIoN

the Best of IMPACT

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2013

workout

run your

FirSt 5K now!

www.impactmagazine.ca

ENDURANCE EDGE

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012

21 TRAIL SHOE

THE BATTLE OVER BAREFOOT

Fitness | Performance | Sport

vancouver’s best trail runs

how to fuel for the marathon, prep for your best half & 10K

tips in weeks

to get healthier

keep your

S’no limitS fitneSS

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION

training schedules

for runners & fashionistas

Spectacular SquamiSh

th

Collector’s edition

Fitness | Performance | Sport

british columbia edition

trail shoes reviewed

20

Anniversary

Fitness | Performance | Sport

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012

21 TRAIL SHOE

REVIEWS

Jessica Zelinka Canadian heptathlon and hurdles champion

Angela Naeth forges her mark in Ironman 70.3

ALBERTA EDITION

Fitness | Performance | Sport

Fitness | Performance | Sport

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION

JULY/AUGUST 2012

2012

race source guide

fitness | Performance | Sport

and speed skater Catriona LeMay Doan; from triathlete Lisa Bentley to mountain runner Kilian Jornet; from chef Gordon Ramsay to tennis GOAT Serena Williams; they are all in amazing company as IMPACT Magazine alumni. You can find their faces and every other IMPACT cover personality in this feature. And while we highlight IMPACT 1215 personalities in print this issue, 156 &52 YOGA five from each decade of IMPACT, USSR TRAVEL YOGA you can catch up on the whereabouts of 15 9 11 dozens of other IMPACT cover athletesRAW and celebrities at impactmagazine.ca. ➞

Follow us

THE INSPIRATION ISSUE


Kurt Browning | 55 Toronto

IMPACT COVER: 1992  k b onice

Kur t B row ning

World champion Kurt has chased his dream of the spotlight and the bow at the end of a skated program ever since IMPACT clicked his photos in 1992. And he still goes to the rink on a regular basis and chases that spotlight. He has hosted many figure skating shows and worked with different networks giving commentary on skating. He’s an actor, starring in 50 live performances of Peter Pan at the Elgin Theatre.

Do for a living as an adult what you did for fun as a child. KURT BROWNING ( VIA H IS FATH ER)

WHAT’S NEXT

Developing an adult skating program. Recovering from a hockey injury, Kurt discovered isometric exercise through inventor Brad Thorpe’s Isophit program and has made it the fundamental part of his fitness routine. He backed up his belief in the program by investing in the company and regularly working with the Isophit team.

Dave Laus  |

Décathlon: Kalenji Run Support Shoe

A 3 0 -Year H is tor y of Cover s w i t h I M PAC T  |  19 91-93

1991

1 99 1

1 9 92

1 9 92

1 9 92

1 9 92

1 9 92

1 9 93

1 9 93

1 9 93

1 9 93

1 9 93

1 9 93

50 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

1 9 92


Mark Tewksbury | 53

If not you, then who? Someone has to be great. Why not me?

Calgary

IMPACT COVER: 1992  mark tew k s

mark tew k s

M ark Tew k sbur y

The 1992 gold medal backstroker went on to be Chef de Mission for Team Canada at the London 2012 Olympics. With colleague Debbie Muir, he is a leadership coach and has been a champion for LGBTQ+ rights since coming out as the first openly gay athlete in 1998. He’s been a Special Olympics Board Member for 12 years; Vice President of the Canadian Olympic Committee; Muhammad Ali Humanitarian Award recipient in 2019; Companion of the Order of Canada in 2020. And he wrote and stars in a one-man show, Belong.

MARK TEWKSBURY

RESILIENCE

“For my acts of rebellion and outing myself, I might have had the Companion of the Order of Canada rank taken away 20 years ago; today they recognize me for it. I did everything against the institution; the first to come out and speak openly about being gay in sport in 1998 and against IOC and sport leadership in 1998; supported the Gay Games in 2000s and people with intellectual disabilities via Special Olympics from 2009 until now.” ➝

HarderLee |

Décathlon: BS190 Badminton Shoes

…and 3 0 Year s of I M PAC Tf ul Stor ies   |  19 94 -95

1 99 4

1 99 4

1 99 4

1994

1994

1994

1 9 95

1 9 95

1 9 95

1 9 95

1 9 95

1 9 95

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 51


Tanya Dubnicoff | 51 Calgary

IMPACT COVER: 1996, 1999  t anyadubnicof f

Tanya D ubnicof f

Tanya is a leadership developer, mother and coach at Tanya Dubnicoff Champions Cycling club. She is a 9-time Canadian track cycling champion, Pan American Games champion, and 1993 World Champion and world record holder.

Sleep small, live BIG. TANYA DUBNICOFF

HarderLee |

Décathlon: Domyos Fitness Shoe

A 3 0 -Year H is tor y of Cover s w i t h I M PAC T  |  19 96 -97

1996

1 99 6

1 9 97

1 99 6

1 9 97

52 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

1996

1 9 97

1996

1 9 97

1996

1 9 97

1996

1 9 97


Jennifer Botterill | 42 Mississauga, Ont.

IMPACT COVER: 1998  jenb ot terill

jenb ot terill

Jennifer is an NHL broadcaster on Sportsnet, a Harvard University graduate, a 3-time Olympic gold medal hockey player, 5-time world champion and twice tournament MVP. She’s a keynote speaker and proud mother.

Bring out the best in those around you. JENNIFER BOTTERILL

Dave Laus  |

Décathlon: Kalenji Run Comfort Shoe

…and 3 0 Year s of I M PAC Tf ul Stor ies   |  19 98 -9 9

1998

1998

1998

1998

1998

1998

1 999

1 999

1 99 9

1999

1999

1999

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 53


Joanne Malar | 46 Summerland, B.C.

IMPACT COVER: 2000, 2003, 2004  Joanne M alar

Joanne is a Commonwealth Games champion and World Champion swimmer who retired in 2005. She’s a motivational speaker, health and fitness TV personality; CTV/TSN Olympic broadcaster and holistic nutritionist. Married to Delano Ducheck, they have four sons, ages 14, 12, 8 and 4 (plus two international students). She works as Recreation Supervisor for the District of Summerland. RESILIENCE

“Athletes often struggle with life after sport. I was no different switching gears in life and finding a path that was as fulfilling. Learning not to judge myself based on a world rank, my body composition or notoriety. I found a place where a mother of four enjoys the freedoms and beauty in nature with my family, in the lake or mountains or my backyard. I’m so proud of my past, my accomplishments, but for all those who strive to be No. 1, it's not a state of eternal happiness or success. Who you are on the inside and your self-worth must be known and appreciated beyond those external labels.”

Liz Tremblay  |

Décathlon: TR2 Trail Running Shoe

A 3 0 -Year H is tor y of Cover s w i t h I M PAC T  |  2 0 0 0 - 01

20 0 0

20 0 0

20 0 0

20 0 0

20 0 0

20 0 0

20 0 1

20 0 1

20 0 1

20 0 1

20 0 1

20 0 1

54 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE


Cindy Klassen | 42 Airdrie, Alta.

IMPACT COVER: 2001, 2006  cind y_ k lassen

Cindy retired from speed skating in 2013 as Canada’s most decorated Olympian with 6 medals. She joined the Calgary Police Service as a constable in 2015. Married in 2018, Cindy had a baby daughter in 2020 and is now a stay-at-home mom. She was Manitoba coach at the 2019 Canada Winter Games and works with Speed Skating Canada in their Female Leadership Pilot Project. RESILIENCE

“I entered university right after high school in 1997, the year I started speed skating. Skating thrived and I put my studies to the side in 1999. Fast forward 15 years, I started working, went back to school, and a full 20 years after I started university, I finally finished my degree in 2017. It is never too late to finish what you started!” ➝

HarderLee |

Décathlon: TR2 Trail Running Shoe

…and 3 0 Year s of I M PAC Tf ul Stor ies   |  2 0 02 - 03

20 02

20 02

20 03

20 02

20 03

20 03

20 02

20 03

20 02

20 03

20 02

20 03

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 55


Beckie Scott O.C., M.S.M. | 47 Canmore, Alta.

IMPACT COVER: 2003   b e ck iescot t4

b e ck ie. scot t .9 4

Retired in 2006 as Canada’s most decorated cross-country ski racer. A 3-time Olympian, Beckie won gold in Salt Lake City in 2002, becoming the first Canadian (and first North American woman) to win an Olympic medal in cross-country skiing. Beckie is an Officer of the Order of Canada, a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame, Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame and the Canadian Ski Hall of Fame. She is the founder and CEO of Spirit North, an organization working to improve the lives of Indigenous children and youth through the transformative power of sport and play. Now working across six provinces, and reaching over 6,000 Indigenous children and youth annually, Spirit North is recognized as one of Canada’s leading sport-for-social-development organizations. INSPIRED

“I am inspired by the great social movements of our time; by the ideals of equality, fairness and opportunity for all, and by the notion that every day I join a global collective community of individuals working hard to make change for the better.”

HarderLee |

Décathlon: NH150 Hiking Boot

A 3 0 -Year H is tor y of Cover s w i t h I M PAC T  |  2 0 0 4 - 05

20 0 4

20 0 4

20 0 4

20 0 4

20 0 4

20 0 4

20 05

20 05

20 05

20 05

20 05

20 05

56 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE


Kyle Shewfelt | 39 Calgary

IMPACT COVER: 2005  k y leshew

k y leshew

The 2004 Olympic gold medal gymnast retired after his final Olympics in 2008. He opened Kyle Shewfelt Gymnastics in 2013 and has covered four Olympic Games as a broadcaster. He has a new book titled Make It Happen — My Story of Gymnastics, the Olympics, and the Positive Power of Sport. INSPIRED

“I am inspired to get kids active and to share positivity and joy with my community!” ➝

HarderLee |

Décathlon: Forlaz Trek 100 Hiking Boot

…and 3 0 Year s of I M PAC Tf ul Stor ies   |  2 0 06 - 07

20 0 6

20 07

20 0 6

20 07

20 07

20 0 6

20 07

www.impactmagazine.ca

20 0 6

20 0 6

20 0 6

20 0 6

20 07

20 07

20 07

20 07

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 57


Simon Whitfield | 46 Victoria, B.C.

IMPACT COVER: 2001, 2008  simon .w hit f ield

simonw hit f ield

Simon W hit f ield

The 2000 Olympic triathlon champion was Canadian flagbearer at the London Games in 2012. Simon retired from professional sport in 2013 and is involved in several business ventures — Velofix Mobile bicycle shops, Relentless Pursuit Partners, and 4iiiis.com. He plays over-40 rec soccer, coaches at b78 coaching with Jasper Blake and is an accredited Paddle Canada guide at Nimmo Bay Wilderness Resort.

It has always been the regular state of things. There is no clarity, no relief. At the end of all rationality, there is simply the need to decide and the faith to live through, to endure. SIMON WHITFIELD (VIA KEN LIU, THE PAPER MENAGERIE AND OTHER STORIES)

Kevin Light  |

Décathlon: Kiprun KD500 Road Running Shoes

A 3 0 -Year H is tor y of Cover s w i t h I M PAC T  |  2 0 08 - 0 9

20 0 8

20 0 9

20 0 8

20 0 9

20 0 8

20 0 9

58 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

20 0 8

20 0 9

20 0 8

20 0 9

20 0 8

20 0 9

20 0 9


Jon Montgomery | 42 Victoria, B.C.

IMPACT COVER: 2011  J rmont y

The beer drinking gold medallist at Vancouver 2010, Jon is host of the Amazing Race Canada. He’s married to former skeleton teammate Darla Montgomery. They have two kids and are building a life and health and wellness businesses on Vancouver Island. “My interests are in sharing knowledge and experiences pertaining to personal health ownership and leveraging the power of pure, healthy, basic inputs to support our complex biologies with the best tools and practices to regenerate and ultimately make healthy copies of our 70 trillion cells — the hallmark of a potent regenerative system, of which we are the ultimate in complexity.” RESILIENCE

“Resilience is not about overcoming adversity, it’s about facing it — head-on and pushing through to finality, regardless of the outcome. Wins and losses are not measures of resilience, rather, efforts and repeated attempts to overcome are the hallmarks of a resilient mind and attitude towards personal evolution and development.” ➝

Décathlon: TR2 Trail Running Shoe

…and 3 0 Year s of I M PAC Tf ul Stor ies   |  2 010 -1 1

20 1 0

20 1 0

20 1 0

20 1 0

20 1 0

20 1 0

WesTeRN CANADA’s BesT sOURCe OF iNDePeNDeNT sPORTs iNFORmATiON

WesterN caNaDa’s best source of iNDepeNDeNt sports iNformatioN

sePTemBeR/OCTOBeR 2011

November/December 2011

Fitness | Performance | Sport

fitness | Performance | Sport

17

20 Anniversary

trail shoes reviewed

Spectacular SquamiSh

th

keep your

ENDURANCE EDGE

Collector’s edition

Catriona le May Doan and Bret hart readers’ top female & Male Cover athletes

www.impactmagazine.ca

the Best of IMPACT

british columbia eDitioN

impactmagazine.ca

S’no limitS fitneSS

ALbertA eDItIoN

Kevin Light  |

fire ice

ComFoRt FooD to warm your winter run

oN

Speed Skater Christine Nesbitt

the winter running & fitness issue www.impactmagazine.ca MAY/JUNE 2011

20 1 1

20 1 1

20 1 1

20 1 1

20 1 1

1

20 1 1

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 59


Jessica Zelinka | 40 Calgary

IMPACT COVER: 2012  jessic azelinka

jessic azelinka

Jessic a Zelinka

A 2007 Pan American Games champion and double silver medallist at the Commonwealth Games, the star heptathlete and hurdler is head coach of University of Calgary Dinos cross country and track and field teams.

HarderLee |

INSPIRED

"Major sporting events inspire me, whether I'm participating as an athlete, a coach or a spectator. Having people gather from all corners of the world to celebrate sport is truly extraordinary."

Décathlon: Kalenji Run Support Shoe

A 3 0 -Year H is tor y of Cover s w i t h I M PAC T  |  2 01 2 -13 Western Canada’s best sourCe of independent sports information

Western Canada’s best sourCe of independent sports information

Western Canada’s best sourCe of independent sports information

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION

MARCH/APRIL 2012

may/june 2012

JULY/AUGUST 2012

January/February 2012

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION

2012

race source guide Fitness | Performance | Sport

workout

build your core

PLUS: watch out for wildlife

run your

Get your groove on!

tri training

Parkour

RunninG Shoe ReviewS

imPact

heroes hit the high marK

the motivation & inspiration issue www.impactmagazine.ca MAY/JUNE 2011

1

pre-race meal

gEt Fit FOr a

THE mulTisporT issuE

20 12

www.impactmagazine.ca MAY/JUNE 2011

Kings of the Hill

4 MINUTE WORKOUT

YOGA DEMYSTIFIED

WICKED COOL WINTER FASHION BRAZIL, PENTICTON & ARUBA

TRAVEL

YOGA DEMYSTIFIED THE OLYMPIC & PARALYMPIC ISSUE

1

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION

MARCH/APRIL 2013

MAY/JUNE 2013

JULY/AUGUST 2013

No Ordinary Ryder

THE WINTER RUNNING & FITNESS ISSUE

ALBERTA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA ALBERTA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA

BRITISH COLUMBIA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA

ALBERTA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA

20 12

20 12

20 12

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2013

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

STAR SHAPE

Sky Runner

Hesjedal leads a riding revolution

FROM THE ARCTIC TO THE ATLANTIC

THE THE FITNESS FITNESS ISSUE ISSUE

THE FITNESS ISSUE

20 12

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION

Dylan Wykes

ATHLETES WITH IMPACT

4 MINUTE WORKOUT

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2013

Janelle Morrison

INSPIRING

TRAVEL & TRAILS

UFC WORKOUT

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION

IMPACT HERO

Devon Kershaw & Alex Harvey

TRAVEL & TRAILS

Get Fighting Fit

20 12

FAMILY FOOD FAVOURITES

BRAZIL, PENTICTON & ARUBA

GOLD MEDAL FOOD For All Your Games

gran FOnDO raw food appeal

REVAMPED

OVER BAREFOOT

Puts His Stamp On Fitness

PLUS: food myths busted

THE RUNNING ISSUE

20 12

www.impactmagazine.ca

10K Ace Kip Kangogo

your perfect

british columbia edition

www.impactmagazine.ca

imPact hero rick hansen with rick mercer

aLberta edition

www.impactmagazine.ca aLberta edition

urban workout

SHOULD LIFT WEIGHTS

Jon Cornish

Fitness in the Lion’s Den

MEET A DOZEN WESTERN CANADIAN OLYMPIANS FOCUSED ON THE PODIUM

dig in to a

mud run

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012

WHY WOMEN

THE BATTLE

OVER BAREFOOT

Geroy Simon

for 2012

triple threat

music to run with

FirSt 5K now!

www.impactmagazine.ca

to get healthier

12

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION

REVIEWS

THE BATTLE

Jessica Zelinka Canadian heptathlon and hurdles champion

Fitness | Performance | Sport

vancouver’s best trail runs

how to fuel for the marathon, prep for your best half & 10K

tips in 8 weeks

Angela Naeth forges her mark in Ironman 70.3

Fitness | Performance | Sport

training schedules

for runners & fashionistas

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012

21 TRAIL SHOE

REVIEWS

ALBERTA EDITION

Fitness | Performance | Sport

yoga

WESTERN CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012

21 TRAIL SHOE

Adam Campbell

Canada’s Fastest Marathoner

HOW CELEBRITIES STAY FIT

Fitness Diva Trish Stratus

THE

IMPACT

GOLD MEDAL

HEROES

THE RUNNING ISSUE

GUTS, GRIT & GRACE

156 IDEAS &52 TIPS FITNESS

FEATURING THE 2013

NUTRITION

RACE SOURCE

GUIDE

HOT FOR YOGA BACKCOUNTRY IN THE

USSR

22

THE BIG CHILI

RUNNING

SHOES

REVIEWED

8

ACTORS WORKOUT

WEEKS TO GET GRAN FONDO FIT

GO THERE DO THAT

BOSTON STRONG RUNNERS STAND UNITED

FASHION

8

ULTIMATE TRIATHLON KIT PLUS

CROSSFIT

ROCKING THE GYM

ALBERTA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

THE MULTISPORT ISSUE

ALBERTA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

20 1 3

20 1 3

16 TR

AIL SH REVI OES EWED

BRITISH COLUMBIA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

60 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

20 1 3

BIKING

TORONTO’S

FAST

HEALTHY

MARATHON

PLUS IMPACT’S NEW GUIDE TO

THE

5

ENTURES ADVIN THE

DS BADLAN

ISSUE

ALBERTA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

20 1 3

FAT

FOODS

FOR RUNNERS

THE SUMMER SPORTS ISSUE

CANUCK KESLER IN GAME SHAPE

GLUTEN-FREE

SUPER

PODCASTS

HEALTH PRODUCTS

FOR EVERY RUNNER

THE MOTIVATION & INSPIRATION ISSUE

TRAILS

TRAIL RUNNING

THE

TRAINING SCHEDULES

ALBERTA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

CALGARY FLAMES

MARK GIORDANO SEAN MONAHAN

TRAINING ON

ON THE SUNSHINE COAST

FITFOR ACTION

CAPTAIN & THE KID

STUNT

FALL IN LOVE WITH

TRI TRAINING

20 1 3

INDULGENCES

6

TOP

ER TR AIN KOUTS WOR

MEAT FREE

PAUL McCARTNEY

THE

WINTER RUNNING AND SPORTS ISSUE

ALBERTA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

20 1 3

FAT BIKING

HEALTHY

INDULGENCES

MEAT FREE PAUL McCARTNEY

3 WINTER RUNNING

TOP

ER TR AIN KOUTS WOR

THE

AND SPORTS

ISSUE

BRITISH COLUMBIA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

20 1 3


Geroy Simon | 46 Surrey, B.C.

IMPACT COVER: 2012  geroy Simon

geroy simon

Geroy retired in 2013 after winning his third Grey Cup as a receiver with the Saskatchewan Roughriders. He is now Director of Global Scouting with the B.C. Lions. He hopes to work towards a leadership role on a CFL team, such as General Manager or President.

The best ability is availability! GEROY SIMON

RESILIENCE

After failing to make a pro team eight times, Geroy persevered and caught 1,029 passes for a record 16,352 yards to become a CFL Hall of Fame inductee. ➝

Todd Duncan  |

Décathlon: Kiprun Long Running Shoe

…and 3 0 Year s of I M PAC Tf ul Stor ies   |  2 014 -15 CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2014

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | MARCH/APRIL 2014

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | JULY/AUGUST 2014

INAUGURAL O ONTARIN! EDITIO

GOLD

5K | 10K | 21.1K | 42.2K

L MEDA EFULS

TRY THESE

OLYMPIAN WORKOUTS

SEVEN SUPERFOODS TO BOOST YOUR DIET

TOP OF THE

ALBERTA EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

THE

THE RUNNING ISSUE

ULTIMATE

MOUNTAIN ATHLETE

WHO INSPIRE

IMPACT RUNS WILD

WORKOUTS

IN SWEDEN

BARRE & BOXING

1,500+ EVENTS

Training Plans 10K, Half, Marathon, Ultra

WORKOUTS Stairs & Strength Laps

ENDURING THE WILD IN

MADAGASCAR

YOGA

GOING LONG

Food to Run

COUTURE & KIDS

with Brent McMahon

THE RIGHT WAY TO RECOVER

THE MOTIVATION & INSPIRATION ISSUE ALBERTA EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

20 1 5

THE RUNNING ISSUE

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

20 1 5

Marathon Men Eric Gillis & Reid Coolsaet

BY SIMON WHITFIELD

WORKOUTS are Good Medicine OREGON is O’mazing Ride a GRAN FONDO in 10 Weeks JUICE Your Veggies Don’t Fear OPEN WATER

THE MULTISPORT ISSUE

GET FIT WITH

brent bishop 8 Top Socks

RUN TESTED RUN RATED

Aerial Yoga Sweet Honey $99 Home Gym Explore Napa Our Gift of FITNESS

THE FITNESS ISSUE

THE WINTER RUNNING & SPORTS ISSUE

ONTARIO EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

ALBERTA EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2015

20 14 CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015

7

15

Winter Run

Trail Shoe

Triathlon PRO TIPS

RUN FAST

HEROES

Snowshoes Treadmills Fashions

all-day superfood

20 14

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | JULY/AUGUST 2015

14

SHOE REVIEWS

AGE SLOW

SPORTING

APRICOT ICE CREAM GRAPE FIZZIES

20 14

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | MAY/JUNE 2015

29

EAT

on $10 a Day!

+ SWEET CORN SOUP

BRITISH COLUMBIA EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

20 14

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | MARCH/APRIL 2015

RAW

THE WORLD'S

PERFECT ROUTES THE PAIN TRAIN

EAT LIKE A LOCAVORE

ISSUE

20 14

KILIAN JORNET

+ OFF-ROAD FASHION

SUMMER SPORTS

ONTARIO EDITION | WWW.IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

20 14 CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2015

RUN

kawartha lakes

RUN TRAIL

LANNI MARCHANT CANADA’S FASTEST FEMALE MARATHONER

PODIUM FASHION

THE OLYMPIC & PARALYMPIC ISSUE

GOOD AS GOLD

BLUEBERRIES

GOT HEMP?

19 RUNNING SHOE REVIEWS

HOP

WORLD’S TOUGHEST TRAIL RACE

YOUR NEW SUPERFOOD

TREATS

Speedskater Gilmore Junio

GO THERE, DO THAT

BARKLEY MARATHONS

TRAINING SCHEDULES

52

EE PROTEIN

TIME TO

The Face of Fitness

TRAIN FOR A MUD RUN

9

GLUTEN-FR

FITNESS TECH TOY S

JILLIAN MICHAELS

GET DOWN GET DIRTY

15,000+ EVENTS

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2014

11

TRAIL SHOE REVIEWED S

2014 RACE SOURCE GUIDE

DEFENDING CANADIAN

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2014

15

COMMEMORATIVE

POSTER INSIDE

TRAINING

REVIE WS

TIPS

Two-time Olympic Bobsleigh Champion Kaillie Humphries

HEALTHY Holiday Treats

Athletics Superstar Brianne Theisen-Eaton

TRAINING

WHY YOU SHOULD SKI

Obstacle Racing Canine Cardio 8 Great Trail Tips

TOP GEAR for Winter

TRAVEL

Made in Taiwan High on Squamish PAN AM & PARAPAN GAMES Workout with Damian Warner The Canoeist Cookbook Building Canada’s Legacy

FOOD

Get Grilling Best Hummus Ever

THE SUMMER SPORTS ISSUE

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

20 1 5

20 1 5

20 1 5

THE

WINTER RUNNING & SPORTS ISSUE

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

20 1 5

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 61


Lauren Toyota | 38 Los Angeles

IMPACT COVER: 2018   hotforfood / laurentoyota

hotforfood / @laurentoyota

hotforfoodblog

Lauren’s second cookbook, hot for food All Day: Easy recipes to level up your vegan meals is an international and Canadian bestseller. Lauren moved to Los Angeles to escape Toronto winters and is working on a members-only platform as an extension of her EAT IT by hot for food blog to get more access to her epic recipe creations.

Never stop growing and expanding and if you notice fear around something in your life, that's an even bigger invitation to pursue it and just do it. L AUREN TOYOTA

Dave Laus  |

Décathlon: Kalenji Run Comfort Shoe

A 3 0 -Year H is tor y of Cover s w i t h I M PAC T  |  2 016 -17 CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | MARCH/APRIL 2016

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | MAY/JUNE 2016

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | JULY/AUGUST 2016

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF INDEPENDENT SPORTS INFORMATION | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2016

Celebrating

25of YEARS IMPAC TMAGA ZINE.C A

Pan American Games 1500m Bronze Medallist Sasha Gollish

Ray Zahab

GET

Great Glutes 1,300+ EVENTS

in India

Train to Run

HOW FOOD SAVED A

8 WINTER

THE

Reasons to Spin

NUTRITION

… for breakfast!

Workouts

• A Taste of Brazil • Deliciously Raw

OCR & TRIATHLON

5K, 10K, HALF & MARATHON

Pop Star

IMPACT’S TOP

MOTIVATORS •UNLOCK YOUR POTENTIAL •25 REASONS TO GET FIT

MOTIVATION & INSPIRATION ISSUE

Breakfasts

30

• RUN, RIDE, RIO • ACTIVE EDMONTON

SHOE REVIEWS

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

•GIRL POWER •STAGE RACES •CES2016 TECH THE

Ryan Atkins is

THE KING of

OCR

MAKE & TAKE

Trail Food

RUNNING ISSUE

THE

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

OUTDOOR & MULTISPORT ISSUE

Yoga

Terry Fox

Faye

is Cool PLUS:

Stenning

TO WATCH IN RIO

16

SUMMER SPORTS ISSUE

in 7 minutes a day

Follow us

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPAC TMAGA ZINE.C A | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPAC TMAG | T WIT TER.COM/IMPAC TMAG

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

KILLER ABS

Raising the bar in obstacle racing

25 Y E A R S OF IMPAC T

Mountain bike star Emily Batty

THE

DIGITAL EDITION | IMPACTMAGAZINE.CA | FACEBOOK.COM/IMPACTMAG | TWITTER.COM/IMPACTMAG

Adventure to

Argentina

Canada's Greatest Sports Hero

OLYMPIANS

zine's Maga st IMPACT FAN Conte ATE ULTIM

A TRIP! WIN PE TO RU SEE PAGE

PIZZA

25 CANADIAN

Travel

RUNNERS’ BEST

7

Say hello to

25

CANADIAN ADVENTURES

YOGA

RUNNING SHOES

TRAIL SPECIAL

• Running Fashion • 24 Shoe Reviews • Workout & Yoga

20 1 6

20 1 6

20 1 6

20 1 6

20 1 6

20 1 6

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | MARCH/APRIL 2017

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | MAY/JUNE 2017

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JULY/AUGUST 2017

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

The Inspiration Issue

Sh Shawn Booth B h aand Bachelorette nd Bachelorette Kaitlyn Bristowe

The Running Issue

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

The Hot Issue

The Food & Fitness Issue

Fit in Vegas

Pro Rock Climber

Sonnie Trotter

Featuring 800M Runner

Melissa Bishop

YOGA

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

The Outdoor & Adventure Issue

Fashion

Beyond the Strip

Workouts

Fuel up with a

The World's Best

Run Slow

to Lose Weight

fit

Get

18

On the Trail • 15 of the Best Day Hikes

SHOE REVIEWS

Couples

+ Running Fashion

Sweat Together, Stay Together

PLUS:

Gold Medal Olympian

Erica Wiebe

Follow us

Let's Do

Brunch!

FEATURING CANADA'S

Mountain

Men

• Essential Hiking Gear

1, 3 0 0 + E V E N T S

Follow us

Heat Up Your

WORKOUTS

Sonnie Trotter, Bruce Poon Tip & Simon Donato Follow us

Delicious

PLANT-BASED RECIPES

HOLIDAY

Recipes

10

The Top

Vegan Canadian

The BEST

Summer Training Tips Get fit with Joga founder

Jana Webb

Follow us

Influencers Follow us

20 17

62 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

20 17

20 17

IDEAS FOR

Winter Adventure

Follow us

SO17-BC.indb 1

20 17

Tatum Monod

SPA

For Outdoor Fitness

EWS SHOE REVI

SPROUTING!

For 10K, Half & Marathon

Freeski Star

to a Luxury

Destinations

2017

Trail

The Cool Issue Escape

INCREDIBLE

Take a Swing at Boxing

TRAINING PLANS

Lauren Toyota

For Every Body

Smoothie Bowl

Peanut Butter Jelly Time!

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

YouTube Sensation

2017-08-31 10:57 AM

20 17

20 17


Brian McKeever | 42 Canmore, Alta.

IMPACT COVER: 2014, 2018  brian .mcke ever

brianmcke ever

With 40 Paralympic and world championship medals, the visually impaired skier is preparing for his sixth and final Paralympic Games in Beijing in March. He's looking forward to having time to heal his body after a lifetime in cross country skiing. He hopes to coach more and learn more about the waxing business.

Barriers are only obstacles if we allow them to be. BRIAN McKEEVER

RESILIENCE

Brian started skiing at age two and suffered progressive vision loss starting at age 18. At Vancouver 2010, he made the Olympic and Paralympic teams. His vision continues to degenerate. ➝

HarderLee |

Décathlon: Kiprun KD500 Road Running Shoes

…and 3 0 Year s of I M PAC Tf ul Stor ies   |  2 018 -19 C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018

The Motivation & Inspiration Issue

The Motivation & Inspiration Issue

The Motivation & Inspiration Issue Personal Trainer

Alicia Bell

Scott Salling

Yoga Studio

Yoga Studio

FASHION

FASHION

Our Favourite

18

ANS OLYMPI WATCH TO

20

FASHION

An Adventure To

PERU

CANADA'S TOP

FITNESS TRAINERS

18

ANS OLYMPI WATCH TO

CANADA'S TOP

FITNESS TRAINERS Follow us

Follow us

18

ANS OLYMPI WATCH TO

Follow us

MEN'S HEALTH

For 10K, Half, Marathon

Yoga Studio

PERU

Cycling

Training & Adventures

PLANS

Our Favourite

Comfort Foods

An Adventure To

The Outdoor Issue

Outdoor Enthusiast

Ricky Forbes

TRAINING

Comfort Foods

Our Favourite

Comfort Foods

The Running Issue

ROAD SHOE REVIEWS

Functional

WORKOUTS

NUTRITION TIPS

WHY WE RUN

For Fueling & Recovery

CANADA'S TOP

FITNESS TRAINERS

1,30 0 + E V E N T S

RECIPES

to Pack & Go!

10

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

The Summer Issue

Food & Fitness Issue

Featuring Women's Health

SERENA

Empowering Women

For busy travellers

BLEND-OFF!

Shoe Reviews

TRAIL RUNNING

5

HOT Go-to

Workouts

Summer Activities

20 1 8

20 1 8

20 1 8

20 1 8

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | MARCH/APRIL 2019

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | MAY/JUNE 2019

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JULY/AUGUST 2019

The Inspiration Issue Martine Yzerman Fitness Instructor

The Inspiration Issue

The Running Issue

The Inspiration Issue

Tommy Europe Fitness Instructor

Greg Hetherington Fitness Instructor

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

The Outdoor Issue

For 5K, 10K, Half & Marathon

What Makes a

What Makes a

MEAL PREP

MEAL PREP

MEAL PREP

Healthy Community?

CANADA'S TOP FITNESS

Simplified FASHION

For The Gym

INSTRUCTORS

Healthy Community?

CANADA'S TOP FITNESS

Simplified

WORKOUTS

To Get Fit Quick

INSTRUCTORS

Follow us

20 1 9

TASTY VEGAN RECIPES

Wrap Them Up!

CANADA'S TOP FITNESS

Simplified FASHION

For The Gym

INSTRUCTORS

Follow us

20 1 9

Follow us

20 1 9

NATURE

SHOES TRAIL WED RE V IE

The Summer Issue

Follow us

20 1 9

24

PLUS – Women's Health

PLUS – Spring Salad Recipes

Follow us

20 1 9

TESSA VIRTUE HUMBOLDT BRONCO

6

Ryan Straschnitzki

RITE

DELICIOUS

Holiday Recipes

BACK TO FITNESS

WINTER FITNESS

• The best fitness apps • Fast, full-body workouts • Off-season training tips

Get ready for snow sports

Follow us

20 1 9

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2019

Olympic Ice Dancer

n Kitche ts Produc OUR FAVOU

Lindsay Webster

3x Obstacle Course Racing World Champion

Vegan Nutrition

The Best Burgers + Raw Treats Plant-based Collagen Boosters

1,000+ E VENTS

Follow us

The Winter Issue

DELICIOUS VEGAN RECIPES

Trail Running • What's SUP? Swimwear • Active Vacations

Build Your Legs & Core Strength Dayna Pidhoresky 2020 Olympic Hopeful

The Food & Fitness Issue

Including vegan restaurant pioneer Matthew Kenney

SUMMER FITNESS

EXPLORE

WORKOUTS

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

impactmagazine.ca

(ON THE COVER)

The Chilkoot Trail & Adventure Apparel

20 1 8 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

impactmagazine.ca

TOP CHEFS

Run Local

Healthy Community?

Layering up

Stay in shape this season!

Follow us

20 1 8

Paul Zizka

What Makes a

FASHION

WINTER WORKOUTS

Follow us

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

Mountain Landscape & Adventure Photographer

TRAINING PLANS

COOKIES TARTS BARS DRINKS

VEGAN

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2019

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

RECIPES

Athletes Follow us

20 1 8

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

Healthier Holiday

Meet Canada's Top

Follow us

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2019

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

8

Top blender brands battle it out

GET SHREDDED

with a new routine!

BLOCK PARTY!

Recipes Share 8 toGreat

20 1 8

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

Canada's Winter Male Athlete of the Year

EURO RUNS

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2019

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

THE COOL ISSUE

Brian McKeever

Plant-based recipes

Outdoor Photographers

for

Kate Van Buskirk

Vegan Triathlete Madi Serpico Whalen

AMAZING

WILLIAMS

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2018

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

Succulent, satisfying & sustainable

The BEST CANADIAN

S G SHOE HIKIN Trails Happy

Featuring Indoor Mile Record Holder

Follow us

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | JULY/AUGUST 2018

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

Personal Trainer

Personal Trainer

Jeff Aker

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | MAY/JUNE 2018

C ANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HE ALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION | MARCH/APRIL 2018

IMPACTMAGA ZINE.C A

Follow us

20 1 9

20 1 9

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 63


Philip Ndugga | 47 Calgary

IMPACT COVER: 2020   Philip N dugga / Philip N dugga Pro Trainer

Philip is an extraordinary trainer and humanitarian who whips his Canadian clients into shape while devoting countless hours to his Ssubi Foundation which raises funds to support education initiatives in his native Uganda. With gyms closed due to COVID-19, Philip pivoted to virtual training via Zoom which proved to be a great success.

Having a passion is the greatest gift of all, especially when you're living it. PHILIP NDUGGA

RESILIENCE

“Many of us have been tested during this global pandemic. There have been lots of setbacks, but what I know for sure is that setbacks are a part of life and how we get through them determines the course of our future. You can come out bitter or better with a new fire ready to take on any challenge.”

HarderLee

Décathlon: Domyos 520 Fitness shoe

A 3 0 -Year H is tor y of Cover s w i t h I M PAC T  |  2 02 0 -21

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2020

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

impactmagazine.ca PHILIP NDUGGA

The Inspiration Issue

Featured as one of Canada's Top Fitness Trainers 2020

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2020

impactmagazine.ca

impactmagazine.ca

The Inspiration Issue

The Inspiration Issue

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2020

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

DELICIOUS & HEALTHY RECIPES

MARCH/APRIL 2020

impactmagazine.ca

Food & Nutrition

THE

Business of Fitness

PLANT-BASED NUTRITION +

Follow us

2020

THE INSPIRATION ISSUE

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

THE INSPIRATION ISSUE

Plant-Powered Mains

Beautiful Desserts

pg. 14

pg. 106

pg. 164

2020

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

Olympic qualifiers

TOP HIKES

TOP HIKES

THE INSPIRATION ISSUE

NOVEMBER 2020

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

impactmagazine.ca

impactmagazine.ca

Plant-based

Follow us

THE RUNNING ISSUE

MARK McMORRIS Cinnamon Buns & Festive Vegan

THE COMEBACK KID

Plant-based

HOLIDAY RECIPES

Plant-based

RECIPES

Cold Weather

to warm you up

to warm you up

RECIPES

RUNNING

WORKOUTS

WORKOUTS

WORKOUTS

2020

with Canada’s Top Fitness Trainers

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

Motivation

Core for the Outdoors

with Canada’s Top Fitness Trainers

Follow us

2020

THE OUTDOOR SUMMER ISSUE

Olympics & Life

TOP HIKES

TO KEEP YOU ACTIVE

to warm you up

Follow us

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

SAM EFFAH ON TRAINING FOR THE

WORKOUTS with Canada’s Top Fitness Trainers

2020

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

TO KEEP YOU ACTIVE

RECIPES

• Top 10 Foods to Boost Immunity • The Science of Sound • Resilience Practices

100% D ES OF PAG NT-BASE PLA DNESS! GOO

Sharpen Your Knife Skills Follow us

2020

MENTAL HEALTH

TO KEEP YOU ACTIVE

Taking Care of YOUR HEALTH

200+ MAKE THIS SAUCE pg. 123

Follow us

NOVEMBER 2020

KATE WRIGHT’S JOURNEY TO THE

HALEY DANIELS OPENS UP ABOUT

1,000+ EVENTS

HANNAH FLETCHER

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

impactmagazine.ca

Olympic Hopeful

Canadian Climber / Olympic Qualifier Alannah Yip

Innovating for future success

A CHANGE OF COURSE FOR THE

Exploring the challenges events are facing as a result of COVID-19

POST-RUN RECIPES

Featured as one of Canada's Top Fitness Trainers 2020

NOVEMBER 2020

impactmagazine.ca

RACE INDUSTRY

WORKOUTS + TRAINING PLANS 10K, Half Marathon Marathon

TOP FITNESS TRAINERS

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

Special Summer Edition

2020 SPECIAL EDITION

CANADA'S

2020 DIGITAL EDITION

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

TREVOR HOFBAUER IS OLYMPIC BOUND

FOR PRE, DURING & POST WORKOUT

CANADA’S BEST SOURCE OF HEALTH & FITNESS INFORMATION

EXPERT TIPS & ADVICE

MARATHONER

INSPIRING ADVICE

2020

+

impactmagazine.ca

To Get Fit in 2020!

RECIPE IDEAS

Follow us

PLANT-BASED NUTRITION

B E ST OF

The Running Issue

CASSIE DAY Featured as one of Canada's Top Fitness Trainers 2020

INSPIRING ADVICE

INSPIRING ADVICE

+

impactmagazine.ca Follow us

Follow us

2020

Follow us

2020

THE 30TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE From left to right: Philip Ndugga, Kyle Shewfelt, Tanya Dubnicoff, Simon Whitfield, Jon Montgomery, Brian McKeever, Mark Tewsbury, Jessica Zelinka.

From left to right: Kurt Browning, Jennifer Botterill, Joanne Malar, Lauren Toyota, Cindy Klassen, Beckie Scott, Geroy Simon.

2020

30

YEARS of Inspiration

Canada’s Top

impactmagazine.ca

Canada’s Top

Canada’s Top

Fitness Instructors

Fitness Instructors

Fitness Instructors

The State

The State

The State

Fitness Industry

Fitness Industry

2021

2021

impactmagazine.ca

impactmagazine.ca

2021

A Marathon Journey

Olympic Bound

The 30th Anniversary Issue

impactmagazine.ca

impactmagazine.ca

impactmagazine.ca

ERICA WIEBE

TRAINING PLANS

— of the —

STRETCHING for OPTIMAL MOVEMENT

— of the —

STRETCHING for OPTIMAL MOVEMENT

NAOMI KEANE Featured as one of Canada’s Top Fitness Instructors

KIM HARVEY Featured as one of Canada’s Top Fitness Instructors

202 1

— of the —

STAYCATIONS

Running on Veggies

Fitness Industry

WITH THE

30

marathon record holder, Malindi Elmore

Follow us

Follow us

202 1

64 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

YEARS of Inspiration

Hiking with Fido

Canadian

Follow us

202 1

WILD

TOP OUTDOOR

Podcast Picks

STRETCHING for OPTIMAL MOVEMENT DIONE MASON Featured as one of Canada’s Top Fitness Instructors

Follow us

Follow us

for Every Distance

202 1

Follow us

202 1

202 1

Athletic Shoes: Décathlon Canada

DECEMBER 2020


Westside congratulates IMPACT Magazine on 30 years and running

R E C R E AT I O N C E N T R E

GET BACK TO FITNESS – WITH – ONE ON ONE PROUDLY SERVING CALGARY FOR 32+ YEARS

Accountability Lose your Covid Curve Appointment Only Personal Fitness Instruction Inc. Personal Training Nutritional Consulting

Sandra Bueckert (age 55), One On One Personal Fitness owner at Elbow Falls circa 1989.

Call 403.244.9059 for your FREE consultation today! Or visit us online at oneononefitness.ca IMPACT-OneOnOne-Nov2021 V2.indd 1

2021-11-06 12:38 PM

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 65


TR AVE L

The World With IMPACT Travelling

30 top fitness travel destinations from IMPACT Magazine over 3 decades BY CHRIS WELNER

O

ver 30 Years, IMPACT Magazine has taken readers to amazing destinations for active and fit adventures around the world. We hope we have inspired your travels over the years and if you need a refresher of where we have gone together, here’s a look at 30 of our favourite destinations and travel stories. We thought about ranking the list, but they are all top-flight experiences.

1. ST.LUCIA'S STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN MAY/JUNE 2017

With adventures on land and sea, St. Lucia has activities to challenge your heart and an atmosphere to soothe your soul, a place where you can get your sweat on and leave life’s knotted tensions behind. Go there with Chris Welner. ANSE CHASTANET RESORT

66 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE


2. JAMAICA, YA MON SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

Put the Reggae Marathon in your datebook for December and revel in the glory of the world’s happiest marathon, where soulful beats accompany you throughout the race. Elaine Kupser soaks up the sunshine. REGGAE MARATHON

3. BACKPACKING ECUADOR SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

Many backpackers blow through Ecuador on the way to Machu Picchu, but those who take the time to visit this lesserknown South American country will discover — as did writer Sinead Mulhern — one of the most magical places in the world in Andes El Cajas National Park. ➝

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 67


4. LA FRANCE EN VACANCES JULY/AUGUST 2019

France is the top tourist destination in the world with more than 90 million visitors per year and no wonder, with a cuisine to die for, unparalleled sightseeing and a unique culture. While you’re ‘en vacances,’ consider translating some of your time into cycling, hiking or running through this beautiful country.

8. RISING IN RISHISKESH — INDIA 5. CHILKOOT TRAIL ALTITUDE ADVENTURE — B.C. MAY/JUNE 2019

Hiking or biking, the Chilkoot Trail winds through 53 kilometres of wilderness from the coast of Alaska, across the U.S.-Canada border and into British Columbia. Experience lush costal rainforest, the rocky Chilkoot Pass, stunning alpine lakes and rugged tundra. PARKS CANADA

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

Surrounded by the majestic Himalayas, with the life-giving Ganges River snaking through, the tranquil Indian town of Rishiskesh is known as the birthplace of Yoga. Writer Kadie Hummel took her Yoga teacher training here, a place she describes as something out of a storybook. RICHARD ALOIS

9. ARGENTINA, TOP TO TIP NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2016

6. DISCOVER PHUKET — THAILAND

7. HIKING THE BLACK FOREST — GERMANY

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2015

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2019

Test your fitness with a three-day ride in Khao Lak past areas ravaged by the deadly Tsunami of 2004. Or tune up winter triathlon training in Phuket at the Thanyapura Health & Sports Resort.

In the 19th century, Philipp Bussemer began publishing hiking guides for the Black Forest Highlands in Germany. Travellers continue to trek those trails and witness beautiful mountain and valley panoramas.

68 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

It was a grueling 5,856K tour of Argentina beginning at the Bolivian border and finishing in Ushuaia, the so-called “world’s end.” Adventurer Damian Jakibchuk took up the epic challenge of riding solo to the bottom of South America.

10. RUNNING IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

Northern California can be chilly in the fall, but not cold enough to stop naked folks from strutting their stuff in San Francisco’s Bay to Breakers 12K Run. It’s one of many active adventures at your beck and call, from fly fishing to hiking the majestic trails at Yosemite National Park. Elaine Kupser visits.


15. CYCLING THE OREGON TRAIL — U.S. MAY/JUNE 2015

Follow in the horse tracks of 19th Century explorers Lewis and Clark as you ride the Oregon Trail in America’s most connected network of cycling trails. TRAVEL OREGON

11. HONOURING THE FALLEN IN ITALY NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2016

The road up Monte Cassino is a twisting, calf-cramping series of switchbacks, but it is only eight kilometres long. After a screaming 25K downhill from our lunch spot by Lago Selva, this is our final reward. It is the last climb of our trip at the end of a week of cycling down the Adriatic Coast of Italy with Wounded Warriors Canada, writes Evan Baker.

12. RUN AROUND EUROPE

16. SPIRITUAL PATH TO MOUNT SINAI — EGYPT JULY/AUGUST 2016

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

Are your running shoes looking to spend some time in Europe? IMPACT’s Michelle Tchea reveals seven spectacular European destinations, from Austria to Poland.

13. CYCLE TOURING THE PACIFIC COAST

14. VEGAS BEYOND THE STRIP — U.S.

MAY/JUNE 2018

JULY/AUGUST 2017

Jump on for a 5,000K bike ride from Jasper, Alberta to Los Angeles with writer Sean Heakes as he discovers his inner soul.

Writer James Fell spent no time in casinos during his trip to Las Vegas. He did discover some of the great outdoors in and around the desert city.

Most of the 7,497-foot climb up Mount Sinai is trekked under moonlight and flashlight to avoid daytime heat in the Egyptian desert. Watching an awe-inspiring sunrise from the summit of the mountain where Moses is said to have received the Ten Commandments is the reward for your efforts. SHAWN CLOVER

17. RUN RIDE RIO — BRAZIL MAY/JUNE 2016

From cycling Grand Tour races to Ironman triathlons, marathons and ultras and, oh yes, the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Summer Games, Rio de Janeiro is a South American paradise full of life, love and sporting adventures. The beaches are wicked too. ➝

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 69


18. WILD MADAGASCAR — AFRICA

23. CUBA’S CYCLING REVOLUTION

MARCH/APRIL 2015

JULY/AUGUST 2018

Through millions of years of erosion, the Tsingy de Bemaraha forest has taken on fantastical forms unlike anywhere else. It is one of the few remaining dry tropical forests of the world. Join this science exploration with endurance athlete Ian MacNairn.

Cuba is not the first place you think about for a cycling holiday. Not as exotic as Italy or France, or even places closer to home here in North America. But Cuba is catching on as a cycling destination. Touring on two wheels will reveal Cuba, far away from the controlled environment of the tourist zones.

GEORGE KOUROUNIS

19. MADE IN TAIWAN

24. CLIMBING HIGH IN SQUAMISH — B.C.

JULY/AUGUST 2015

JULY/AUGUST 2015

Discover the many facets of Taiwan’s fitness culture, from active school children to bike touring and racing and the world’s biggest stair climber, the 84 storey Taipei 101 skyscraper. Taiwan has also firmly established itself as a leader in manufacturing fitness equipment used around the world.

Guarded by the granite monolith called Stawamus Chief, Squamish B.C. is Canada’s capital of outdoor adventure.

20. CUERNEVACA, MEXICO JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2001

Fitness travels are among the best ways to rid your body and mind of unwanted stress. Publisher Elaine Kupser got pampered in Hosteria Las Quintas Resort and Spa in one of IMPACT’s first destination travel features.

21. ITALY’S BIKE HOTEL NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015

The Belvedere Bike Hotel in Riccione, Italy, is just for cyclists. Do we need to say more?

22. BACK COUNTRY IN THE USSR — RUSSIA JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2013

A sneak peek into Mother Russia before the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi.

70 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

BOB YOUNG, DESTINATION B.C.


25. HIKING LIKE A VIKING — SWEDEN JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2015

The IcebugX covers 75K over three days of vast tracts of a stunning landscape known as the Bohuslan archipelago, a spectacular setting of islands, islets and rocky outcrops that make up southwestern Sweden. JONAS JORNEBERG

26. PARADISE FOUND IN KONA, HAWAII — U.S. SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2014

As the site of the Ironman World Championships triathlon, Kona could rightfully be described as the ultimate fitness destination. But whether you are an elite athlete or you just love to swim, run or ride, this quaint town on Hawaii’s Big Island will have you coming back for more year after year. HAWAII TOURISM

27. THE LAND THAT DOES NOT MELT — BAFFIN ISLAND NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012

Two adventurers ski into Baffin Island’s Auyuittuq National Park for a dangerous ski tour at the Arctic Circle.

28. DRINK IN THE DESERT — OSOYOOS, B.C. MAY/JUNE 2014

Test your guts and taste your glory in Osoyoos, beautiful wine country at the south end of the Okanagan Valley filled with rolling hills to ride and run.

29. ULTIMATE FAN ON THE INCA TRAIL — PERU JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018

IMPACT’s Ultimate Fan Jinell Mah Ming won an epic adventure from IMPACT to tour the Inca Trail in Peru with G Adventures. Journey with Jinell to the spectacular ruins of Machu Picchu.

30. GO THERE, DO THAT

Our last great travel pick is actually dozens of destinations across Ontario, Alberta and B.C. In our regular Go There, Do That feature, IMPACT opened the doors to places such as Kawartha Lakes, Collingwood, and Niagara Falls in Ontario. We visited Jasper, Edmonton, Canmore and Waterton in Alberta and among our visits in B.C. were the Sunshine Coast, Golden, Fernie, Penticton and Tofino.

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 71


A Step Through Time

The Evolution of the Running Shoe From the earliest leather track spikes to ultra light carbon plated shoes of today, the running shoe has undergone many technological advances over the decades BY LOUISE HODGSON-JONES  LOUISEHODGSONJONES

MIZUNO, NEW BALANCE & PUMA

LOUISE.HODGSONJONES

72 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

LOUISEHODGSONJO


T

he earliest running shoes probably date from the late 19th century where cross country running was part of the gruelling curriculum on the playing fields of English public schools. Then, leather spiked shoes were the norm but as track running developed so did the need to have faster, lighter shoes. Enter Joseph William Foster who designed spikes for the 1924 British Olympic Team. His innovations were later handed down to his grandson of the same name who founded Reebok in the 1950s. Across the pond in North America, track running was also popular and in the 1930s New Balance developed the Trackster with a ripple sole for the MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) track team. Based in Boston, New Balance was founded in 1906 as an arch support company and in the 1950s introduced multiple width shoes – which those with ‘generous’ feet are forever grateful for even to this day. Meanwhile in Europe. two brothers were feuding it out over how to run their shoe business. The Dassler Brothers Shoe Factory dates from 1924 and by the 1936 Olympic Games Adi and Rudolf Dassler’s track shoes were being worn by gold medal winners including Jesse Owens. They decided to part ways in the 1940s with Adi launching adidas and Rudolf, PUMA. They continued to battle it out on the soccer pitches where their football boots became the footwear of choice for soccer legends. But both continued to make an impact in the running shoe market. Mizuno was founded in 1906 in Japan as a sporting goods store and specialized in baseball uniforms before expanding into the running market in the 1920s. Other sports had a hand in how running shoes evolved – the Chuck Taylor Converse All Star basketball shoe was a precursor of the modern running shoe as were various tennis shoes. Both basketball and tennis shoes used EVA in the midsole – the material of choice in many of today’s running brands.

Specialty Stores As companies developed running shoes, finding a way to get them into the hands of the consumer was the next task – it wasn’t unusual to see shoes being sold out of the back of a van. “There was no distribution set up, but people were still wanting shoes,” says Rob Reid, founder of Frontrunners and co-owner of New Balance in Victoria. “As consumer demand increased during the 1970s running boom we saw the rise of the specialty stores. With that came the R & D into shoe technology.” The shoes in the 1970s and 1980s were constructed simply, says David Korell, Category Manager – Performance, New Balance Canada. “They were a simple one-piece foam with solid rubber outsoles, stiff, hard underfoot with the upper a suede or mesh.”

“Shoes went from sheet EVA material that was cut and shaped for the midsole to different strengths to support the foot in different areas,” says Reid. “That is when you had Nike going the Air route and Asics with the Gel. It gives energy back to the foot and helps toe off.” With running specialty stores on the rise in the 1990s consumers realized that they could get expert advice and shoes that fitted properly. “The industry was consumer led. Stores would prescribe shoes for their customers and ask themselves, what are their expectations and how can they meet them,” says Ben Kotanen, Territory Manager, Western Canada, Mizuno. It was in 1997 that Mizuno introduced their first Wave shoe. “It was our first big technology into making shoes faster and lighter.” The Wave Rider won the ➝

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 73


THE SHOE RUNDOWN Outsole This is the sole that strikes the ground and can vary depending on the type of running shoe. Usually, the material is a durable rubber. Some companies collaborate with brands such as Skechers, which has Goodyear rubber outsoles that offer good grip and traction. Trail shoes have lugs which line the outsole to provide added traction. Midsole This lies between the outsole and the insole and provides the cushioning you need when striking. EVA (ethylene vinyl acetate) has been the material of choice for decades, but you can also find cell-based foam. The addition of a carbon plate in the midsole offers stability for the ankle and can enhance energy return. A rocker is the curved part of the midsole at the top of the shoe which helps with toeing off and can produce a more efficient stride. Insole These are made from EVA with some soft, comfortable fabric for the feet. If you find the insoles that come with the shoe don’t offer enough support, then looking at inserts like Superfeet may help, or custom orthotics. Upper The upper part of the shoe is usually a fabric or mesh material that have become lighter and more breathable over the years. Toe Box We often judge the fit of a shoe by its toe box and many brands fit differently. They can be quite snug although companies like Altra offer a wider toe box so the foot can splay out naturally. Heel Drop The difference between the forefoot and heel height is called the offset or heel drop. Typically, there is a 10 - 12mm drop which helps cushioning. Minimal shoes have zero drop. The stack height is the thickness of the midsole.

1999 Editor’s Choice Award in Runners’ World which put the brand on the map. The Wave Rider is now on version 25 and is Mizuno’s best seller. Technology had a hand in the PUMA DISC SYSTEM, developed in 1991, which replaced shoelaces with a disc and compression unit. Worn by Olympic hurdler Colin Jackson in 1993, the disc consisted of an adjustable closure disc on the top of the shoe, a compression unit that replaced the tongue and a side unit that adjusted the shoe to the foot. Foam Technology The last two decades has seen more advances in foam technology. ‘Super foams’ are denser and more durable, lighter in weight yet offering the same compression. Carbon plate technology offers some rigidity and stability particularly in the heel and ankle. Brands now use the term ‘energy return’ in their marketing which simply means you as a runner are using less effort when toeing off thanks to the advances in the midsole materials. adidas has gone one step further. Their new 4DFWD features a lattice midsole that minimizes the impact between the foot and the ground. “adidas 4DFWD really does take 4D technology to the next level, enabling us to design in a way that conventional foam midsoles do not allow,” says Charlotte Heidmann, Product Manager, adidas Running. Saucony’s Endorphin Series also features a similar technology. The shoes feature a lightweight PEBA based foam and Speedroll Technology. “This means the shoes roll forward a little faster than a standard running shoe. The effect helps create a quick and smooth feeling from stride to stride,” says Chris Mahoney, Vice-President of Design, Saucony Canada. All of PUMA’s new models, Deviate, Velocity and Liberate, feature their new foam technology NITRO which is infused with nitrogen gas. The Deviate also has a composite carbon fibre plate that acts as a lever to propel the foot forward. Plated shoes have become a hot trend in recent years says Laura Tingle, Product Manager, Newton Running.

74 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

“In 2021 we rolled out NRG foam and a PA11 plate in our new Gravity+ model. The PA11 plate is made from castor beans, it has improved the performance of our shoes, as well as decreasing our impact on the environment.” Environmentally Friendly More and more companies are encompassing sustainable materials in their shoes. In 2020, On Running launched their fully recyclable shoe, the Cyclon, also made from castor beans. This year, Newton’s entire shoe line is made of recycled materials (there are four plastic water bottles in one pair of Newton shoes) and a biodegradable sole. HOKA has implemented more sustainable fabrics in their uppers particularly in their SKY trail shoes. The Trail Glove – a collaboration of Merrell and Vibram – is a sustainable trail shoe that includes 65 per cent recycled materials in the upper, 100 per cent recycled laces, 100 per cent recycled webbing, and Vibram EcoStep 30 per cent recycled rubber. Trail shoes have also undergone a transformation over the decades. For companies such as The North Face the outdoors was always rooted in their DNA, and they built their reputation on providing hard wearing and durable climbing boots and apparel. “We aren’t the first when you think of trail shoes, but we have evolved and are now well known to those who like our brand,” says Nick Boulton, National Account Executive. The North Face has developed a new technology – Vectiv – which integrates deep lugs in the outsole and carbon plates in the rocker midsole allowing for a smooth heel to toe off. This technology can be found in their everyday Infinite shoe as well as the more advance Flight series. To offer more cushioning some brands are increasing their stack height. HOKA was a forerunner in this but now New Balance Fresh Foam with a 34 mm heel height and 4 mm drop is competing in the market. “Elite runners like maximum cushioning so we felt the need to introduce a stack shoe,” says Korell. Shoes are subject to regulations but only in elite competition. Think Vaporfly


The Dassler Shoe

THEN AND NOW THE EVOLUTION OF THE SNEAKER

Factory from 1924 and PUMA's current headquarters.

Mizuno’s first Wave Rider shoe was launched in 1997 – winning the Runners’ World Editor’s Choice award in 1999. The shoe is their number one best seller and is now on version 25.

and we all remember the controversy about the carbon fibre plate and the ‘three-minute’ advantage. More recently Vienna Marathon winner, Derara Hurisa of Ethiopia was disqualified because his shoes were one centimetre thicker than allowed by World Athletics. Shoes must have a maximum stack height of 40 millimetres to be eligible for records. Consumer Choice Giving consumers options is key in today’s competitive shoe market. By offering sizes from 0 to 20 and in six widths, New Balance may have a slight edge over its competitors. A company such as Altra is addressing those with foot issues by having a wider toe box allowing the foot to splay out naturally. “It’s about aligning your body naturally. By taking out the elevated heel you can still have the same amount of forefront cushion,” says owner Brian Beckstead. A wide toe box is also a feature in Xero Shoes, which started making a DIY barefoot sandal in 2009. Consumer demand led them to making running shoes. According to Steven Sashen, CEO, Xero Shoes, it is all about a natural fit, motion and feel. “Shoes have a nonelevated (zero-drop) heel for proper posture, they are super flexible to let your

feet bend and move naturally and low-tothe-ground for balance and agility.” Vibram popularized the minimalist five-finger shoe, and although it is certainly not for everyone, their V-Run weighs just 4.8 oz. Their partnership with Merrell in 2011 produced the Barefoot Collection, a minimalist trail shoe. “Vibram’s expertise in barefoot running and fitness, allowed us to introduce the ideal barefoot designs for all outdoor activities,” says Rory Lauder, Field Marketing Specialist, Merrell. So, what does the future hold for the running shoe? Faster, lighter, higher? The industry is moving towards the sustainable route using environmentally friendly materials and recyclable products. Korell thinks that the plate technology in running shoes could influence everyday shoes. He also predicts that foams will get lighter to allow for more stack height. Kotanen says the future will be consumer driven. “One of the biggest shifts in the industry is how we have changed the way we fit shoes.” For companies like Mizuno their models sell better in speciality stores because that is where runners like to shop. With myriad options to choose from it is an exciting time for the shoe industry, and demand doesn’t show any signs of slowing down.

Classic Models New Balance shoes have always had a classic look about them. During the 1970s running boom the 320 was a top seller.

In 1982, the 990 was launched in a stylish grey suede and available in multiple widths.

Today’s Fresh Foam shoe is an everyday trainer offering maximum cushion and width.

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 75


TRAINING

Reach Your True Performance Potential

Training, nutrition and recovery fundamentals that have stood the test of time BY CALVIN ZARYSKI  FINISHERPIX High performance coach Calvin Zaryski is the 2021 World IRONMAN 70.3 Age Group Champion, 9X World XTERRA Age Group Champion. ZARYSKICALVIN

I

CALVIN.ZARYSKI

still recall the first issue of IMPACT Magazine 30 years ago. I was a kinesiology student learning the art of coaching and exercise science. Three decades later, many training trends have come and gone. Similarly, much has changed in the area of wearable technology with high-performance sport being more accessible to many more people. Through it all, the basics of high performance have stood the test of time.

As an elite athlete and master endurance coach, I stay current with scientific research and applied learning. Much of this attention is driven by my athletic performance goals which included my first World IRONMAN 70.3 Championships on Sept. 17 in St. George, Utah. When preparing for a World Championships, I create a training program that has all the proven methods to maximize performance gains and recovery. The final six-eight weeks is what makes

the difference. I don’t waste my time or money on market-driven tools that have no validity or reliability. Furthermore, I keep my training, nutrition and recovery simple. The results of detailed planning and meticulous execution resulted in my first IRONMAN 70.3 World title at age 53 — a title earned riding a 15-yearold triathlon bike and without carbon plated shoes. My point is that your health and training trumps any equipment

Coach Cal Zaryski takes his own training advice to heart, winning his first IRONMAN 70.3 world title this fall in St. George, Utah.

76 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE


COACH CAL’S TRAINING TIPS TO BE YOUR BEST purchase or technology. Don’t get too caught up in the shiny bells and whistles and grand promises. Looking back on my career in triathlon, my ultimate goal was to win a world title. Growing up as a soccer player, running and eventually cycling developed quickly. But swimming was a challenge. When I step back and try to identify the key principles that have allowed me to pursue maximal performance, the following come to mind. Athletes need a low level of baseline stress to maximize recovery and training loads. Losing a job or going through divorce will affect your performance. Consistency in training is the next most important principle to develop superior endurance performance. Beside time constraints, structural and soft tissue health can be a major limiter to remaining consistent. Regular tissue care, as basic as stretching and sport massage is critical. Rest must not only allow the peripheral tissue to adapt, but promote recovery of central systems such as hormones and cellular processes. Age and aging will always play a role in the amount or type of training load. Pay attention to how well your body is recovering and adapt your training accordingly.

Wearable tools and body data should be considered, but never used exclusively to determine training load. Mood and motivation work best to identify general fatigue. Even tracking heart rate variability has flaws. Diet supports the training energy requirement and more importantly, recovery. But it does not need to be complicated, nor overly restrictive or expensive. Paying hundreds of dollars a month for supplements simply is not necessary. A general understanding of training adaptation is beneficial to remain positive and motivated through the mindless grind of daily routines. The older the athlete is, the more important proper recovery practices are (stretching, water therapy, protein intake, fascial release, skeletal adjustments, etc). Video is a great tool to assess technique in all sports, helping to identify your limitations. Despite three decades that have come and gone for me and IMPACT, the fundamentals of training, nutrition and recovery have stood the test of time. There are no magic pills to take. It’s about having a plan that fits you and sticking to it. Once you’ve put in the hard work, try implementing my training tips to reach your true performance potential.

• After high-stress run sessions, active recovery such as deep-water running or an easy 30-minute ride are the best methods to reduce excessive inflammation and promote recovery (much better than compression leg boots). • Regular exposure to natural altitude is superior to any altitude chamber or device. • Less is better when designing intensive training sessions. • Midday naps make all the difference when training two-three times per day. • My personal super foods are eggs, avocados, and salads. • Listen to your intuition during a training session. Stop or back off before a mishap. • Never sacrifice your health for fitness gains. • Trust your fitness, even when under high anxiety of a race.

Age and aging will always play a role in the amount or type of training load.

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 77


H E A LT H

Yes, You’re an Athlete

Simon Marshall and Lesley Peterson give us their advice on

Don’t believe us? Sometimes you have to fake it till you make it

creating your athletic alter ego.

BY SIMON MARSHALL AND LESLEY PATERSON Co-authors of The Brave Athlete: Calm the F*ck Down and Rise to the Occasion. BRAVEHEART COACHING

LESLEYDOESTRI

WWW.BRAVEHEARTCOACH.COM Re-printed by permission from The Brave Athlete: Calm the F*ck Down and Rise to the Occasion, VeloPress 2017.

T

ell me about yourself as an athlete.” You would be amazed at how athletes respond to this simple question. On the face of it, it’s an invitation to talk about routine and quantifiable aspects of athletic life: the event an athlete competes in, the type and amount of training she does,

recent results, PRs, and so on. However, far more revealing is how athletes talk about themselves–the words they use, what they choose to focus on first and second and, sometimes more importantly, what they don’t mention at all. One aspect of your inner world is your athletic identity, which is the degree to

78 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

which you identify as being an “athlete” and how you look to others to confirm or validate your beliefs about your athleticism. Athletic identity is all about thinking and feeling like an athlete. Athletic identity has nothing to do with how fast you are, how much racing you do, or how much you train.


Scientific evidence increasingly suggests that pretending to be someone else can be a powerful strategy to instantly transform into an aspirational version of yourself.

WHAT CONSTITUTES A MATURE ATHLETIC IDENTITY? 1. You currently participate in sports or exercise. 2. You are comfortable calling yourself an athlete. 3. You are comfortable being called an athlete by others.

HOW TO FAKE IT TILL YOU MAKE IT It turns out that following advice to “just be yourself” is often the worst thing you can do. Scientific evidence increasingly suggests that pretending to be someone else can be a powerful strategy to instantly transform into an aspirational version of yourself. Your true self might be shy, self-critical, and easily intimidated by the competition, but what if for just a few hours you could try on a new athletic identity–someone who thrives in competition, has tons of confidence, refuses to quit, and doesn’t care what others think? Anecdotally, we know that many top performers already do this. For years, Beyoncé performed as Sasha Fierce until her true identity caught up. Lesley competes as gritty boxer, Paddy McGinty. We call these temporary identities “alter egos” and they aren’t just for superhero movies or people with dissociative identity disorders. Using an alternative identity can play a strong therapeutic role in psychotherapy, and new evidence suggests that pretending can favourably alter your biochemistry and improve performance. Yes, “fake it ‘til you make it” is now backed by science. The first step in creating your athletic alter ego is to think of the attributes you want your new identity to have. It sometimes helps to think of actual people or fictional characters that embody the identity you’re seeking. Perhaps you’re looking for a sleek ninja

or a bare-knuckle boxer? Perhaps you want to think and act like an actual athlete you admire for his or her guts and tenacity. If there are people or characters who remind you of this identity, make a note of them to help you get into character. Then choose a name for your alter ego that matches the traits of your character and develop a backstory. How did they develop these traits? What kind of life have they experienced? What have they already endured? The final elements in bringing the character to life involve thinking through the behaviours and self-talk that get you into the mindset of the identity. They include personal mantras, actions, and routines, as well as physical reminders that help you step into that identity. The great advantage of being an athlete is that we already have good triggers for the transition–our race kit can literally become our costume. Regardless of the scientific basis for forming an alter ego, we find that many athletes are relieved to know that they don’t have to undergo a complete personality makeover to develop the athletic identity they want. It’s far less intimidating to simply suit up as a new character rather than tackle years of entrenched thinking. Until the true identity has a chance to catch up through fixing self-schema and experience, stepping into new shoes is a great way to start.

4. You “own” your athletic ability. You’re neither embarrassed by it, nor do you feel the need to prove your athletic ability to others. 5. You don’t engage in excessive self-criticism or self-aggrandizement (telling people how awesome you are) when talking about your ability or performance. 6. You maintain a healthy balance between your sport and other interests. Your ability and/or performance in sports is not the sole contributor to your self-worth. You have friends who are not athletes, and you frequently talk about non-sportrelated topics in social situations. 7. You have emotional reactions that most people would consider reasonable when shit goes wrong (e.g., losing, failing, getting penalized, getting injured, etc.).

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 79


AOR -

providing safe, evidence-based health care supplements Photo: Capsules in the production line at AOR’s manufacturing facility.

The Calgary nutraceutical company is an innovator in natural health products putting the needs of the consumer first including India, China and within Europe. “Once we have made a determination about the specific requirements of the raw material, based on available literature, we then look at vendors and sources,” says Dr. NavNirat Nibber, AOR’s Medical Advisor and Brand Educator. “We need to ascertain the correct source and ask are there any environmental or sustainability considerations we need to know about?”

Photo: Dr. NavNirat Nibber, AOR’s Medical Advisor and Brand Educator

F

inding natural health solutions to chronic illness or disease is becoming more common today, but that wasn’t always the case when Dr. Traj Nibber, PhD was a pharmacist 30 years ago. His frustration that there weren’t nutritional supplements available to those suffering from AIDS led him to investigate and source his own compounds which in turn led to him founding Advanced Orthomolecular Research (AOR), now a leading supplier of natural health supplements in North America. What makes AOR stand out is their thorough research into raw materials, some of which are supplied from countries Sponsored Content

to be the most popular. ‘We produce these from a therapeutic and preventative angle ensuring we have products for every age,” Nibber explains. “In your 30’s you may need co-factors to help build bone but later on helping to encourage bone re-modelling on a cellular level is important.” When designing products AOR research different populations to ascertain who will benefit. For their gluten free and vegan supplements, they ensure there aren’t any impediments, particularly any allergens or animal by-products.

AOR manufactures at their own plant in Calgary. This has its advantages as they can control and ensure no contaminants are introduced at any time and they are constantly testing from the time they start processing “The safety of our consumers to outputting the is a high priority.” finished product. Dr. NavNirat Nibber AOR’ s Medical Advisor and Brand Educator The final product undergoes rigorous clinical trials and must meet regulatory standards from Health Canada which has to give its stamp of approval with a Natural Product Number (NPN). AOR has it own quality standards and are also guided by Canadian Good Manufacturing Process (cGMP) in its best practices. AOR has a vast array of products with the Bone & Joint Health supplements proving

For 30 years AOR has been an innovator in providing safe, science-based, quality health products and looking forward they will continue to evolve and adapt to consumer needs. “As a dynamic company we will continue to follow the science and engage with our customer base. The safety of our consumers is a high priority.” says Nibber.


FALL 2021

SEL F C ARE IS HE ALT H C ARE. GLOW MD CLINICS IS MORE THAN JUST SKIN DEEP.

THE GLOW ON GLENMORE & ELBOW 314 - 6707 ELBOW DR SW 403.404.GLOW (4569) @GLOWMDCLINICS • RN Owned Health, Vitality and Beauty Clinic • Medical Physician Directed • Multi Disciplinary Health Professional Team including Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioner and Nature guides • Serving the Calgary Community since 1998

HEALTH. VITALITY. BEAUTY. THE GLOW.

You’ve probably come across our wonderful team of professional providers of beauty including Physicians, Nurses, and Allied Health Professionals on their social media accounts: @glowmdclinics @glowmd_jason @glowmd_julia @glowmd_leahm

@drdanielle_glowmd @glowmd_row @glowmd_arina @yycacupuncture

Or perhaps you’ve seen the GLOW VAN “E.D.I.T.H.” travelling across Canada collecting messages of GLOW VIBES everywhere it stops. Our team has been engaged in your pursuit of SELF CARE in your community since DAY 1 because we believe SELF CARE is HEALTH CARE, the type of care that goes beyond just your physical appearance. GLOWMDCLINICS.COM


SPORTS MEDICINE

WHAT IS SARCOPENIA?

Muscle Matters

The most important, but often under-appreciated tissue we need to work as we age BY STUART PHILLIPS Stuart Phillips is a Professor and Canada Research Chair in Muscle Health and Aging in the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University in Hamilton, ON. MACKINPROF

O

FACEBOOK.COM/SMPPH.D

ver the last century, we have added more than 30 years to the human lifespan. Sadly, healthspan — the period of our lives during which we’re in good health — has not kept pace with the increase in longevity. So why is healthspan more important than lifespan? While longevity is great, who wants to live to be 120 and feel like they’re 120? In the search for behaviours that might help us age well, there are many axioms. People talk about mental or brain health, bone health, metabolic health, heart health, but we rarely hear about muscle health. That changes now. Simply put, muscle matters. Muscle is most obviously the tissue of locomotion. Without muscle, or with weaker muscles, we can’t or don’t move well.

MACKINPROF

Various disorders of neural or muscular origin serve as potent reminders of how much more difficult life is when our physical mobility is compromised. However, all of us are under the influence of one process that causes just about all our biological systems to decline: aging. As we age, the loss of muscle is termed sarcopenia. Derived from Greek, the word literally means ‘poverty of flesh.’ So, can we prevent this ‘poverty’ and manage sarcopenia? Preventing any normal age-related process is next to impossible; however, we can slow the decline and, in doing so, preserve our mobility in later life. Muscle plays many roles in our general health beyond locomotion. For example, muscle plays a central role in regulating blood sugar. Following consumption of a higher carbohydrate-containing

82 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

Sarcopenia is the term given to the gradual age-related loss of muscle mass and strength. Many view sarcopenia as a natural part of aging, which is understandable as there are some things that we have to accept as we age. We are unsure exactly what causes sarcopenia, but it is likely a combination of diet, physical activity levels, hormone concentrations, and natural, biological, aging processes. It is at this point when many ask when sarcopenia begins? The answer is that we don’t know; however, population data shows that starting somewhere in our 40-50s we lose, on average, about one percent of muscle mass and about one-two percent of our muscle strength per year. That means someone in their 50s can, by the time they reach their 80s, expect to have lost almost 30 percent of their muscle mass and between 30-60 percent of their strength. On a scale, their body weight may have stayed the same. Why? Sadly, they have replaced their muscle weight with body fat, which is not atypical.

meal, particularly one composed of ‘simple sugars’, like a can of pop or a bowl of white rice, our blood sugar levels rise. If these levels remain elevated, which is a hallmark of Type 2 diabetes, then the elevated sugars can cause damage. Muscle is like a sink for blood sugar. As such, it is the single largest site for disposal and storage of post-meal blood sugar. In short, having a large and active — you still need those muscles to move — muscle mass is important in regulating blood sugar and may reduce our risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and its complications. ➝


OU R FAVO U R I T E

Fitness Brands

Congratulations to IMPACT Magazine on 30 years of impact! NEW RELEASES!

Come see our

NEW OUTDOOR FIELDS!

Connect with us on Facebook to learn about our special offers and promotions! At Genesis Centre: 7555 Falconridge Blvd. NE. Calgary, AB

@HumanKineticsCanada Canada.HumanKinetics.com

1-800-465-7301

Shockwave at Bridgeland Sport and Spine

Are you tired of being in pain? Stubborn Injuries Need Deeper Treatment. WE HAVE SOLUTIONS. bridgelandsport.com 403.237.7686

• plantar fasciitis • tennis elbow • runner’s knee • achilles tendonitis • rotator cuff tendonitis

ABOVE: Dr. Hankins demonstrating Shockwave on Achilles tendinitis

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 83


The role that muscle plays in controlling blood sugar is critical. People with Type 2 diabetes have much higher rates of heart disease, adult-onset blindness, kidney problems, and adult amputations. Take-home message: hang onto your muscle for as long as possible to lower your risk of acquiring Type 2 diabetes or managing your diabetes better. What if I told you that managing your body weight was also a matter of managing your muscle? While it may not be an exact relationship, one of the things we do know is that for most people, the biggest contribution to the amount of energy they burn in a given day is called their resting metabolic rate or RMR. Your RMR is a function of all the active metabolic processes in your body and the energy that’s required to keep them running. Even if you do little to nothing movement-wise all day, you still expend energy to keep your heart beating, contracting the muscles needed to breathe, and many other metabolic reactions. In most people, when we distill their RMR down to the tissues that contribute to energy expenditure, you can chalk it up to their liver and their muscle. Your liver might be, relatively speaking, small, but it’s very active metabolically. While not as metabolically active as your liver, your muscle is much larger, so it burns a fair amount of energy too. Now think about being physically active, and it’s like you’re firing up the muscle, burning more energy. All weight loss and gain runs, at some point, through what scientists refer to as energy balance: energy in versus energy out. The goal is to keep those processes balanced – energy in (food and drink) = energy out – to mitigate weight gain (or loss). By hanging onto a larger, and more active (are you sensing the pattern yet?) muscle mass we may be better able to manage our weight. Hopefully, by this point, you’re a convert if you weren’t already. Muscle is an important, but often under-appreciated tissue to hang onto and keep in good shape as we age. So what can we do to slow, as you can’t prevent, sarcopenia and age well? It’s simple: move it or lose it!

HOW HARD ARE YOU WORKING WHEN YOU ARE LIFTING WEIGHTS? It’s hard to know how much weight to lift. I think sometimes, it’s much easier for people to just say how difficult something was rather than to know how much weight they need to lift. This is true even if the person is doing a push-up. The idea behind the scale below is for people to become familiar with the concept of effort as a driver of what people should do in terms of lifting weights. There are many free-weight lifting programs available that involve the use of weights, or simply your own bodyweight.

10 9 8 7 5-6 1-4 0

Maximal effort – I could not have lifted that weight one more time I could have lifted that weight one more time I could have lifted that weight one or likely two more times I could have lifted that weight two or likely three more times Light effort – I can lift that weight about 20 times Very light effort – I can lift that weight many times (>30) Rest

Like many organs, including your brain, bones, and muscle, if it doesn’t get worked, it doesn’t work! Quite simply, stay as physically active for as long you can and work the muscles you want to hang onto. There is one important caveat, however, that you need to subject your muscles to some kind of load. This is commonly achieved through weightlifting or resistance training. The how of resistance training can be made overly complex. Nevertheless, resistance training can be ridiculously simple and require only your perception of your effort as a guide to how hard to work. The bare-bones for a resistance exercise program are as follows: • Minimum of twice weekly • Focus on major muscle groups: legs, chest and back • Perform a lift with a weight that you can safely lift somewhere between 10-20 times before you rate your effort as an 8/10 where 1/10 is a very light effort (everything other than rest) and 10/10 is a maximal effort, and you can’t lift the weight anymore • You can use any type of weight or something, such as a resistance training band, to provide external resistance, including your own bodyweight

84 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

Your first trip to a gym or your first lifting session anywhere can be intimidating for someone who has never lifted weights. If you’ve never lifted weights before, then look for a gym or community program that targets people in your age group and caters to people with any chronic health conditions you may have. If you’re in your 50s, 60s, or beyond, you don’t need a complex program that requires a weight belt, and knee wraps to move a weight. If you have the means, a personal trainer (PT) can be great. Pick a PT who is qualified, suits your personality style and helps you work to achieve your goals. If you’re finding the program overly complex, hard to follow, too tiring, or causing you pain, then ask for a new program or a new PT. A big point in adopting a new exercise program is that the beginning is always the most difficult. If you can get beyond the first eight to 10 weeks, you will begin to see and feel some remarkable changes! Keeping your muscle in as active and healthy a state as possible as you age is critical. Loss of muscle means loss of the tissue that disposes of blood sugar, that you’re at risk of weight gain, and that your physical mobility will be compromised. A key to living better? Mind your muscle. Stay active, stay strong and age well.


OU R FAVO U R I T E

Fitness Brands

Discover the Edge Advantage

WHERE A PASSION FOR SPORT DRIVES A PASSION FOR LEARNING AND LEADING edgeschool.com

CANMORE ALL-MOUNTAIN LEASH — RUN HANDS-FREE — rockymountaindog.ca

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 85


SPORTS MEDICINE

Get Static Stretching Back into Your Warm-up

Practical analysis of research shows benefits for sport performance BY DAVID G BEHM, PHD Research Professor, School of Human Kinetics and Recreation, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

O

ver the last 20 years many sport science articles have reported performance deficits — typically three-five per cent — after prolonged static stretching (more than 60 seconds per muscle group) when not including dynamic warm-up activities. That research almost sent static stretching to extinction as a component of a warm-up. However, evidence is building to show that when shorter durations of static stretching (less than 60 seconds per muscle group) are included in a full

pre-exercise warm-up that includes aerobic activity, static and dynamic stretching, and dynamic activity, there are only trivial effects on subsequent strength, power, agility, sprint and muscle endurance among other performance variables. Unfortunately, there is still reluctance to incorporate static stretching into sport, fitness and health programs. The stretching and flexibility research may not necessarily be at fault, but the interpretation of these studies may be flawed. For example, many studies

86 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

incorporated unrealistic, stretching durations. The typical warm-up stretch duration of professional athletes is around 12-17 seconds per muscle, whereas most studies have used more than 60 seconds of stretching per muscle with some studies using 20-30 minutes of static stretching with a single muscle. Secondly, the testing is often conducted almost immediately following the prolonged static stretch rather than 10-15 minutes after, when the competition or training typically start and performance impairments disappear.


Chronic increase in range of motion • • • • •

Separate training session distinct from warm-up activities Two to six days per week 30 to 60 seconds per muscle group Minimum five minutes per week per muscle group 60-100 per cent of stretch tolerance (point of discomfort)

Client / YWCA Project / Impact Magazine Execution / Advertisement Filename / 221_ImpactMagazineAd_2.25x9.75 Size / 2.25 x 9.75” Bleed / 0.125"  Proof size / 100% CMYK / YES Black / – Pantone / – Spellcheck / Yes Proof # / 1 Note / – MatterStudio.ca

PRESCRIPTIONS FOR STRETCHING

GOING STRONG FOR DECADES EVERYBODY WELCOME

Pre-activity (warm-up) preparation for athletic performance to acutely increase range of motion, having trivial or positive effects on performance (E.G., STRENGTH, POWER, AGILITY, SPRINT) • Less than 60 seconds of static stretching per muscle group • Within a full warm-up that includes initially about five minutes of aerobic activity, static and dynamic stretching (about 90 seconds per muscle group) and subsequent 5-15 minutes of dynamic sport or task-specific activities

Reduction in musculotendinous injury incidence

We will meet you where you’re at

• Chronic static stretching • 30 seconds per muscle group (may perform multiple shorter stretches to achieve total time) • About five minutes per target muscle group (e.g. stretching for running would involve about five minutes of stretching of the quadriceps, hamstrings, triceps calves, hip adductors and abductors before lower-limb activities such as walking, running and jumping)

It is important to include static stretching in a warm-up because it increases joint range of motion, extensibility of the muscles and tendons, and improves the ability to move the limbs during sport or training. Stretching one muscle will even improve flexibility of contralateral (opposite) and other non-stretched muscles, which would be of great benefit during rehabilitation when you cannot stretch the injured limb. Most muscle and tendon injuries occur when the muscle is in an elongated position. However, with stretch training, there is not only an increased range of motion, but the muscle is able to exert more force when in an extended position and can counterbalance the strain in these positions to limit injuries. There is strong evidence static stretching reduces musculotendinous injuries, particularly in sports that include explosive actions and rapid change of direction. There is also evidence chronic stretch training — a long-term stretching program — can help relieve pain.

Static and dynamic stretch training can also improve balance, which, especially for seniors, may reduce the incidence of falls and associated injuries. The rationale is that improved flexibility permits an individual to accommodate, absorb and respond more efficiently to balance threats. Substantial static stretching can also help to provide cardiovascular and stress-related health benefits. Much of the past stretching research was not interested in the practical applications of stretching and examined stretching in isolation under impractical sport or training conditions to see how muscles responded as a basic science question. However, when stretching research uses practical stretching protocols within a full warm-up, we find a reduction in muscle and tendon injuries, while having trivial effects on your performance.

FLEXIBLE MEMBERSHIP OPTIONS Restriction Exemption Program in Effect

fitness@ywcalgary.ca 403.262.0498

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 87 221_ImpactMagazineAd_2.25x9.75.indd 1

2021-10-12 9:21 AM


IMPACT PICKS

Must-Haves For the Kitchen EDITOR'S PICKS

KATY WHITT

W

e’ve been passionate about food over the past 30 years, and after careful selection and debate, we emerged with our list of top culinary must-haves to ensure you feel like a top chef.

Solis

BARISTA PERFETTA Perfect your morning coffee routine with the slim Solis Barista Perfetta Espresso Machine. Built for the home espresso journey, the Perfetta offers an excellent starting point for new baristas without sacrificing the tools more experienced enthusiasts need. $750.00 I WWW.CAPPUCCINOKING.COM

Breville

SMART OVEN™ AIR FRYER Why buy a stand-alone air fryer when Breville’s Smart Oven™ Air Fryer can turn out guilt-free French fries and other family favourites? Use the LCD display to easily set the timer, temperature, and access 11 smart cooking functions including toast, bake, slow cook and of course, air fry. $499.99 I WWW.BREVILLE.COM

Cuisipro

STAINLESS STEEL MEASURING CUPS AND SPOONS SET These nesting measuring sets are oval shaped to reach into the smallest spice jar. $72.50 I WWW.CUISPRO.COM

Cuisipro

STAINLESS STEEL MIXING BOWL SET OF 3 Stylish and highly functional, this mixing bowl set is your perfect partner for cooking and baking prep. $87.50 I WWW.CUISPRO.COM

88 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE


Kitchenaid

STAND MIXER A tilt-head stand mixer that provides you with endless possibilities in the kitchen and elevates the everyday. Built to last, it features 10 speeds to gently knead, thoroughly mix and whip ingredients. $629.99 I WWW.KITCHENAID.CA

Cookbook Cooks

MISE EN PLACE BOWLS Nothing makes us as happy as having that perfect bowl in the kitchen. Big, small, colourful, pretty, and most importantly — useful! FROM $6.95-$29.95 I WWW.COOKBOOKCOOKS.COM

Zwilling

PRO 6.5" NAKIRI KNIFE The unique blade shape and ergonomic bolster of the Nakiri make it ideal for chopping lots of veggies. $199.99 I WWW.COOKCULTURE.COM

Cuisipro

Cuisipro

These tongs are a modern, elegant and timeless tool, finished in mirror stainless steel. $21.00 I WWW.CUISIPRO.COM

Cuisipro

Cuisipro

PICCALO GRATER

STAINLESS STEEL SPAGHETTI SERVER

Exclusive to Cuisipro, Surface Glide Technology™ grooved grating surface takes etched graters to the next level. $46.50 I WWW.CUISIPRO.COM

This mini grater features Patented Surface Glide Technology and is designed for fine grating. $16.50 I WWW.CUISIPRO.COM

This server is made of heavy gauge stainless steel with a drainage hole and rounded edges to easily handle pasta. $38.00 I WWW.CUISPRO.COM

4-SIDED BOX GRATER

STAINLESS STEEL SERVING TONGS

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 89


Staub

BRAISER CHISTERA 4QT/3.7L Perfect for browning / braising, every culinary creation is sure to taste as wonderful as these vessels look. $329.99 I WWW.COOKCULTURE.COM

Breville

3X BLUICER™ PRO Make the most of your fresh ingredients with Breville’s 3X Bluicer™ Pro. Create healthy and flavourful smoothies, juices, dressings, marinades, and more with this blender and juicer in one. $629.99 I WWW.BREVILLE.COM

Thermomix

THERMOMIX® TM6TM The TM6TM is a revolutionary kitchen appliance. The newest model is Wi-Fi-connected, performs 22 culinary functions and walks you through 50,000+ global recipes. $2,099 I WWW.THERMOMIX.CA

CRUX®

ARTISAN SERIES 7.5” CORDLESS IMMERSION BLENDER

Frieling

17 OZ. INSULATED STAINLESS STEEL FRENCH PRESS

Cuisinart®

Cuisinart®

GRIND CENTRAL COFFEE GRINDER

This immersion blender makes it easy to blend almost anywhere without the hassle of a cord. $103.99

Manually brew great-tasting cups of flavourful coffee with this elegant, double-wall insulated French Press. $92.99

With its brushed stainless steel housing and vintage styling this coffee grinder is destined to be a classic addition to your kitchen. $59.99

WWW.BEDBATHANDBEYOND.CA

WWW.BEDBATHANDBEYOND.CA

WWW.BEDBATHANDBEYOND.CA

90 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

PERFECTEMP CORDLESS ELECTRIC PROGRAMMABLE KETTLE For tea to reach its full flavour, it should be steeped at just the right temperature. This kettle has 6 preset temperatures for different varieties of tea. $149.99 I WWW.CUISINART.CA


Field

#8 CAST IRON SKILLET Great tools are rare—and get better with time and use. This is the closest living relative to vintage cast iron: light enough for everday use. $199.99 I WWW.COOKCULTURE.COM

Demeyere

INDUSTRY 4L SAUCEPAN This Demeyere saucepan is the perfect choice for making a wide variety of dishes including sauces, soup and stew. $309.99 I WWW.COOKCULTURE.COM

Instant™ Omni™ Plus

INSTANT OMNI PLUS 10-IN-1 TOASTER OVEN A high-performance toaster oven that broils, bakes, roasts, dehydrates, toasts and air fries so you can dig into healthy homemade meals in no time. $342.95 I WWW.AMAZON.CA

Philips

PASTA MAKER PLUS SMART This pasta maker provides an easy, mess-free way to create fresh pasta at home in under 10 minutes. With the touch of a button it will automatically mix, knead and extrude pasta. $399.99 I WWW.PHILIPS.CA

J.A. Henckels International

CLASSIC 6-INCH UTILITY KNIFE Find utility with a hot dropforged, high carbon, no-stain steel knife featuring 3-rivet, full tang construction for optimal balance and support. $64.99 WWW.BEDBATHANDBEYOND.CA

Cuisinart® Peugot

CORDLESS RECHARGEABLE COMPACT BLENDER

SodaStream® SOURCE™

Guaranteed for a lifetime of happy grinding—with designs that are sleek, classic, and iconic. FROM $60.00-$200.00

Compact, cordless convenience meets full-size professional performance. The EvolutionX™ blends, crushes and purées. $179.99 I WWW.CUISINART.CA

SodaStream partners with Yves Behar, world-renowned designer, to give you this elegant sparkling water kit. $149.99

PEPPER GRINDER

WWW.COOKBOOKCOOKS.COM

SPARKLING WATER MAKER STARTER KIT

WWW.BEDBATHANDBEYOND.CA

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 91


H E A LT H

Ocean Robbins dedicates his life educating others about building a healthier and a more compassionate world.

How Food Can Help Save Our Planet

What you put on your plate could shape the future of climate change BY OCEAN ROBBINS Author, speaker, co-founder and CEO of Food Revolution Network, living in the mountains of Santa Cruz, CA. FOODREVOLUTIONNETWORK

I

FOODREVOLUTIONNETWORK

f there’s one common problem that every inhabitant of the Earth is currently facing, it’s climate change. Those two words sound innocent enough: “climate change.” But what’s happening isn’t just climate change, it’s climate chaos. And as crazy as things have gotten, unless we change course, we are barely seeing the tip of the iceberg of what’s coming. Unprecedented heat waves in unlikely places, unprecedented flooding, droughts and wildfires; the first rainfall on the peak of Greenland’s ice sheet for the first time in

FOODREVOLUTION

literally ever — and a truly alarming new scientific report on the now-unavoidable impact of global warming on our world, we can’t keep acting as if this isn’t an urgent matter of life or death. The problem can seem so daunting, and our individual power can feel so limited. Most of us don’t want to stop driving our cars, heating our homes, or buying the manufactured goods that keep us alive and comfortable. The good news is, we all share one thing that can have a significant impact on climate change: the food we eat.

92 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

By making small adjustments to your daily food choices, you can help counteract the biggest environmental threats we’re facing today. It’s not the whole story, but you can take a real bite out of the problem. Earth’s temperature has risen about one degree Celsius since the mid to late 19th Century and scientists estimate that over the next 20 years, the global temperature is expected to reach or exceed 1.5 C of warming. What’s causing this rise in temperature? Well, we are. According to a new United Nations-commissioned scientific


TOP 10 EMISSION-PRODUCING FOODS

The good news is, we all share one thing that can have a significant impact on climate change: the food we eat.

report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), we’ve lost the chance to reverse some of the effects of climate change, such as rising sea levels, in our lifetime. Unless there are immediate, rapid and large-scale reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, reaching that 1.5 C target will be beyond reach. “This report is a reality check,” says IPCC Working Group I co-chair Valérie Masson-Delmotte. “We now have a much clearer picture of the past, present and future climate, which is essential for understanding where we are headed, what can be done, and how we can prepare.” The report shares “unequivocal” evidence that, as most scientists have been arguing for years, human activities are the biggest driver of our warming atmosphere. But what can we do? A report from the World Resources Institute says that shifting from a standard, animal-centric diet is one of the best places to start. Even changing just 30 per cent of your food from animal products to plant-based foods would lead to meaningful improvements. In 2018, the journal Science published the largest study to date on the environmental impact of food. It was an enormous and thorough study. Researchers looked at data collected from 38,700 farms from 119 countries and studied the 40 food products that

(Greenhouse Gas Emissions per kilogram of food products. Measured in kilograms of carbon dioxide equivalents per kilogram of food product.)

represent approximately 90 per cent of everything we eat. The authors concluded that livestock provides only 18 per cent of the food calories eaten by humans, and 37 per cent of the protein, yet it uses over 77 per cent of global farmland. Meanwhile, livestock is also responsible for 57 per cent of water pollution, 56 per cent of air pollution, and uses a third of the world’s fresh water. By now, you’re probably wondering — exactly which foods contribute most to climate change? Where can you start if you want to shift your diet to help prevent global collapse? A 2011 analysis by the Environmental Working Group looked at the carbon footprint of various foods. In other words, how much do different foods contribute to the greenhouse gas effect? Their report shows how many kilograms of carbon dioxide is emitted per kilogram of each food consumed. The worst offenders included beef, of course, and also lamb, cheese, pork, farmed salmon, turkey, chicken, canned tuna, and eggs. When I face the enormity of climate change, sometimes the problem can feel so large that I’m tempted to think that I don’t matter all that much. Sometimes, I feel not so much like a drop in the bucket, as a drop in the sea. Then I remember the words of Mahatma Gandhi, who famously said, “Whatever you do in life will be insignificant but it

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Beef (beef herd): 99.48 kg Lamb and mutton: 39.72 kg Beef (Dairy herd): 33.3 kg Prawns (farmed): 26.87 kg Cheese: 23.88 kg Fish (farmed): 13.63 kg Pig meat: 12.31 kg Poultry meat: 9.87 kg Eggs: 4.67 kg Rice: 4.45 kg

is very important that you do it because you can't know.” And when I look at how food and climate change are related, I start to think that maybe our choices aren’t really all that insignificant after all. Because when it comes to what you and I eat, we have real power. And it just so happens that the same food choices that contribute to a healthier climate can also help contribute to longer and healthier lives. So whether you go 100 per cent plant-based or adopt a meat-free Monday; and whether you support organic or regenerative agriculture some of the time or all of the time… there are steps you can take. Every step, and every bite counts — for you, and for the planet, too.

Ocean’s father, John Robbins, author of the 1987 Diet for a New America - a book that changed our lives for the better - was featured in IMPACT Magazine’s November/December 1994 issue. Almost 30 years later, it is fitting for us to be featuring a story from his son, Ocean Robbins, who has worked alongside his father in his quest for a healthier planet.

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 93


FOOD AND NUTRITION

The Science of Food & Nutrition with T. Colin Campbell

The China Study co-author shares benefits of a whole-food plant-based diet AN INTERVIEW WITH T. COLIN CAMPBELL who has been dedicated to the science of human health for over 60 years. His primary focus is on the association between diet and disease.

A

fter consuming meat, milk and eggs while growing up on a dairy farm in Virginia, T. Colin Campbell believed that more protein in a diet was better for health. But mounting evidence soon challenged those long-held beliefs. Campbell himself began eating a primarily whole-food plant-based diet some 30 years ago. He is well known for The China Study, which he co-authored in 2005. Since then, he has authored three more works, including New York Times bestseller Whole: Rethinking the Science of Nutrition in 2013 and The Future of Nutrition: An Insider's Look at the Science, Why We Keep Getting It Wrong, and How to Start Getting It Right in 2020. Today, the 87-year-old continues to advocate for a wider adoption of whole-food plant-based diets. He and his research have been featured in many documentaries including Forks Over Knives, Eating You Alive and Food Matters. He is the founder of the T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutritional Studies. T. Colin Campbell joined us for a conversation about The China Study, food as medicine, disease prevention and what exactly is the future of food.

94 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

IMPACT Magazine: You grew up on a dairy farm. How did you end up advocating for plant-based whole-food diets? T. Colin Campbell: After consuming meat, milk and eggs during my youth, milking cows on the farm, and after writing my doctoral dissertation at Cornell University justifying the consumption of more protein for good health, I was subsequently surprised to see evidence that questioned my beliefs. It came from a project on malnourished children in The Philippines that I was coordinating. Children consuming the most protein seemed to have a higher risk of liver cancer, similar to findings from a lab animal study in India. Critical research was needed as to what is true.


Whole plants have all the nutrients necessary for optimizing health, and this includes protein.

With research funding from the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), repeatedly renewed for 27 years, laboratory animal studies (rats, mice) showed that increased animal protein consumption dramatically increased the growth of liver cancer whereas plant protein did not. Cancer growth was alternately turned on by animal protein, off by decreased animal protein, in the same animals. Additional studies sought the principal mechanism for this effect. It was found that not one but many mechanisms worked together, as in symphony, to produce this effect. IM: Why distinguish between plantbased and whole-food plant-based? TC: Plant-based, created by me in the late 1970s to emphasize its scientific basis instead of animal welfare as the descriptor for this dietary lifestyle, is not sufficiently discriminating. Diets composed of plant content merely over one-half of the total diet may be acceptable. The addition of “whole” refers to the fact that nutrients in food may have very different nutritional properties than when consumed in isolation, as in supplements. The passing of time and the advice of colleagues suggests that a better descriptor would be a whole plant food diet. I also suggest that we consider this diet as a ‘goal’ rather than being an absolute recommendation. IM: Why was The China Study ground-breaking? TC: It provided a large number of disease mortality rates and diet and

lifestyle factors that allowed us to study diet-disease associations more comprehensively than is possible in western populations. Ranges of diet experience and disease mortality were considerably beyond the scope of ranges existing in western countries. Data reliability was good, especially because personal residency and food use were unusually constant over long periods of time. And finally, these data, when combined with our prior lab findings, allowed us to consider disease causation by using a concept of nutrition that does not depend on single nutrient and single mechanism causation of single diseases, a huge source of nutrition confusion in western countries. IM: Why aren't we using food as medicine? TC: Our present practices arise from a centuries-old misunderstanding of disease formation. Much too often it is presumed that diseases arise from specific causes using specific mechanisms to cause specific diseases, which are then treated by specific, targeted pharmaceutical (medicinal) remedies. This method ignores a far more comprehensive and effective way for food, via nutrition, to prevent and even reverse (treat) a broad array of related human diseases, all with a common dietary remedy that encourages use of a variety of plant foods. It should be noted that using ‘medicine’ for human health is primarily an enterprise in gaining wealth whereas using ‘food’ is an enterprise to gaining personal health.

IM: What are we getting wrong with common dietary guidelines? TC: Dietary guidelines are created and controlled by politically sensitive officials in order to please their corporate sponsors and the voting public, even if this means revising the interpretation of evidence summarized by highly qualified scientists. IM: How can a whole-food plant-based way of eating help athletes? TC: Impressive studies on athletes were conducted more than a century ago at Yale University to show that highly accomplished and physically fit young men performed better (more endurance, coordination, and even strength) after changing to a diet that was mostly plant-based. More recently, I have been personally told by world class athletes in almost all the primary sports their impressive accomplishments after changing to a whole-food plant-based diet. IM: How can it help with prevention of disease? TC: This diet, which depends on a holistic interpretation of nutrition, prevents a broad variety of diseases, especially the chronic degenerative diseases which occur with aging. Whole plants have all the nutrients necessary for optimizing health, and this includes protein. IM: Why can't we get over meat as being the only protein source? TC: The nutritional argument for consuming meat has long depended ➝

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 95


on the failed notion that all animal-based proteins have higher biological value than all plant-based proteins, interpreted as higher quality. Understandably, the public prefers quality. Determination of so-called high quality was first published in 1924 and was represented as the proportion of ingested protein that is retained by the body, generally accepted as beneficial for body growth, good for farm-animal production but not for humans. Unfortunately, this is false. Higher retention (‘quality’) of ingested animal protein also means increased synthesis of blood cholesterol that foretells heart disease, increased growth hormone (IGF) that foretells cancer, and repression of immune system activity (antibodies, natural killer cells) that foretells more cancer and diseases caused by viruses. IM: You've been following a plant-based whole-food diet for more than 30 years. What do you like to eat each day? TC: Cooked oatmeal (no milk) with lots of fruit (frozen in winter, fresh in summer) for breakfast, salad (lots of chopped vegetables, lettuce) for lunch, and cooked food for dinner. This latter may comprise countless recipe types that include all kinds of veggies, usually with a grain, plus fruit for dessert. IM: Is there a reason you don’t identify as vegan? TC: Although I respect the primary motivation of many vegans and vegetarians to advance animal welfare, this is insufficient for large scale public adoption of food choice. My personal interest in animal welfare mostly concerns the vast use of farm animals for human food that causes human illness and the unnecessary dependence on experimental animals to test candidate drugs. Fundamentally, I believe that food choice should primarily depend on a science-based understanding of what food does to our personal health, for this is the only reason that the idea of food

even exists. In doing so, we then discover what this means for the welfare of all life on our planet. IM: What is the most important message we need to send to our reader about a plant-based, whole-food diet? TC: Scientifically justifying the consumption of plants, as whole-foods, for human health is now irrefutable. I make this strong assertion because I believe it and because I invite challenges from anyone with contrary interpretations to come forth and publicly defend their views with substantiated evidence. Fundamental evidence is not personal. I do not say that we have convincing evidence showing that 100 per cent of individuals need to be 100 per cent whole-food, plant-based 100 per cent of the time. However, it is clear that the closer we approach this goal, the greater are the odds for good health and the more likely this practice will be maintained willingly because taste preferences change, for some individuals within days and for virtually all within a few months. Adopting a whole plant food diet also is critical for saving our planet — we have no time left to turn this awful trend around! Relying on a livestock-based food system which is now known to be the main cause of multifaceted climate change problems is a looming catastrophe for our grandchildren. IM: What is the future of food? TC: The future, ideally, should encourage local and sustainable food production wherein the public directly participates, including urban as well as rural people. Probably the biggest problem limiting this initiative will be the increasing number of mouths to feed, thus requiring incentives to curb population growth. Much can be accomplished if livestockbased agriculture is reduced. There is simply no scientific basis for consuming these animals. In doing so, we encourage our own destruction.

96 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE


What will you accomplish

We’ll help you eat more plants. And fuel your health through cooking. Because we believe a vibrant life starts with what you put on your plate. So come cook with us.

@thebigswich www.joinswich.com


RECIPES

Delightful Waffles with Mushrooms Guaranteed to be your new fave for Sunday brunch BY SHIRA BLUSTEIN AND BRIAN LUPTAK  GABRIEL CABRERA Shira Blustein is the owner and founder of The Acorn, an award-winning, vegetable-forward restaurant and bar located at the heart of Vancouver, B.C.'s Main Street. Brain Luptak was head chef at The Acorn for five years and one of IMPACT Magazine's Top Vegan Chefs in 2019. ACORNVANCOUVER

T

ACORNVANCOUVER

ACORNVANCOUVER

his playful vegan gluten-free take on chicken and waffles is the perfect sweet and savoury dish for brunch. It’s such a hit that it has remained on our menu ever since we launched our brunch back in 2014.

Pickling Liquid Makes 4 Cups

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • •

2 cups white balsamic vinegar 2 Tbsp. sugar 2 Tbsp. salt 3 bay leaves 1 tsp. peppercorns 1 tsp. yellow mustard seeds 1 tsp. celery seeds 1 tsp. coriander seeds

DIRECTIONS In a medium pot, combine all the ingredients with 2 cups of water and bring to a simmer. Turn off the heat and allow the liquid to steep for 5 minutes. Strain and reserve the liquid, discarding the solids. Allow the liquid to cool, then transfer to an airtight container.

Bourbon Maple Syrup Makes 2 1/4 cups

INGREDIENTS Serves 6

INGREDIENTS (SEE RECIPES)

DIRECTIONS

• 6 House Gluten-free Waffles • 1 recipe Southern Fried Maitake Mushrooms • 1 ½ cups Mushroom Gravy • ¾ cup Bourbon Maple Syrup • Watercress, for garnish

Lay out six plates and place a waffle at the centre of each. Top each waffle with two fried mushroom pieces. Ladle ¼ cup gravy off to one side of each waffle, then ladle 2 Tbsp. bourbon maple syrup over the fried mushrooms and waffle. Top with 1 Tbsp. pickled shallots and garnish with watercress.

98 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

• ½ cup bourbon • ½ tsp. salt • 2 cups maple syrup

DIRECTIONS In a small pot on medium hot, simmer the bourbon until it has reduced by half. Add the salt and whisk in the maple syrup until everything is evenly blended. Remove from heat and cool to room temperature.


Mushroom Gravy

Gluten-free flour blend

Makes 8 Cups

INGREDIENTS • 20 cremini mushrooms, washed, dried, quartered • 1 medium onion, roughly chopped • 1 carrot, peeled and cut in ½-inch slices • 1 stalk of celery, washed and cut in ½-inch slices • 6 cloves garlic • 1 Tbsp. salt • 1 tsp. pepper • ¼ cup olive oil • ½ cup tomato paste • 1 cup red wine • 10 sprigs thyme • 1 bay leaf

Note: This tried-and-true blend is used for both the house gluten-free waffles and the southern fried maitake mushrooms. You could use a storebought gluten-free blend.

Makes 2 3/4 Cups

INGREDIENTS • • • • • •

1 3/8 cups brown rice flour ¼ cup organic oat flour 2 Tbsp. psyllium husks ¼ cup tapioca starch flour ½ cup potato starch ¼ cup white rice flour

DIRECTIONS Sift all the ingredients together into a bowl. Store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to six months.

Southern Fried Maitake Mushrooms

House Gluten-free Waffles Makes 6 Waffles

Makes 12 Pieces

DIRECTIONS

INGREDIENTS

Preheat oven to 400 F. In a large bowl, mix together the mushrooms, onions, carrots, celery, garlic, salt, pepper and olive oil until all the vegetables are evenly coated. Lay the vegetables out on a roasting pan lined with parchment paper and roast in the oven for 25 minutes. Check to make sure the vegetables are starting to carmelize, then mix in the tomato paste and continue to roast for another 10 minutes. Once the tomato paste begins to turn a deep brownish-red, remove the pan from the oven and transfer the mixture to a large pot on medium heat. Saute, stirring often. When the bottom of the pot begins to get sticky, add the red wine to deglaze the pan, scraping the bottom of the pan to pick up the carmelized bits. Simmer until the red wine has reduced by half, then add 8 cups water and the thyme and bay leaf. Bring the liquid to a boil, reduce and simmer, and cook for 30 minutes, or until the liquid has reduced by half. Remove from heat and allow to cool. Working in small batches, transfer the mixture to your Vitamix. Gradually working up to high speed, puree until fully blended. Pass the gravy through a fine-mesh strainer, using the back of a ladle to press all the liquid out. If making the gravy in advance, allow it to cool completely, then store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to five days or in the freezer for up to two months. Re-blitz the gravy in your Vitamix before reheating to serve.

• • • • • • • • • •

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • •

2 cups soy milk 2 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice ¾ cup gluten-free flour blend 2 Tbsp. smoked paprika 1 tsp. chili powder 1 tsp. salt and extra to taste ½ tsp. pepper 1 tsp. sugar 3 maitake mushrooms, quartered 8 cups canola oil

1 ¼ cups unsweetened almond milk 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar ¼ cup grapeseed oil ¼ cup maple syrup ¼ tsp. vanilla extract 2 cups gluten-free flour blend 1 ½ tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. salt ¼ cup soda water or carbonated water

DIRECTIONS

DIRECTIONS In a shallow bowl, mix together soy milk and lemon juice and let rest for 5 minutes to curdle. In a separate bowl, mix together the gluten-free flour blend, smoked paprika, chili powder, salt, pepper and sugar. Add the maitake mushrooms to the bowl of soy milk and lemon juice. Toss them to make sure they are well coated and let marinate in the liquid until after you've made the waffles (then return to this part of the recipe and follow the steps below to fry them.) In a heavy-bottomed, high-sided pot, heat the oil to 350 F. Remove the mushrooms one by one from the marinating liquid and toss them in the bowl of seasoned flour, making sure to coat them well. Working in small batches, fry the mushrooms for 2 minutes, until crispy and golden brown. Using tongs, carefully remove them from the hot oil and place on a paper towel to soak up any excess oil. Season with salt to taste and serve immediately.

In a large bowl, mix together the almond milk and apple cider vinegar and let sit for 5 minutes to curdle. Whisk in the grapeseed oil, maple syrup and vanilla. In a separate bowl, mix together the gluten-free flour blend, baking powder and salt. Add the curdled milk to the dry ingredients and mix until well combined. Evenly whisk in the soda water and set aside. Heat a nonstick waffle iron on high heat. Spray with cooking oil, then ladle about ½ cup of batter into the iron. Cook until crispy. Enjoy right away or keep warm in a 250 F oven until ready to serve.

Excerpted from Acorn: Vegetables Re-Imagined: Seasonal Recipes from Root to Stem by Shira Blustein and Brian Luptak. Copyright © 2021 Shira Blustein. Published by Appetite by Random House®, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All rights reserved.

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 99


RECIPES

Vegan Bannock

A healthy take on a family favourite BY SASHA WILLIAMS Cancer survivor, entrepreneur, activist, nutritionist, bodybuilder and expat in Nicaragua. _SASHA.WILLIAMS_

SASHAWILLIAMSASCENSION

SASHAWILLIAMSV

I

decided to take a moment to share a tradition from my Metis roots. I love attending powwows where you can spend a day or two immersed in Indigenous culture and try some traditional fry bread, or bannock. This is my take on an old family favourite. It’s baked and doesn’t contain a lot of oil. This fry bread is perfect for Sunday morning breakfast or tea time. You can also use the dough to wrap around long green branches and bake over a hot fire while sharing stories. It’s like roasting marshmallows, but cooler.

INGREDIENTS • 3 cups premixed cake flour (Or make a substitute: Measure 1 level cup of all-purpose flour, remove 2 Tbsp. of the flour and then place the flour into a bowl. Add 2 tsp. of cornstarch to the all-purpose flour. Whisk together to combine.)

• • • • • •

100 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

3 Tbsp. granulated organic cane sugar 1 Tbsp. baking powder 1 tsp. salt 1/2 block/lb of vegan butter spread 1 cup dairy-free milk Jam/honey/agave nectar for topping

DIRECTIONS 1. Preheat the oven to 425 F. 2. Mix dry ingredients together in a bowl. 3. Add butter and mix by hand until crumbled. 4. Slowly add milk until dough forms but is not sticky/runny. (Add a little flour if the mixture is too wet). 5. Knead (folding) for 2 minutes into a ball. 6. Spread in circular formation about 1/2 an inch thick on a cookie sheet. 7. Bake for 20 minutes or until browned. 8. Serve warm with jam or agave nectar. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 430; protein 12.8 g; fat 3.1 g; carbs 47 g.


HOLIDAY CELEBRATIONS MADE EASY! Make your wine, beer or spirits experience unforgettable no matter what the occasion! Book private tastings or arrange your corporate gifting through our Trusted Expert team at Willow Park Wines & Spirits. Contact our Corporate Concierge, Stephen Turik at stephent@willowpark.net or 403.296.1640 ext. 221

willowparkwines.com


RECIPES

102 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE


Rock The Grill Portobello Burger A simple, mineral-rich burger with a meaty texture and earthy warmth BY BRENDAN BRAZIER Formulator and co-founder of Vega, former pro Ironman triathlete and author of the Thrive book series, based in Los Angeles. Brendan was one of IMPACT Magazine's Top Vegan Influencers in 2017. BRENDANBRAZIER

DIRECTIONS Portobello Burger If using the grill, preheat to high. Brush both sides of the mushroom caps with oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Grill mushrooms, turning once, until grill marks can be seen, about 3-4 minutes per side. You can also cook the mushrooms in a grill pan over medium-high heat. Wasabi Aioli In a medium bowl, whisk together aioli and wasabi paste, leaving no lumps of wasabi paste. Keep in a sealed container, refrigerated for up to one week. Edamame Hummus In a food processor, combine all the ingredients. Pulse to mix, then process until creamy smooth, but thick enough to dip. Add a little water, if it’s too thick. Keep in a sealed container, refrigerated, for up to one week.

INGREDIENTS Portobello Burger

Makes 1 Burger • 1 sprouted ancient grain burger bun • 1 Tbsp. edamame hummus (see recipe) • 1 ½ tsp. sriracha hot sauce, or to taste • 1 Tbsp. wasabi aioli • 1 small handful baby spinach • 1 large or two small grilled portobello mushroom caps • ¼ ripe avocado, peeled, and thinly sliced • 3 paper-thin slices fennel

Wasabi Aioli

Makes 4 Cups • 16 oz. dairy-free aioli • 1 tsp. wasabi paste, or to taste

Edamame Hummus

Makes 1 ½ Cups • 2 cups shelled edamame, thawed if frozen • 1 cup cooked (or rinsed canned) chickpeas • ½ avocado, peeled and chopped • 3 small cloves garlic, finely chopped • ¼ cup tahini • ¼ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice • 2 Tbsp. avocado oil • 5 tsp. sea salt, or to taste • ½ cup water

Assembly Cut the bun in half. Evenly spread the bottom half with the edamame hummus and sriracha sauce and the top half with the wasabi aioli. Top the hummus with the baby spinach, then layer with the mushroom cap, avocado and fennel and the top half of the bun. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 474; protein 17.3 g; fat 20.4 g; carbs 57.6 g.

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 103


RECIPES

Paprika-Spiked Chickpeas and Greens A great addition to just about any weeknight bowl BY ANNA PIPPUS Anna Pippus is the voice behind Easy Animal-Free, and is known for her casual, creative approach to health and flavourful vegan cooking. Anna was one of IMPACT Magazine’s Top Vegan Influencers in 2017. EASYANIMALFREE

ANNAPIPPUS

S

o simple, so delicious, these chickpeas couldn’t be easier. You can also try this on a slice of toast for an easy lunch. I find the aroma from the sauteing paprika and garlic powder intoxicating, and the spices really transform the chickpeas. Serves 4

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • •

2-3 tsp. extra virgin olive oil 2 cups cooked chickpeas, drained and rinsed 3 big kale or collard leaves, finely chopped 2 tsp. sweet paprika 1 tsp. garlic powder Salt and pepper 1 Tbsp. water

DIRECTIONS 1. Heat a wide skillet over medium heat. Add the oil and swirl it around in the pan. Stir in the chickpeas, kale, paprika, and garlic powder, and season with salt and pepper. 2. Drizzle in the water and saute the mixture until the greens wilt and the chickpeas are warmed through. Add more water if needed to maintain a smooth consistency and glossy appearance – it should not look dry. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 421; protein 21.5 g; fat 8.5 g; carbs 68.4 g.

Excerpted from The Vegan Family Cookbook by Anna Pippus. Copyright © 2021 Anna Pippus. Photography ©2021 Anna Pippus. Published by Appetite by Random House, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All rights reserved.

104 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE


Helping you

eat, live & thrive FOR OVER 25 YEARS, with local, organic and sustainable goods.

NORTH 7 Arbour Lake Drive NW, Calgary T3G 5G8

CENTRAL 1407 4th Street SW, Calgary T2R 0Y2

SOUTH 5222 130 SE, Calgary T2Z 0G4

amaranthfoods.ca

Experience

the GR ANDEST of HOLIDAY

SEASONS

For over 107 years, Fairmont Palliser has been home to memorable occasions. We welcome you and your loved ones to join us this festive season to be a part of that tradition and experience the grandest of holiday seasons. Visit us at www.fairmont.com/palliser-calgary/ for our festive offerings.

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 105


RECIPES

Chili with Cornbread, Sour Cream and Salsa Warm up with this season-shifting chili and dress it up with cornbread, corn salsa and homemade vegan sour cream BY CHEF MATTHEW KENNEY Author, educator and CEO of Matthew Kenney Cuisine in Los Angeles, CA. Matthew was one of IMPACT Magazine’s Top Vegan Chefs in 2019. MATTHEWKENNEYCUISINE

B

eans and legumes are an important staple in plant-based cuisine thanks to their high nutritional value, diverse adaptations and subtle flavour. This plant-based chili is an effortless meal filled with sweet and smoky flavours that will leave you feeling full and satisfied but not bursting. Jazz it up with vegan sour cream, cornbread and corn salsa.

Vegetable Chili INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• • • • • • • • • • •

Heat a large cast iron skillet or pot over medium heat. Add the onion, carrot and bell pepper to the pan and sweat it out with a pinch of salt. Add the crumbled tempeh and the garlic cloves and cook until the tempeh is browned. Add the canned chilies and the southwest seasoning. Cook until all the ingredients are dry and sticking to the pan, then add the diced tomato. Use the juices from the tomato to deglaze the pan, scraping up any bits of food stuck to the bottom of the pan. Add the bean, tomato sauce and nutritional yeast and simmer. Cook for 15 minutes to an hour, until desired consistency and flavour is reached. Serve garnished with sour cream, corn salsa and a wedge of cornbread.

4 ½ tsp. grapeseed oil, divided ½ cup yellow onion, diced ½ cup carrot, chopped ½ cup bell pepper, chopped ½ tsp. salt 1 cup smoked tempeh, crumbled 2 garlic cloves, minced 2 cups tomato sauce 1 cup diced tomato ⅓ cup green chilies, diced 3 Tbsp. Southwest Spice Blend (see sidebar recipe) • 1 ½ cups kidney beans, drained and rinsed • 1 ½ cups black beans, drained and rinsed • ¼ cup nutritional yeast

106 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

Cornbread This cornbread is perfectly sweet, moist and tender and makes a delicious side. It is the ideal comfort food and accompaniment for the vegetable chili.

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • • • • •

1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1 ½ cups plant-based milk 1 Tbsp. flax meal 3 Tbsp. hot water ½ cup dairy-free butter ¼ cup brown sugar ¾ cup yellow cornmeal, fine ¾ cup all purpose flour 1 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. baking soda 1 tsp. salt ¾ cup sweet corn, canned/frozen/fresh • 1 Tbsp. maple syrup, and more for brushing

DIRECTIONS Preheat the oven to 400 F and brush a 6-inch cast iron skillet with oil and place in the oven to preheat. In a bowl, prepare the buttermilk by combining the apple cider vinegar and milk. Set aside. In another warm bowl, prepare a flax egg by mixing the flax meal with the 3 Tbsp. of hot water. Set aside to bloom. On medium low heat, melt the dairyfree butter in a pot on the stove and then add the brown sugar and whisk until the sugar has dissolved. When the sugar has dissolved into the butter, remove from the heat. In a large mixing bowl, add the cornmeal, all purpose flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt and whisk to combine. Add the maple syrup, buttermilk, melted butter and flax egg and mix well to combine. Lastly, fold in the whole sweet corn pieces. Carefully pour the batter into the hot cast iron skillet. Cook for 25 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the centre comes out clean. Once out of the oven, brush with maple syrup. Allow to cool for 20 minutes before slicing.


Corn Salsa Use the corn salsa leftovers as a topping for a salad, filling for a wrap, or scoop it with chips.

INGREDIENTS • 1 cup corn, fresh/canned/frozen • 2 Tbsp. red onion • ½ jalapeno pepper (or fresno pepper), finely minced • ¼ cup cilantro, finely minced • 1 Tbsp. lime juice • 1 tsp. agave • ¼ tsp. salt

DIRECTIONS Heat a cast iron skillet on high. Add the corn to the skillet and dry roast, stirring occasionally to brown evenly. Some kernels may pop out of the pan. Once kernels are partially blackened, remove and allow to cool. In a bowl, combine all the ingredients and allow the flavours to marinate for at least 15 minutes before serving.

Sour Cream Use this sour cream recipe to cool down spicy dishes and add creaminess to sweet or savoury foods. Add chopped herbs such as cilantro or chives to make it extra special. Replacing traditional dairy-based toppings with a tofu-based alternative lowers the fat and cholesterol.

INGREDIENTS Southwest Spice Blend This salt-free spice blend is packed with flavour and a little bit of heat. Use as a dry rub, or in a marinade.

INGREDIENTS • • • •

⅓ cup coriander seeds ⅓ cup cumin seeds ¼ cup smoked paprika 2 Tbsp. chili powder

DIRECTIONS Combine and mix well.

• 1 tsp. cayenne pepper • 1 Tbsp. oregano • 1 Tbsp. garlic powder

• • • • •

1 pkg. silken tofu 1 Tbsp. lemon juice 2 Tbsp. maple syrup 1 tsp. salt ¾ cup grapeseed oil

DIRECTIONS Place the tofu, lemon juice, maple syrup and salt in a high-speed blender and puree until smooth. With the blender running, slowly rain in the oil (this should take about 2 minutes). Salt with salt to taste and chill in the refrigerator for 1 hour before serving.

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 107


RECIPES

Nutty Protein Bowl

Yes, plants have protein – plenty of protein – and this bowl proves it BY BRIAN SKINNER Chef Brian Skinner is an award-winning plant-based chef in Kelowna, B.C. at his restaurant, Frankie We Salute You! Brian was featured as one of IMPACT Magazine's Top Vegan Chefs in 2019. CHEFSKINNER

FRANKIEWESALUTEYOU

INGREDIENTS • • • • • •

Quinoa (cooked to package specs) Maple tofu (see recipe) Almond butter sauce (see recipe) Grilled yams Hemp seeds Fresh garnishes such as sliced cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, shredded red cabbage, and sprouts

Maple Tofu

Serves 4 • 1 package of firm tofu (350 g) • ¼ cup soy sauce • ¼ cup maple syrup • 1 Tbsp. rice vinegar (try balsamic for a different delicious flavour) • 1 garlic clove, squished • 3-4 slices of ginger

DIRECTIONS Almond Butter Sauce

Makes 2 Cups • ⅓ cup water • ¼ cup almond butter (or almonds and 2 Tbsp. coconut milk) • 2 Tbsp. lime juice • 1 Tbsp. rice vinegar • 1 tsp. tamari • 1 Tbsp. ginger, chopped • ½ stalk green onion, sliced • ¼ tsp. chili flakes • 2 Tbsp. toasted coconut • 1 date, pitted • ¼ lime, zest and juice • 1 tsp. salt

108 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

Drain and slice the tofu into a funky shape (I like triangles). Place in a wide frying pan with remaining ingredients and bring to a simmer. After 5-10 minutes, flip the tofu, turn off the heat and let it absorb the flavours for another 5 minutes. To assemble the bowl: With quinoa as your base, start piling your ingredients on: grilled yams, hemp seeds and whatever fresh garnishes you’ve chosen. Top with maple tofu and almond butter sauce. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 406; protein 13.7 g; fat 25.2 g; carbs 36.2 g.


OU R FAVO U R I T E

Food Brands

Join the Plant-Based Challenge INTERESTED IN A PLANT-BASED DIET? Join the FREE 21 day Plant-Based Challenge. Sign up to get recipes, tools and tips. Whether you are brand new to eating a plant-based diet, or want some more ideas, join the challenge to improve your health and fitness with plants. Sign up at plantbasedplans.com

Impact Winter Edition 2021 Final.pdf 1 2021-10-18 5:09:33 PM

C

M

From nature to you 100% Organic Herbal Tea and Botanicals Cold brewed with pure Rocky Mountain water No sugars | No calories | Nothing artificial

www.rockymountaintisane.com #wemaketeacool

Freshly made plant-based whole food meals delivered to your door.

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

florafoodsco.com COCHRANE, AB

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 109


RECIPES

Righteous Rainbow Noodles with Mango Habanero Hot Sauce and Fermented Cashew Cream Oodles of noodles and oodles of flavour packed into this saucy, slurpy, healthy dish! BY DANIELLE ARSENAULT  DANIELLE ARSENAULT One of IMPACT Magazine’s Top Vegan Influencers, and raw food chef from Vancouver Island, B.C. & Ometepe, Nicaragua. PACHAVEGA

T

PACHAVEGALIVING

PACHAVEGALIVING

here’s just something about noodles. You can find them in many cultures all over the world. Maybe it’s the slurping, maybe the twisting of a fork in attempts to get as much sauce in one bite as possible. One major difference here is that this noodle dish is raw! Eating spiralized vegetable noodles on the regular is an amazing way to eat more veg, as long as they are accompanied by an awesome sauce! One thing I know for sure, this recipe blends spicy, sweet and sour of the Mango Habanero Hot Sauce with the rich and creamy umami-ness of the Simple Cashew Cheese for a bite of heaven and explosion of flavour. Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

Rainbow Noodles

Mango Habanero Hot Sauce Add all ingredients to a food processor and process on high until well mixed.

• • • • • • •

1 butternut squash, peeled and spiraled into noodles 1 beet, spiralized 1 zucchini spiralized 1/3 cup cashews (for garnish) 1 Tbsp. fresh cilantro, finely chopped Slices of red onion and julienned carrots A handful of mung bean sprouts

Mango Habanero Hot Sauce • • • • • • • •

2 mangoes, chopped Pulp of 1 whole passionfruit 1-2 habanero peppers, de-seeded 3 cloves garlic, minced ½ Tbsp. fresh turmeric, minced 1 Tbsp. cilantro Pinch of black pepper Pinch of salt

Simple Cashew Cheese • • • • • •

2 cups cashews – soaked for minimum 6 hours then rinsed and drained 2 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 2 Tbsp. lemon or lime juice 2 capsules probiotic powder with acidophilus 1/2 cup water 1 tsp. sea salt

Simple Cashew Cheese Place all ingredients in a high-speed blender. Blend on high until the consistency is like cream – be patient with this, the creamier, the better the final product. You’ll probably have to use the tamper for this one – it’s thick! Using a spatula, scoop out into a glass bowl and cover loosely with a cloth. Wait 24 hours for the nut cheese to ferment and bubble start to form. When fermented, stir the bubbles down and store in the fridge in a glass jar. The final consistency will be like a creamy cream cheese spread. Assembly Arrange the squash, beet and zucchini noodles on the plate with the sauces in the centre of the plate, garnish with the veggies. Serve and devour! Notes: If you want softer noodles, mix the veggies spirals with the sauces in a big bowl ahead of time, let sit for 10 minutes and then serve with the garnishes. The salt content in the sauces will draw out the water in the veggies and soften them. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 629; protein 19 g; fat 35 g; carbs 75 g.

110 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE


IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 111


RECIPES

Double Ginger Cookies Gluten-free cookies perfected! BY EMILY VON EUW

EMILY VON EUW

THISRAWSOMEVEGANLIFE

THISRAWSOMEVEGANLIFE

RAWSOMEVEGAN

WWW.THISRAWSOMEVEGANLIFE.COM

T

his is one of my all-time favourite recipes, and I have spent months perfecting it for you (and for me and my family, not gonna lie.) These cookies are soft, chewy, sweet – but not too sweet – and decked out in ginger and chocolate. Yes, there is ginger powder as well as crystallized ginger chunks in the dough. We are wild over here. There’s just the right amount of subtle cinnamon to complement the other flavours, and it just so happens that this recipe is also gluten-free. Of course, we finish off the cookies with some lightly flaked salt for a totally balanced sweet/salty/spicy extravaganza! Makes about 10 big cookies (12 medium or 16 small)

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • • •

¾ cup vegan butter ¾ cup unrefined sugar 1 Tbsp. ground chia seeds, mixed with 3-4 Tbsp. water ¼ cup molasses 2 ¼ cups all-purpose flour (gluten-free flour mixes work too) 1 Tbsp. ginger powder 1 Tbsp. cinnamon powder 1 tsp. baking soda 1 tsp. sea salt ¾ cup crystallized ginger chunks, roughly chopped into bite-sized pieces • Additional sugar for coating

DIRECTIONS 1. Preheat the oven to 350 F. 2. In a large bowl, cream the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add the chia mixture and molasses and mix just until smooth. 3. In another bowl, combine the flour, ginger, cinnamon, baking soda and salt. Add this dry mixture to your wet mixture in the large bowl until you have a dough. 4. Roll dough into 1 ½ - 2 inch balls, depending on how big you like your cookies. Roll each ball in sugar and place on baking sheets lined with parchment paper. 5. Bake for about 15 minutes, checking on them a couple times to make sure they don’t overbake. You want them to

112 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

widen out and flatten a little bit, and develop those beautiful cracks on top. This will happen towards the end of the baking time. Let the baking sheets cool on wire racks, then enjoy the cookies. Optional: Add some chocolate drizzle (melt ¼ cup vegan chocolate, whisk in 2 Tbsp. warm vegan milk) and flaky maldon salt for extra decadence. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 262; protein 3.7 g; fat 5.8 g; carbs 48.8 g.


OU R FAVO U R I T E

Food Brands

HE Y, F U T U R E D R I N K E R… A R E YO U N O U G H T Y ? ORGANIC. VEGAN. DEALCOHOLIZED. DELICIOUS.

SOFTCRUSH.CA @NOUGHTYAF

Free-Spirited, Botanical Cocktails

Use promo code IMPACT10 for 10% off your first order at drinkwildfolk.com

oy mas J e i h r T h of C

1081 2ND AVENUE NW | 403.287.8544 8 SPRUCE CENTRE SW | 403.452.3960 2171 MAHOGANY BLVD SE | 587.623.1144 826 CROWFOOT CRESCENT NW | 403.241.3475

@piejunkieyyc | piejunkie.ca

IMPACT MAGAZINE I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I 113


RECIPES

Zesty Lemon Blueberry Muffins Citrus and berries sing in these giant-sized muffins BY SHAYLA ROBERTS  SHAYLA ROBERTS Plant-based performance coach who eats plants based in Canmore, AB. Shayla was one of IMPACT Magazine's Top Vegan Influencers in 2017. EVOLUTIONCOACHINGU

EVOLUTIONCOACHING

WWW.EVOLUTIONCOACHINGU.COM

T

hese muffins are easy to make and great for a post-workout snack! Use fresh or frozen blueberries or cranberries. They are a delicious source of calcium and fibre.

Serves 6

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • •

1 cup plant-based milk 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar 1 cup organic all-purpose flour 1 cup whole wheat flour 1 Tbsp. ground flax seed 2 1⁄2 tsp. baking powder 1⁄4 tsp. baking soda 1⁄2 tsp. salt

• • • • • •

1⁄2 cup natural sugar 1⁄4 cup organic canola oil 1 tsp. vanilla extract Zest of one lemon Juice of one lemon 1 cup fresh or frozen blueberries or cranberries

DIRECTIONS 1. Preheat the oven to 350 F and line a muffin pan with 6 extra-large baking cups. 2. In a large measuring cup, add plant-based milk and apple cider vinegar. Let curdle. 3. In a large bowl combine flour, flax, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Set aside. 4. In a separate bowl, zest and juice a large lemon. Add sugar, canola oil and vanilla extract. Add the plant-based milk mixture and stir to combine. 5. Stir into the dry ingredients. Don’t overmix, a few lumps are okay. Fold in berries. If using frozen berries there is no need to thaw. 6. Spoon into muffin tins, filling each cup 3/4 full. Bake for 20-25 minutes until a knife inserted in the middle comes out clean. 7. Allow muffins to cool before removing from the pan. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 325; protein 9.3 g; fat 11.9 g; carbs 45 g.

114 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE


Using The Latest Technology To Provide Compassionate Care

A

BURRARD ANIMAL HOSPITAL + EMERGENCY • Open 24 Hours • Works with Your Busy Schedule (No extra charge for after-hours services) • Advanced Diagnostics including CT Scan

BURRARD ANIMAL HOSPITAL + EMERGENCY 1788 West Broadway, Vancouver 604.738.5683 | www.burrardvet.com

OAK ANIMAL HOSPITAL 3888 Oak Street, Vancouver 604.739.7111 | www.oakvet.com

t Oak Animal Hospital and Burrard Animal Hospital + Emergency, Dr. Parmjit Dhillon combines a love of animals with the latest diagnostic technology. Dr. Dhillon’s passion for animals stems from his roots in India, where he grew up on a family farm surrounded by farm animals and pets. These early experiences provided the catalyst for him to pursue veterinary medicine. He earned his master’s degree in veterinary sciences in India, with additional training at Purdue University in Indiana. “The whole idea is good medicine, good care,” says Dr. Dhillon. “These animals are a member of each and every family.” When Dr. Dhillon opened Oak Animal Hospital in 1999, it was one of only a few Canadian clinics to offer ultrasound, along with digital radiography and endoscopy. He also started a mobile diagnostic practice serving close to 90 clinics in the Lower Mainland, providing advanced diagnostics like abdominal, cardiac and other body parts ultrasound, along with a mobile endoscopy service. More recently, Dr. Dhillon opened Burrard Animal Hospital + Emergency, a facility that is changing the way animals are being cared for in BC. It is a 24-hour operation in the heart of Kitsilano, with 8 doctors and a full team of technicians, assistants and support staff. “People can walk in any time or call any time,” he said. “We are here when they need help with their pets.” In addition to medical services such as checkups, consultations and vaccinations, the hospital offers a wide range of preventive, emergency, and diagnostic services, including a full lab, ultra-sound and Canada’s first of its kind CT (computed tomography) scanner for pets. “This machine can scan a whole cat in two minutes. When X-rays and blood tests are not enough to detect a problem, ultrasound is the next step. It’s ideal for detecting problems in the gastrointestinal tract or other soft tissues, as it was with a dog that came in with a corncob obstruction in the small intestine. The CT scan is faster and infinitely more accurate. Where an X-ray provides a static, two-dimensional image, the CT scan is three-dimensional, digital, and provides the equivalent of 1,000 to 1,500 images. It allows a veterinarian to diagnose a problem instantaneously, which saves time, money and suffering, without waiting for weeks to get a appointment at referral facilities in these busy times. Sponsored Content


FINAL IMPACT

My 10-Year Journey with IMPACT How a magazine helped marathoner Martin Parnell become a household name while raising cash and consciousness BY MARTIN PARNELL  CHARLES HOPE Martin is a world-class endurance athlete, 5-time Guinness World Record holder, author, speaker and philanthropist from Calgary, AB. MARTINJPARNELL

MARTIN.PARNELL.71

MARTINJPARNELL

A

decade ago, IMPACT Magazine published an article in their 2011 Running Issue titled “12 million steps to Success.” It shared the story of a challenge I had set myself a year earlier, to run 250 marathons in one year and raise $250,000 for the humanitarian organization Right To Play. However, publisher Elaine Kupser and her team didn’t just write the story, they were part of the story. The 100th marathon took place on Sunday June 6, 2010 and Elaine organized a party at Eau Claire Market. Over 80 people turned up and she had cake for everyone. Over the years, my running and fundraising continued and IMPACT was with me all the way. In 2011, it was hanging out with The Fitness Guy, Pete Estabrooks while playing 61 hours of netball and setting a Guinness World Record, or my annual New Year’s Eve 5K, 10K, half-marathon and marathon. Elaine was there again, even when temperatures hit -36 C and it was too cold for the Penguins at the Calgary Zoo to go outside. Recently, Elaine and IMPACT have been a big supporter of my efforts to help the women and girls in Afghanistan who run for freedom and equality. In 2015 I read an article about the

116 I 30th Anniversary Issue 2021 I IMPACT MAGAZINE

first Afghan woman who had run a marathon and the challenges she faced during her training. As she ran along the street men would verbally abuse her and throw rocks at her to stop running. But she didn’t quit. She went back to her walled garden and ran around and around for hours on end to get her mileage in. I travelled to Afghanistan in 2016 and ran a marathon in support of these women and girls and in the 2017 Running Issue, Kate Mckenzie, Co-Director of The Secret Marathon film, wrote an article telling the story of these courageous and powerful women and girls. Over the years, Elaine, editor Chris Welner, Pete and the rest of the IMPACT team have become friends. IMPACT is more than a magazine, it is a family. It is a community of individuals who believe in an active lifestyle, who need a place to gather and that place is IMPACT Magazine. IMPACT shares stories, it allows us to look beyond our horizon and dream of what could be. IMPACT has been publishing for 30 years now and I have been on my dream journey for 10 years with them. I’m looking forward to the next 10.


Inside Back Cover (ad) 8.125"