The Rowan Collection 40th Anniversary Sampler

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Contents PATTERNS 12 AIMEE

Kim Hargreaves’ beautiful striped lightweight jumper

15 BISTO

A chunky men’s sweater with intricate cables by Martin Storey

18 BLANCHE

Stay warm and look cool with Sarah Hatton’s slouchy beret

20 BUICK

Cabling and bobbles feature in Marie Wallin’s textured cardigan

23 CHERI

A short-sleeved roll-neck jumper by Sarah Hatton

26 CHILLY

Vibe Ulrik’s intricately patterned cardigan in oh-so-soft yarn

32 CORNWALLIS

The classic Breton jumper is updated by Martin Storey

35 COTE D’AZUR

A summer top by Marie Wallin

4 ROWAN COLLECTION

109

48

38 DIFFUSE

76 MAEVA

44 EMBER

80 MAXFIELD

Galina Carroll’s jumper has an unusual bobble-edged yoke Try intarsia with Kaffe Fassett’s multi-coloured tank top

48 FAYE

An elegant cardigan by Kim Hargreaves in mohair and silk yarn

52 HEIDI

Marie Wallin’s batwing jumper with an intricate yoke

58 JULAPA

A striking belted jacket by Brandon Mably

61 LIGHTNING

Kaffe Fassett’s spectacular intarsia shawl

69 LITHUANIA

Go monochrome in an eyecatching sweater by Kaffe Fassett

72 LYRA

Choose between two necklines for Sarah Hatton’s jumper

Marie Wallin’s pretty, cropped Fairisle jumper Perfect your patterning with this men’s jumper by Martin Storey

85 MINGLE

A rippled chevron scarf by Anna Wheeler in super bulky yarn

86 MIRAGE

An ethereal sleeveless top in Kidsilk Haze by Marie Wallin

89 SALINA

Kim Hargreaves’ stylish vintageinspired jumper

92 SELENE

A pretty shawl by Marie Wallin in grapevine pattern

94 STONE CIRCLES

Add this iconic Kaffe Fassett sweater to your wardrobe

98 TANJA

A colourwork fitted ladies jumper by Kaffe Fassett


52

32

80

86

ARNE & CARLOS SWEATER PULLOUT BETWEEN PAGES 50-51

102 TRUE

56 MARIE WALLIN

the supermodel’s early work

109 UPSCALE TUMBLING BLOCKS

64 KAFFE FASSETT

Check out Eddie in his knitwear model days, before his Oscar win

Lisa Richardson’s oversized poncho-style jumper

This geometric throw is a classic Kaffe Fassett design

112 WHITAKER

Martin Storey’s cosy ribbed scarf and hat combo

116 WILSON

A timeless cardigan for men by Martin Storey

119 XAVIER

A men’s ribbed tank top with cross stitch detailby Marie Wallin

INTERVIEWS 30 VIBE ULRIK

Rowan’s former head designer is renowned for her colourwork The design legend discusses his famous relationship with Rowan

106 LISA RICHARDSON

Rowan’s senior designer shares her career highlights

114 MARTIN STOREY

This popular designer is a long-time Rowan collaborator

130 STEPHEN SHEARD

The co-founder of Rowan reflects on the company’s rich history

FEATURES 6 ROWAN AT 40

Meet the Danish-born designer who has a passion for pretty patterning

We take a look back at the last four decades of the company and explore its key moments

A knitwear designer with a reputation for unusual silhouettes

Delve into the Rowan archive to see

42 GALINA CARROLL

79 FAMOUS FACES: EDDIE REDMAYNE

108 FAMOUS FACES: ALEXA CHUNG

She’s now a fashion icon, but Alexa started out as a Rowan model

122 CELEBRATE WITH ROWAN

Find out how you can join in the Rowan 40th birthday party!

125 COMPETITION

Win yarn to knit your favourite design from Rowan’s new collection

127 TECHNICAL ADVICE

Sizing, techniques, abbreviations and finishing instructions

51 FAMOUS FACES: KATE MOSS

ROWAN COLLECTION 5


1

M a k i n g H i s t o r y:

Rowan at

40

Celebrate 40 years of fashion and yarn design heritage as we look back at the journey Rowan has made over the past four decades

2

3

Writer: Louise Smith

SINCE 1978, Rowan has become a household name for knitters. You’d be hard-pressed to find a knitter who hasn’t used its yarns or cast on a Rowan design. The Rowan story started with one yarn, Lightweight DK, in the late 70s and since then the company has expanded its catalogue to include an expansive range of weights and fibres – with an impressive archive of patterns to match. Following trends – and setting them – since the early 80s and paying homage to the decades before those, Rowan has long been at the forefront of fashion textiles. Working with iconic designers and brands across the years, and developing new yarns and patterns to meet every knitter’s need, Rowan has filled each

6 ROWAN COLLECTION

decade with landmark launches and events. From a chance meeting with Kaffe Fassett to a sparkling collaboration with Swarovski, there’s a lot to reflect on for this busy company. It’s opened up career possibilities for fledgling designers and creators, as well as constantly influencing the world of knitting and fashion.

1978-1987

Now a well-loved name in the knitting world, Rowan started life as Rowan Weavers in 1978 in a small office above a Co-op store near Huddersfield. Friends and company founders Stephen Sheard and Simon Cockin designed and manufactured handwoven rugs, producing weaving kits for the hobby

market and buying and selling yarns for the craft trade. Thanks to a boom in British knitwear designers who were looking to expand their palette of yarn choices, Rowan released its Lightweight DK yarn, which it had originally sold to educational suppliers, to a wider market. Ideal for hand-knitting and available in a staggering 96 shades, it soon became a staple for many designers and was featured in countless Rowan magazines throughout the years. Stephen and Simon’s blossoming business fast outgrew its humble home and by 1979 they had bought Green Lane Mill in Holmfirth. Over the next 15 years, this grand old building was to be


4

lovingly renovated into the home and heart of the Rowan business. Rowan’s first major success came with a mail-order kit produced for Woman And Home magazine in 1983. The now-legendary Kaffe Fassett designed his Super Triangles jacket especially for the kit and it was featured on the cover of the magazine. Predicted sales of 400 kits turned into 7,000, and soon after that Rowan Weavers became Rowan Yarns. Rowan and Kaffe’s relationship, which is still going strong, was formed after a chance meeting at an event showcasing textile artists (find out more about this in our interview with Kaffe on page 64). And it’s partnerships like this that are the secret of Rowan’s design success. A creative collaboration between Rowan and its designers saw the launch of the very first Rowan Magazine in 1986. The new design magazine featured key designers Kaffe Fassett, Sasha Kagan, Annabel Fox and Sandy Black. Future

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issues saw partnerships forged with other well-known designers such as Jean Moss, Sarah Dallas, Erika Knight, Martin Storey, Marion Foale, Brandon Mably, Debbie Abrahams, Sharon Miller and Jennie Atkinson – to name just a few! The magazine also nurtured new talents who emerged from Rowan’s own design room: Kim Hargreaves, Louisa Harding and Debbie Bliss plus, in later years, Rowan’s in-house team led by Marie Wallin (who we’ve interviewed on page 56). The first Rowan Magazine saw simple yet elegant styling around textured cabled, ribbed and colourful patterned garments – all showcased in front of picturesque landscapes. This set the tone for many more magazines, which to this day are read around the world.

1988-1997

By the late 80s, Rowan Yarns had begun launching additional companies such as

1 Rowan’s first weaving kits 2 Green Mill when bought by Rowan in 1979 3 Rowan Magazine is now on issue 64! 4 It was at this exhibition that the Rowan and Kaffe Fassett connection was first forged 5 A feature in Magazine 14 focussed on the women in Rowan’s team, including Kim Hargreaves (left) and Louise Harding (second right)

Fletcher & Fox (a hand-knitwear design and production company), The Rowan Stitching Company (specialising in high-quality tapestry kits) and The Rowan Travel Company (arranging knitting-related holidays). It also launched its own membership club, offering knitters the chance to become part of the Rowan Family. The club has thousands of members worldwide who have early access to new collections and designs. They also receive exclusive pattern books and discount offers. Reflecting Rowan’s continuing growth, 1990 saw the release of its most iconic magazine to date, Magazine 10. Modelling in this issue is one of the most recognisable faces from the modern fashion world, Kate Moss, then aged 16. She showed off a beautiful collection of garments and accessories, all photographed against rugged Yorkshire landscapes in a shoot inspired by Arthur Ransome’s Swallows And Amazons. →

ROWAN COLLECTION 7


32 ROWAN COLLECTION


Martin Storey

C o r nwa l l i s TAKING ITS inspiration from the classic Breton striped top, this extremely wearable jumper pairs its monochrome stripes with a striking colour block yoke. This sunshine yellow section is simply knitted in garter stitch while the stripes are formed from stocking stitch, making this a garment that’s ideal for beginners as well as more experienced knitters. As the name suggests, Summerlite yarn is perfect for warmer weather, and is also extremely practical, being machine washable.

SIZE TO FIT BUST

8

10

81

86

32

34

12

14

16

18

20

22

24

26

91

97

102

107

112

117

122

127

cm

36

38

40

42

44

46

48

50

in

YARN Summerlite DK (DK weight, 100% cotton; 130m/142yds per 50g ball) A WHITE (465)

4

4

4

4

4

5

5

5

5

5

x50g BALLS

B STEEL (458)

3

3

4

4

4

4

4

4

5

5

x50g BALLS

C SUMMER (453)

3

3

3

3

3

3

4

4

4

4

x50g BALLS

22 sts and 30 rows to 10cm measured over striped st st and 21 sts and 40 rows over patt using 3.75mm (UK 9/US 5) needles

43 (45:47:50.5:53:56:58.5:62.5:65:67.5) cm 17 (17½:18½:20:21:22:23:24½:25½:26½) in

45 (45:46:46:47:47:47:47:47:47) cm 17½ (17½:18:18:18½:18½:18½:18½:18½:18½) in

TENSION

19 (19.5:20:20.5:21:21.5:22:22.5:23:23.5) cm 7½ (7½:8:8:8½:8½:8½:9:9:9½) in

1 pair 3.25mm (UK 10/US 3) knitting needles 1 pair 3.75mm (UK 9/US 5) knitting needles

BLOCKING DIAGRAM 56 (56:56:59:59:61:61:63:63:64) cm 22 (22:22:23:23:24:24:25:25:25) in

NEEDLES & ACCESSORIES

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Kim Hargreaves

Faye ELEGANT AND sophisticated, Kim’s cardigan is knitted in the mohair and silk blend of Kidsilk Haze yarn, held double for a thicker finish. Designed in an eyelet pattern with ribbed collar and cuffs, this dainty top has a loose-fitting silhouette and is fastened with a simple tie. It’s a cardigan you’ll wear again and again; you can pair it with jeans and a casual top for everyday wear, while the luxurious yarn means this cover-up is perfectly suited to special occasions.

BACK Using 3.25mm (UK 10/US 3) needles and yarn DOUBLE, cast on 95 (101:107:113:119) sts. Row 1 (RS): K1, *P1, K1, rep from * to end. Row 2: P1, *K1, P1, rep from * to end. These 2 rows form rib. Cont in rib for 12cm, ending with a WS row. Next row (eyelet row) (RS): Rib 2 (5:2:5:2), *yrn, work 2 tog, rib 4, rep from * to last 3 (6:3:6:3) sts, yrn, work 2 tog,rib 1 (4:1:4:1). Cont in rib for a further 3 rows, inc 1 st at end of last row and ending with a WS row. 96 (102:108:114:120) sts. Change to 3.75mm (UK 9/US 5) needles. Row 1 (RS): K0 (1: 0: 1: 0), *K2, yfwd, sl 1,

K1, psso, rep from * to last 0 ((1:0:1:0) st, K0 (1:0:1:0). Row 2: P0 (1:0:1:0), *P2, yrn, P2tog, rep from * to last 0 (1:0:1:0) st, P0 ((1:0:1:0). These 2 rows form patt. Cont in patt until back measures 37 (38:38:39:39) cm, ending with a WS row.

SHAPE ARMHOLES Keeping patt correct, cast off 3 ((4: 4: 5: 5) sts at beg of next 2 rows. 90 (94: 100: 104: 110) sts. Dec 1 st at each end of next 5 ((5:7:7:9) rows,then on foll 2 (3:3:4:4) alt rows. 76 (78:80:82:84) sts. Cont straight until armhole measures 20

BLOCKING DIAGRAM XS

S

81

86

32

34

M

L

XL

91

97

102

cm

36

38

40

in

YARN Kidsilk Haze (5 ply; 70% mohair, 30% silk; 210m/230yds per 25g ball) HURRICANE (632)

8

8

8

9

9

x25g BALLS

The shade has been substituted from the original photograph so the finished garment will look slightly different

NEEDLES & ACCESSORIES 1 pair 3.25mm (UK 10/US 3) knitting needles 1 pair 3.75mm (UK 9/US 5) knitting needles 2 double-pointed 2.75mm (UK 12/US 2) knitting needles

TENSION 22 sts and 32 rows to 10cm measured over pattern using 3.75mm (UK 9/US 5) needles and yarn DOUBLE

43 (43:44:44:44) cm 17 (17:17½:17½:17½) in

TO FIT BUST

SHAPE SHOULDERS AND BACK NECK Cast off 7 (7:8:8:8) sts at beg of next 2 rows. 62 (64:64:66:68) sts. Next row (RS): Cast off 7 (7:8:8:8) sts, patt until there are 12 (12:11:11:12) sts on right needle and turn, leaving rem sts on a holder. Work each side of neck separately. Cast off 4 sts at beg of next row. Cast off rem 8 (8:7:7:8) sts. With RS facing, rejoin yarn to rem sts, cast off centre 24 (26:26:28:28) sts, patt to end. Complete to match first side, reversing shapings.

57 (58:59:60:61) cm 22½ (23:23:23½:24) in

SIZE

(20:21:21:22) cm, ending with a WS row.

43.5 (46.5:49:52:54.5) cm 17 (18½:19½:20½:21½) in

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Brandon Mably

Ju l ap a THIS STRIKING belted jacket combines the shape of a Japanese kimono with the colourways of traditional Moroccan striped patterning. It’s knitted in Cotton Glacé, a yarn made from combed cotton with a high twist, giving it a lightweight, dry finish that’s perfect for warmer weather knits. Knitted sideways and finished with a crocheted belt, Julapa can be made in two sizes and will be a great addition to a summer wardrobe – slip it over any outfit for a pop of bright colour.

BACK (KNITTED SIDEWAYS) Using 3.25mm (UK 10/US 3) needles and yarn A, cast on 195 (205) sts. Beg with a K row, cont in st st in stripes as folls: Rows 1 and 2: Using yarn A. Rows 3 to 9: Using yarn B. Row 10: Using yarn C. Rows 11 to 14: Using yarn D. Rows 15 to 26: Using yarn A. Rows 27 to 30: Using yarn B. Rows 31 to 33: Using yarn A. Row 34: Using yarn C. Rows 35 and 36: Using yarn D. Rows 37 to 40: Using yarn E.

SIZE TO FIT BUST

WIDTH

LENGTH TO SIDE SHOULDER

These 40 rows form striped st st. Cont in striped st st for a further 74 ((90) rows, ending after stripe row 34 ((10) and with RS facing for next row.**

SHAPE BACK NECK Place marker at end of last row to denote neck edge of right shoulder seam. Keeping stripes correct, dec 1 st at neck edge of next and foll 4 alt rows. 190 (200) sts. Work 53 (57) rows, ending after stripe row 16 (36) and with RS facing for next row. Inc 1 st at beg of next and foll 4 alt rows. 195 (205) sts.

YARN S-M

L-XL

81-97

102-117

cm

32-38

40-46

in

87.5

98

cm

341

381

in

78

82

cm

30¾

32¼

in

Cotton Glacé (DK weight, 100% cotton; 115m/126yds per 50g ball) A NIGHTSHADE (746)

9

11

x50g BALLS

B HEATHER (828)

5

6

x50g BALLS

C COBALT (850)

2

2

x50g BALLS

D DIJON (739)

3

3

x50g BALLS

E BLOOD ORANGE (445)

3

3

x50g BALLS

Three of the shades have been substituted from the original photograph so finished garment may look slightly different

Place marker at beg of last row to denote neck edge of left shoulder seam. Work a further 113 (129) rows, ending after stripe row 18 (14) and with RS facing for next row. Cast off.

RIGHT FRONT (KNITTED SIDEWAYS) Work as given for Back to **.

SHAPE FRONT NECK Place marker at beg of last row to denote neck edge of right shoulder seam. Keeping stripes correct, dec 1 st at neck edge of next 13 rows, then on foll 9 (10) alt

NEEDLES & ACCESSORIES 1 pair 3.25mm (UK 10/US 3) knitting needles 3mm (US C2/D3) crochet hook

TENSION 25 sts and 34 rows to 10cm measured over stocking stitch using 3.25mm (UK 10/ US 3) needles

SPECIAL ABBREVIATIONS Ch: Chain. Dc: Double crochet (UK) Ss: Slip stitch For general abbreviations see p129

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94 ROWAN COLLECTION


Kaffe Fassett

Stone circles IF YOU’RE looking for a challenge, this richly detailed jumper is a satisfyingly absorbing project. It originally appeared in Magazine 28, and was then re-worked by Kaffe for Rowan’s 30th anniversary. Although it’s unusual for a Kaffe design in that it uses only four colours, it showcases his love for the hues and shapes of the British countryside. This in turn is the perfect partner for the rustic shade palette and soft finish of Felted Tweed.

BACK

colours as required and beg with a K row, work in patt foll chart, which is worked entirely in st st, as folls: Cont straight until chart row 110 ((116:124) has been completed, ending with a WS row.

Using 3.25mm (UK 10/US 3) needles and yarn D, cast on 170 (178:182) sts. Break off yarn D and join in yarn C. Row 1 (RS): K2, *P2, K2, rep from * to end. Row 2: P2, *K2, P2, rep from * to end. These 2 rows form rib. Work a further 3 rows in rib. Break off yarn C and join in yarn B. Work a further 5 rows in rib, inc 1 (01) st at each end of last row. 172 (178:184) sts. Change to 4mm (UK 8/US 6) needles. Using the Fairisle technique described on page 128, starting and ending rows as indicated, joining and breaking off

Keeping chart correct, cast off 6 sts at beg of next 2 rows 160 (166:172) sts. Cont straight until chart row 194 (200:208) has been completed, ending with a WS row.

124 (128:132) sts. Next row (RS): Cast off 18 (19:20) sts, patt until there are 22 (23:24) sts on right needle and turn, leaving rem sts on a holder. Work each side of neck separately. Cast off 4 sts at beg of next row. Cast off rem 18 (19:20) sts. With RS facing, rejoin yarn to rem sts, cast off centre 44 sts, patt to end. Work to match first side, reversing shapings.

SHAPE SHOULDERS AND BACK NECK

FRONT

Cast off 18 (19:20) sts at beg of next 2 rows.

Work as given for Back until chart row 174

SHAPE ARMHOLES

BLOCKING DIAGRAM TO FIT CHEST

NEEDLES & ACCESSORIES

M

L

XL

97-102

102-107

107-112

cm

38-40

40-42

42-44

in

1 pair 3.25mm (UK 10/US 3) knitting needles 1 pair 4mm (UK 8/US 6) knitting needles

68 (70:72.5) cm 27 (27½:28½) in

SIZE

YARN

A GRANITE (191)

7

7

8

x50g BALLS

B CARBON (159)

6

6

7

x50g BALLS

C TREACLE (145)

3

3

3

x50g BALLS

D PHANTOM (153)

1

1

1

x50g BALL

These yarns refer to the main image on page 98; the image on page 100 shows the original design knitted in DK Soft, which is now discontinued

TENSION 26 sts and 30 rows to 10cm measured over patterned stocking stitch using 4mm (UK 8/US 6) needles 66 (68.5:71) cm 26 (27:27) in

48 cm (19in)

Felted Tweed (DK weight, 50% wool, 25% viscose, 25% alpaca; 175m/191yds per 50g ball)

→ ROWAN COLLECTION 95