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Issue 21 - Miniature Horse Quarterly

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Miniature Horse Quarterly - Issue 21


* FOAL BRAG * Spring is with us again and with the flowers come the foals! I have had some wonderful photos sent in by members to show off their gorgeous babies and they are included in this edition of your magazine for all to see. There have been some tragedies with foaling this season and to all those members who have lost a mare and/or foal we are thinking of you.

Publishing Rates & Deadlines Full Page Half Page Quarter Page Business Card Classifieds (text only) Full page Half Page Quarter Page Centre Spread

Black and White (per issue) 110.00 60.00 35.00 7.00 7.00 Colour (per issue) 130.00 70.00 40.00 180.00

Ad Design

60.00

Stud profiles are free and are limited to one photo to a maximum article size of half page. No sales or advertising is permitted in stud profiles.

Issue Jan/Feb/Mar (Foal) Apr/May/Jun (National) Jul/Aug/Sep (Stallion) Oct/Nov/Dec (Mare/Foal)

Advertiser: Maple Leaf Miniatures

Deadline 1st Feb 1st May 1st Aug 1st Nov

Print mid-Feb mid-May mid-Aug mid-Nov

Inside Front

Welcome New Members / Area Coordinators

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IMHR Contacts / Presidents Report

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Upcoming Events / Recent Show Photos

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New Raffle!! Win a fabulous horse walker!

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CoOrdinator Report WA

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Vale: Marie Bimr - Coomba Park

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Article: Back to Basics with Genetics - Gayle Donaldson - Final in this Series

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Article: Predicting Foaling

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Foal Brag!

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Recent Show Photos

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Anatomical Chart / Classifieds

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Advertiser: Centaur Mini Stud

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Centrefold IMHR Pullout Calendar for 2011

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Advertiser: Centaur Mini Stud

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Member Article: Impy the radio star / Advertising Layouts and Sizes

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Foal Brag!

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Article: Foal Care from Birth to 30 Days

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Horse Face / Leg Markings - how to identify the markings on your foals and/or horses.

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Advertiser: IMHR National Show 2011 / How to Upgrade a Horse with IMHR

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Notice to Members / Spotlight on Products - Unlimited Web Hosting

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Notice to Members / Colour Competition Results

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Noticeboard

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Business Card & Service Directory

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Foal Brag!

Inside Back

Advertiser: Silver Oak Miniatures

Back Cover

Front Cover: Created by Namaste Graphic Designs namastegraphicdesigns.com

Issue 21 - Miniature Horse Quarterly

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NFP = Not for Publication

829 830 831 832 833 834 835 836 837 838 839 840 841 842 843 844 845 846 847 848 849 850 851

Vanessa Bechly NFP NFP Debbie Wolfe Kathy Baker Linda Cremonini Tamara Rushworth Rose-Marie Ford NFP Hanson Family Katherine Petho Susie Maynard Margaret Webb NFP Shivon Allen NFP NFP Helen Stokes Julie Hindmarsh Claudia Miller Carlene Wilson Anthony Gimm Patricia Mackaway

852 853 854 855 856 857 858

Claire Philp Susan & Seth Vanwyngaarden Joanne Poulton Heather Lord Lorraine Morris Kelly Bradtke Carleen McPhie

Note from our departing Webmaster: I thoroughly enjoyed my time as the IMHR webmaster and I thank the members for their support and kind comments. However, I decided it was time for me to slow down and decrease my work load, so it was time to return the website to the IMHR. The ‘new’ website is a credit to the IMHR and I wish them much success in the future. Thank you Brenda Oldenhof

Area Coordinators Please contact these people for information about IMHR or shows and activities in your area. Contact the Secretary if you would like to be an Area Coordinator.

Rebecca Beriman - South Australia - rebeccaberiman@bigpond.com Pam Herrod - Western Australia - Nickurra@bordernet.com.au Wal & Tracey Filicietti - Lismore NSW - Wat.4@bigpond.com Barb Turnbull - Mackay Qld - horseymum@hotmail.com Leigh Palmer - Bendigo & District - cramer.park.minis@bigpond.com Shirley Wiggins - Tasmania - Sewiggins05@gmail.com Fiona Cameron - Central West NSW - allawaastud@yahoo.com Jennifer Elliot - Nth Qld - jendanelle@yahoo.com.au Donna Gilroy - Hunter Valley/Newcastle - donnamaylea@netcentral.com.au Michael Bowden - Rockhampton Qld (The Caves, Mt Morgan, Mt Larcom) hillstongrove@bigpond.com

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Miniature Horse Quarterly - Issue 21


IMHR Contacts President (National Office)

Committee

Leanne Williams “Lakeview” 2459 Currawang Road Currawang NSW 2580 Ph: (02) 4844 6393 Mob: 0419 215 307 Fax: (02) 9475 4671 info@minihorseinfo.com

Desley Rumpf Email: kildaireminiatures@bigpond.com

Vice President John Bellette-NSW johnbellette1@bigpond.com Secretary Leonie Boehme Ph: (02) 4829 2209 leonieb@whisperingpines.net.au Treasurer Marie Bimr Ph: (02) 6554 2261 mbimr2010@bigpond.com

Kerrie Pendred Email: Kerrie_Pendred@pillar.com.au Lyn Whitehead Email: coopersminis@aapt.net.au Non-Committee Positions MHQ Editor Trish Blinkhorn Email: minifarm@tpg.com.au Webmaster IMHR (Inc) Email: info@minihorseinfo.com Horse Deals Ad Coordinator Brenda Peet Email: peetribe@aapt.net.au

Presidents Report A big congratulations to all the winners at the recent IMHR shows including QLD State Show, QLD Wide Bay Regional Show and the NSW Spring Carnival. It’s great to see so much support out there for the Miniature Horses. We always have lots of spectators coming along - many of which are potential future miniature horse owners. As always, they were very welcome at all of these events resulting in some very nice emails coming in and also new members. Well done to all. It is your positive attitude and great sportsmanship that will attract new members and owners to our industry to keep it growing. The Spring Carnival was a wonderful event and a great tribute to our dear friend Marie Bimr who we lost suddenly. Nicole Kelly and Sapphire Park Sculptures You Can’t Touch This were deserving winners of the Memorial Trophy which was awarded by Mirek Bimr. Many of Mirek’s family were also in attendance and it was a very moving tribute to one of our greatest supporters and one of my best friends. We are donating profits and also the income generated at the show to the National Heart Foundation in Marie Bimr’s name. If you would like to also contribute, please visit the Heart Foundation website - www.heartfoundation.com.au or call 1300 55 02 82. We have a new look website and new address - www.imhr.com.au ! We would like to thank Brenda for all her hard work on the previous one - WELL DONE ! The new website is now managed by the National Office so you can send your updates etc.. to office@imhr.com. au. A BIG REMINDER about the upcoming exhibitor/judges clinics in QLD - 13-14th November in Veresdale, NSW - 20-21st November in Tamworth and ACT - 27-28th November at EPIC. Full details and booking forms are online. It is a great opportunity to learn more about our wonderful breed and also get some tips on presenting and showing them to their best. There are special discount rates for those who have attended clinics previously. Please pass this information to anyone who may be interested - you do not need to be a member to attend. The DM Stockfeeds Victorian State Championships will be held at Bendigo Showgrounds on 19-20th February 2011. Entry forms and program available soon ! We are hoping to have state shows in other states such as WA and TAS in 2011. Stay tuned. The NSW State Show entries close on the 26th November so get your entries in as soon as you can. It should be a great show with lots of interest being generated this year. We will be having a Xmas party on the Saturday night in the club house so bring your dancing shoes !! Hopefully Santa will make an appearance also. Our National Show is fast approaching so it’s time to start planning your time off work and caretakers for your other animals while you are away. Show dates are confirmed as 28th April to 2nd May at AELEC in Tamworth. We are planning an extended program including Amateur classes. Also, to help you promote your horses for sale, we are looking at having a ‘Sales Alley’ row of stables for those selling their horses to make it easier for potential buyers to find you. Also, there will be a parade of horses for sale to be held during the show in the evening. We will be offering promotional advertising in our Show Premium and Show Catalogues again this time around so it’s time to start getting your advertising together now. It’s great to see some beautiful babies out there. Initially I thought it was to be a filly season but I have two colts on the ground now so I guess that blows that theory out of the water ! Good luck for the rest of the foaling season for all. Don’t forget to keep sending your gorgeous foal photos in for publication in future issues of our magazine. As we are volunteers, our office is never closed so feel free to catch up on your paperwork and photos over the Xmas break :) Wishing all our members a wonderful foaling season and a safe and happy Xmas and New Year !! Leanne Williams

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This is a list of all shows for this coming season which IMHR are aware of, if you know of any other shows being held in your state please let the secretary know for inclusion in future issues.

NSW

26th - 28th November - National Capital Horse Show - EPIC, Canberra 28th November - Hunter Valley Regional Appaloosa Club - NSW Equestrian Centre Lochinvar 10th - 12th December - IMHR NSW State Championships - EPIC, Canberra - Pre-entries close 26th November 2011 20th February - Oberon Show 14th - 27th April - Sydney Royal Easter Show – Entries close 17/11/2010 28th – 2nd May - IMHR National Show 6th -8th May - Bathurst Royal Show

QLD Nothing to report - if you know of shows let us know so we can tell others please!

TAS

Nothing to report - if you know of shows let us know so we can tell others please!

SA

Pinto Ass of Sth Aust Inc - www.sapintoassociation.com - phone 08 8527 7038 (dates unknown - call for details)

VIC Nothing to report - if you know of shows let us know so we can tell others please!

Wide Bay Regional Show Queensland

Supreme Miniature Horse Sapphire Park Sculptures Wortha Dime A & K Miniature Hodge Judge Matt Sheard

Supreme Small Horse Karavale Breakfast at Tiffanys Carol Shoesmith Judge Matt Sheard

Photos taken by HoofPrints Photography - hoofprints@hotmail.com.au - 0413 309694

Photos from recent shows

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Miniature

For full results on these and other shows, please log on to our website at www.minihorseinfo.com you have photos you would HorseIf Quarterly - Issue 19 like to share, please send them in high resolution to the editor.


www.imhr.com.au

www.imhr.com.au

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Hi, my name is Pamela Herrod and I am your State Co-ordinator for Western Australia. I look forward to bringing you news and I am happy to present you with my first report. Currently I am in the process of obtaining open classes for the Perth Royal Show for 2011 and this looks very promising. I have also been led to believe that most of the classes for the miniatures are open to all miniature associations and registries. I have notified all the precifice breeds that IMHR does exist in WA. I have also been in contact with the breeds that have closed miniature classes and asked for them to be reinstated with height for age. I am just waiting for confirmation that IMHR registered horses can compete in these classes. WA is moving forward and I will notify IMHR when we have achieved these goals so they can added into the IMHR Show Section. I would also like to share something which may be of interest to our members – the TIN HORSE HIGHWAY. On a 20kilometre stretch of road near the tiny southern wheatfields town of Kulin, the local farmers have spent the past 15 years trying to outdo each other by decorating the roadside with tin horses. It all started as just a bit of fun, people had made these tin horses, erected them under the cover of darkness, and they started to try to out-do each other! All these new horses begin to appear each spring in the lead-up to the October races.

Westward Horse!! A tin horse is sitting on an outback toilet, reading a copy of Playhorse magazine

There's a sprightly tin filly brandishing a tennis racket with intent

Another rearing horse running across the paddock

Another equine wonder!

The first tin horse to appear was a rather modest affair made from a few bits of old tin welded together, which without notice mysteriously appeared in a paddock. At last count, there were more than 60, each bigger, better and more outlandish than the last. These horses don’t eat or drink but are great viewing for the public. You see some strange things beside the road in country Australia but Western Australia's Tin Horse Highway is about as weird, wacky and wonderful as it gets. There are many others to be seen, something to watch for if you visit WA; until next time. Pam

All other coordinators - we would love to hear from you; what you have been up to in promoting IMHR Inc in your areas. Send your reports along to the editor at minifarm@tpg.com.au so all members are made aware of how IMHR Inc is growing at such a fast rate and to see what is happening around the nation.

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Miniature Horse Quarterly - Issue 21


VALE

MARIE

The miniature horse world has lost one of its finest ambassadors, Marie Bimr of Coomba Park Stud passed away unexpectedly in mid-October, leaving many of our members in mourning. Not just a valuable contributor to the success of the IMHR, Marie was a warm, kind-hearted lady. Always the first to welcome newcomers to a show, Marie didn’t differentiate between the top competitors and the most recent beginners. She made everyone feel welcome, and along with husband Merik, she lent a valuable hand measuring horses at major shows. As Nicola Field notes, “When we arrived at our first state show, it was Marie who showed us where to go for measuring, where to get our programs and numbers, and what to expect in our first classes. We will always be indebted to Marie for her help.” Trish Blinkhorn recalls Marie fondly, saying, “The best thing I remember about Marie is that she gave wonderful hugs.” Donna Gilroy says Marie will be sorely missed in the miniature horse world, adding, “Marie was always happy, never frowning, always smiling. She never had a bad word to say about anybody.” But we’ll leave the final word to Brenda Peet, proud owner of one of Marie’s stallions Coomba Smokey Joe, who says, “My dear Marie, Joe Joe and I will always be dancing for you”. Merik, our thoughts and best wishes are with you at this difficult time. We hope you continue to be a part of the miniature horse world, and we thank you for sharing Marie with us. Rest assured, Marie will be remembered and admired by all who met her.

Coomba Magic Flight

&

Coomba Smokey Joe

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Presented by Gayle Donaldson

Back to basics with genetics

Understanding basic horse genetics is the key to understanding horse colour and coat patterns, as well as the genetic disorders of the horse, such as lethal white syndrome. Genes are like pieces of code that say how the molecular building blocks of living organisms will be built, which in turn determines what they will look like and how they work (or don’t). The genes are encoded by a molecule called DNA. Horse genetics is now being increasingly studied, leading to an increased understanding of both genetic disorders and colour inheritance. When we study horse genetics we might only be concerned with how genes are passed on from parents to offspring. This kind of information can answer questions about a foals possible colour or likelihood of it inheriting some genetic disorder. Knowledge of this aspect of horse genetics can be used to plan breeding programs to optimise the likelihood of foals with a certain sets of characteristics, and/or to minimise the spread of undesirable characteristics. Genes occur in different forms called alleles Genes for any particular character occur in alleles. To understand horse genetics you need to understand about alleles and how they work. Each allele has a slightly different code and may make a slightly different product, or control a process in a slightly different way. It is rather like models of a particular make of car, in that each model is essentially similar with just some minor differences. But, (hopefully) each model of car will still transport you around. Since each gene is represented twice any particular individual can have its 2 copies as the same allele, when it is called homozygous for that gene, or as two different alleles, when it is termed heterozygous for that gene. If an allele has to be homozygous to affect the phenotype (what the horse looks like) it is said to be recessive. If an allele over-rides another – affecting the phenotype even when it is heterozygous - it is said to be dominant over it. Genes are organised on chromosomes Genes don't just float around in cells. They are spaced out along a (relatively) few long continuous strands of DNA. Often the analogy of beads on a string is used. Horse cells have 64 chromosomes each, Particular places on a chromosome are called loci (singular locus). Each particular gene has a particular place, or locus, on a particular chromosome. Each cell of a horse’s body contains two copies of each chromosome - one from the dam and one from the sire. In horses there are 32 pairs of chromosomes. Gregor Mendel unravelled the laws of heredity, before either chromosomes or genes were known about and established the principles of heredity through his work on pea plants. These laws apply equally to horses. The science of horse genetics is based on an understanding of Mendelian inheritance. Mendel realised that inheritance could only be explained if the elements that determine characteristics (now known as alleles) existed in pairs. These pairs are separated in the gametes (sex cells), so that eggs and sperms carry just one member of each pair – whether any particular gamete carries one allele or the alternative one is determined by chance so that either is equally likely. When an egg and sperm fuse during fertilisation new pairs are formed. The next generation thus carries the new pairs brought together from the parents of this generation. A horse genetics example of Mendelian inheritance Applying Mendel’s First Law to horse genetics we can work out the possible characteristic of a foal from a particular mating, as long as one main gene controls that feature and we know the genotype of the parents at that locus. For example we’ll consider the probability of a gray foal from a gray mare and a chestnut stallion. The chestnut stallion is of genotype G+G+ (i.e. is homozygous for “non gray” alleles). The gray mare had only one gray parent herself and so must be heterozygous for the gray allele, i.e. of genotype G+GG. We can construct something called a Punnett Square to visualise this cross: Genetic contribution from mare:

Genetic contribution from stallion:

50% chance of either allele in the egg

Only G alleles in the sperm

G

+

+

+

+

G

+

50% chance: G G Not gray

G

G

50% chance: G G Gray

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If we had a gray heterozygous mare and a gray heterozygous stallion, i.e. both of genotype G+GG then the cross would be as follows: Genetic contribution from mare: 50% chance of either allele in the egg

Genetic contribution from stallion: 50% chance of either allele in the sperm G

+

G +

G

25% chance: G G

+

+

G

G

G

Gray G

G

+

25% chance: G G

Not gray 25% chance: G G

G

G

+

25% chance: G G

Gray

Gray

Altogether there’s a 75% chance of a gray foal (25%+25%+25%). Another way of saying this is that there’s a 3:1 ratio of gray to not gray. This ratio is what you normally expect when mating together two heterozygous horses (for any one characteristic/colour). Horse genetics and partial dominance In cases of complete dominance the heterozygote has the same phenotype as the dominant homozygote. This relationship between a pair of alleles provides the simplest situation for study. With partial dominance (also called semi-dominance or incomplete dominance) the heterozygote exhibits a phenotype that is intermediate between the homozygous forms. There’s a well-known horse genetics example, that of the cream dilution gene (the C locus). Alleles at the C locus are responsible for the palomino, buckskin, smokey black, cremello, perlino and smokey cream. The two known alleles are designated C+ and CCr. CCr shows partial dominance and dilutes red to yellow in a single dose and to pale cream in a double dose. Horses with a chestnut base color and genotype C+C+ are chestnut, while those of genotype CCrCCr are cremello. Horses of genotype C+CCr are palomino, a color intermediate between the phenotypes for the homozygous forms. Similarly horses with a brown or bay base color and genotype C+C+ are brown or bay, while those of genotype CCrCCr are perlino. Horses of genotype C+CCr are an intermediate color of buckskin. Cream dilution can have a very subtle effect on black pigment and horses with a black base color are diluted to smokey black (C+CCr) or smokey cream (CCrCCr). e.g. a cross between two palominos Genetic contribution from mare: 50% chance of either allele in the egg

Genetic contribution from stallion: 50% chance of either allele in the sperm C

C +

+

+

25% chance: C C chestnut

Cr

25% chance: C C palomino

C

C

+

+

Cr +

25% chance: C C palomino

Cr

25% chance: C cremello

Cr

Cr

C

Cr

The above article is only brushing the surface of the study of genetics, trying not to get bogged down in too much detail for the beginner. For those interested, the website from which this information has been gathered, is much more detailed and an excellent place to start further exploration of this subject. Information supplied courtesy of Glynis Scott, from her website www.horse-genetics.com (edited by Gayle Donaldson) I have enjoyed researching each of the articles I have presented in the magazine to date and hope they have helped some of you to understand more fully the multitude of colours our beautiful miniature horses come in...or even better, encouraged you to delve deeper into the subject of horse colours on your own. If anyone has any ideas on any other colour subjects they would like covered, please email these to your editor or myself. But most importantly….enjoy your horses, whatever their colour!

We would like to thank Gayle Donaldson for her time in presenting these articles to you, and hope you have gained more understanding of the complexities of colour genetics. Issue 21 - Miniature Horse Quarterly

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Predicting Foaling Most mares foal late at night or early in the morning when everything is quiet and they are undisturbed. They also have the ability to delay foaling for awhile if they feel insecure. This means that you can watch your mare for hours on end, week after week, then when you return after a quick break you find your mare has foaled on her own with no one peeking at her. Fortunately the majority of mares will foal normally without any assistance. But there are a few mares who get in trouble and need human intervention to prevent the death of the foal, the mare, or both. Therefore someone should attend all foalings. But how do you know when? Although you should monitor your mare, you probably won’t need to spend eleven months of nearly sleepless nights. Normal gestation for a mare lasts about 335 days, with some healthy foals born as early as 300 days and others taking over 360 days. However, foals born before about 320 days are usually weak, have a low birth weight, and may require intensive care. Environmental factors, sex of the foal, and age of the mare can all affect the length of gestation. Foals born during the early spring are often carried a week to ten days longer than foals born during late summer. Colts are usually carried a couple of days longer than fillies. Mares tend to carry their foals longer as they age - usually about one day longer for each year of age over ten years. Mares seem to follow a pattern year after year therefore good record keeping helps to predict when an individual mare will foal. As foaling time nears, your mare will show various signs that she is getting ready. Not all mares will show all of the signs, but you should see at least some of the signs. Signs of impending foaling •

Size - The mare’s abdomen will continue to increase in size. Beware though if she gets much bigger than you would expect for the stage of gestation. One of the signs that the foal is in trouble is when the mare’s abdomen is huge.

Udder development - In preparation for foaling, the mare’s udder will start to fill (“bagging up”) as early as a month before she foals. But some mares won’t develop a bag until after she has foaled. Often mares that have developed a bag will start to drip a clear fluid that gradually turns white. Within the last 24 hours or so before foaling the substance will turn sticky and creamy. This substance is colostrum, and if the mare is losing a significant amount it should be collected and frozen to give to the foal later.

Waxing - Once the mare has developed a bag, she may exhibit a honey colored, waxy substance on the nipples. Some mares may wax a couple of weeks before foaling, while others don’t show anything until after they have foaled.

Relaxation around the mare's hindquarters - Often the muscles in the mare’s pelvic area will gradually relax causing the area around her tail head to appear hollow. This may occur two or three weeks before foaling. Then her vulva will relax and elongate to allow it to stretch to several times its normal size during foaling. This often occurs within the last day or two before foaling.

Behavior - During the last few weeks of gestation, the mare may become cranky and restless. She may also want to be alone. As she starts into the first stage of foaling she may switch her tail, stamp her feet and kick at her abdomen. These are also signs of colic, but if she is still eating, drinking, defecating and/or urinating she is probably started into labor.

Now that you know what signs to look for, how should you monitor your mare? Many people monitor their mares by setting an alarm clock to wake them up every few hours and trudging out to the barn to look. But it seems like the more often you check, the longer you have to wait. Besides, mares are sneaky they wait until you go back into the house and then they foal in privacy. So what do you do? You could just sleep in the barn, although that can be uncomfortable. You could hire someone to watch or impose on family members to take turns checking on the mare. Hopefully your family doesn’t mind. You could buy a collar with a transmitter to put on the mare to alert you when she lies down on her side. Of course, there will be plenty of false alarms. It’s amazing how many times a mare will lie down when you are monitoring her. Another system utilizes a transmitter that is attached to the mare’s vulva. The transmitter is activated when the vulva lips are separated just prior to foaling. You could install a closed-circuit television to watch the mare in her stall. An advantage of using this system is that you can monitor the mare without disturbing her. But although you don’t have to trudge out to the barn every few hours,

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you still need to be watching the monitor when the mare starts to foal. Then there is the cost of installing cameras, cable and monitors. A similar, but less expensive, option is to install a baby monitor in the stall. You can’t see the mare, but you can hear her as she moves around. You can also monitor the calcium concentration in the mare’s milk. There are commercial kits for this, such as PredictA-Foal. When the mare’s udder starts to fill, place a couple of drops of milk on the test strip and watch for the color to change. Always do this in the evening. Once two out of four zones on the test strip change color, you should start checking the mare’s rectal temperature in the morning and in the evening. When her evening temperature is equal to or less than her morning temperature and three or four out of four zones on the test strip change color, you should monitor the mare around the clock as she will probably foal within the next couple of days. Perhaps the best idea is some combination of monitoring techniques - such as a collar to warn you to check the television monitor. Otherwise, make sure your alarm clock is working and you have plenty of coffee available. unknown source

Mashar Phoenix

Bogart Park In Your Dreamz

Atlanta Music & Lyrics

Minimania Dominos Northern Lights Wiru Sparkles

Coomba Golden Marie

Yarreh Lane Flash Dancer

Kamelco Park Perfected by Excellence

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Anyssa Park Ultimate Aladin Araluen Park 10 Outa 10

Odyssey Park Painted Lady

Minimania Lil Ghost Ryder Anyssa Park Super Trooper

Shikinah Miss Utah

Excellence Academy BR Allure Anyssa Park Ultimate Dancin in Diamonds

Minimania Dark Angel

Selvaggio Dancers Sweet Surprise

Silver Oak DQ Monte Carlo

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If you do not see your foal in this issue, please let me know. There were so many it may have ‘got lost’ in all the emails.

Miniature Horse Quarterly - Issue 21

Araluen Park Bloss’s Flamin Hell


Morongla Show Cowra NSW October 4 2010

Res. Champion Small Horse Castrawes Ellsangel Rob & Rhonda Barnes ........................

Supreme Small Horse Centaur Eldorado Lady Hawke

Champion Small Horse Eldorado Lady Hawke Christine Cantrill

Supreme Little Horse Koriana Colour Me Star

Owner Kylie Raines - Shown by Christine Cantrill

Supreme Miniature Horse Aone Born To Be A Star Melissa Cummings Photos taken by Leanne Williams

Members

It has become necessary for us to point out that over the last few issues, we have been receiving advertisements in sizes not compatible with our pages or sections. To alleviate this, we have provided a guide for size requirements. This can be found on page 21. Please note that business cards and classifieds must conform to a specific size. We realise that business cards can come in different sizes from different printing houses (or homebased ones) but we need to make our Business Directory a little more ‘tidy’ than it currently is. Thank you for your help in this.

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Scolinda Stud Offers FOR SALE “Scolinda Sparkling Diamond” IMHR Miniature Horse 34.5” DOB: 31/12/2004 *Perlino *Correct conformation *Breed 100% dilutes!! Price reduced $800 ono Visit our website for photos & more sales stock www.scolindastud.webs.com PH 03 6395 6165 or 0437 607 419

Scolinda Stud Offers FOR SALE “Inxs Custom Made” (Blaze) IMHR Miniature Horse -33.6” DOB; 1/12/2002 *Leopard Appaloosa –Harris Polka Dot- Bloodlines *Supreme Champion winning stallion* *Correct conformation & lovely moving stallion Price reduced $900 ono Visit our website for photos & more sales stock www.scolindastud.webs.com PH 03 6395 6165 or 0437 607 419

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“IMPY” AT TRIPLE M RADIO ADELAIDE FOR MELBOURNE CUP “POO LOTTO” Crystal Park Rowdys Extreme Impatience (Impy) and owner Karen Bail were invited to bring Impy to Triple M radio station on 26th October 2010 for the Hot Breakfast Show. Impy’s job was to pick a winning horse for a promotion for the Melbourne Cup - a $10,000 bet for a lucky listener. Squares were drawn up in the car park with all the horse numbers. Our little lady was then required to ‘poop’ on a square of her choice!! Eventually - after waiting patiently - she did oblige by pooping in No. 18 . Win or loose on that number does not matter. Her nature and presence won everyone over. A great morning with Louie, Ali and the miniature horse. Thank you Triple M and Crystal Park for such a “radio star” to be in South Australia! Karen Bail

ADVERTISING SAMPLES AND SIZES Ad Description *All ads must be pre-paid ! page " page Full page Business Card Classified Section (Text only)

Ad sizing in mm Width x Height 90 x 140 190 x 140 210 x 297 100 x 65 100 X 65

Alternate Sizing Width x Height 190 x 65 92 x 275 65 x 100

All artwork is to be supplied in ‘print ready’ format in either JPEG or PDF. All at 300 DPI using CMYK colour. If adverts are supplied in sizes other than stated above, they will be cropped to fit or enlarged to fit. This may affect the ad by either losing some content or blurring; to avoid this, please ensure your adverts conform to these sizes.

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Yarreh Lane Dreams of Destiny

Araluen Park A Little Ray of Sunshine

Leawood Park Spotless Springwaters EG Sweet Cherie

Leawood Park Pocket Rocket

Araluen Park BZ Dancin Up A Storm

KN Kisses by Candlelight

Springwaters Misstabel

Kamelco Park K Black Satin

Araluen Park Absolutely Smokin Hot

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Anyssa Park Ultimate Impact

Miniature Horse Quarterly - Issue 21

Thank you all for providing wonderful photos of your gorgeous foals. If your mares didn’t time it right for this issue, please send new foal photos in for the next issue #22.


Foal Care From Birth to 30 Days by: Sarah L. Evers Article # 4956 Reprinted with kind permission from thehorse.com Foal care from the first few hours of life to one month can be critical in the overall health and welfare of the newborn foal. With experience caring for 300-500 Central Kentucky foals per year since 1985, Scott Pierce, DVM, MRCVS, of Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital, summarized his knowledge on “Foal Care From Birth to 30 Days” in his presentation at the 2003 American Association of Equine Practitioners’ convention. He provided a basic review of the most common problems and how they are handled in his practice. First Exam “The immediate post-partum examination is very important,” said Pierce. “Early detection of problems and prompt veterinary care are critical to the overall outcome of the compromised foal.” Farm personnel are usually the first to examine the foal, and they should be able to recognize abnormalities, he said. All farms should have an emergency kit, and foaling staff should have basic knowledge of pulmonary resuscitation of the newborn. “Many times, a brief administration of nasal oxygen will make a great difference in the immediate health of compromised foals,” said Pierce. Respiratory rate should be 60-70 breaths per minute, and the foal should begin breathing within 30 seconds of birth. Mucous membrane color should be pink one minute after delivery, and capillary refill time should be two seconds or less. Pierce also said the foal should respond to external stimuli, such as touch and noise, begin a suckle reflex within about five minutes. Heart rate can be evaluated by watching for the heartbeat through the chest wall. Normal heart rate for newborns is 60-120 beats per minute. The umbilical cord should be allowed to break on its own (usually within five to six minutes after birth), then it should be immediately dipped in 0.5% chlorhexidine or undiluted povidone solution. Handlers should wear gloves to prevent contamination of the umbilicus, said Pierce. The foal will usually stand within one hour of birth and nurse within two hours. If a foal does not nurse within five hours, a veterinarian should be called. The veterinarian will give the foal colostrum (a mare’s first milk), which contains needed antibodies so that the foal can fight infection. In addition, the mare’s udder should be examined. The mare’s colostrum can be measured with a Colostrometer. If the colostrum measures a specific gravity under 10.6, then donor colostrum should be given. Some mares will object to the foal’s nursing. In this instance, they can be sedated with acepromazine. In addition, a foal should pass his meconium (first feces) within 24 hours after birth. To help this along, he can be given an enema. Pierce recommended either a commercially available human sodium phosphate product or warm soapy water. Veterinary Exam The veterinarian will usually come the morning after delivery (as most foals are born at night) or when foals are only a few hours old. He or she will examine the foal’s general condition, strength, mental status, and ability to nurse, along with conformation. The veterinarian will listen to the heart and lungs for any abnormalities, palpate for fractured ribs and a cleft palate, examine the umbilicus, and look in the eyes. When a foal is past 12 hours of age, or it is six to eight hours after the first nursing, a complete blood sample can be drawn to measure immunoglobulin (IgG, a type of antibody) levels. Pierce likes to see IgG levels above 400 mg/dl. Foals at risk for disease should have an IgG level above 800 mg/dl. If IgG levels are lacking, fresh frozen plasma can be given intravenously. Pierce said that he gives flunixin meglumine (Banamine) along with the plasma to prevent adverse reactions. CBC’s can also be performed to determine the WBC counts. Occasionally these bloods have to be drawn more than once. Sometimes WBC counts are not normal until Day 4, but if any of the measurements are abnormal, farm personnel should watch the foal more closely for signs of depression, lameness, diarrhea, or lack of nursing. In a normal foal with an abnormal WBC count, the temperature should be taken twice daily. In Pierce’s practice, a mare and foal are usually turned out by themselves for at most an hour in the first day, with the time increasing each day. After 10-12 days, they join other mares and foals in a large field. Common Abnormalities Angular Limb Deformities--Pierce said angular limb problems are common. Foals are usually graded on a scale of zero to three (with zero being straight) to help evaluate severity and improvement of the problem. “Most foals will improve without treatment within the first 30 days of life,” he said. “Therefore, one should let the foal improve on its own and initiate specific therapy only when the foal has stopped improving, the rate of improvement has slowed, or a drastic change in the conformation has occurred.” Each type of deformity is treated differently, but treatments can involve periosteal transection, limited turnout, special trimming and/or shoes, and monitoring through radiographs for changes and/or a deterioration in the foal’s conformation. Congenital Papillomas (Warts)--These can be found on various parts of the body; however, the head and legs are the most common locations. Pierce said that warts are usually not a problem unless they hemorrhage from trauma. Hemorrhaging can usually be easily stopped. He said that warts will usually go away on their own. Delayed Ossification of Cuboidal Bones--Crushing of the carpal (knee) or tarsal (hock) bones can be found in premature foals or term foals with conformational problems. “Foals with severe conformational defects or delayed ossification of their cuboidal bones are stall confined, and radiographs are taken weekly until cuboidal bone mineralization has occurred,” Pierce said. “Splinting might be required in the occasional severe case, especially with concurrent soft tissue laxity; however, it should be avoided if possible.” Diarrhea--This problem can be serious with many unfavorable results. Diarrhea in the foal can be due to a non-life-threatening situation, such as milk overload, a change in the gastrointestinal flora, or be related to foal heat. However, it could be related to such serious diseases as rotavirus or bacterial infections. Rotavirus can affect foals at any age, is highly contagious, and is very hard to control, with bleach being the disinfectant of choice. Treatment involves supportive care and isolation. A vaccine is available pre-foaling for broodmares to reduce the severity of the disease in older foals, although it has not been known to help young foals, said Pierce.

...cont. page 28

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Face markings - these may help you with your registration applications.

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Miniature Horse Quarterly - Issue 21


Leg markings - these may help you with your registration applications.

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HOW TO UPGRADE A HORSE WITH IMHR If you horse currently holds temporary registration – that is any horse under 5 years of age – you will need to upgrade it to Permanent Status when it reaches the age of 5 years. The date that the upgrade is due is on the front of your registration certificate. Step 1: Step 2: Step 3: Step 4: Step 5:

Measure the horse Take a photo of each side of the horse and print or put on CD On the back of the original registration certificate is a Permanent Height section. Complete that section and sign it. Fill out a work order Send all of the above with the appropriate fee to IMHR.

You do not need to fill in a new Registration Application. Regards, Leanne Williams President 26

Miniature Horse Quarterly - Issue 21


2010 Spring Carnival Taree NSW

Supreme Junior Miniature Sapphire Park Sculptures You Can’t Touch This Nicole Kelly

Supreme Senior Small Horse Fantasy Farm X Rated Deb & Stephanie Meyrick (Handler Nicole Kelly)

Supreme Junior Small Horse Mirrindel Charisma Steve Dwyer

Supreme Senior Miniature Sapphire Park Pixies Katie Rose Owner Kyle Maher (Handler Katie Crosse)

Marie Bimr Memorial Award Best Coloured Exhibit Sapphire Park Sculptures You Can’t Touch This Nicole Kelly Award presented by Mirek Bimr Hi Point Small Horse Exhibit Mirrindel Charisma Steve Dwyer

Hi Point Miniature Horse Exhibit Sapphire Park Sculptures You Can’t Touch This Nicole Kelly

Sapphire Park Sculptures You Can’t Touch This meeting a 17.3hh warmblood!

Phar Lap Memorial Supreme Gelding Mirrindel Charisma Steve Dwyer

Marie Bimr Memorial Award Trophy

+VEHFGPSUIFTIPXXBT .ST,BSFO"MMFO /48

Photos taken by Leanne Williams

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...cont. from page 23

Bacterial diarrheas are typically caused by Clostridium and Salmonella species, are usually profuse and watery, and are usually seen with depression and toxemia. Fecal cultures, virus isolation, and Rotazyme tests are used for diagnosis, and depending on the specific diagnosis, a variety of treatments can be used. Fluid therapy is common and can help foals recover faster. “Many foals can be treated on the farm if the personnel are qualified,” Pierce said. “A major complicating factor is abdominal pain. Most painful foals are referred to the hospital.” Entropion--This occurs when the eyelid turns inward against the eyeball. This is the most common eye problem, and it can be treated with an injection of procaine penicillin in the affected eyelid. Restraint of the foal is very important during this procedure to prevent needle damage due to movement. Failure of Passive Transfer--Foals which don’t receive enough antibodies through the colostrum suffer from failure of passive transfer. Pierce recommends that all foals which have not reached an IgG level of 400 mg/dl receive one or more liter of plasma intravenously. Blood is then drawn to see if levels are high enough. Foals at risk for disease should have immunoglobulin (IgG) level above 800 mg/dl. Those below 200 mg/dl are considered an emergency. If the quality or amount of the colostrum is in question, then the foal should be given stored, tested colostrum within 12 hours of birth. “Recently, some insurance companies have developed their own policies and requirements for IgG concentrations before insuring foals for mortality,” Pierce said. “These different policies can be confusing at times and can be an added expense to the client.” Flexor and Extensor Abnormalities--The most common flexural weaknesses--back at the knees and weak pasterns--will usually correct themselves in the first few weeks. Turnout is restricted. Trimming and special shoes can be used for support. “A small bandage with extra padding behind the heel bulbs can serve as adequate protection until the foal strengthens or until shoes can be applied,” said Pierce. “Without protection, heel bulb and pastern lacerations are common in these foals. Usually, a round pen or small temporary pen works well for initial turnout.” Fractured Ribs--Fractured ribs can be deadly if the rib penetrates the lungs or heart. “No foal should be turned out into a paddock until its ribs have been palpated,” he said. “Fractured ribs are most common after dystocia or in very large foals. If the foal has fractured ribs, it should be restricted to a stall for approximately three weeks. Usually, this length of time will allow for stabilization of the fracture site, and an adequate fibrous callus over the fracture will form.” Pierce said that with mild fractures, signs might include colic after exercise or an increased heart or respiratory rate. Ultrasound can confirm a fracture if it is not readily palpated. Head Tilt--This is seen in many normal foals and usually does not last longer than seven days. It is possibly caused by birth asphyxia or maturation of the nervous system, said Pierce. He recommended that a careful examination and a CBC be performed in case of underlying disease. Heart Murmurs--Most heart murmurs can be considered normal and will go away within two weeks, but if one does persist, a cardiac ultrasound examination is suggested. Normal heart murmurs can be found in very excitable foals, but will go away if the foal is lightly tranquilized. However, abnormal murmurs will not diminish with tranquilization. Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (dummy foals)--This syndrome is also known as neonatal maladjustment syndrome and can be seen in foals which might have been affected by premature placental separation (red bag delivery), dystocia, or non-elective Caesarean sections. Signs such as delayed nursing or standing, wandering, and/or seizures can appear as early as 48 hours after birth or as late as five days. These foals are usually referred to a veterinary hospital. Leg Edema--Some foals might develop swelling in the lower legs, with no fever or illness. Management with turnout in a small paddock and banamine for one day can reduce swelling, with a few requiring bandaging, said Pierce. Meconium Impaction--If the foal has a problem passing his meconium, he might experience abdominal pain. Another enema of warm, soapy water can be given along with Banamine and mineral oil given through a nasogastric tube. If the foal passed his meconium before birth, then the amnionic fluid will be fecal tinged and the amniotic fluid that entered the foal’s lungs might have been contaminated. This could lead to meconium pneumonia. Neonatal Isoerythrolysis (NI)--”Neonatal isoerythrolysis occurs when the foal inherits different blood antigens (types) from the stallion and the mare,” Pierce explained. “As a result, the mare has produced antibodies to these antigens, which are concentrated in her colostrum. The foal nurses the colostrum, and, depending on the concentration and type of antibodies, the foal develops hemolytic anemia (anemia resulting from decreased red cell survival time) within 24-96 hours of age. Affected foals become icteric (have yellow membranes), depressed, and anemic.” Treatment involves supportive care and blood transfusions; however, prevention through the use of a red blood cell (RBC) antibody screen within 30 days of birth can help determine if a foal is at risk. Pierce recommended that if a mare had not foaled within 30 days of the screening, that it be repeated. He said that he will muzzle a positive foal for 15 hours after birth to prevent nursing. The foal will receive compatible colostrum through bottle feeding, and the mare is milked and her colostrum discarded. Some veterinarians prefer to muzzle the foal for 24 hours. Omphalophlebitis--Inflammation of the umbilical veins and umbilical remnant infections are now less common. Inappropriate handling of the umbilicus during delivery or an unsanitary environment could cause this problem. Pierce said that less than 1% of foals are affected. As with patent urachus (more on this later), weak or recumbent foals are more at risk due to increased exposure to bedding, dust, and/or fecal matter. Infections are usually found three to four weeks after birth when the dried umbilical remnant does not fall off. Some foals develop fevers, an elevated white blood cell count, pus-like drainage, and/or an abscess. Ultrasound can help determine the severity, structures involved, and extent of the infection, allowing the veterinarian to make a judgment on the type and length of treatment, he said. Treatment is usually with antibiotics, although occasionally an abscess might be lanced and cultured. Surgery is rarely needed. A follow-up ultrasound exam and CBC counts can be done to determine when treatment should be ended.

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...cont. on page 31


WE WISH TO DRAW MEMBERS ATTENTION TO THE FOLLOWING 1. IMHR Work Order: New prices on the work order will be effective from August 1 2010 and will include membership. 2. Branding Reminder: (a) horses born between August 1 2009 and July 31 2010 are branded with a ‘9’ (b) horses born between August 1 2010 and July 31 2011 are branded with an ‘0’ Brands are based on BREEDING SEASON and NOT calendar year. 3. Deadlines for Miniature Horse Quarterly - is clearly written on page 3 of the magazine above the Table of Contents. Please note this and have all your information to the editor ON OR BEFORE THIS DATE. Please also have all inclusions PRINT READY, the editor will not be proof-reading, altering and/or retyping any inclusions, they will be printed as received. Thank you for your efforts. 4. Members, you may or may not be aware, (and this is especially for our new members) that your stud contact details can be put onto the IMHR Inc website free of charge. Please request for your stud to be included by contacting the IMHR office.

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Notice to Members With the increasing number of registrations and transfers being received at the office, it becomes even more important to ensure that your paperwork is completed correctly and completely to speed up processing. To assist with this, we have put together a handy reference guide to help you and give you useful tips to ensure that you have given us all the information we need. The information is on the website www.minihorseinfo.com on the FORMS page. Please read this carefully and hopefully a lot of your questions will be answered. Do not hesitate to contact the Secretary if you require assistance. Any incomplete or incorrect paperwork received at the office will incur a reprocessing fee. Remember - do not email the office with your information - please print it and put it with your membership or registration paperwork. Due to the volumes, it is impossible for us to keep matching up the paperwork for you. You don’t need to email us to tell us in advance that you have paid - just print the receipt and put it with your paperwork and post it in together. Thank you all for your cooperation - it is very much appreciated.

Unfortunately the attachments of the pictures did not come through to Fay in time for the deadline and the families could not be contacted due to show commitments. Prizes will be sent to the winners as usual, and we thank our sponsors again for their support.

Winner of the 8-12 age group is Claire Gilroy

Congratulations!

Winner of the 13-17 age group is Kate Papadopoulos Congratulations!

Due to the fact there is very little interest in these colour competitions for our youth, the sponsors have decided this will be the final competition. If anyone has any ideas about other youth competitions please let the office know or the editor.

These winners will each receive a prize supplied by KINGSTON HORSE SUPPLIES of Qld. Lyle Park Story Book Horses will also be giving a prize to all who entered the competition! Thank you so much for your sponsorship of our youth! 30

Miniature Horse Quarterly - Issue 21


...cont. from page 28

Patent Urachus--”The urachus is the in-utero connection between the fetus urinary bladder and allantoic cavity,” he explained. “In normal foals, this structure closes soon after delivery, and it eventually completely regresses to a group of ligaments. If the urachus does not close, urine will exit the umbilical area.” Pierce said that a urine-soaked umbilicus can sometimes be seen, especially in weak foals, those which struggle to rise, and foals which strain to defecate due to meconium retention. One concern is that bacteria can gain entry through the foal’s abdomen. Therefore, broad-spectrum antibiotics are used, and after two to three days, closure is attempted with the use of silver nitrate sticks over three to four days. In some cases, surgery is required to correct the problem. Premature Foals--Pierce said that due to differences in fetal maturation, a wide range of gestational lengths is possible, with a normal gestational length between 322-345 days. Some mares will foal as early as 310 days and have a normal foal. However, foals born under 310 days might need intensive therapy to survive. “One must consider the advisability of these attempts, because many foals have developmental skeletal issues as they grow on their relatively immature skeletal structure,” Pierce commented. “The cost of salvaging these very immature foals is considerable.” Scleral (Eye) Hemorrhage--Although no problems have been associated with bleeding in the sclera, Pierce commented that it might be noticed. It can be caused by trauma at birth. Septic Arthritis (Joint Ill or Navel Ill)--When circulating bacteria are shed into the blood, they can lodge and grow in the epiphyseal or metaphyseal growth complex, and possibly extend into the joint cavity. Synovial colonization is less common. Bacteria can then cause septic arthritis, also known as joint or navel ill. Pierce believes that not only can infection begin in the umbilicus, but that bacteria from the intestine and respiratory tract could be more common sources. “Any time a foal presents with lameness and fever, septic arthritis is the first problem to rule out,” he said. “Waiting just one day can many times make a serious difference in the eventual outcome. It cannot be stressed enough that a lame foal with or without a fever should be looked at very closely for the presence of septic arthritis. The longer one waits to lavage (wash) the joint, the more the cartilage is damaged. Additionally, the infection seems to become more deeply seated in the bone, making the treatment more extensive and costly with a poorer prognosis.” In addition to joint lavage, the foal is given antibiotics targeted to the specific bacteria; the antibiotic choice has been determined through a culture. “Foals with a clinically identifiable septic joint that is not obvious along with lameness and fever are started on systemic antibiotics and monitored very closely,” said Pierce. Radiographs can also determine if metaphyseal osteomyelitis (bone infection) is causing pain and lameness. Septicemia--Septicemia, or systemic disease, can appear within the first few hours of life, said Pierce. Signs include inability to stand and nurse, discolored mucous membranes with poor perfusion, and septic shock with cardiovascular collapse. Immediate treatment is necessary. Despite treatment, foals can develop septic arthritis or osteomyelitis. Affected foals are referred to a hospital for treatment. Many cases of septicemia are caused by bacterial placentitis. Those born with equine herpesvirus usually die. Foals born with leptospirosis might be small, but they are usually mature. Umbilical Bleeding--If hemorrhaging occurs, a commercially available clamp can be used to stop the bleeding. These foals should be watched for signs of infection over the next two to three weeks. If an infection develops, antibiotics can be given. Umbilical Hernia--These can be palpated upon first exam; however, they become more obvious after several weeks. Hernias are usually treated closer to weaning. ‘Windswept’ Foals--A foal might be termed a windswept foal if he has a conformational abnormality that results in both limbs being slanted in one direction. This could be caused by improper fetal position during the last few weeks before birth. A veterinarian will need to evaluate the curvature of the long bones and look for any spinal deformities. Affected foals are confined to stall rest until improvement warrants a change to a round pen or paddock. Surgery, such as a periosteal transection or transphyseal bridging, might be needed; however, most foals will correct themselves. More on Flexural Deformities Pierce said the most common mistake in treating flexural deformities is not being aggressive enough if the foal is not responding to treatment. If bandaging, tetracycline, and turnout are not enough, then splinting might be necessary; this should produce response within three days. Over at the knees conformation is very common, and most foals improve with exercise. “I have not had much success with surgery, casting, or tetracycline in severe carpal flexural deformities,” said Pierce. “Even some of the more severe cases will improve in a couple months with paddock exercise.” Owners can let the foal exercise in a small paddock with his dam; however, when the foal becomes tired--which is evidenced by trembling legs--the mare and foal should be put in a stall. This can occur after 30 minutes. However, the mare and foal can be turned out up to four times daily. “Patience is the most successful, non-stressful method of treating flexural deformity of the carpus in the foal,” he noted. Pierce concluded his presentation saying that at the end of the foal’s first month, most neonatal diseases become less frequent. He stressed the importance of the initial exam, along with follow-up exams if needed.

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NOTICES

POLICY CHANGES Members, please be advised that all horses must hold IMHR Inc. registration if they are advertised in this magazine. IMHR Website If you find that there are broken links or errors on our website, would you please report this to the webmaster on info@minihorseinfo.com If you have further requests, please also direct these to our office on info@minihorseinfo.com.au DEADLINES FOR MINIATURE HORSE QUARTERLY The deadline for advertising, articles etc is clearly written on page 3 of the magazine above the Table of Contents. Please note this and have all your information to the editor BY THIS DATE. Please also have all inclusions PRINT READY, the editor will not be proof-reading, altering and/or retyping any inclusions, they will be printed as received. Thank you for your efforts. If you do not have the facilities to create your own advert, IMHR office offers a design service, please contact us for details. CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Text only advertising is available for $7.00 per section. The size is approximately business card size and does not include photos. This is a very economical way of advertising your sales/wanted/lease etc. Please submit all classifieds to the editor ‘print-ready’ in jpeg format as they are to appear. No retyping will be done. REQUEST FOR SPONSORSHIP We have been getting many requests for sponsorship of open agricultural shows. We now require a form to be completed for all requests to enable us to ensure we are tracking this sponsorship and that it is fairly distributed. The forms are now available for download from the website or you may request a form from the office. You must be a current financial member to request sponsorship. Please note: be aware that even though IMHR may sponsor classes at a show run by another organisation, we do not assume jurisdiction in the event of a protest. You must follow the rules set down by the RAS, RNA or Show Society running that show. If unsure, please check with the Show Management or Show Secretary at that show.

Reminder! We can’t find you if we don’t have your correct or current details! If you have changed or are planning on changing your address, email or phone number please let the office know at info@minihorseinfo.com It is up to you to keep us updated, please take the time, it is only you who will miss out if you don’t. 32

Miniature Horse Quarterly - Issue 21

If anyone has any interesting articles they may have read or written and would like to share with other members, please send them to the editor on minifarm@tpg.com.au to be included in future issues. These could be health issues, natural remedies that are tried and true, foaling anecdotes or tips, show tips, breeding tips or something similar. Whatever you think may be of help to another member or a new person into the industry - send it along. Let’s share and help one another if we can. If any of the articles are not written by you personally, can you make sure you have permission for us to re-print them in the MHQ and give us the details of the author so we may give credit. Thank you.


Business Cards & Service Directory

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DISCLAIMER: The publisher does not guarantee the completeness, accuracy or correctness of any information or advice contained in this publication. Any information or advice is solely for the interest of readers and before placing any reliance on it, the reader must investigate and evaluate it to determine the appropriateness in the readers’ personal circumstances. The publisher accepts no responsibility for loss or damage of any kind resulting from reliance on any information or advice. IMHR prints advertisements provided by advertisers but gives no warranty and makes no representation as to the truth, accuracy or sufďŹ ciency of any description, photograph or statement therein.

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Business Cards & Service Directory

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Notice to Members about Photos Some adverts and/or photos are sent to me as very small files, so if they are blurry, or not as you expected, please be aware that they are reproduced proportionally as best as I can with what I am given. Please keep in mind for future issues that you need to have high resolution adverts and photos with a minimum of 300dpi. Ed MHQ 23

If you have a business card and would like it advertised here, please send it along to the editor on minifarm@tpg.com.au to be included in future issues. Only $7.00 per issue. Be seen - stay in people’s minds - increase your sales potential. They won’t know you are around unless they can see you. 34

Miniature Horse Quarterly - Issue 21


Kamelco Park K Forever More

Leawood Park Apache

Minimania Just R Silver Ghost

Nickurra Maid 2 Impress

Nickurra Keeper of my Heart

Springwaters EG Mystic Amulet Scolinda Ruby Mae

Leawood Park Passion 4 Fashion

Springwaters Hot Chocolate Anyssa Park Ultimate Wings of an Angel

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