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PORTFOLIO OF GUAN MIN Master of Design Studies Harvard Graduate School of Design 2017 Candidate


THE OTHER SIDE Almost two years ago, I was enrolled in the Critical Conservation program of Harvard GSD, as my previous projects expressed a strong interest on culture and identity transformation in the modern context. In the last twenty years, I have witnessed the dramatic urban evolution happening in the built environment of China and modern structures replacing traditional and cultural fabrics. Hence, I was curious how designers should respond to this global cultural crisis. However, as I broadened my horizon on this topic by attending classes and reading books from sociologists such as Henry Lefebvre, David Harvey, Guy Debord, I started to realize that I used to be too concentrated on the morphologic world, and failed to percieve the other side of the world, the "invisible" socio-economic geography, that was significantly reshaped in the urbanization process. Therefore, in the design and research projects during my GSD study, I have been trying to untangle and interpret the specific socio-economic dynamic into explicit questions, and deal with these questions not only by designing new spatial structures, but also by implementing economic, political and technological interventions.

CONTENTS Ribbon Prolific Relic (Re)creation of the Riverway Embracing Pilgrimage to the Hills Flowing History Fit Point Village of the Cloud

3 7 12 20 25 30 36 44

Other Works

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Ribbon

The Park of U-Center, Beijing Academic Project Site: Boston, America Collaborate Work Collaborater: Linzi Tang, Xiaolei Yue Instructor: Xiao Feng Date: Jan. 2015

The site is located at Wudaokou, which is one of the most prosperous area in Beijing. A subway station is located next to the site, producing massive human traffic, especially in the morning and evening. According the a report, more than 10,000 people access the subway from this station every day. Meanwhile, many universities are located in the surrounding area, which further increase the vitality of the area. Therefore, the shopping mall locating in the middle of the site, U-center, has become the real heart of this district by attracting not only university students but also nearby residents and tourists. The design of the park not only provide a comfortable path to public transportation for the adjacent communities, but also creates various scales of space along the street and inside the park to meet different demands of different groups, including residents, students and pedestrians. The emergence of this park provides a cozy space to improve the life quality of this prosperous area and also aims to alleviate the heavy human traffic. The park extends the social life from U-center into a more natural world with sunshine, grass and fresh air.

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Site Analysis

Incentives of Design

37%

Residence Railway

100,000+

In the area showed in the map, 37% of the land belongs to universities.

More than 100 thousand people access this subway station everyday.

Subway

Sunken City Highway

U-Center (Shopping Mall) Subway Station Residence

0

1km

2km

More than 80 thousand students live in this area.

Site City Highway Subway Railway Land Use: University

80,000+

The site is located at Wudaokou, which is one of the most prosperous area in Beijing. Many universities are located in the surrounding area. The shopping mall in the site has become the center of this district by attracting not only university students but also nearby residents. A subway station is also located next to the site, producing massive human traffic.

Residence 4

Subway Station

Shopping Mall

Universities

Railway

Easy access to the subway

Interact with sidewalk and community

Create private space of the park

The design of the park not only provide a comfortable path to public transportation, but also creates various scale of space along the street and inside the park to meet different demands of residents, students and pedestrians. The emergence of this park provides a cozy space to improve the life quality of the prosperous area and also alleviates the heavy human traffic.

Robust Community

Daily Life

Social Events


Planting Design Arbor

Small Arbor & Shrub

Section

Street

Subway Railway

Sunken Lawn

Plaza

Street

5


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Prolific Relic

Relic as Framework to Foster Productive Connections betwen People and Land Competition Project, 1st Prize of 2016 "Ruins & Rebirth" International Landscape Design Competition Site: Dongjingyu Village, Tianjin Province, China Collaborate Work Collaborater: Longfeng Wu (Harvard GSD, DDes 2019), Ruyi Chen (Penn, MLA 2017) Date: Oct. 2016-Dec. 2016

Dongjingyu Village was abadoned by its residents due to the lack of electricty and sufficient water supply, leaving unmovable stone walls swallowed by the rampant vegetations in the past decades. Largely based on the muscular power, the previous local villagers built the folk house with stone that was distributed in the surrounding hills. They carefully selected the site of village and organized foundations as well as farm land in periphery area. The local people's wisdom of achieving the balance of nature and living engraved the relic. Inspired by the cultural landscape in Dongjingyu village, the design proposal aims to revitalize the village in a way of bringing novel and vibrant connections between people and land by redesigning and leveraging the local industry. Our team sees the remains not ruins but resources, the technological innovations not adversity but opportunity, the traditional ways of living not outdated but advantage. The design of Dongjingyu village tries to show a new relationship between human and land, urban and rural, traditional and future.

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The Site

The site is located in Dongjingyu Village, which was abadoned by its residents due to the lack of electricty and water supply, leaving unmovable stone walls swallowed by the rampant vegetations in the past decades.

Idea and Strategy Phase 0: Reorganization Identify and Reorganize Infrastructure as Development Framework

Phase 1: Intervention Fauna Farming as an Art, Product and Landschaft

Phase 2: Invitation Courtyard Planting as a New Bond and Sight Spot

Phase 3: Innovation Garden Design Festival as a Future Stimulus

Infrastructure Condition (Before)

Site Reorganizing Strategy

8

Infrastructure Condition (After)


Program Phase 1: Intervention

Design Prototype

Fauna Farming as an Art, Product and Landschaft

AR Technology Applied

Section

9


Phase 2: Invitation

Courtyard Planting as a New Bond and Sight Spot

Design Prototype

Trip Booking APP UI

Seasonal Program

Phase 3: Innovation

Garden Design Festival as a Future Stimulus Event Facility

10

After a stable economic system is formed, the site expects to host international garden design festivals.

Yard & House Without Roof

House Foundation

Wall Fragment

No Wall


0-1 Year

1-5 Years

5-12 Years

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(Re)creation of the Riverway

Beijing Cultural Park & Plaza Academic Project Site: Beijing, China Individual Work Instructor: Xiong Li Date: May. 2014-Jul. 2014

The park and plaza project is based on the re-design of Zizhu Park. The location of Zizhu park used to be Pingdi Fountain 1700 years ago, which formed the initial water system of Beijing. Due to the existing water system, the first emperor of Yuan Dynasty built Beijing, which started the city's history as the economic and cultural center of the nation. The riverway has fostered the development of Beijing. The design aims to re-create the riverway and cultural landscape with modern recreation facilities to link social life with the city's culture and history. The site locates in a multi-functional area and therefore has to play different roles to respond the evolving demands of people's modern life. The park not only provides places to exercise and relax, but also draws in commercial elements to enrich life events. In the design of the city plaza, elements that represent Beijing culture are applied, such as gray brick, rice fields, local trees, which arouse the city history and self's cultural identity. The design of the park and the plaza shows different strategies and provides different answers to integrate nature and city, modern and past.

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Site Analysis

The History of the Riverway in Beijing

700 A.D.

1150 A.D.

1205 A.D.

1. 1700year ago, Ancient Gaoliang River is the most important water system in Beijing. It originated from Pingdi Fountain (SITE) and formed Shicha Lake, Bei Lake, Zhongnan Lake. 2. In Jing dynasty, the emperor built Qionghua Island in Bei Lake, and when it came to Yuan dynasty, the new emperor decided to built the new captial and made the city plan basing on Qionghua Island, which formed the establishment of Beijing. 3. The Pingdi Fountain starts to dry, so in 1205, people drew water from Kunming Lake to support the need, and in 1291, Shoujing Guo drew water from Baifu Fountain to Kunming Lake and formed Beijing water system that continued to today.

Design Concept

As a city park, the design focuses on three aspects: modern life, ecological city and cultural memory. Firstly, the city park must meet residents’ daily demands, such as exercising, reading, chessing, chatting in the park. Besides, the park draws in commercial elements to enrich life events. Secondly, the park must be connected to the whole city green system, and create a city-scale ecological system which will hugely benefit the city environment. Thirdly, the design should focus on culture and history that the site possesses. By exploring and showing it in the design, we can give people an opportunity to experience and inherit the culture.

1. Built a central lake, which metaphorize the Pingdi Fountain and make it the core landscape of the park.

2. Channel the lake into a river, and built some fields along the river, reproduce the anicent scene that rivers prosper the city.

3. Channel a stem from Chang River to complete the water system, make this channel inconspicuous by terrains, trees, stones, etc.

4. Use the methods in the design of Chinese traditional gradens to create various types of spaces that acheive different functions. 13


14


Greenway Design

Design Analysis of City Park Space Organization

Water System

Spatial Structure

Terrain System

Traffic Analysis

Construction & Hard Pavement

15


16


Design Concept: Haidian Cultural Plaza

Morphological Formation

The design of the plaza focuses on two words: Memory and Integration. Memory represents the features common in Haidian, Beijing, like grey bricks used in tradiontional buildings, jujube trees in the counrtyard, rice in the field, the natural ponds in the Summer Palace, etc. These all can arouse our memory of the old past days. Integration includes three meaning. The first meaning is integration of nature and building as the plaza locates between buildings and a park. The second meaning is integration of water, for the plaza has a sunken square and rainwater garden in the center, which can avoid the rain causing floods in the streets. The third is integration of people, the plaza will play as a communcation bond, and while it provides lots of activities, it will gather people to relax outdoor.

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Memory: Brick

Grey bricks are the main construction material of Beijing traditional houses, which can easily arouse the memory of the past life and cultural identity. In this plaza, the grey bricks are used flexibly to create various kinds of space.

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Memory: Rice

Memory: Tree

Jingxi Rice produced in Haidian used to be famous in China. Hundred years ago, there were a lot of farmland in Beijing because of it’s geographical conditions. People not only can enjoy the agricultural landscape, but also can engage in the cultivation of rice, which will bring residents a special experience.

Trees have been planted in the courtyard of Beijing traditional houses. The space under the tree played an inportant role in past public life. Hence trees strongly connect with people's memory and emotion. Many of these treees are not only beautiful but also produce colorful and edible fruits.

Punica granatum

Diospyros kaki

Ziziphus jujuba

Syringa oblata

Malus spectabilis

Michelia alba

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Embracing

Rebuilding the Neighborhood Relationship Academic Project Site: Beijing, China Collaborate Work Collaborater: Jingchen Gao (Harvard GSD, MArchII 2018) Date: Sep. 2014-Oct. 2014

After the 1950s, many Beijing traditional courtyard houses started to contain multiple families, yet it had been designed for one family hundreds years ago. Although the house was crowded, these families lived in a close relationship with overlapping life activities and many of them found it heartwarming. However, as Beijing has developed rapidly, courtyard houses were replaced by modern residential towers and the previous neighborhood relationship collapsed. At the same time, many other question emerged, such as child safety, age concern, etc. The design of this micro community center aims to rebuild the neighborhood relationship and resolve the social problems--children stay at home alone after school while the elders are also bored and lonely. This project not only provides a prototype for the architectural design, but also arranges life activities that can effectively connect children and elderly, which is believed to be a starting point to further impetus the formation of a closer and warmer neighborhood relationship. The micro community center are designed under the tree that used to be in the yard of the traditional houses, which also symbolizes an inheritance of the previous social life.

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21


22


23


24


Pilgrimage to the Hills

Reapplying JIE in Modern Park Design Academic Project Site: Beijing, China Individual Work Instructor: Jianning Zhu Date: Oct. 2013- Dec. 2013

Ancient Chinese people worship the mountains. They believe that the mountain symbolizes nobility, strong will and other human characters. Therefore, Jie, which means borrowing the scenic views from the outside landscape by organizing sightlines and spaces, is frequently used in the design of Chinese traditional gardens. However, due to the rapid urban development, the natural views are blocked by the high-rise buildings nowadays. Young generations even aren't aware of the existence of these mountains. In this site, I surprisingly found out that the linear land faced towards three famous mountains in Beijing, which used to play an important role in the design of the surrounding traditional gardens. Further, there are no high-rise buildings located among the sightline, leaving a clear view to the mountains in the site. Hence, The park is designed to pilgrimage to the hills and inherit the Chinese aesthetic philosophy, as well as providing a peaceful and poetic place for residents to escape from the crowed urban environment.

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“Jie” in Chinese Traditional Gardens

*Jie is the most classical design strategy applied in the design of Chinese Traditional Garden. In brief, Jie means borrowing the scene from a distance.

The Lost Hills: Refound in the Site

1960: See the Hills

2000: The view is blocked

View toward the Hills from the Site

Source: Analysis of the Traditional Chinese Garden, Yigang Peng, 1986 The columns and cornices function as frames to capture the view, which is a typical use of Jie.

In Jinshan, there are many hills around the buildings. Hence rooms or windows would be set up towards the hills or buildings in order to highlight the scenery.

Three Hills and Five Gardens

Elevate the Platform

Avoid Trees

A Site Toward the Hills

Three Hills and Five Gardens is the general name of the Imperial Palaces in western beijing, which were built during Qing dynasty. The three Hills refers to Xi Hill, Yuquan Hill and Wanshou Hill. On the three hills, three palaces—Qing Yi Garden (the Summer Palace), Jingyi Garden, Jingming Garden—were built. In addition with Changchun Garden and Yihe Palace nearby, they constitute the Five Gardens. With its grand scale and outstanding achievements in art, the Three Hills and Five Gardens is the treasure of Beijing. 26

Two Strategies:

The Three Hills and Five Gardens used to be the objest of “Jie” —buildings in beijing would capture their views and show their respect. However, since the buildings are getting higher, we can hardly see them inside the city nowadays. The site’s direction is just towards the three mountains, plus, there are no high-rise buildings along the view. As a result, people can see the hills directly, which is uncommon in beijing now. Therefore, I use the concept Jie in my design, in other words, the liner park is designed to pilgrimage to the hills, as long as providing a peaceful and poetic place for visitors to escape from the crowded city.


Site Analysis

Space Layout

Planting

Greenway System

27


The Spacial Sequence- Six Sections

This urban linear park is divided into six sections, and each one takes a Chinese classic prose as its theme in response to the different environment and function requirements. By using water, bamboo, stones and other elements, I intend to create a poetic, comfortable and relaxing space In the viewpoints in the third, fourth and sixth part, people can gradually see the distant mountains become more and more distinct.

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Section 1-1

Section 2-2 29


Flowing History

Landscape Constructuring with Cultural Consciousness Professional Project Site: Beijing, China Collaborate Work Collaborater: Siyu Zhu Instructor: Yufan Zhu Date: Jul. 2014-Sep. 2014

The project is the landscape design for the building of SIPO, State Intellectual Property Office. The main responsibility is to examine patents and organize relevant trainings. The architecture design is enlightened a traditional toy named Luban Lock, which symbolized the intelligence of Chinese people and the huge number of inventions in the past thousands years. However, the location of the building also has a unique history. It is located on ancient Yongding River fan, which formed a special geological feature under the ground. The design exposed a common challenge that designers frequently encounter--how to inherit features from the past and combine with current identity. Accept providing exterior space for the staffs to relax and exercise, the landscape design not only aims to show China's patent history, but also reflects on the geological feature of the site. The combination of history and culture features forms the new identity of the site.

30


Site Analysis

Building Introduction

Yongding River Fan in Late Pleistocene

The building is designed by China Architecture Design & Research group, instructed by Chinese famous architect Kai CUI. The design is enlightened by a traditional toy, named Luban Lock. Luban Lock not only demonstrates the intelligence of Chinese people, but also symbolizes the huge number of inventions that Chinese people devised in its thousand years history.

Geological Section of the Site

Space Analysis

The site is located on ancient Yongdine River fan, which formed in late pleistocene. These fans interlapped and created the geological feature and structure of Beijing. In addition, Anicent Yongding River played an important role in moistening and fostering this city thousand years ago.

Building

Main Building

Steel Structure Building

Courtyard

Basement 1

Floor 1

Introduction of SIPO

The project construction, named as SIPO, Beijing, is affiliated with the State Intellectual Property Office of the People Republic of China (SIPO). As a local office, it helps SIPO examine the patents, and also organizes relevant trainings. There will be about 2000 people working in the construction.

Periphery 31


N

32

0

20

40

60m

1. Mirror Pool 2. Flower Garden 3. Stone Stage 4. Sunken Garden 5. Activities Field 6. Amber Water Fall 7. Era Monument 8. Ribbon Garden 9. Roof Garden 10. Main Entrance 11. Staff Entrance


Space Layout (Building)

User and Function Analysis

Traffic Analysis

Flow Prediction

Space Layout (Courtyard)

View Analysis

Space Layout (Courtyard) Fire Control Access

33


Amber & Patent

Display the History in Ambers

Glass Brick Patents resemble to ambers for they share two key features. Both of them are open to the world: everyone can search the detail of each patent easily on the internet. Meanwhile, the flower or insect in the amber is clear and visible. Both of them are well protected: patents are protected by law since hundred years ago, as ambers have a solid shell so that it can hand down to generations. Considering this fact, in the design, I uses elements that seem similar to ambers to metaphorize patents. Characters

The History of Patent in China

1. The height difference between basement 1 yard and floor 1 yard is 5 meters.

Pictures

2. Digest the height by stairs. The deisgn is inspired by the geological section of the site.

Courtyard Section

34

3. Create platforms among the terrace. At the same time, plant trees and flowers.

4. Place the Ambers with led light in the stones, and build a water fall.

Cultural Relics

China has its own patent history, and we should let people know about it. It is a suitable opportunity to tell them some historical stories when they come to apply for the patent and wait in the courntyard.


Detail Design

This installation locates beside the Amber Waterfall. The abstract art work symbolizes memory and history. What’s more, it brings changes to the site and create a interesting place. While the installation is build by many rotatable metal plates, people can freely join in the change of the form.

Taihu Stone is a great symbol of Chinese Traditional Gardens. However, in this design, I replace the traditional stone with a sculpture of Taihu Stone that made by resin. This transparent sculpture exposes the sense of purity and repect, and also represents the profound Chinese culture.

This installation locates above the small courtyard, and can be seen from the Staff Entrace. In both of the Chinese and world patent history, color clothes witnessed the begin of patent legal system. However, this new color clothes are made by new material, which makes it light but tough. 35


Fit Point

The Exercise & Health Science Campus Academic Project Site: Boston, America Collaborate Work Collaborater: Djuro Bartulica, Hao Ding, Yi Sha, Yan Liu Instructor: Richard Peiser Date: Nov. 2016-Dec. 2016

Columbia Point has worn many hats in it’s history. In the past century, it has functioned as a calf pasture, World War II prisoner-of-war camp, a dump, and a public housing complex. The area has, due to these major transitions, remained largely unplanned with respect to walkability and public space. A cohesive road network and open space plan similarly is nonexistent on the site despite the fact that a large amount of acreage is currently devoted to it. In order to address the concerns associated with the existing residential neighborhood and also to serve Mass plans for campus expansion, the project begins conceptually with the the creation of 3 new medium-scale central green spaces at appropriate walkable distances from the T-stop. These spaces represent the larger goal of establishing a more holistic and congenial green space network for the entire site. Since health, exercise science, and nursing programs make up the largest cohorts at UMass, the institutional incubation fostering research in health, exercise and food sciences and accompanying office space make up the major programs of the development. The urban renewal project not only aims to associated with UMass plans for major campus expansion (16,000 to 25,000 students) that must address existing residential and institutional uses, but also stimulates and improves the local economy.

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Demographics

The Site: Columbia Point

Total Population, 2015

% White Population, 2015

3,832

Median Age, 2015

Elevated Main Street

34.2%

% Renter Occupied Housing, 2015

T-Station

Main Street 25.1

Median Household Income, 2015

99.4%

% Under Poverty Line, 2015 Elevated Highway

$26,660

32.4%

Harbor Point

The site is located at Columbia Point, Boston. It is a young community and is relatively high in poverty. The urban renewal project not only aims to associated with UMass plans for major campus expansion (16,000 to 25,000 students) that must address existing residential and institutional uses, but also stimulates and improves the local economy.

Boston College High School

UMASS Boston

JFK Library

The site is a 97-acre land located in Columbia Point, Boston. The area has, due to these major transitions, remained largely unplanned with respect to walkability and public space. A cohesive road network and open space plan similarly is nonexistent on the site despite the fact that a large amount of acreage is currently devoted to it.

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Concept: Health & Exercise

T-Station

High Value Office & High Density Residence

Multi-Family Housing T-Station

Since health, exercise science, and nursing programs make up the largest cohorts at UMass, the institutional incubation fostering research in health, exercise and food sciences and accompanying office space make up the major programs of the development. Meanwhile, a new green space system is designed to foster daily exercise and improve public health. This strategy also adds to UMass's future expansion plans and activate the T-station.

Waterfront T-Station

Retail & Recreation Center

Central Plaza

Institution & Incubator

Student Housing

Community Facilities Lifestyle Center

Residence: Multi-Family & Student Housing

UMASS

Office Hotel Retail Multi-Family Student Housing Institutional Civic

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Waterfront Greenway Green Corridor

Summary & Land Use Budget

39


Waterfront Landscape

Park Waterfront Walk Rock Barrier

Grassland (slope)

Sandy Beach

Grassland (slope) Wetland Concrete Barrier

The waterfront landscape provides seaside space to easily access the ocean scenery and cozy breeze, and ,at the meantime, deals with the ecological concerns. The different types of barrier system protect the park from waves. The wetland not only can purify the rain water and protect the coastal habitat, but also can absorb the sea water and protect the land from erosion and salinization. 40


Retail & Recreation Center

Office (1st&2nd Floor Retail)

Hotel (1st Floor Retail)

Residence: Multi-Family (1st Floor Retail)

Residence

Food

Shopping

Work

Lodging

Event

41


Institution & Incubator

Institution & Incubator

42

Residence: Student Housing

Residence: Multi-Family

Residence

Exercise

Experience

Education

Research

Public Lecture


UE

9 0 0 0 2 % 8 9 9 % 6 3 5 7 3 9

0 %

9

5 3 % 9 2 7 % 6 9 0 7 8

0 %

Financial Model PHASING

Office Building Area Dev cost/sf Total dev cost Operating cost/EGI

398,923 390,536 280 Dev cost/sf $127,655,405 $124,971,544 30% Operating cost

Institutional Institutional Building Area Area Total dev cost -

280 42%

0 Dev cost/sf $0 Operating cost

14%

62%

260 35%

356,836Total 209,065 Total Residual Land Value Phase 3 $107,050,882 350 $509,692,461 Key 597 per land area (sf) per arce Rent/sf $28 Rent/Key 200 $121 $5,274,459 Retail RevenueArea $17,442,216 Building 186,659 Revenue 74,021 $43,604,968 0 13% Occupancy 95% Occupancy 80% Total Development Cost Total dev cost $48,531,226 $19,245,552 $0 13% EGI $16,570,105 EGI $34,883,974 $2,275,245,124 Operating Cost $5,302,434 Operating Cost $27,907,180 Total Hard Cost Total 74% NOI Building Area $11,267,671 $6,976,7952,682,678 $1,933,958,356 Total 2,212,030 NOI 3,040,246 Cap rate 5.0% Cap rate 6.5% Total dev cost $646,226,689 $870,732,003 $758,286,432 Valueconstruction $225,353,426 Total $549,292,686 Value $740,122,202 $107,335,306 $644,543,467 Dev cost $186,880,882 Dev cost $73,172,720 Profit@20% $18,688,088 Profit@20% $14,634,544 Residual Land value $19,784,456 Residual Land value $19,528,042 PRO FORMA RESIDUAL LAND VALUE per sf $32 per key $32,692 Multifamily_Market rate Multifamily_Affordable (15%) Retail per sf $93Student Housing Area Unit Size Dev cost/sf Number of Units Operating cost Rent/Unit Revenue Occupancy EGI Operating Cost NOI Cap rate Value Dev cost Profit@20% Residual Land value per unit per sf Dev cost/sf Operating cost/EGI Office Area Rent/sf Revenue Occupancy EGI Operating Cost NOI Cap rate Value Dev cost Profit@20% Residual Land value per sf

Dev cost/sf Operating cost

LAND DEVELOPMENT PRO FORMA Total Residual Land Value

Phase 1

Multifamily_Affordable (15%) Student Retail Phase 1 Phase 2 Housing Phase 3 Area 718,203 Area 1,264,792 Area 260,680 Multifamily housing Unit SizeArea 1,000 9401,979,416Building 911,547 Unit Size 1,897,059 8% Number of 718 912 Number of Units 1897 1346 Number of Units Units 1979 Rent/Unit (80% AMI) $1,600 Rent/Unit $2,880 Rent/sf 41%$30 18% Total dev cost $255,233,258 $531,176,506 $554,236,381 Revenue $13,789,503 Revenue $46,513,198 Revenue $7,820,397 Occupancy 95% Occupancy 95% Occupancy 10% 95% Student housing EGI $13,100,028 EGI $44,187,538 EGI $7,429,378 23% Building Area 505,836 412,530 346,426 Operating Cost $3,930,008 Operating Cost $2,600,282 Number of Units 538 Operating Cost 439 $18,558,766 369 NOI $9,170,020 NOI $25,628,772 NOI $4,829,095 Total dev cost $141,634,080 $115,508,400 $96,999,170 Cap rate 5.5% Cap rate 5.0% Cap rate 5.0% Value $166,727,630 Value $512,575,439 Value $96,581,909 Phase 2 Hotel Dev cost $201,096,922 Dev cost $354,141,650 Dev cost $67,776,778 Building Area 209,065 0 0 2% Profit@20% $40,219,384 Profit@20% $70,828,330 Profit@20% $13,555,356 Number of Keys 597 0 0 Residual Land value -$74,588,676 Residual Land value $87,605,460 Residual Land value 9% $15,249,775 Total dev cost $73,172,720 $0 $0 per unit -$103,855 per unit $65,092 per sf $59 13% per sf -$104 per sf $69

622,936

4,069,819 1,000 4,070 $3,000 $146,513,472 95% $139,187,798 $41,756,339 $97,431,459 5.5% $1,771,481,066 $1,139,549,223 $227,909,845 $404,021,997 $99,273 $99

280 30%

789,459 $35 $27,631,073 95% $26,249,519 $9,187,332 $17,062,187 5.0% $341,243,746 $252,626,949 $50,525,390 $38,091,407 $48

320 35%

Multifamily housing Student housing Hotel Office Retail

Multifamily housing Student housing Office Institutional Retail

0 Hotel 266,100 Area $0 Unit Size $79,830,000

Area Unit Size 300 Dev cost/sf Number of Units 32%Rent/Unit (80% Operating cost AMI) Revenue Occupancy EGI Operating Cost NOI Cap rate Value Dev cost Profit@20% Residual Land value per unit per sf Dev cost/sf Operating cost/EGI Institutional Area Rent/sf Revenue Occupancy EGI Operating Cost NOI Cap rate Value Dev cost Profit@20% Residual Land value per sf

Dev cost/sf Operating cost

718,203 1,000 718 $1,600 $13,789,503 95% $13,100,028 $3,930,008 $9,170,020 5.5% $166,727,630 $201,096,922 $40,219,384 -$74,588,676 -$103,855 -$104 280 30%

622,936 $28 $17,442,216 95% $16,570,105 $5,302,434 $11,267,671 5.0% $225,353,426 $186,880,882 $18,688,088 $19,784,456 $32

300 32%

Area Unit Size 350 Number of Units 80%Rent/Unit Revenue Occupancy EGI Operating Cost NOI Cap rate Value Dev cost Profit@20% Residual Land value per unit per sf Dev cost/sf Operating cost

Hotel Area Unit Size Key Rent/Key Revenue Occupancy EGI Operating Cost NOI Cap rate Value Dev cost Profit@20% Residual Land value per key per sf Dev cost/sf Operating cost

1,264,792 940 1346 $2,880 $46,513,198 95% $44,187,538 $18,558,766 $25,628,772 5.0% $512,575,439 $354,141,650 $70,828,330 $87,605,460 $65,092 $69 280 42%

209,065 350 597 200 $43,604,968 80% $34,883,974 $27,907,180 $6,976,795 6.5% $107,335,306 $73,172,720 $14,634,544 $19,528,042 $32,692 $93 350 80%

DEVELOPMENT COSTS Development Costs Entitlements Drainage Roads Utilities Amenities Subtotal Marketing 6% Administration 4%

$509,692,461

Multifamily housing Student housing Institutional

Area Rent/sf Revenue Occupancy EGI Operating Cost NOI Cap rate Value Dev cost Profit@20% Residual Land value per sf

Dev cost/sf Operating cost

260,680

$30 $7,820,397 95% $7,429,378 $2,600,282 $4,829,095 5.0% $96,581,909 $67,776,778 $13,555,356 $15,249,775 $59

260 35%

Total Total Residual Land Value $509,692,461 per land area (sf) per arce $121 $5,274,459 Total Development Cost $2,275,245,124 Total Hard Cost $1,933,958,356

Multifamily Student Housing Retail Office Institutional Hotel Multifamily Student Housing Retail Office Institutional Hotel Revenue Multifamily Student Housing Retail Office Institutional Hotel Total Revenue Expenses Land Acqusition Cost Development Cost Administration Marketing Total Expenses NET REVENUE Unleveraged IRR NPV@8% Land Acqusition Cost per Land Area (sf)

Total 4,788 1,346 260,680 789,459 622,936 597 Inflation % 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% Total $458,318,223 $114,779,160 $17,866,580 $46,357,418 $29,147,890 $61,955 $666,531,226 Total $123,000,000 $168,943,989 $40,426,985 $26,951,323 ($359,322,297) $307,208,930 12.0% $51,249,609 $123,000,000 $29

0

1

0

1 $68,804 $65,092 $59 $48 $32 $93 1

0

$0 0 $123,000,000

($123,000,000) ($123,000,000)

$0 1 $6,726,316 $1,609,555 $1,073,037 ($9,408,908) ($9,408,908)

$3,800,000 $24,000,000 $35,000,000 $40,000,000 $25,000,000 $127,800,000 $30,581,548 $20,387,698

PHASE 1 2 152 90 31,110 66,487 0 100 2 $70,868 $67,045 $60 $50 $33 $96 2 $10,766,551 $6,014,616 $1,874,519 $3,304,247 $0 $9,578 $21,969,511 2

3 152 90 31,110 66,487 0 100 3 $72,994 $69,056 $62 $51 $34 $99 3 $11,089,547 $6,195,055 $1,930,754 $3,403,375 $0 $9,865 $22,628,596 3

4 152 90 31,110 66,487 0 100 4 $75,184 $71,128 $64 $53 $35 $102 4 $11,422,234 $6,380,906 $1,988,677 $3,505,476 $0 $10,161 $23,307,454 4

5 152 90 31,110 66,487 0 100 5 $77,439 $73,262 $66 $54 $36 $105 5 $11,764,901 $6,572,333 $2,048,337 $3,610,640 $0 $10,466 $24,006,678 5

6 152 90 31,110 66,487 0 100 6 $79,762 $75,460 $68 $56 $37 $108 6 $12,117,848 $6,769,503 $2,109,787 $3,718,959 $0 $10,780 $24,726,878 6

7 152 90 31,110 66,487 0 100 7 $82,155 $77,723 $70 $58 $38 $112 7 $12,481,383 $6,972,588 $2,173,081 $3,830,528 $0 $11,104 $25,468,684 7

$6,928,105 $1,657,842 $1,105,228 ($9,691,175) $12,278,336

$7,135,948 $1,707,577 $1,138,385 ($9,981,910) $12,646,686

$7,350,027 $1,758,804 $1,172,536 ($10,281,367) $13,026,086

$7,570,528 $1,811,568 $1,207,712 ($10,589,808) $13,416,869

$7,797,644 $1,865,916 $1,243,944 ($10,907,503) $13,819,375

$8,031,573 $1,921,893 $1,281,262 ($11,234,728) $14,233,956

9 316 73 12,337 65,089 44,350 0 9 $87,158 $82,457 $74 $61 $40 $118 9 $27,557,433 $6,032,735 $914,238 $3,978,369 $1,784,317 $0 $40,267,092 9

10 316 73 12,337 65,089 44,350 0 10 $89,773 $84,931 $76 $63 $41 $122 10 $28,384,156 $6,213,718 $941,666 $4,097,720 $1,837,846 $0 $41,475,105 10

11 316 73 12,337 65,089 44,350 0 11 $92,466 $87,478 $79 $65 $43 $126 11 $29,235,681 $6,400,129 $969,915 $4,220,651 $1,892,981 $0 $42,719,358 11

12 316 73 12,337 65,089 44,350 0 12 $95,240 $90,103 $81 $67 $44 $129 12 $30,112,751 $6,592,133 $999,013 $4,347,271 $1,949,771 $0 $44,000,939 12

13 316 73 12,337 65,089 44,350 0 13 $98,098 $92,806 $83 $69 $45 $133 13 $31,016,134 $6,789,897 $1,028,983 $4,477,689 $2,008,264 $0 $45,320,967 13

$8,520,696 $2,038,936 $1,359,291 ($11,918,923) $28,348,170

$8,776,316 $2,100,104 $1,400,070 ($12,276,490) $29,198,615

$9,039,606 $2,163,108 $1,442,072 ($12,644,785) $30,074,573

$9,310,794 $2,228,001 $1,485,334 ($13,024,129) $30,976,810

$9,590,118 $2,294,841 $1,529,894 ($13,414,853) $31,906,115

PHASE 3 14 330 61 0 0 59,473 0 14 $101,040 $95,590 $86 $71 $47 $137 14 $33,333,511 $5,872,930 $0 $0 $2,773,845 $0 $41,980,286 14 $9,877,822 $2,363,686 $1,575,791 ($13,817,298) $28,162,988

PHASE 2 8 316 73 12,337 65,089 44,350 0 8 $84,620 $80,055 $72 $59 $39 $115 8 $26,754,790 $5,857,025 $887,610 $3,862,494 $1,732,346 $0 $39,094,265 8 $8,272,520 $1,979,550 $1,319,700 ($11,571,770) $27,522,495

15 330 61 0 0 59,473 0 15 $104,072 $98,458 $88 $73 $48 $141 15 $34,333,516 $6,049,118 $0 $0 $2,857,060 $0 $43,239,695 15

16 330 61 0 0 59,473 0 16 $107,194 $101,411 $91 $75 $49 $146 16 $35,363,522 $6,230,592 $0 $0 $2,942,772 $0 $44,536,886 16

17 330 61 0 0 59,473 0 17 $110,410 $104,454 $94 $77 $51 $150 17 $36,424,428 $6,417,510 $0 $0 $3,031,055 $0 $45,872,992 17

18 330 61 0 0 59,473 0 18 $113,722 $107,587 $97 $80 $52 $154 18 $37,517,160 $6,610,035 $0 $0 $3,121,987 $0 $47,249,182 18

19 330 61 0 0 59,473 0 19 $117,134 $110,815 $100 $82 $54 $159 19 $38,642,675 $6,808,336 $0 $0 $3,215,646 $0 $48,666,658 19

$10,174,156 $2,434,597 $1,623,064 ($14,231,817) $29,007,878

$10,479,381 $2,507,634 $1,671,756 ($14,658,772) $29,878,114

$10,793,762 $2,582,863 $1,721,909 ($15,098,535) $30,774,458

$11,117,575 $2,660,349 $1,773,566 ($15,551,491) $31,697,691

$11,451,102 $2,740,160 $1,826,773 ($16,018,036) $32,648,622

43


Village in the Cloud

Rural Development with Internet Impetus Competition Project, 2nd Prize of 2015 L & A Design Star Competition Site: Henggang Village, Zhejiang Province, China Collaborate Work Collaborater: Wu Longfeng (Harvard GSD, DDes 2019), Jingchan Gao (Harvard GSD, MArchII 2018) Date: Oct. 2015-Dec. 2015

Henggang Village is a typical Chinese village located in Zhejing Province. Although it possesses abundant agricultural sources, the village is facing a common challenge as well as many other China rural areas--how to survive in the decay of first industry. Many development modes were tried in other areas but most of them shared similar defects. Fortunately, the village is located in the area with high-quality infrastructure, especially for internet, which has brought huge change to the comsumption world. Meanwhile, there are many cities around the village within accessible distances. Therefore, promoting the village by internet is a potential and promising strategy. With the help of internet tools, which can effectively connect the rural and urban residents, the design aims to promote and thrive the village by re-forming the material and spiritual bond between villages and cities. The design of the spatial settlement and industrial model are based on local features and current conditions. Many interesting and characteristic agriculture-related events are constructed to promote the recovery of the emotional bond between urban residents and rural life, and fundamentally, thrive Henggang village.

44


Internet, Transport and Agriculture Pattern of Henggang

Urban-Rural Nexus Model

Site

Legend

StrategyďźšInternet + Village Henggang Village is located in Tongxiang City, Zhejiang Province. According to the analysis, residents in the Changjiang River Delta Region, where Henggang Village is located, have a better access to internet. Meanwhile, there are many cities around the village. There infrastructure conditions bring huge advantages for Henggang Village's further development. Compining the rural development with internet is a possible and promising way.

HENGGANG APP

Development Problem

Section1

Increase the supply and demand info exchange by internet intervention, maximize the agriculture production, boost the income of villiagers as a base of agricultural landscape continuity

Section2

By offering services such as sign up your farmland for urban residents, people could feel and taste the village life, as emotional connection would be built between the rural and urban area.

Section3

Internet is a media for conserving the vernacular landscape, diversify the tourism experience further, tasting the local culture, hence providing more potentiality of multiple industries.

JOIN US! HENGGANG WEB

& Su

ce &

pply

Sup ply

er ty M Pr op e an ag er consum & em ty g in M en Sightsee a t ent ume nag & cons em estm g in v Sightsee t Iennt en & t si stm Vi ve In & sit Vi

Vis it & Pit P ch itch up up & Vis it

Cl Cl ie ie nt nt N N ee ee ds ds & & An An al al ys ys is is

Pro Pro vid vid eS e pa Spa ce c & e& Se S rvi ervi ce ce ProvidPro vidce e Spa e Spa cevic & Ser & eService

& Demand & Demand Place Provide Place Provide

Mark Mark et S et S urve urve y y

Triliyp Trip FamFilaym

Or Or g g

an an Pl Pl ac a i i e P ce P ro r vid ovid Plac Plac e& e& e Pro e Pro De De vide vide m m &D &D an an ema ema d nd nd d

ow ow Sh Sh TV TV

& Supp nd &lySupply Dema Food Dema Food nd M M ar ar ke k t S et S ur ur ve ve y y Mart Mart s s ket ket Ana Ana icie olicie l o lysis lysis p al p l a i i ent erent r e f f Pre Pre

nt nt ista ista Ass Ass

Fo od De d De ma m Food Food nd and Dem Dem & & and and & Su & Su pply pply

Funding h earc h Funding Researc Res

g din un tF g en ndin nm nt Fu e nm

As sis ta nt As sis ta nt

Grocery prof e s s i ng Grocery profe ssin g

RestaRuersatanut rant

Pr op

Spa

ness Busi tion ess usin on B icati

a unic

m Com Com

mun

ManM agaenrager s s

C

s s ent ent sid sid Re Re an an

ide

ists ists Art Art

SociSaocia l l C

U r b Ur b

Farmland & internet infrastrcutral upgrade Basic housing & Entertaining facilities Farmland & internet infrastrcutral upgrade Farmland reconfiguration & farming facility installation Basic housing & Entertaining facilities Regional transportation for agri products Farmland reconfiguration & farming facility installation Regional transportation for agri products

Prov

nt nt ista ista ass ass n& n& atio atio per per mo mo gra rogra P

alysis eeds & An Client N is s y al An s& ee d sis y N l na ent &A Cli eds Ne ent Cli

Provide Space &

Pro

is

Startu pE xhi Startu bit pE xhi ors bit Provide Space Prov & or ide Spa s ce

ers rm Fa rs e rm Fa

ers ers sign sign De De

Timeline of Infrastructure Implementation Timeline of Infrastructure Implementation

alys eeds & An Client N

ent ent estm estm Inv Inv

Su pp ly

t t t t or or en en pp pp Su Su em em a a ag nag at at D D an a M M & & n n io io at at iz iz an gan rg r O O ity tic Ac

me &

Su pp ly

ity

me &

R

ese F Tech Su arc port & Da nd ta analysis he ma mers Res DeFar Tec ear rs & h Su port &FaDa d e n d ta ch i r a an e aly m sis z Prov Dem &P ers rog ce & ram Far Pla de m De ze Provi Client &P s i g rog Needs n ce & Anal ram Pla ysis De sig Client N n eeds & Analysis tic

Co ns u

VoluVnotelunte er er

The village is suffering from many current problems as many other villages in China. Since the primary industry is decaying, thriving the village merely by agricultural production improvement is impossible. Many villages have chose to development tourism, however the common tourism development mode in villages has many defects. In this sense, Henggang Villages as well as most rural areas in China are facing the same challenge--how to develop in a promising and sustainable way.

Co ns u

ista nt

O O NG NG

Lacking Connection with Cities

Ass

rs arme

Go Go ve ve r r

Current Situation and Problems in Henggang Village

Dilapidated Houses

ply ply Sup Sup e& e& sum sum C on C on

Poor Standardization

alys et An ey urv S t rke ey Ma v r u tS rke Ma

Martk

& Supply & Supply Consume Consume

Over-Commercialization

m De

Program 5: Cultural Tourism

Ac

od Fo

Program3: Sign-up Your Farm Program4: Interactive Farming

e e lg lg

Sup Sup erm erm ar ar ke ke Fo o

Resea s rch mer Far ly Tech Suport & DatRaeanalysi er fro searcs p ers p her m C Suarm Tec &F h Suport & Dat fro ol a analysis t mand upply alysis m S An Ass Co De & tket ista d Mar ot d l n n o t a F is

Section 3 Local Life-style

rs rs to to isi isi

Program1: Accurate Farming Program2: High-end Agri Products

Section 2 Participatory Farming

To an urTisotu UrbaUnrb s rists

Section 1 Agricultural Production

Urban Res iden ts Urban Res iden ts

Lagging Logistic

rs cto tra on ctors tra on

Low Productive Diversity

Co mp an C o mp y V an yV

Labour Migration Towards The City

ls essiona Prof ls yed essiona plo Prof Em oyed pl Em

Polluted Canals

Make Henggang as a brand replicable Housing upgrade & folk activity introduction Make Henggang as a brand replicable Housing upgrade & folk activity introduction

45


Farmland Typology

Building Typology

Larger Scale Farmland

Original Building Renewal

Small Scale Typology

Complex Building

Woodland

Courtyard Houses

Fine Farmland

Two-Story Building

Production Pond

One-Story Building

Terraced Greenspace

One-Story Building

Road Greening

New Strategy: Flat the Urban-Rural Nexus Divide the program into three main sections -Agricultural Production, Participatory Farming and Local Lifestyle - to fully utilize the internet to promote industries, improve incomes, and conserve culture. 46


Site Analysis Current

N

0

50m

N

50

100m

Sign-up Your Farmland 50m

50m

20

Future

Accurate farming

Traditional Settlements

50m

50m

High-end Agriculture Production

Traditional Farming Experience

47


Agricultural Production Accurate Farming

48

Sign-up Your Farmland


Participatory Farming High-end Agriculture Production

Traditional Farming Experience

49


Architectural Space

50

Public Activities


51


Waterview

The New Economic Impetus of Harvard Academic Project Site: Boston, America Collaborate Work Collaborater: Abhinab Basnyat, Sergio Asmar, Tuoyo Ebigbeyi, Andrejs Rauchut, Steven Sunmonu, Tianze Tong Instructor: Edward Marchant Date: Nov. 2016- Dec. 2016

HETANG Style

Rural Development under Growing Tourism Investment Competition Project, 3rd Prize of 2016 L & A Design Star Competition Site: Bapai Village, Yunan Province, China Collaborate Work Collaborater: Longfeng Wu (Harvard GSD, DDes 2019), Jingchen Gao (Harvard GSD, MArchII 2018) Ruyi Chen (Penn, MLA 2017), Hang Yin (BJFU, PhD 2019) Date: Oct. 2016-Dec. 2016 52


Is the Gobi Desert a Harbor

The Foreign

Academic Research, Graded as Distinction Site: Gobi Desert, Asia Collaborate Work Collaborater: Andrew (Harvard GSD, MUP 2017) Instructor: Neil Brenner Date: Apr. 2016-May. 2016

Academic Project, GIS Mapping Site: Boston Individual Work Instructor: Robert Gerard Pietrusko Date: Mar. 2016-Apr. 2016

Toward a New Geography, Rural Tourism in China

Foodscape Boston

Academic Research, Graded as Distinction Site: Zhejiang & Anhui Province, China Individual Work Instructor: George Thomas, Susan Snyder Date: Sep. 2016-May. 2017

Academic Project Site: Boston, America Collaborate Work Collaborater: Xin Chen, Benni Y.L. Pong Instructor: Robert Gerard Pietrusko Date: Apr. 2016-May. 2016

Planetary Hinterland: A Radical Cartography

Socio-Economic Study of the Emerging Industry

Representation of Boston Census Data

Perceptual Experience in Eat and Drinking

53


Christmas Eve Watercolor Studio, Dec 2012

Upon the Stones Sketch in Dajue Temple, Jun 2014

Snow Watercolor Course, Jan 2013

54

Meditation Colour Theory Course, Jan 2013

Fleeting time Sketch in Puzhao Temple, Jun 2014


55

Work Samples of Guan Min  

Harvard GSD MDes 2017

Work Samples of Guan Min  

Harvard GSD MDes 2017

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