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IMA MAGAZINE September–December 2014

Georgia O’Keeffe | Provenance: Still Life with Profile of Laval | Volunteering at the IMA | Donor Thank You


Contents

O’Keeffe and the Southwestern Still Life The Sutphin Fountain/Founders Day Staff Profile: Dr. Tricia Y. Paik Recent Acquisition: Five Brushstrokes TAG: Early Childhood Education Volunteering at the IMA Still Life with Profile of Laval

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Emily Zoss Editor Matthew Taylor Designer Tascha Mae Horowitz Photo Editor Robin Lawrence Anne M. Young Rights & Reproductions Laurie Gilbert Project Manager Heidi Davis-Soylu Megan Oldfather Dr. Annette Schlagenhauff Harriet Warkel Contributors

Our continuing series on provenance, or the history of ownership, turns to Gauguin’s Still Life with Profile of Laval. Investigation into its turbulent past during World War II has revealed a surprising connection to a Monuments Man from Indianapolis.

Jordyn Cox Tascha Mae Horowitz Eric Lubrick Photographers Front cover: Yousuf Karsh (Armenian-Canadian, 1908–2002), Georgia O’Keeffe, 1956. © Yousuf Karsh. Left: Unidentified photographer, Stephen Kovalyak, George Stout, and Thomas Carr Howe Jr. (at far right) transporting Michelangelo’s sculpture Madonna and Child, 1945. Thomas Carr Howe papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Volunteer Profile: Greg Raley-Barrett IMA Board of Governors The Fashion Arts Society of the IMA Mellon Curators-at-Large Seasonal Gifts from the IMA Donor Thank You Exhibitions /Calendar Recent Events Upcoming Donor and Affiliate Events

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Pages 22–23: Stephen Sprouse (American, 1953–2004), Pantsuit Ensemble, Fall/Winter 1991, synthetic netting with plastic paillettes, A) jacket: L: 31 in. (overall) B) shirt: L: 20 in. (overall) C) pants: 35 x 30 in. D.1-.2) breast plates: 6 x 6 x 1/4 in. (each). Indianapolis Museum of Art, Fashion Arts Society Acquisition Fund, 2013.310A-D.2 © Stephen Sprouse.

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The IMA Magazine is published by the IMA, 4000 Michigan Road, Indianapolis, Indiana 462083326. Questions or comments may be directed to the staff at 317-923-1331. All reproduction rights are reserved by the IMA, and permission to sell or use commercially any photographs, slides, or videotapes must be obtained in writing from the Rights & Reproductions office. © 2014 Indianapolis Museum of Art The IMA Magazine is printed on paper containing FSC-certified 100% post-consumer fiber, is processed chlorine free, and is manufactured using biogas energy. (The FSC® trademark identifies products which contain fiber from well-managed forests certified in accordance with the rules of the Forest Stewardship Council®.)


From the Director

There’s so much to enjoy in this issue of the IMA Magazine. Highlights include stories on the exhibition Georgia O’Keeffe and the Southwestern Still Life, our monumental and colorful acquisition by Roy Lichtenstein, and several new faces you will start seeing at the Museum. However, a thread throughout that particularly struck me is about volunteering at the IMA. As members, you know that the IMA is a very big place. We have the 660,000-square-foot main building, the 52-acre Oldfields–Lilly House & Gardens estate, and The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park: 100 Acres. In addition, there are the Miller House and Garden in Columbus and the director’s residence, Westerley, along with a host of other buildings on campus. Each day about 300 full- and part-time employees do their part to maintain the beauty of all these facilities and provide exceptional programming for our visitors. But like many beloved museums and cultural attractions around the country, the job is so big that there is no way our staff can do everything. That’s where our trusted volunteers come in! In all, the IMA has approximately 645 volunteers who donate more than 30,000 hours each year. Volunteers help in the Madeline F. Elder Greenhouse and our beautiful gardens, caring for thousands of plants. They assist in the conservation science lab, registration, curatorial, public programs, administrative offices, and the library. Our Governors and Life Trustees are volunteers, and if you ever take a tour with one of our terrific docents, you are being guided by a volunteer. As the IMA expands its public programs and enhances its gardens and parkland, it can only do so in large part because of our growing number of loyal volunteers. So be sure to contact us if you would like to learn more about joining their ranks. I want to take this opportunity to express my gratitude to everyone who gives to the IMA, including those who volunteer their time, skill, and enthusiasm. Without your dedication, we simply could not achieve all we do in service to our community and the world beyond. Thank you.

DR. CHARLES L. VENABLE THE MELVIN & BREN SIMON DIRECTOR AND CEO

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TEXT BY

HARRIET WARKEL

GUEST CURATOR OF AMERICAN ART

Georgia O’Keeffe and the Southwestern Still Life Organized by Joseph S. Czestochowski, Produced by International Arts®. Curated by Charles C. Eldredge.


November 2, 2014–February 15, 2015 Founders Day Dinner & Exhibition Preview October 30 Member Preview Days October 31 & November 1 Exhibition Opening Party November 1

The ancient land and rich cultural traditions of the Southwest region of the United States fueled the imaginations of many early 20th-century artists, including Georgia O’Keeffe. The evocative still-life paintings produced by these artists provide a fascinating example of art’s capacity to document the essence of a place and time. Georgia O’Keeffe and the Southwestern Still Life will feature works by O’Keeffe and her contemporaries that help tell the story of the American Southwest as seen through the eyes of the artists that lived there. It is the first major exhibition to focus on the role of the still life as a means of exploring the culture and diversity of the region. Home of arresting desert vistas, rugged terrain, and distinctive plant and animal life, the Southwest is one of the most awe-inspiring regions of America. Numerous 20th-century artists were drawn to its beauty. Some artists stayed for long periods of time, while others passed through only for short visits, but a great many were moved to capture the land in their art. One might imagine, naturally enough, that the typical vehicle for doing so would be the landscape. However, many of the most striking images of the Southwest that these artists produced were still-life paintings that depicted objects that defined and symbolized the region. The breadth of these artists’ subjects and styles resulted in an array of compelling

images that reflect the unique character of the American Southwest. Approximately 60 such works will be on view in the IMA exhibition, which will primarily be organized around groups of still-life subjects such as flowers and edibles, cultural artifacts, and bones. Throughout, the exhibition will prompt visitors to expand their understanding of what a still life is and what it can convey. Georgia O’Keeffe’s still lifes are instrumental to how we envision the Southwest. O’Keeffe first traveled to the Southwest in 1917, when she spent a few days in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and was immediately captivated by the region. However, her next opportunity to return wasn’t until 1929, when she was invited as a guest of Mabel Dodge Luhan, a wealthy American art patron who had established an art and literary colony in Taos. The following year O’Keeffe began her regular summer sojourns to New Mexico. Searching for a quieter place to stay than the bustling Luhan compound, she discovered the more secluded Ghost Ranch and spent every summer there from 1934 until 1940. O’Keeffe later purchased and renovated a ruined hacienda in the village of Abiquiu, and in 1949 she moved permanently to New Mexico, spending part of each year at either Ghost Ranch or Abiquiu. During O’Keeffe’s exploration of the surrounding landscape, she discovered the animal bones that

Opposite: John Loengard (American, b. 1934), Profile view of American artist Georgia O’Keeffe leaning against a wall amidst the shadows of a fence in a courtyard, Abiquiu, New Mexico, 1966. The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images. © John Loengard. Above: Georgia O’Keeffe (1887–1986). Deer Horns, 1938. Oil on canvas, 36 x 16 in. Collection of Louis Bacon. (O’Keeffe 941) Photography by Christie’s Images. © Copyright 2014 Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. Image courtesy International Arts®

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Above: Victor Higgins (1884–1949). Petunias, ca. 1928–1930. Oil on canvas, 48 x 48 in. Private collection, Courtesy Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico. © Copyright 2014. Image courtesy International Arts®

littered the desert floor. These unusual objects inspired O’Keeffe from the first time she saw them, bleached white from lying in the sun. She called the remains “as beautiful as anything I know” and considered them symbols of the place she had come to love and call home: “To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes and all, with their tails switching, the bones seem to cut sharply to the center of something that is keenly alive on the desert even tho’ it is vast and empty and untouchable— and knows no kindness with all its beauty.” The paintings by O’Keeffe in the exhibition illustrate the variety of still-life subjects that will be on display. Several feature the skeletal remains she described so eloquently; she also painted works that reflect an awareness of Pueblo culture and artifacts. Among her favorite subjects during her time at Abiquiu was the patio of her newly renovated adobe home, and the shadowed passageway leading to the

sunlit patio became a prominent focus of these still lifes. However, when thinking of O’Keeffe’s still-life paintings, flowers are probably the subjects that first come to mind to many viewers. The exhibition includes a number of such works concentrating on floral subjects, all depicted in the close-up, vibrantly colored style for which O’Keeffe is best known. Georgia O’Keeffe’s iconic still lifes were influential in the development of an energetic Southwestern art scene that flourishes yet today. A key component of the exhibition is its inclusion of works by other artists who similarly drew on the expressive potential of the still life to capture the spirit of the Southwest region. Some of their names will likely be familiar to IMA audiences. The American Modernist Marsden Hartley, for example, found inspiration during a yearlong stay in New Mexico and created still-life paintings in which he depicted New Mexican subjects such as Hispanic santos, or saints. The Indiana-born Victor Higgins relocated permanently to Taos and became an important figure in the Southwest art scene. Many of his Southwestern still lifes contain brightly colored flowers set in Native American pottery; local textiles also feature prominently in these works. Other artists, though, may prove to be discoveries for many viewers. The range of approaches they engage in addressing their Southwestern subjects allows for a notably multifaceted investigation of the exhibition theme. A broad variety of additional interpretive experiences will be available in the exhibition. Audio guides and rich in-gallery video content will provide expanded information on key works, artists, and themes. The Inspired by O’Keeffe school competition and exhibition will offer schools a meaningful opportunity to integrate and respond to the featured exhibition in the classroom, and selected student

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works will be displayed in the gallery. Visitors can even create their own still lifes in a dedicated drawing studio space within the exhibition gallery. All these activities will contribute to a deeper understanding of how a still life can resonate with intensely personal meaning—knowledge shared by O’Keeffe and the many artists she influenced.

This exhibition is presented by The Alliance of the IMA, with additional support provided by Barnes & Thornburg LLP.

O’Keeffe Education Supporters underwrite all public programs, educational outreach, and gallery experiences related to Georgia O’Keeffe and the Southwestern Still Life. Platinum Supporter

Silver Supporters Buckingham Foundation The Lacy Foundation


The Sutphin Fountain and Founders Day

Sutphin Fountain dedication. Photograph by Jim Young, Indianapolis News, October 25, 1972. Courtesy of the Indianapolis Star.

SUTPHIN FOUNTAIN BY THE NUMBERS • 27 high-powered jets are used to spray water • 10,000 gallons of water pump through the fountain every minute • 352 granite blocks create the sunburst design • 15 feet is the height of the central water spray • 42 years since the Fountain’s dedication

For more than four decades, millions of visitors to the IMA have been greeted by jets of water gracefully surging into the air. Nestled between the Museum building and The Dudley and Mary Louise Sutphin Mall is the monumental Sutphin Fountain. Boasting hundreds of handcrafted blocks of granite laid out in a sunburst pattern, the fountain operates year-round as a dramatic focal point and beloved gathering place. The design of the fountain—by Stuart O. Dawson of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates Inc.—has long been an icon for the Museum, first serving as the inspiration for the Museum’s logo for more than two decades, and currently as the graphic identity for the Second Century Society. Thanks to the generosity of the

Sutphin family, the fountain was dedicated in memory of Samuel Brady Sutphin on October 25, 1972. Today the Sutphin Fountain continues to welcome and delight visitors to the IMA.

ANNUAL FOUNDERS DAY DINNER The first Founders Day Dinner was held October 11, 1982, on the occasion of the Museum’s centennial celebration. After the success of the inaugural event, the evening has become a much-anticipated annual affair. The celebration also marked the launch of the IMA’s Second Century Society, a prestigious group of individuals established in 1983 to lead the IMA into its second century of existence. The organization continues to be a vital source of operating income for the Museum.

In honor of their continuous commitment, members of the Second Century Society, Founders Society, and Legacy Circle are welcome to join the Board of Governors for the Founders Day Dinner and a special exhibition preview of Georgia O’Keeffe and the Southwestern Still Life. Enjoy a cocktail reception in Pulliam Family Great Hall and tour the exhibition in the Allen Whitehill Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery before heading to the Deer Zink Special Events Pavilion for an extraordinary dinner among faithful friends of the IMA.

Interested in becoming a member of the IMA’s Second Century Society? Contact Andra Walters: 317-923-1331, ext. 227 or awalters@imamuseum.org

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ANNUAL FOUNDERS DAY DINNER & SPECIAL PREVIEW OF GEORGIA O’KEEFFE AND THE SOUTHWESTERN STILL LIFE

October 30, 2014 Pulliam Family Great Hall & Deer Zink Special Events Pavilion $175 RSVP to awalters@imamuseum.org The IMA Founders Day Dinner is presented by ITT Technical Institute, with additional support provided by JPMorgan


Staff Profile: Dr. Tricia Y. Paik This summer the IMA welcomed Dr. Tricia Y. Paik as its new curator of contemporary art. Before joining the IMA in August, Paik served as the associate curator of modern and contemporary art at the Saint Louis Art Museum, where she oversaw the museum’s collection of painting, sculpture, mixed media, and new media from 1945 to the present. While at SLAM she also curated two ongoing contemporary exhibition programs, as well as a number of significant indoor and outdoor installations. A graduate of Dartmouth College and New York University, Paik has also held positions at the Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

What drew you to pursue a career as a curator of contemporary art? That’s a great question, because when I started out in the art world almost 25 years ago, it wasn’t originally my goal to become a contemporary curator. In fact, I first considered working at a gallery specializing in Old Masters, and then when in graduate school for art history, the latest period I studied was art of the 1970s. The thought of becoming a contemporary curator didn’t start taking shape until a few years into a curatorial assistant position at MoMA, though the job entailed working with the drawings collection from 1880 to 1945. So I worked on more historical shows while there but was also given the opportunity to do smaller assignments on contemporary artists. By that time, I had been living in New York for about a decade and had spent a lot of time visiting galleries and artist studios in SoHo, Tribeca, and the then-growing scene in Chelsea. I really liked the vitality and variety of the art that I saw. That’s when it dawned on me— that all art, of course, was once contemporary. I realized then that I could continue being an art historian while also working with

contemporary artists—working on projects as the art was being made. That was an inspiring proposition. What excites you about the IMA’s contemporary art collection and program? My predecessors have already built a strong collection, so I’m thrilled about taking up that mantle. The contemporary program at the IMA is quite ambitious, especially through its scale—its spacious gallery footprint inside, as well as outside with The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park: 100 Acres. I am just so honored to be able to curate in all these spaces for our public! While I like looking toward the future and thinking about where artists will take us visually, aesthetically, conceptually, I also enjoy putting contemporary art in the context of what has come before. I hope to work on exhibitions and acquisitions that will allow for intriguing connections across the entire IMA collection. Offering such conversations between different periods and cultures can be quite illuminating and is just the kind of meaningful experience that an encyclopedic museum such as the IMA can provide for our audiences. Also,

what is quite exciting as well as unique for a comprehensive museum is the IMA’s dedication to the natural environment. I love that it’s a part of the Museum’s mission. I’m proud to be joining a community committed to nature as much as to art. What are you looking forward to the most about living in Indianapolis? I’m very pleased about continuing to live in the Midwest, having just come from St. Louis, where I was for five years. I will admit that having been raised on the West Coast and having lived most of my life on the East Coast, I was exposed to the extremely unfair bias that Chicago was the only worthwhile city in the Midwest! Of course, after I moved to St. Louis I was quickly corrected of such a wrong attitude, as my life there truly exceeded my expectations. Since I’m still learning about Indianapolis, I’m looking forward to being surprised and amazed by what’s special, unique, and rewarding about this city, the way life unfolded for me in my prior Midwestern city. Having lived in New York for many years, I will

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also admit that I bought my first car just five years ago! So I look forward to embracing life in a town passionate for cars. Maybe it will rub off on me, and I will be inspired to take an auto repair class. Or maybe I’ll finally learn how to drive stick. Any willing teachers out there?

Photo by Eric Lubrick


Five Brushstrokes by Roy Lichtenstein At a community ceremony on August 29, the Indianapolis Museum of Art debuted Five Brushstrokes, a monumental work by Roy Lichtenstein that was commissioned in the early 1980s but never before assembled. The sculpture is considered to be Lichtenstein’s most ambitious work in his Brushstroke series. Consisting of five separate elements, the tallest of which soars 40 feet into the air, Five Brushstrokes unites a striking collection of forms and colors and is one of Lichtenstein’s premier “scatter pieces.” Installed on The Dudley and Mary Louise Sutphin Mall in front of the main Museum building, Five Brushstrokes is a prominent new addition to the IMA’s celebrated collection of 20th- and 21st-century sculptures and provides an awe-inspiring welcome to IMA visitors. “We have been working in partnership with the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation in New York for more than a year to bring this iconic work of art to Indianapolis,” said Dr. Charles L. Venable, The Melvin & Bren Simon Director and CEO at the IMA. “I am thrilled that with the generous help of some special donors, the IMA is able to acquire this key work by one of America’s greatest artists. I am confident it will become a beloved addition to the cultural landscape of our state similar to Robert Indiana’s original LOVE, which has long greeted our visitors,” continued Venable. Five Brushstrokes has been acquired through the generosity of the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation and the late Robert and Marjorie Mann of Indianapolis, who

established an acquisitions fund for contemporary sculpture through a bequest in 2011. The installation was generously underwritten by Ersal and Izabela Ozdemir. “Roy Lichtenstein always wanted his work installed in relationship to other peer artists, so we are all delighted to have worked with the IMA to find such a great home for Five Brushstrokes in the Museum’s gardens,” said Dr. Jack Cowart, director of the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation. He continued, “It has been our pleasure, and with the appreciation of the Lichtenstein family, to facilitate this partial gift to such a remarkable museum setting. We thank the IMA and its Board and supporters for choosing this most adventurous path and for being the first institution to install Five Brushstrokes.”

ABOUT FIVE BRUSHSTROKES Five Brushstrokes was originally commissioned by the Stuart Collection at the University of California, San Diego, in the early 1980s. Throughout much of 1983 and 1984 Lichtenstein worked on the commission, sketching his thoughts, creating color cutouts of each element, and then making a wooden maquette of the work. However, when the final full specifications were determined, the sculpture’s huge scale prevented its fabrication. Following Lichtenstein’s death in 1997, the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation was established with the purpose of increasing the world’s exposure to the work of Roy Lichtenstein, and the Foundation funded the fabrication of two examples of Five Brushstrokes in 2012: the artist

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RECENT ACQUISITION

proof acquired by the Indianapolis Museum of Art and an edition of one that is still owned by the Foundation.

ABOUT ROY LICHTENSTEIN Roy Lichtenstein (American, 1923–1997) was born in New York City and had his first solo exhibition in the city in 1951. By 1962 Lichtenstein was showing at the prestigious Leo Castelli Gallery, where he exhibited his signature comic strip paintings. He also made sculptural works in the early 1960s in the form of utilitarian objects and mannequin-style heads, both directly influenced by his paintings. As his career progressed, the artist’s sculpture evolved with his painting. In the 1980s this convergence of media culminated in his monumental Brushstroke sculpture series. Evoking the movement and color of paint on canvas, these totemic works suspend the artist’s sweeping brushstrokes in midair, balancing one on top of the other in a dynamic sculptural spectacle. Examples from the Brushstroke series are now in the collections of leading museums around the world, including the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia (Madrid), Walker Art Center (Minneapolis), J. Paul Getty Museum (Los Angeles) and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden (Washington, DC).

Left: IMA staff installing Roy Lichtenstein’s Five Brushstrokes, designed 1983–84, fabricated 2012. Indianapolis Museum of Art, Partial Gift of the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation with additional support from the Robert L. and Marjorie J. Mann Fund. © Roy Lichtenstein Foundation. Photos by Jordyn Cox.


TAG: Early Childhood Education and the Arts

The magical journey of learning and exploration during the early childhood years is an unparalleled time of wonder and discovery. It is also a determining time of development that provides the foundation for all future learning. Experiences that are anchored in the arts are particularly well suited for young children because the arts naturally teem with opportunities to engage the whole child through multisensory exploration. Early and positive experiences with the arts also establish feelings of self-efficacy and initiate memories that last throughout a learner’s lifetime. Responding to the potential associated with this exceptional period of development, the IMA launched the Toddler Art Groups (TAG) program in September 2013—the first IMA

school program designed specifically to serve the academic needs of preschoolers. From September through May, 20 students from St. Mary’s Child Center, a local preschool with a strong commitment to serving children in poverty, visited the IMA twice each month for TAG time. A typical TAG session began with a hunt for TAG Tiger, a stuffed animal who often napped in the galleries. Guided by a modified version of the children’s song “We’re Going on a Bear Hunt,” students located TAG Tiger, took her for a walk to look at art, and then found a good spot near the galleries to read her a story. Story time was followed by sensory activities that helped students build their own understanding of the artwork and to establish

positive relationships more broadly with art, learning, and the Museum. On their following visit, students explored art making in an IMA studio classroom and reconnected with an artwork that resonated with the children during their previous visit. For example, after visiting the Julianne Swartz: How Deep Is Your exhibition, students created their own sound collages using digital recorders, mesh, lights, and ribbons. The TAG program was constructed through collaboration with two organizations: St. Mary’s Child Center and Arts for Learning. During the pilot year, one St. Mary’s Child Center preschool class of four- and five-year-olds visited the IMA for an hour each Thursday during the yearlong program. Arts for Learning, the

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TEXT BY

HEIDI DAVIS-SOYLU

MANAGER OF ACADEMIC ENGAGEMENT AND LEARNING RESEARCH

Indiana affiliate of the national nonprofit Young Audiences, partnered with the IMA to provide the teaching artist as well as an at-school extension of the program. The PNC Foundation has awarded a grant that will underwrite the expansion of the program to serve 100 students and 18 teachers next school year.

Toddler Art Group is supported by a grant from the PNC Foundation

Above: Children in a TAG session view works in the Majestic African Textiles exhibition that was on view May 3, 2013–March 2, 2014.


Volunteering at the IMA main building and grounds. Volunteers also receive computer training and an introduction to the IMA’s volunteer software system, which allows staff and volunteers to communicate with each other as well as track and schedule hours. Some volunteer areas, such as the gardens and grounds, require additional interviews and training. Volunteer opportunities are currently available in the following areas: security support, The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park: 100 Acres, visitor information, special events and projects, The Toby, the Museum Store, membership, gardens and grounds, and the African Art Activity Space. From our founding in 1883, the IMA has continuously relied on the generosity of our volunteers. Today, we have more than 500 active volunteers in our Museum database. These hardworking individuals help at various locations around the Museum campus and assist with special events and educational programs. Our volunteers are integral to the IMA’s success, as our capacity to provide outstanding service and programs for our visitors depends on the donated time and talents of these individuals.

BECOMING A VOLUNTEER Volunteering at the IMA is customized to your skills, personality, and schedule. Individuals interested in becoming a volunteer at the Museum will complete an application process. Once accepted, volunteers will participate in a mandatory—and fun—orientation process that includes basic skills training and a guided tour of the

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MEGAN OLDFATHER

VISITOR AND VOLUNTEER SERVICES COORDINATOR

The IMA is currently expanding our volunteer program. In the coming year, we will add more exciting opportunities to volunteer; consequently, we will need even more individuals to share their talents. If you are interested in

volunteering at the IMA, visit imamuseum.org/give-join/ volunteer, where you can view the current list of opportunities and sign up to join our community of volunteers.

BENEFITS OF VOLUNTEERING As a volunteer, you can meet new friends, get behind-the-scenes access, and share your passion for art and nature with the community. In addition to the intrinsic perks, all volunteers receive 20% off of an individual membership, free volunteer t-shirts, and free parking. Volunteers working in featured exhibitions receive free individual admission, and event volunteers are able to attend preview parties, movies, and lectures for free after their duties are complete. The advantages of volunteering are great, but the Visitor and Volunteer Services staff want to make sure you achieve your personal volunteering goal— whether it is building a resume for school or employment, supporting the arts, meeting new people, or staying active in the community. The ultimate objective for the IMA is to have happy and utilized volunteers.

If you are interested in volunteering at the IMA, visit imamuseum.org/give-join/volunteer.

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TEXT BY

Left: Paul Gauguin (French, 1848–1903), Still Life with Profile of Laval, 1886, oil on canvas, 18-1/8 x 15 in. Indianapolis Museum of Art, Samuel Josefowitz Collection of the School of Pont-Aven, through the generosity of Lilly Endowment Inc., the Josefowitz Family, Mr. and Mrs. James M. Cornelius, Mr. and Mrs. Leonard J. Betley, Lori and Dan Efroymson, and other Friends of the Museum, 1998.167. Below: Unknown photographer, Interior of Herzog Palace in Budapest, with Gauguin’s Still Life with Profile of Laval visible at far right, about 1930. Photo courtesy of Forster Központ, Fotótár, Budapest.

DR. ANNETTE SCHLAGENHAUFF

ASSOCIATE CURATOR FOR RESEARCH

Provenance:

Paul Gauguin’s Still Life with Profile of Laval The release in February 2014 of the movie The Monuments Men prompted much public interest in the activities of the remarkable men and women who sought to protect the world’s cultural heritage during and after World War II. Recent research at the IMA has revealed that Gauguin’s Still Life with Profile of Laval, a painting acquired by the IMA in 1998, can be linked to a particular Monuments Man—one, in fact, who hailed from Indiana. During the months preceding its acquisition in 1998, along with 16 other paintings from the School of Pont-Aven that were owned by Swiss collector Samuel Josefowitz, Still Life with Profile of Laval came under considerable scrutiny because of its WWII-era provenance. In due-diligence efforts to ensure clear title to each painting, the IMA contacted the Art Loss Register (ALR), whose Division of Historic Claims documents art looted during the Holocaust. While initial results of these inquiries cleared the works, further research by the IMA and ALR led to information that delayed the acquisition for several weeks. The Gauguin was found to have once belonged to the prominent Jewish banker and industrialist Mór Lipót Herzog, who had assembled one of the best and largest art collections

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in Budapest, Hungary, in the early 20th century—and the ALR reported that some heirs to the Herzog family were in the midst of filing claims for the restitution of paintings that had been looted by the Nazis, with Hungarian government support, in spring 1944. It became urgent to gather biographical information on the family, confirm which heir had inherited the painting, and determine whether proper restitution had occurred after the war. Facts were assembled by a team consisting of researchers at the ALR; members of the IMA staff including Ellen Lee, now The Wood-Pulliam Senior Curator, and then-director Bret Waller; and Josefowitz, who was assisted by a Hungarian provenance researcher charged with combing the Hungarian National Archives for clues.


Top: Export stamp on back of Still Life with Profile of Laval. Bottom: Unknown photographer, Thomas Carr Howe Jr., at Alt Aussee Austria, July 1945. Charles Parkhurst Papers, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Gallery Archives

The investigation showed that upon Mór Lipót Herzog’s death in 1934, the collection was divided among his three children, and Still Life with Profile of Laval had been inherited by the middle son, András Herzog. He had married and divorced Maria Izabella Parravicini, with whom he fathered two children. The staunchly anti-Semitic Hungarian government sent András Herzog to a forced labor camp in 1942, where he died a year later. During the course of the war, the Herzog siblings attempted to safeguard major portions of their collection in the cellar of a factory they owned in a Budapest suburb. The cache of art works was discovered, however, and seized by the Nazis in spring 1944. Some paintings were appropriated by Adolf Eichmann’s Sonderkommando (Special Action Unit) and others were sequestered and brought to the basement of Budapest’s Museum of Fine Arts for storage. To this day litigation continues for many significant works of art that were never restituted to the Herzog heirs, but information obtained in 1998 revealed that Still Life with Profile of Laval had been returned to a Countess István Bethlen in 1948. With the assistance of genealogical dictionaries Waller was able to close the circle: Maria Izabella Parravicini had remarried after her divorce from András Herzog and had become Countess István Bethlen. The painting was returned to Maria Izabella, the ex-wife of András, likely on behalf of their children. After the painting’s return an export license for it was granted, which is corroborated by a stamp on the back of the canvas that

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bears the Hungarian crest. The painting promptly left Hungary, entering the art market in Switzerland. After a succession of owners it was purchased by Josefowitz at auction in 1980. The painting’s history seemed to suggest that Still Life with Profile of Laval may have remained in the basement of the Museum of Fine Arts in Budapest during the later years of the war, prior to its return to the family. However, an additional chapter of its story can now be written—one that includes Thomas Carr Howe Jr., a Monuments Man from Indiana. Housed within the archives of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, is a collection of photographs of artworks that passed through the Munich Central Collecting Point (MCCP). The MCCP was established in 1945 to process art located in Nazi hiding places by the Allies in the final days of World War II and to restitute it to its nation of origin. An image specialist at the NGA discovered a photo of Still Life with Profile of Laval in this archive and contacted the IMA. The question became: under what circumstances did this painting travel from Budapest to Munich and back again? In late 1944 and early 1945, the Axis countries, including Hungary, took steps to safeguard art treasures from advancing Allied troops on both the western and eastern fronts. Responding to the Russian threat, two train cars were loaded with art from Budapest’s Museum of Fine Arts, including the painting by Gauguin. The shipment traveled westward to various sites, eventually arriving in the German town of Grassau in


April 1945. All the while the works were accompanied by Dénes Csánky, the director of the Museum of Fine Arts—a clear indication of their importance to Hungary. In May 1945 US Navy lieutenant Thomas Carr Howe Jr. took up his appointment as a Monuments Man, assisting the military to recover stolen art. Raised in Indianapolis and the son of Butler University president Thomas Carr Howe Sr., he pursued a career as an art museum professional, advancing to the position of director of the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in San Francisco by 1939. During his ten months as a Monuments Man he participated in missions at several major sites, including the salt mine at Alt Aussee, where the art intended for Hitler’s planned Führermuseum at Linz had been hidden, as well as the castle of Neuschwanstein, where the Nazis had stashed art looted from Jewish collections in France. Upon his return to the US he was approached by the Indianapolis publisher Bobbs-Merrill to write an account of his time in Europe. Based on the detailed diaries he had kept, and armed with the letters his wife had retained, Howe authored Salt Mines and Castles: The Discovery and Restitution of Looted European Art, which was published in 1946. At this point the story of the IMA’s Still Life with Profile of Laval intersects with Howe’s vivid narrative. On his very first solo mission Howe was sent to Grassau to secure the art from Budapest. In his book he recounts in detail his altercation with Csánky, who understandably did not welcome this mission undertaken on the

In May 1945 US Navy lieutenant Thomas Carr Howe Jr. took up his appointment as a Monuments Man, assisting the military to recover stolen art. authority of the US Army. But Howe succeeded in transporting the Grassau cache—more than eighty cases in all, loaded onto five trucks—to Munich, and subsequently delivered it to the MCCP. Although restitutions from the MCCP proceeded first to non-enemy nations, leaving Italy and Hungary at the end of the queue, by late December 1946 shipments started to make their way to Hungary. On a third and final shipment, dated April 21, 1947, Still Life with Profile of Laval left Munich for Budapest. Gauguin’s small masterpiece was returned to András Herzog’s ex-wife the following year and cleared for export from Hungary. Thus, with the help of a Monuments Man from Indiana, we have been able to provide a more comprehensive account of the winding journey of Gauguin’s Still Life with Profile of Laval to the IMA.

Above: Unidentified photographer, Recovery of looted artworks from Neuschwanstein Castle, 1945. Thomas Carr Howe Jr. helped with the recovery efforts at this site. James J. Rorimer papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

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Volunteer Profile: Greg Raley-Barrett Greg Raley-Barrett has been a volunteer at the IMA since the Penrod Arts Fair of 2012 and a member for more than six years. During his tenure as a volunteer, his areas of service have included special events, festivals, Lilly House, Winter Nights, The National Bank of Indianapolis Summer Nights Film Series, and the Welcome Desk. When he’s not volunteering at the Museum, he creates collaborative online spaces for Fortune 500 companies and non-profit organizations. Inspired by his dedicated support of the Museum, we asked Raley-Barrett some questions about his experience as a volunteer.

What inspires you to volunteer at the IMA? I am an Indianapolis native, and the IMA has been one of my favorite places for as long as I can remember. When I was in middle school, I would ride my bike to the Museum at least once a week and try to memorize as many pieces of art as I could. I would secretly follow the docents around on their tours and later, when I returned to the IMA with family or friends, I would pretend to be a tour guide and relay what I had learned—not always accurately. The Museum has always been there for me as I grew up. It instilled in me a passion for culture, history, beauty, and whimsy. The Museum taught me to think critically, apply empathy, and look deeper than the surface. I volunteer so that I can try to convey all those things to others and to ensure that the IMA can inspire future generations.

What’s one memory you can share from your experiences volunteering? Working as a volunteer has allowed me to meet so many people and share a wealth of experiences. Every opportunity to volunteer is an opportunity to create new memories. My favorite experience occurred during volunteer recognition week at the IMA. The volunteers were treated to different events throughout the week, including a behind-thescenes tour of the IMA art storage facilities. Being able to explore the wealth of works in storage at the IMA and to be able to ask the experts questions about every aspect of the Museum was an experience that I will treasure. Not only did I gain a deeper understanding of what the IMA does for the community, I truly felt the appreciation of every staff member at the IMA. They made all of the volunteers feel like an important part of the IMA family.

What’s your favorite work of art in the IMA’s collection and why? Asking me about my favorite work of art is like asking me what my favorite food is. It depends on my mood, my recent obsessions, or what is being featured in the current exhibitions. But if I were to pick a work that I always have to stop and visit on a regular basis, it would be the painting of Aristotle by Jusepe de Ribera, on display in the Clowes Pavilion. I can remember seeing it for as long as I have been coming to the IMA, since the early ’70s. It is a painting of a simple man in worn garments, his face and hands wrinkled and weathered. This image is honest and unpretentious even though the subject is one of great genius. The emotions that the painting evokes are complex; every time I view it I feel something new.

Why should others volunteer at the IMA? There are countless reasons why you should volunteer at the IMA. You get the opportunity to step out of your comfort zone in a safe environment. Volunteering allows you to experience and learn about things up close and personally. Every time I arrive at the Museum for a volunteer opportunity, I am introduced to new ideas, people, and concepts. And I always return home energized, motivated, and feeling more creative than ever. Volunteering at the IMA recharges my creative energy.

Photo by Eric Lubrick

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IMA Board of Governors

In June, the Indianapolis Museum of Art welcomed three new members to the Board of Governors.

DAVID ESKENAZI

MICHAEL L. KUBACKI

SUSAN RUSSELL

David Eskenazi is the President of the Indianapolis division of Sandor, where he oversees the coordination of their Indianapolis and Scottsdale, Arizona, offices and is responsible for a range of new and existing developments. Before joining Sandor, Eskenazi was a real estate and corporate attorney at Rudnick and Wolfe (now DLA Piper) in Chicago. As an active member of the community Eskenazi currently serves on the boards of The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, the Dean’s Advisory Board for the Herron School of Art and Design, the Eskenazi Health Foundation, and University High School. Eskenazi graduated summa cum laude with a BA from Tufts University and earned his JD from the University of Michigan.

Michael L. Kubacki is the Executive Chairman of Lake City Bank, which has offices throughout northern and central Indiana, and its holding company, Lakeland Financial Corporation. Kubacki joined the company in 1998 after a 25-year career with Northern Trust Corporation, serving in its Chicago and Los Angeles offices. A native of Pierceton, Indiana, he received his bachelor’s degree in business from Indiana University and an MBA from the University of Chicago. Throughout his career, Kubacki has been active in a number of organizations. His other current board affiliations include the Indiana Chamber of Commerce (where he is past Chairman), the Corporate Partnership for Economic Growth, IUSB School of Business Advisory, LaCasa Business Advisory, the Indiana Chapter of the Nature Conservancy, and the Indiana Society of Chicago.

Until 2011, Susan Russell was CEO and founder of Mayfair Lane, a start-up she built into a success and that was, in turn, acquired. A native East Coaster, Russell has also worked in marketing and communications for a variety of companies in New York, Boston, and Indianapolis. She received a BS in communications from Boston University’s College of Communication in 1995. Russell serves on the boards of Women’s Fund of Central Indiana, Congregation Beth-El Zedeck, and Women for Riley.

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IMA BOARD OF GOVERNORS Thomas Hiatt – Chair Founding Partner, Centerfield Capital Partners LP

Bradley B. Chambers President and CEO, Buckingham Companies

Matthew Gutwein – Vice Chair Finance Committee, Chair President and CEO, Health and Hospital Corporation of Marion County

David Eskenazi President, Sandor Development

Rick L. Johnson – Vice Chair Investment Committee, Chair President and CEO, Johnson Ventures Inc. Ersal Ozdemir – Secretary Government and Community Relations Committee, Chair President and CEO, Keystone Construction Peter A. Morse Jr. – Treasurer Partner, Barnes & Thornburg LLP

Jane Fortune Philanthropist, Community Leader, and Author Kent Hawryluk Co-Founder, Marcadia Biotech Kay Koch Collections Committee, Chair Philanthropist and Community Leader Michael L. Kubacki Executive Chairman, Lake City Bank

Lynne M. Maguire – At-Large Member of Executive Committee Compensation Committee, Chair Vice President, Planning and Marketing, Columbus Regional Hospital

Deborah Lilly Philanthropist and Community Leader

Marya Rose – At-Large Member of Executive Committee Nominating Committee, Chair Chief Administrative Officer, Cummins Inc.

Benjamin A. Pecar Audit Committee, Chair Partner, Barnes & Thornburg LLP

June McCormack – Immediate Past Chair Development Committee, Chair Executive Vice President, Chief Information Officer, and President, Online Division, ITT Technical Institute

Derica Rice Executive Vice President, Global Services, and CFO, Eli Lilly and Company

The Honorable Sergio Aguilera Mexican Consul to Indianapolis from 2002–2007 and Community Leader

Michael Robertson, MD Professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology/Oncology, IU School of Medicine

Agatha S. Barclay Philanthropist, Community Leader, and Author

Susan Russell Entrepreneur and Community Leader

Kathryn G. Betley Buildings and Grounds Committee, Chair Philanthropist and Community Leader

Jeffrey Smulyan President and CEO, Emmis Communications

Mary Clare Broadbent Philanthropist and Community Leader

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The Fashion Arts Society of the IMA The IMA has been collecting textiles and fashion arts for more than a century. The first item acquired was an Irish embroidered table runner purchased in 1888; since that time, the Museum has built a collection of nearly 7,000 items. From Asian and African ceremonial textiles to quilts and coverlets from Indiana, the collection represents all of the world’s major traditions in fabric.

One of the winning designs from Project IMA–IN:spired, 2012.

Attendees at the 2014 Hats Off luncheon. Standing: Danielle Smith and Tracy Forner. Seated: Martin Webb and Nikki Blaine.

Launched in 2010 in conjunction with the exhibition Body Unbound: Contemporary Couture from the IMA’s Collection, the IMA’s Fashion Arts Society (FAS) was formed to promote interest in and appreciation of textile and fashion arts through the study of couture and cloth from around the world. Over the last four years, the group has advanced this mission by hosting special events, talks, and public programs. Among the most popular FAS events have been the annual Hats Off luncheon, the wildly successful Project IMA fashion shows, and behind-the-scenes tours of private and public collections. All highlight a seamless integration of educational and social interests, a key emphasis of each IMA Affiliate Group. “In joining the Fashion Arts Society, I believe one takes their love of fashion to an important next step. Whether founded on personal style and wardrobe building (a.k.a. shopping!) or a more industry-based interest in textiles, garment construction, and collecting, joining FAS means becoming part of a vibrant collective that seeks to honor Indiana’s immense fashion legacy and grow the IMA fashion collection,” stated Kimann Schultz, current president of FAS. “We thrive on the individuality of our members and their personal styles and honor the fundamental creativity it represents. With fashion as the foundation of our

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friendship building, we have a group that is beautifully inclusive and diverse.” FAS is leading the way as fashion becomes an increasingly important part of the fabric of Indianapolis’s culture. With nearly 100 members, the group brings together fashionistas, fashion designers, milliners, boutique owners, fashion bloggers, critics and writers, stylists, marketers, photographers, and many others who share a common zeal for fashion. Their efforts not only support programming, but also help the IMA acquire new works for the collection. FAS has recently underwritten the acquisition of couture pieces by Alexander McQueen, Christian Lacroix, Jean Paul Gaultier, Thierry Mugler, Issey Miyake, and Vivienne Westwood. “FAS members have been invaluable supporters of the Textile and Fashion Arts Department,” said Niloo Paydar, curator of textile and fashion arts. “Their passion and commitment to raise funds for acquisitions of important designer fashions will ensure the growth of our fashion arts collection for generations to come.”

Interested in joining FAS? There are 3 easy ways to join: 1. Log on to imamuseum.org/join 2. Call 317-920-2651 3. Visit the IMA Welcome Desk


Two Scholars Named as Mellon Curatorsat-Large In April 2014, the IMA announced the appointments of Dr. Christian Feest and Dr. Constantine Petridis as the next Mellon Curators-at-Large Program scholars. Feest and Petridis will assess the entirety of the IMA’s Native American and African collections, respectively, concentrating on the aesthetic quality of pieces as works of art and their historical importance. Initiated in 2011, after the IMA received a $1.025 million grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Mellon Curators-at-Large Program has allowed the IMA to engage renowned scholars to conduct cutting-edge research on the IMA’s collections while simultaneously experimenting with new ways of enhancing scholarly breadth across its large and encyclopedic holdings.

ABOUT DR. CHRISTIAN FEEST Dr. Christian Feest

Dr. Constantine Petridis

One of the world’s leading experts on Native American art, Dr. Christian Feest has studied Native American collections in Europe and America for more than 50 years, with much of his work focusing on the early collecting of Native American material in central Europe and the accurate documenting of those collections. He is the author of numerous books and articles in the field. Feest was born in Broumov, Czech Republic. Presently Feest serves as a guest curator at the Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky, and the Lokschuppen Museum in Rosenheim, Germany. In addition, since 1968, Feest has curated or co-curated numerous exhibitions at the world-renowned Museum of Ethnography in Vienna, where he was director from 2004 to 2010. Since 2004, Feest has taught as an associate professor at the University of

Vienna, from which he earned his PhD in 1969, and has also held professorships at the University of Chicago and the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt, Germany.

ABOUT DR. CONSTANTINE PETRIDIS Dr. Constantine Petridis has been active in the field of African art for nearly 25 years, both as a scholar and a curator, and has worked with a wide variety of private and public collections in both Europe and the United States. Petridis was born and educated in Belgium. He has been curator of African art at the Cleveland Museum of Art since 2002. From 2005 to 2008, Petridis also served as consulting curator at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto, where he oversaw the installation of the renowned Frum Collection of African Art. He has held pre- and postdoctoral fellowships from the

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Belgian National Fund for Scientific Research, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Belgian American Educational Foundation. Petridis holds an MA in art history and archaeology (1991) and a PhD in art history (1997), both from Ghent University in Belgium. Having published extensively on the arts of Central Africa, Petridis is currently organizing a major traveling exhibition on the arts of the Senufo peoples of West Africa.


All products are available at either the Museum Store or the Madeline F. Elder Greenhouse Shop.

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Etched Glass Vases $30 to $70

The Temple of Flora Book $59.99 The Secret Garden Coloring Book $14.95

Green Cast Iron Tea Set $70

Seasonal Gifts from the IMA Cat Stoneware Tea Mug $25

Charley Harper Owl Tile by Motawi Tileworks $36 Iron Easel $22

Photos by Eric Lubrick

Birds in Boxwood Pin $90 Birds in Boxwood Necklace $95

Standing Hedgehog $19.95 Turtle $15.95 Small Hedgehog $6.95 All hand-carved from natural granite boulders

Merino Wool Felt Eyeglass Holders $18 each

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Jonathan Adler Brass Pig $90

Hand-Etched and Painted Vases by Mary-Melinda Wellsandt $80 to $95 each

Witherspoon Watches by Michael Graves for Projects $150 each

Bypass Pruners with Lifetime Guarantee $56.95

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Solid Brass Sundials $125


Artist Palette Tray $35 Artist Palette Coaster $8

Barcode Earrings $70

L’Oiseau Sculpture by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Vitra $205

Playable Art Ball $36.95

Artist’s Tools Infinity Scarf $40

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A Thank You to Our Donors

We extend our gratitude to each donor who made a gift to the IMA during our fiscal year, July 1, 2013–June 30, 2014. Second Century Society and Patron Circle members and Annual Fund contributors provide vital support for the IMA’s daily operations, from art conservation to educational and public programs to the maintenance of the gardens and grounds. Donors of works of art foster new understanding of the permanent collection while increasing its quality and scope. As IMA corporate sponsors and grantors address the special project needs of the present, members of the Legacy Circle ensure the future of the IMA as a preeminent art institution by including the Museum in their estate plans.

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Above: Installation view of the contemporary design galleries, which opened in November 2013.


SECOND CENTURY SOCIETY AND PATRON CIRCLE Clowes Circle ($25,000 to $49,999) Tom and Nora Hiatt Kay F. Koch Mr. and Mrs. Eli Lilly II June M. McCormack Myrta Pulliam Steve and Livia Russell Dr. Charles L. Venable and Mr. Martin K. Webb Richard D. and Billie Lou* Wood Chairman’s Circle ($10,000 to $24,999) Lori Efroymson Aguilera and Sergio Aguilera Bob and Toni Bader Gay and Tony Barclay Leonard and Kathryn Betley Mr. and Mrs. Trent Cowles Christel DeHaan Mr. and Mrs. Scott Dorsey Jane Fortune and Robert Hesse Penny and Russell Fortune III Kent Hawryluk Mr. and Mrs. Rick L. Johnson, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. David W. Knall James E. and Patricia J. LaCrosse Dr. and Mrs. John C. Lechleiter Lynne Maguire and Will Miller Alice* and Kirk McKinney Ellie, Weber & Emaline Morse Mr. and Mrs. Ersal Ozdemir Andrew and Jane Paine Benjamin A. Pecar and Leslie D. Thompson Dr. and Mrs. John G. Rapp Derica and Robin Rice Michael Robertson and Christopher Slapak Marya and Tony Rose Mr. and Mrs. George A. Rubin Jeff and Heather Smulyan Ann M. and Chris Stack Charles and Peggy Sutphin Dr. and Mrs. Eugene D. Van Hove William J. and Roberta Witchger President’s Circle ($5,000 to $9,999) Dan and Kate Appel Sarah C. Barney George and Mary Clare Broadbent Jerry H. and Barbara J. Burris Foundation Daniel and Kathryn Cantor Brad and Carolyn Chambers Mrs. Jack Dustman Edgar and Dorothy Fehnel Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Golden Dr. Howard Harris and Mrs. Anita Harris Mr. and Mrs. Allan B. Hubbard Ann H. Hunt Catharine D. Lichtenauer Michael K. and Patricia P. McCrory

Marni F. McKinney and Richard D. Waterfield Lawrence and Ann O’Connor Kathi and Bob Postlethwait Gary and Phyllis Schahet Mr. and Mrs. George J. Seybert Daniel and Marianne Stout Gene and Rosemary Tanner Marianne Williams Tobias Ambassador Randall L. Tobias Mr. and Mrs. Bob L. Turner Anna S. and James P. White Director’s Circle ($2,500 to $4,999) Anonymous Alice Elizabeth Appel Ronald and Helmi Banta Dr. and Mrs. Richard E. Barb Mr. and Mrs. Eric Bedel Robert and Patricia Bennett Alice Berkowitz Ted and Peggy Boehm Michael and Mary Ann Browning Eddy and Kathy Cabello Eurelio M. and Shirley Cavalier Damon and Kay Davis Richard A. and Helen J. Dickinson Theodore M. Englehart and Dorothy H. Schulz Mr. and Mrs. John Fazli Marni R. Fechtman William L. Fortune and Joseph D. Blakley Mr. David Garrett Jody Garrigus Gary L. and Kristin C. Geipel Richard and Sharon Gilmor The Eugene & Marilyn Glick Family Foundation Michelle and Perry Griffith Mrs. C.P. Griffith Mr. Matthew R. Gutwein and Ms. Jane Henegar Mr. John R. Hammond and Ms. Diana H. Hamilton Charles H. Helmen Cran and Joan Henderson Frank and Patsy Hiatt Ginny H. Hodowal Mark and Carmen Holeman Francine and Roger Hurwitz Susan M. Jacobs and David H. Kleiman Walter W. and Laura M. Jolly Joan D. Kahn Dana and Marc Katz Mr. Michael Kennedy and Ms. pegg kennedy Mrs. Jerry L. Kight Mrs. Ann W. King Mr. and Mrs. John Kite John Krauss and Marnie Maxwell Ellen W. Lee and Stephen J. Dutton Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Leventhal

Carlos and Eleanor Lopez Kurt and Linda Mahrdt Ms. Susanne M. McAlister and Mr. Jerry Greene Dr. and Mrs. William W. McCutchen Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. McKinney Nancy and Rob McMillan Boris Meditch Drs. Shirley M. and Thomas M. Mueller Mr. and Mrs. John M. Mutz Mr. and Mrs. F. Timothy Nagler Mr. and Mrs. Peter Nicholas Dorit and Gerald Paul Dr. Marian M. Pettengill Mr. Narcisso G. Povinelli Rev. and Mrs. C. Davies Reed Timothy J. Riffle and Sarah M. McConnell N. Clay and Amy Robbins Margaret Cole Russell Mr. and Mrs. William N. Salin Edward and Carol Smithwick Jack and Susanne Sogard Mr. and Mrs. Michael B. Stayton Pamela A. Steed and Peter Furno Ms. Kate L. Steele Mary M. Sutherland Mr. Samuel B. Sutphin and Ms. Kerry Dinneen Sidney Taurel Mr. Douglas L. Tillman Phyllis Vernick Bret and Mary Lou Waller Dr. and Mrs. Robert D. Walton Mr. and Mrs. Bradley J. Warnecke Rosalind H. Webb Emily A. West Margaret Wiley Mr. and Mrs. Gene E. Wilkins Mr. and Mrs. Jeremiah Wise Walter and Joan Wolf Turner and Diann Woodard Mr. and Mrs. Timothy T. Wright Mark and Sally Zelonis Gene and Mary Ann Zink Patron Circle ($500–$2,499) Anonymous Mrs. James F. Ackerman Dorothy Alig Mr. and Mrs. Jerald Ancel Bob and Patricia Anker Dr. and Mrs. Kingsley Annan Mr. and Mrs. Don B. Ansel Mr. and Mrs. Steve Anzalone Joe and Charlene Barnette Frank and Katrina Basile Mr. Preston Bautista and Mr. Bruce Nixon Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Beard Mr. Thomas Betley Dr. and Mrs. Peter Blankenhorn Mr. and Mrs. William C. Bonifield Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Borinstein

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Mr. C. Harvey Bradley Mr. and Mrs. R. Stephen Bradner Dr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Broadie Mr. Gayle Brock and Ms. Suellen Bunting Dr. and Mrs. Richard C. Bump Lorene Burkhart Mr. Gary Butkus and Mr. Jason Range Mr. and Mrs. Vince Caponi Ms. Olevia B. Cascadden Greg and Amy Chappell George and Linda Charbonneau Mrs. George H. A. Clowes Jr. Alan and Linda Cohen Dr. and Mrs. John J. Coleman Mr. David Contis and Ms. Sandra Cath Mr. Daniel P. Corrigan Ms. Margaret Coyle Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey Crowe Mr. and Mrs. William Curran Mr. and Mrs. Alan J. Dansker Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Darst Mr. and Mrs. Terry W. Dawson Mike Dinius and Jeannie Regan-Dinius Mrs. Constance C. Earle Jeremy Efroymson Mr. and Mrs. George C. Elliott Stephen and Julia Enkema Mr. Henry L. Fernandez and Mr. Kenneth S. Palmer Elaine Ewing Fess and Stephen W. Fess Ms. Wendy M. Fortune and Mr. Thomas R. Neal Mr. Steven C. Frazer Phyllis and Ed Gabovitch Dr. and Mrs. David Gerstein Ms. Jennifer Gillen-Rosenberg David W. and Betty Givens Mr. and Mrs. Morton Green Mrs. Anne Greenleaf Dr. and Mrs. Andrew Greenspan Mr. and Mrs. William J. Greer Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Grein Frank and Barbara Grunwald Ms. Kathryn Haigh Mr. and Mrs. George W. Hamilton Jr. Mr. Henry Havel and Ms. Mary Stickelmeyer Dr. and Mrs. Samuel Hennessee Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan R. Hess Mr. Jay L. Hicks Ms. Hollie Hirst and Ms. Lia Hirst Dr. and Mrs. Zachary I. Hodes Mr. and Mrs. Stephen J. Holmes Mrs. Mari Hulman George Bill and Nancy Hunt Ms. Mindy Hutchinson and Mr. Rob Friedman Harriet M. Ivey and Richard E. Brashear Mr. and Mrs. Kyle E. Jackson Mrs. Ernest A. Jacques * deceased


Mr. and Mrs. Jim James Mr. and Mrs. John J. Jaqua Jr. Craig W. Johnson Ms. Jenny Johnson Susan R. Jones-Huffine and Matthew Huffine Judge and Mrs. James S. Kirsch Mr. and Mrs. Kevin M. Kohart Mr. and Mrs. Scott Kraege Dr. Ruth Kramer and Dr. Joseph Jakubowski Mr. and Mrs. Michael Kubacki Audrey M. Larman Mr. and Mrs. Jordan H. Leibman Dr. Louis and Mrs. Myrna Lemberger Mr. and Mrs. James B. Lootens Mr. and Mrs. John Love Terren B. Magid and Julie Manning Magid The Marmon Family Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Mathiesen Mr. and Mrs. Dylan McCauley Mr. and Mrs. Mack P. McKinzie Robyn McMahon Mr. and Mrs. William J. Mead Sharon R. Merriman Ina M. Mohlman Mr. Darin Moody Dr.* and Mrs. Jans Muller Mr. and Mrs. Patrick J. Murphy Dr. Sara H. Murphy and Mr. Clifford Hull Blake Lee and Carolyn Neubauer Jane R. Nolan Mr. Ralph G. Nowak Sean and Elizabeth O’Farrell Mr. and Mrs. Keith Passwater Sally M. Peck Mr. James D. Rapp and Dr. Patricia W. Rapp Dr. Rachel Y. Reams Mr. and Mrs. Garrett Reasoner Dr. and Mrs. Charles H. Redish Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Reilly Jr. Mr. Kenneth Remenschneider and Dr. Sharon L. Hoog David and Jill Resley Mr. David A. Rodgers Mrs. Patty L. Roesch Dr. and Dr. Dale A. Rouch Nancy Russell Carolyn Schaefer and John Gray Anne and Roderick Scheele Robert and Alice Schloss Mr. Thomas F. Schnellenberger and Ms. Jacqueline Simmons Mr. and Mrs. Michael L. Schultz Dr. Albert E. Schultze and Dr. Marcia Kolvitz Mrs. Jeanne Scofield Mr. Vishant Shah and Ms. Emily Shortridge Michael Shapiro Dr. Marguerite K. Shepard

Maribeth and J. Albert Smith Jr. Patsy Solinger Dr. and Mrs. James G. Spahn Mr. and Mrs. John A. Steen Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Stevens Ms. Katie Sutphin Mr. James R. Sweeney II Mr. and Dr. John H. R. Taylor Mr. and Mrs. John E. Toevs Mr. and Mrs. Tim Vidimos Emily and Courtenay Weldon Mrs. William A. Wick Mr. and Mrs. Chuck Williams Dr. and Mrs. John F. Williams Mr. and Mrs. Dan Willis Mr. and Mrs. Gene Witchger Mr. William Witchger Mr. Christian Wolf and Ms. Elaine Holden Mr. and Mrs. Chris Wulke Marjorie P. Zeigler Mr. and Mrs. W. Paul Zimmerman Jr.

ANNUAL FUND $2,000 + Anonymous The Barth Foundation, a fund of Central Indiana Community Foundation Mr. and Mrs. James M. Cornelius Mrs. Dale A. Davidson* The Estate of Hartley and Margaret Dellinger Mr. and Mrs. William E. Dyer Dr. and Mrs. William G. Enright Judge and Mrs. James S. Kirsch Mr. and Mrs. John L. Lisher Joanne W. Orr Charitable Foundation Schwarz Partners, L.P. $1,000 to $1,999 Don and Karen Lake Buttrey, The Saltsburg Fund Ms. Carol J. Feeney Drs. Richard and Rebecca P. Feldman Ms. Marilyn F. Friedman Estate of Earl Harris Tom and Patty Hefner Mr. John H. Holliday Mr. Gregory A. Huffman Jewel Investments, LLC Richard M. Fairbanks Foundation $500 to $999 Lori Efroymson Aguilera and Sergio Aguilera Ms. Barbara J. Briggs Mr. and Mrs. Gregory Canter Mr. Daniel P. Corrigan Mrs. Joan B. Elder Ms. Karen Friss Dr. John A. Galloway and Dr. Mildred G. Galloway

Mark and Carmen Holeman KEJ Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Martin J. Kroot Martin, Barry, Greg Kroot and Families Dr. J. D. Marhenke Mr. and Mrs. Leigh Marsh Mrs. Virginia R. Melin Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth L. Renkens Ms. Carrie Renner Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Russell Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Sieck Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Witt Dr. Robert D. Yee and Mrs. Linda M. Yee $250 to $499 Art Study Group Dr. Judith A. Bland Mr. and Mrs. James W. Conine Mr. and Mrs. William L. Elder Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. Frazier Mr. and Mrs. Dick T. Freije Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Carl J. Gahwiler Mr. and Mrs. Garth Gathers Mrs. Nancy J. Harrison Mr. Samuel Hershey Mr. and Mrs. John C. Jenkins Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Kassing Mr. and Mrs. Jack A. Kesler Ms. Nancy King Mr. Jon Laramore and Ms. Janet McCabe Mr. Ignacio M. Larrinua and Ms. Mary T. Wolf Mr. Stephen M. Martin and Ms. Mary Lou Mayer Alice* and Kirk McKinney Ms. Sally Morlan and Mrs. Jenny Morlan-Horner Mr. and Mrs. Byron L. Myers Blake Lee and Carolyn Neubauer Susan Rohrer Mrs. Jane Rothbaum Mrs. Gemma Diego Urquiola and Mr. Edward J. Bastyr Dr. and Mrs. John Vahle Anna S. and James P. White Ms. Gretchen Wolfram

GIFTS IN MEMORIAM In Memory of Irene Sramek Andersen Mrs. Rose Mary Zolezzi In Memory of Leslie Blair Ball State University Art Gallery

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In Memory of Charlotte Bose Mr. Samuel Hershey Mr. and Mrs. Leo Kurtz In Memory of Ruth A. Burns Ms. Susan S. Barrett Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Bray Friends at Nomura Ms. Judy Gardner Dr. Paul Grmoljez and Ms. Alice Gordon Mrs. Jeanne B. Grumme Mark and Carmen Holeman Ms. Judy Huber Mrs. Dessie S. Koch and Ms. Jane Jones Dr. and Mrs. John C. Lappas Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Lerner Boris Meditch Mr. and Mrs. James Naus Mrs. Betty Neff The Over and Brinkman Families Mr. and Mrs. Tom Sylvester Ms. Pattiann Tehan Mr. and Mrs. Bert M. Wilhoite Mr. and Mrs. John Wright In Memory of Mrs. H.L. Conant and Mrs. H.E. Conant Steven Conant, MD In Memory of Ben Day Richard A. and Helen J. Dickinson Marni R. Fechtman Mark and Carmen Holeman Anna S. and James P. White In Memory of Allan H. Dyer Mr. and Mrs. William E. Dyer Judge and Mrs. James S. Kirsch In Memory of William E. Eberbach Ms. Sue E. Arnold Mrs. Wendy W. Ford Ms. Julie Renshaw In Memory of Constance R. Ellsworth Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mitchell In Memory of Richard E. Ford Lori Efroymson Aguilera and Sergio Aguilera In Memory of Alma Francescon Ms. Tracy Baldwin Richard A. and Helen J. Dickinson Marni R. Fechtman Richard and Lucille Freije


Ms. Patricia Kirn Mr. and Mrs. Bill Kurker Mark and Sally Zelonis In Memory of Deloris Garrett Sarah C. Barney Ms. Claudia DeMonte and Mr. Ed McGowin Mark and Carmen Holeman Dorit and Gerald Paul Mr. and Mrs. George A. Rubin Bernadine Speers Bret and Mary Lou Waller Anna S. and James P. White Miss Lorain C. Will In Memory of Mimi Haerle Ms. Marion Haerle In Memory of Paul N. Hutchinson Mr. and Mrs. William J. Greer In Memory of Betty King Dr. and Mrs. Evart M. Beck Cardiothoracic Surgeons, Inc. Marni R. Fechtman Jody Garrigus Ms. Nancy King Mrs. Mary P. Moss Dr. and Mrs. William E. Segar Ms. Madeleine Wing and Mr. Travis Selmier In Memory of Dr. Theodore H. Krumm Mrs. Nina K. Winter In Memory of Theodore H. Krumm, Jr. Mrs. Nina K. Winter In Memory of Dr. Thomas W. Kuebler Steven Conant, MD Ms. Caroline Kuebler and Mr. Peter J. Hill Ellen W. Lee and Stephen J. Dutton Mrs. Amy Perry Dr. and Mrs. John M. Teramoto Mrs. Nina K. Winter In Memory of Shirley Kulwin’s Sister Dorit and Gerald Paul In Memory of Carolyn La Vanchy Mrs. Mary Jane Witz

In Memory of Erica Lampe Mr. and Mrs. Mark A. Barbato Mr. and Mrs. Gayl Doster Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur J. Elsner Frank and Barbara Grunwald Mrs. Elinor Hanasono Mr. and Mrs. Eric C. Redman Mr. and Mrs. Glenn E. Stoup In Memory of Myra Mason’s Daughter, Gena Dorit and Gerald Paul In Memory of Alice McKinney Daniel and Kathryn Cantor Mrs. Joan B. Elder Mr. and Mrs. William L. Elder Jr. Mark and Carmen Holeman Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert L. Holmes James E. and Patricia J. LaCrosse Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Lugar Dorit and Gerald Paul Dr. and Mrs. William E. Segar Bret and Mary Lou Waller In Memory of Jans Mueller Marni R. Fechtman In Memory of Elisabeth Neuss Mr. and Mrs. Cameron Ainsworth In Memory of Les Niebrugge Ms. Sue E. Arnold Mr. and Mrs. Randall C. Belden Mr. Chad Franer Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Hathaway Drs. Meredith T. and Kathleen A. Hull Mr. and Mrs. Kevin B. Huston Mrs. Barbara A. Kent Dr. and Mrs. R. Peter Mohlman Mr. John D. Montgomery Mr. Timothy E. Sadler Dr. and Mrs. John H. Sexauer Mr. and Mrs. Gregory Shaner Ms. Jo Ellen Sharp Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stewart Mr. and Mrs. John E. Toevs Mr. and Mrs. James O. Yarber In Memory of Sidney Parkans Ms. Nancy K. Doedens Dr. Howard Harris and Mrs. Anita Harris Mr. and Mrs. Robert Meier Dorit and Gerald Paul

In Memory of Joan Peterson Mr. and Mrs. Russ Bachman Mr. Mark Baltz Mr. and Mrs. B.T. Barcelo Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Bene Mr. and Mrs. Donald Broman Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Cochrane Mr. and Mrs. Carl Forsberg Mr. and Mrs. David Gill Ms. Lynnette Hahn Mr. and Mrs. Jan L. Jacobs Mr. and Mrs. R.J. Kenney Mr. and Mrs. Richard Lintner Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Marinera Ms. Joan Michaelis and Mr. Robert Enoch Northern Box Company, Inc. Ms. Mary Ridgway Mr. and Mrs. Robert Roche Mr. and Mrs. John Sawulski Dr. and Mrs. Donald M. Schlegel Schwarz Partners, L.P. Mr. and Mrs. Jay Shumaker Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Thompson Mr. and Mrs. Danny Wampler Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Wood In Memory of Patricia Donovan Plym Ellinor McElroy and Jocko Cunningham In Memory of Althea Pogue Ms. Judith K. Clifton Mr. and Mrs. David Cook Mr. Tom Endicott Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Galloway Mr. and Mrs. Dick Geupel Mr. and Mrs. Eric Kelly Ms. Eloise H. Kibler Mr. and Mrs. Jim Needham Mr. and Mrs. Carl Schafer Marsha and Charles Weaver Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Woody In Memory of Patricia Quinn Mr. and Mrs. David Cook In Memory of Ann Reel Andrew and Jane Paine In Memory of Frank Russell Nancy Russell In Memory of Ambrose Smith Anna S. and James P. White

In Memory of Stephen Taylor’s Father Dorit and Gerald Paul In Memory of Adam Terlinden Dr. Howard Harris and Mrs. Anita Harris In Memory of John J. Traverso Mrs. Nancy J. Harrison Mrs. Nancy C. Turula In Memory of Wendy Wilkerson’s Mother Susan M. Jacobs and David H. Kleiman Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Mantel Dorit and Gerald Paul In Memory of Delores E. Wright-Wood Anonymous Ms. Carol Aquino Ms. Jody Binhack Canadian Aboriginal and Minority Supplier Council Chicago Minority Supplier Development Council Ewie Co., Inc. Ms. Lisa Garofalo GDKN Corporation Georgia Minority Supplier Development Council, Inc. Glen Meadow Homeowner’s Association Ms. L. Deloris Hayes and Mr. Hallie Bryant Healthcare Supplier Diversity Alliance Mr. and Mrs. George Hilliard Honda’s Procurement Diversity Team Mrs. Janice Bryant Howroyd Ms. Christine Humphrey Indiana Minority Supplier Development Council Mr. Burt R. Jordan Liberty Power Corp LLC Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Lippincott Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Mantel Mrs. Editha Masters Midwest Minority Supplier Development Council Ms. Carla Preston Ms. Lissa Shackelford Southern Florida Minority Supplier Development Council Southwest Minority Supplier D.C. Techsoft Systems, Inc. Toyota Supplier Diversity The Watson Company

In Memory of Kathy Taurel Mr. Alan Cohen Dorit and Gerald Paul Sephardic Congregation of Indianapolis

* deceased

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GIFTS IN TRIBUTE In Honor of Maxwell L. Anderson and Charles L. Venable, Ph.D. Mr. James C. Klosterman In Honor of Madelyn Hanson Berns Ms. Margie Berns and Mr. Tony Silva In Honor of Marilyn and Theodore R. Bowie Alexandra and Jocelyn Bowie In Honor of Theodore R. Bowie Alexandra and Jocelyn Bowie In Honor of Sarah Green June M. McCormack In Honor of Tom Hiatt Alice* and Kirk McKinney In Honor of the 67th Wedding Anniversary of Mark and Carmen Holeman Anna S. and James P. White In Honor of Raymond Walton Horn Dr. Ray Horn In Honor of Jim Kincannon Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Glaser In Honor of the Wedding of Christy Krieg and Patrick Carroll Marni R. Fechtman In Honor of Ellen Lee Mr. Richard Lee Steele In Honor of June M. McCormack Mr. and Mrs. Richard Daigle In Honor of the Birthday of E. Kirk McKinney Anna S. and James P. White In Honor of R. Craig Miller Martin Filler and Rosemarie Bletter Mr. James Zemaitis In Honor of Nonie’s Garden Anonymous John L. Krauss In Honor of Dorit Paul Mr. and Mrs. Clark Crowell In Honor of Dorit and Gerald Paul Ms. Jill Replogle

In Honor of Niloo Paydar Ms. Joanne Sprouse Margaret Wiley In Honor of the Marriage of Michael Robertson and Christopher Slapak Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth L. Renkens In Honor of the Retirement of Charles Sherman Richard M. Fairbanks Foundation In Honor of Dr. Greg Smith Kuniej Berry Associates LLC In Honor of Harriett R. Snyder Ms. Sherry M. Beck In Honor of Elizabeth Taylor’s Birthday Dorit and Gerald Paul In Honor of Marcel Wanders xO Design In Honor of Joan Wolf’s Birthday Dorit and Gerald Paul

LEGACY CIRCLE Anonymous (2) Dan and Kate Appel Mr. Edward N. Ballard Frank and Katrina Basile Mrs. Claire R. Bennett Alice Berkowitz Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Bowman Steven Conant, MD Chris W. and Lesley J. Conrad Phyllis Crum Damon and Kay Davis Mr. J. Gregory Dawson Richard A. and Helen J. Dickinson The Efroymson Family Edgar and Dorothy Fehnel Drs. Richard and Rebecca P. Feldman Elaine Ewing Fess and Stephen W. Fess Russell and Penny Fortune Mrs. Otto N. Frenzel, III Mr. David Garrett David W. and Betty Givens David and Julie Goodrich Mr. and Mrs. John R. Hayes Tom and Nora Hiatt Mr. John H. Holliday Francine and Roger Hurwitz Mr. and Mrs. Rick L. Johnson Jr. Joan D. Kahn Dana and Marc Katz

Mr. and Mrs. David W. Knall Kay F. Koch Dr. Ruth Kramer and Dr. Joseph Jakubowski John L. Krauss and Margaret M. Maxwell Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Ledman Catharine D. Lichtenauer June M. McCormack Michael K. and Patricia P. McCrory Alice* and Kirk McKinney Mr. and Mrs.* H. Roll McLaughlin Boris Meditch Ina M. Mohlman Katherine C. Nagler Perry Holliday O’Neal Andrew and Jane Paine Dorit and Gerald Paul Mr. and Mrs. R. Stephen Radcliffe George and Peggy Rapp Mr. James D. Rapp and Dr. Patricia W. Rapp Dr. and Mrs. John G. Rapp Rev. and Mrs. C. Davies Reed Carolyn Schaefer and John Gray Jack and Susanne Sogard Mrs. Becky Curtis Stevens Charles and Peggy Sutphin Marianne Williams Tobias Ambassador Randall L. Tobias Anna S. and James P. White Richard D. and Billie Lou* Wood Mr. and Mrs. Timothy T. Wright Mr. and Mrs. James W. Yee Kwang Fei Young Mr. and Mrs. W. Paul Zimmerman Jr.

CORPORATE, GRANT, AND GOVERNMENT SUPPORT $500,000 + Anonymous Lilly Endowment Inc. The Melvin & Bren Simon Foundation $250,000 to $499,999 The Getty Foundation $100,000 to $249,999 The Clowes Fund Eli Lilly and Company Foundation Henry Luce Foundation Institute of Museum and Library Services National Endowment for the Arts

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$50,000 to $99,999 Arts Council of Indianapolis and the City of Indianapolis The Indianapolis Foundation, a CICF affiliate JPMorgan Chase & Co. National Endowment for the Humanities $25,000 to $49,999 Alliance of the IMA Barnes & Thornburg LLP The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation The Eugene & Marilyn Glick Family Foundation The National Bank of Indianapolis The Penrod Society $10,000 to $24,999 Christel DeHaan Family Foundation Efroymson Family Fund, a CICF Fund Indiana Arts Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency ITT Educational Services, Inc. Merrill Lynch Wealth Management Nicholas H. Noyes, Jr., Memorial Foundation, Inc. PNC Foundation Samuel H. Kress Foundation $5,000 to $9,999 BKD, LLP Brickyard Marketing Christie’s E-gineering, LLC Gregory & Appel Insurance Herman Miller Indiana Business Solutions LLC/ Xerox Corporation Indianapolis Monthly Lumina Foundation for Education MET Foundation Inc. Republic National Distributing Company Robin Lehman Glass $1,000 to $4,999 AIA Indiana and Indianapolis Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation Axis Architecture + Interiors Bose McKinney & Evans LLP Browning Day Mullins Dierdorf Architects Burberry Butler University Cassidy Turley The Container Store Design Arts Society of the IMA


Eskenazi Health Foundation Goldman, Sachs & Co. Honda Manufacturing of Indiana, LLC Indiana Chapter ASID Indiana Farm Bureau Insurance IndyHub Indianapolis Power & Light Company Kirby Risk Electrical Supply Macy’s, Inc. Monarch Beverage Nathaniel Edmunds Photography Parr, Richey, Obremskey, Frandsen & Patterson LLP Pasquinelli Family Foundation PCD Capital Group, LLC Spring Meadow Nursery Steel Dynamics, Inc. Engineered Bar Products Division Sun King Brewing Co. Teachers Credit Union

DONORS TO THE COLLECTION Anonymous The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts Ms. Sherry M. Beck Ms. Margie Berns and Mr. Tony Silva Leonard and Kathryn Betley Mrs. Charlotte H. Bose* Alexandra and Jocelyn Bowie Lorene Burkhart Mr. Gary Butkus and Mr. Jason Range Susan Cahn Mr. and Mrs. Donald A. Coffin Steven Conant, MD David Edward Co. Allan H. Dyer* Martin Filler and Rosemarie Bletter Jody Garrigus Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence Goldberg Mr. and Mrs. William J. Greer Guests of the 2013 New Year’s Eve at the IMA event Mr. Alan Heller Dr. Ray Horn Kimie Iijima Joseph E. Cain Foundation Dana and Marc Katz KDDI Mobile Kiwi Arts Group Mr. James C. Klosterman Ms. Caroline Kuebler and Mr. Peter J. Hill LucePlan USA Inc. Lynne Maguire and William Miller Maruni Wood Industry, Inc.

Mattiazzi June M. McCormack Dan and Elli McElroy Catherine Miller and Thomas Patch Elizabeth Miller and Alan Melting Margaret Miller Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Morgan Museo Alessi Mr. and Mrs. F. Timothy Nagler Dorit and Gerald Paul Pasquinelli Family Foundation Mrs. Amy M. Perry Gaye and John Rardon Sawaya & Moroni S.p.A. Drs. Annette D. Schlagenhauff and James Robinson Scholten Japanese Art Mr. and Mrs. Michael L. Schultz Seiko Instruments Mr. Vishant Shah and Ms. Emily Shortridge Mr. Mike Sims Ms. Joanne Sprouse Ann M. and Chris Stack Tiffany & Co. Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates, Inc. Dr. Charles L. Venable and Mr. Martin K. Webb When Objects Work Anna S. and James P. White Margaret Wiley Mr. R. Dean Willey Mrs. Nina K. Winter xO Design Mr. James Zemaitis Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Zufi

DONORS TO SPECIAL PROJECTS Anonymous (9) A. Brown & Sons Nursery Mr. and Mrs. Robert Antrim Axis Architecture + Interiors BKD, LLP Brickyard Marketing George and Mary Clare Broadbent Browning Day Mullins Dierdorf Architects Burberry Butler University The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation The Clowes Fund Mr. David and Dr. Suzanne Combs

The Container Store Mr. and Mrs. Trent Cowles The Davey Tree Expert Co. Damon and Kay Davis Mrs. Ione DeBolt Mr. and Mrs. Kevin DeFord Easter Conservation Services E.D. Frenzel Charitable Trust Efroymson Family Fund, a CICF Fund Dr. and Mrs. William G. Enright Eskenazi Health Foundation The Eugene & Marilyn Glick Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. John N. Failey Mr. and Mrs. Brian Fogg Force Design Jane Fortune and Robert Hesse William L. Fortune Jr. and Joseph D. Blakley Peter J. Fulgenzi The Getty Foundation Mr. Jamie Gibbs and Mr. Paco Argiz Mr. and Mrs. David Gorden Gregory & Appel Insurance Harbor Light LLC Kent Hawryluk Henry Luce Foundation Herman Miller Tom and Nora Hiatt Mrs. Janice Bryant Howroyd Indiana Business Solutions LLC/ Xerox Corporation Indiana Chapter ASID Indianapolis Monthly Indianapolis Zoo IndyHub Institute of Museum and Library Services ITT Educational Services, Inc. Jamie Gibbs Associates Jewel Investments, LLC Mr. and Mrs. Rick L. Johnson, Jr. Kay F. Koch John L. Krauss James E. and Patricia J. LaCrosse Lakeland Nursery Mr. and Mrs. Gil Latz Liberty Power Corp LLC

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Lilly Endowment Inc. Macy’s, Inc. Marigold, Inc. Mrs. Tanya Marsh The Melvin & Bren Simon Foundation Merrill Lynch Wealth Management Mrs. Diana Mutz and Mr. Howard Schrott Phillip D. Myer Nathaniel Edmunds Photography The National Bank of Indianapolis National Endowment for the Arts National Endowment for the Humanities Parr Richey Obremskey Frandsen & Patterson Pasquinelli Family Foundation Pattern Magazine PCD Capital Group, LLC The Penrod Society PNC Foundation Myrta Pulliam George and Peggy Rapp Republic National Distributing Company Robin Lehman Glass Ruth Lilly Philanthropic Foundation Saks Fifth Avenue Samuel H. Kress Foundation Spring Meadow Nursery Sun King Brewing Co. Toyota Supplier Diversity Alice and Ed Vernon

* deceased


Exhibitions

Face to Face: The Neo-Impressionist Portrait, 1886–1904

Georgia O’Keeffe and the Southwestern Still Life

Through September 7 / $12 Public, $6 Students and youth ages 7–17, Free for IMA members and children 6 and under / Allen Whitehill Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery / Floor 2

November 2, 2014–February 15, 2015 / $15 (Tue–Thr), $20 (Fri–Sun) Public, $12 Students and youth ages 7–17, Free for IMA members and children 6 and under / Allen Whitehill Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery / Floor 2

How is a portrait more than just a likeness? Can a portrait reveal elements of character, identity, and personality? And what is the effect when that portrait is rendered according to certain rules of color and methods of brushwork? These are subjects addressed in Face to Face: The Neo-Impressionist Portrait, 1886– 1904, a groundbreaking exhibition organized by the IMA that brings together some of the most fascinating portraits of late 19th-century Europe. More than 50 oil paintings and drawings reveal the range of expression offered by the Neo-Impressionists’ treatment of an enduring theme. This exhibition is made possible through the generosity of the Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation, with additional support provided by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

See page 4. Organized by Joseph S. Czestochowski, Produced by International Arts®. Curated by Charles C. Eldredge. This exhibition is presented by The Alliance of the IMA, with additional support provided by Barnes & Thornburg LLP

O’Keeffe Education Supporters underwrite all public programs, educational outreach, and gallery experiences related to Georgia O’Keeffe and the Southwestern Still Life. Platinum Supporter

Silver Supporters Buckingham Foundation The Lacy Foundation

Top: Man Ray (American, 1890–1976), Mime (detail), 1926, pochoir. Indianapolis Museum of Art, Emma Harter Sweetser Fund, 75.733.1. © 2014 Man Ray Trust/Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY/ADAGP, Paris. Middle: David Burliuk (American, 1882–1967), Onya and Ola (detail), 1939, oil on canvas, 24-1/8 x 18-1/8 in. Indianapolis Museum of Art, Gift of Ann and Joseph Edelman, 72.97.2. © David Burliuk Foundation. Bottom: Bill Viola (American, b. 1951), The Crossing (detail), 1996, two-channel video/sound installation, overall: 105 x 330 x 670 in. (2 m 66.7 cm x 8 m 38.2 cm x 17 m 1.8 cm), Running time: 12 min. Dallas Museum of Art, Lay Family Acquisition Fund, General Acquisitions Fund, and gifts from an anonymous donor, Howard E. Rachofsky, Gayle Stoffel, Mr. and Mrs. William T. Solomon, Catherine and Will Rose, and Emily and Steve Summers, in honor of Deedie Rose. © Bill Viola, Long Beach, California. Photo by Kira Perov.

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For America: Prints of the American Art-Union

Bill Viola: Capturing Spectacle and Passion

Through September 28 / Free / Susan and Charles Golden Gallery / Floor 2

September 26, 2014–January 20, 2015 / Free / June M. McCormack Forefront Galleries / Floor 4

Between 1840 and 1851, the American Art-Union promoted American art by distributing engravings of the best American paintings of the day to its nationwide membership through annual lotteries. These engravings, by the most skilled American engravers, reproduced major paintings by such artists as Thomas Cole, Asher B. Durand, George Caleb Bingham, and William Sidney Mount that were in the possession of the Art-Union.

Fabled Kings Through January 4, 2015 / Free / Frances Parker Appel Gallery / Floor 3 Featuring 16 Indian paintings dating from the late 17th to the 18th centuries, this exhibition highlights works from the IMA’s Asian collection and a selection of paintings from a Panchatantra series painted at Udaipur, on loan from a private collection. The Panchatantra is based on an ancient Indian oral tradition that uses tales to teach life lessons. They are often illustrated by anthropomorphized animals, similar to Aesop’s Fables. Shown for the first time together, the works in Fabled Kings represent the vivid and varied tradition of Indian narrative painting.

Working with video since the early 1970s, Bill Viola is a pioneer of the medium and internationally known for works that explore experiences of physical and spiritual transformation—birth, death, waking, dreaming, emergence, and transcendence. Two works are featured in the exhibition: The Crossing (1996) and The Quintet of the Silent (2001). The striking compositions chart the extremes of human emotion and reflect Viola’s efforts to, in his own words, “represent the unrepresentable.”

The Onya La Tour Collection: Modernism in Indiana October 17, 2014–April 12, 2015 / Free / IMA Alliance Gallery / Floor 2 Presenting 30 works from the unconventional collection of an Indiana native, The Onya La Tour Collection: Modernism in Indiana highlights the early Modernist movement in America. Born and raised in Indiana, Onya La Tour (1896–1976) worked for the WPA in New York during the 1930s and befriended many of the artists whose work she would collect and display in her own gallery. When La Tour moved back to Indiana in 1940, she made her unusual collection available to the public free of charge in her Brown County farmhouse, which she called the “Indiana Museum for Modern Art.” In 1972 La Tour donated much of her collection, which features figurative and abstract styles, to the IMA. This exhibition marks the first

time many of her paintings, drawings, and prints have been displayed since their days in Brown County. The Indiana University Art Museum is also lending four works from La Tour’s collection.

The Rise of American Modernism October 24, 2014–July 26, 2015 / Free / Susan and Charles Golden Gallery / Floor 2 The American Modernist movement and the European masters who shaped it are featured in this exhibition of 29 prints, drawings, watercolors, and photographs from the IMA’s permanent collection. The avant-garde of French art made inroads into the American mainstream in the early 20th century largely through the efforts of photographer Alfred Stieglitz. His 291 Gallery introduced the works of Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, and Paul Cézanne, as well as young Americans such as Marsden Hartley, John Marin, and Katherine Dreier. Along with Marcel Duchamp and Man Ray, Dreier founded the Société Anonyme in 1920 to foster the Modernist movement. Works by these and other artists are included in the exhibition.

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Be sure to visit these exhibitions that each focus on a single work from the IMA’s collections, examining it from a special perspective. Coat of Many Colors Through January 25, 2015 / Free / Gerald and Dorit Paul Galleries / Floor 3 Science and art come together in the IMA’s conservation science laboratory, where in-house scientists study works of art to learn more about their history and how to preserve them. Coat of Many Colors illustrates how scientific imaging and dye analysis has narrowed the possible creation date of a recently acquired Uzbek garment. The research also contributes to our understanding of the influx of modern European synthetic colorants into traditional Central Asian textile arts.

Continuing the Work of the Monuments Men September 5, 2014–September 6, 2015 / Free / Steven Conant Galleries in Memory of Mrs. H.L. Conant / Floor 3 The 2014 release of the Hollywood movie The Monuments Men created much public interest in the issue of Nazi art looting before and during WWII. It also increased awareness of Allied efforts to locate, safeguard, and restitute cultural property after the war. Examination of one work from the IMA’s European collection reveals the complexities of provenance research, and the difficulties sometimes involved in reconstructing a painting’s history of ownership.


Calendar of Events For detailed information on events, to RSVP, or to purchase tickets, please visit imamuseum.org or call 317-923-1331. Assistive listening devices are available for all Toby events and public tours. ASL interpretation available at Toby events where noted, and upon request by calling 317-923-1331, ext. 213. P: Public / M: IMA Members / S: Students

TOURS Collection & Exhibition Tours / Offered daily. Visit imamuseum.org for full schedule. Family Tours / 2nd and 4th Sat of the month / 1:30 & 2:30 pm / Meet on Floor 2 at top of escalator Meet Me at IMA: Alzheimer’s Tours / 2nd Sat, 11 am & 4th Tue, 2 pm / Meet at Welcome Desk / Registration required through Alzheimer’s Association, 1-800-272-3900 Touch & Audio Description Tours / For blind/ low-vision visitors / 1st Sat of the month / 11 am / Meet on Floor 2 at top of escalator Closer Look / 2nd Sat & 3rd Tue of the month / 2 pm / Meet on Floor 2 at top of escalator / Registration required ASK ME! / Docents stationed in galleries / Every Sat / 1–3 pm Lilly House Tours / Fri, Sat & Sun (except Nov 14) / 2 pm / Meet at Lilly House lobby Garden Tours / Sat & Sun through end of October / 1 pm / Meet at Lilly House The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park: 100 Acres Tours / Every Sat through end of October / Noon / Meet at Lake Terrace

YOGA IN THE GALLERIES Saturdays / 10–11 am / Meet in Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion / $13 P, $10 M (price per session) / Registration required September 13, 20, 27 October 4, 11, 18, 25 November 8, 15, 22 December 6, 13, 20, 27

CHRISTMAS AT LILLY HOUSE Enjoy Lilly House decked out for the holidays. November 15–January 4 (except Christmas & New Year’s Day) Tue–Sat 11 am–5 pm, Sun noon–5 pm Extended hours to 9 pm on December 4 & 18

RECURRING EVENTS EVERY WED Family Activity / wee Wednesdays / Star Studio Classroom / 11 am–noon / $8 P, $5 M, Free for grown-ups & children under 1 / Registration required EVERY SAT Family Activity / Make & Take / Star Studio Classroom / 1–4 pm / Free EVERY SUN Family Activity / Art in the Park (through end of October) / 100 Acres: Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion / Noon–4 pm / Free Family Activity / Make & Take / Star Studio Classroom / 1–4 pm / Free

SEPTEMBER 04 THR Class / Hit Below the Felt / Studio 2 / 6–8 pm / $60 P, $40 M / Registration required Film / DamNation / The Toby / 7 pm / $9 P, $5 M 07 SUN Special Event / Music in the Galleries / Allen Whitehall Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery / 2 pm / Free with exhibition admission to Face to Face 09 TUE Class / Make Me @ IMA / Studio 2 / 10 am– noon / Free / Register through Alzheimer’s Association, 1-800-272-3900 Special Event / Homeschool Day at the IMA / Check in at Welcome Desk for location / 11 am–2 pm / $8 P, $5 M, 1 ticket per family / Registration required 11 THR Class / Hit Below the Felt / Studio 2 / 6–8 pm / $60 P, $40 M / Registration required 13 SAT Tour / Masters of Contemporary Glass / Meet on Floor 2 at top of escalator / 1 pm / Free Family Activity / Hold It! / Check in at Welcome Desk for location / 1:30–3:30 pm / Free Tour / For America: Prints of the American Art-Union / Meet on Floor 2 at top of escalator / 3 pm / Free

17 WED Special Event / Indy Jazz Fest Concert / Amphitheater / 7 pm / Visit indyjazzfest.net for ticket information

10 FRI Family Activity / Fam-tastic Days: Fall Break at the IMA / Studios 1 & 2 / 11 am–4 pm / $8 P, $5 M, Free for grown-ups and children under 1

18 THR Class / Hit Below the Felt / Studio 2 / 6–8 pm / $60 P, $40 M / Registration required 20 SAT Special Event / Autumn Equinox / 100 Acres / 3–7 pm / Free

11 SAT Tour / Fabled Kings / Meet on Floor 2 at top of escalator / 1 pm / Free Family Activity / Hold It! / Check in at Welcome Desk for location / 1:30–3:30 pm / Free Special Event / Optical Popsicle 7 / The Toby / 8 pm / $15

21 SUN Tour / ASL Interpreted / Art Inspired by Myths / Meet on Floor 2 at top of escalator / 1 pm / Free

17 FRI Special Event / Art in Odd Places Indianapolis, cosponsored by the IMA / Monument Circle, Downtown / Free

25 THR Special Event / Bill Viola: Capturing Spectacle and Passion Gallery Talk and Reception / McCormack Forefront Galleries / 6 pm / Free / Hosted by Contemporary Art Society

18 SAT Special Event / Art in Odd Places Indianapolis, cosponsored by the IMA / Monument Circle, Downtown / Free

26 FRI Tour / Masters of Contemporary Glass / Meet on Floor 2 at top of escalator / 1 pm / Free

19 SUN Tour / ASL Interpreted / Creative Hoosiers / Meet on Floor 2 at top of escalator / 1 pm / Free

27 SAT Family Activity / Hold It! / Check in at Welcome Desk for location / 1:30–3:30 pm / Free

OCTOBER 02 THR Talk / James Robinson: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Stories behind the IMA’s Asian Art Collection / The Toby / 7 pm / Free 07 TUE Family Activity / Fam-tastic Days: Fall Break at the IMA / Studios 1 & 2 / 11 am–4 pm / $8 P, $5 M, Free for grown-ups and children under 1 08 WED Family Activity / Fam-tastic Days: Fall Break at the IMA / Studios 1 & 2 / 11 am–4 pm / $8 P, $5 M, Free for grown-ups and children under 1 09 THR Family Activity / Fam-tastic Days: Fall Break at the IMA / Studios 1 & 2 / 11 am–4 pm / $8 P, $5 M, Free for grown-ups and children under 1 Talk / Hilda Longinotti: Stories from a Classic / The Toby / 6:30 pm / Free

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24 FRI Tour / The Onya La Tour Collection: Modernism in Indiana / Meet on Floor 2 at top of escalator / 1 pm / Free Family Activity / Pumpkin Carving / Park of the Laments / 3–7 pm / $5 Film / The Blair Witch Project in conjunction with Indy Film Fest / Park of the Laments / 10 pm / $10 25 SAT Family Activity / Hold It! / Check in at Welcome Desk for location / 1:30–3:30 pm / Free 31 FRI Special Event / Member Preview Days of Georgia O’Keeffe and the Southwestern Still Life / Allen Whitehill Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery / 11 am–5 pm / Free (Members only)


NOVEMBER 01 SAT Special Event / Member Preview Days of Georgia O’Keeffe and the Southwestern Still Life / Allen Whitehill Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery / 11 am–5 pm / Free (Members only) Special Event / Georgia O’Keeffe and the Southwestern Still Life Opening Reception / Allen Whitehill Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery / 7 pm / $35 P, $25 M 02 SUN Special Event / Public Opening of Georgia O’Keeffe and the Southwestern Still Life 06 THR Special Event / Georgia O’Keeffe and the Southwestern Still Life Open House for Teachers / Check in at Welcome Desk / 5–6:30 pm / $8 P, $5 M / Registration required 07 FRI Special Event / 2014 LGBT Film Festival / The Toby & DeBoest Lecture Hall / Visit indylgbtfilmfest.com for times and tickets

08 SAT Tour / Fabled Kings / Meet on Floor 2 at top of escalator / 1 pm / Free Family Activity / Hold It! / Check in at Welcome Desk for location / 1:30–3:30 pm / Free Special Event / 2014 LGBT Film Festival / The Toby & DeBoest Lecture Hall / Visit indylgbtfilmfest.com for times and tickets 09 SUN Special Event / 2014 LGBT Film Festival / The Toby & DeBoest Lecture Hall / Visit indylgbtfilmfest.com for times and tickets 16 SUN Special Event / Inspired by O’Keeffe Student Award Ceremony / DeBoest Lecture Hall / 3:30–5 pm / Free / Registration required Tour / ASL Interpreted / Weekend in New England / Meet on Floor 2 at top of escalator / 1 pm / Free Talk / Jane Roy Brown: One Writer’s Garden / The Toby / 2 pm / Free 21 FRI Special Event / B-Movie Bingo / The Toby / 7 pm / $10 P, $5 M 22 SAT Family Activity / Hold It! / Check in at Welcome Desk for location / 1:30–3:30 pm / Free

28 FRI Tour / The Rise of American Modernism / Meet on Floor 2 at top of escalator / 1 pm / Free

18 THR Special Event / Winter Solstice / Grounds / 5:30 pm / Free

29 SAT Special Event / Silent Night / Museumwide / 5–9 pm / Free

21 SUN Tour / ASL Interpreted / Contemporary Art / Meet on Floor 2 at top of escalator / 1 pm / Free

DECEMBER 02 TUE Class / Make Me @ IMA / Studio 2 / 10 am–noon / Free / Register through Alzheimer’s Association, 1-800-272-3900 04 THR Special Event / Holiday Hullabaloo / Museum Store and Greenhouse Shop / 5–9 pm / Free 06 SAT Class / Draw the Line / Studio 3 / 1–4 pm / $60 P, $40 M / Registration required

26 FRI Tour / The Onya La Tour Collection: Modernism in Indiana / Meet on Floor 2 at top of escalator / 1 pm / Free 27 SAT Family Activity / Hold It! / Check in at Welcome Desk for location / 1:30–3:30 pm / Free 31 WED Special Event / New Year’s Eve at the IMA / 9 pm / $200 VIP, $150 P, $125 M/ www.imamuseum.org/NYE

11 THR Special Event / Monster Drawing Rally / 6 pm / Pulliam Family Great Hall / Free 13 SAT Class / Draw the Line / Studio 3 / 1–4 pm / $60 P, $40 M / Registration required Tour / Fabled Kings / Meet on Floor 2 at top of escalator / 1 pm / Free Family Activity / Hold It! / Check in at Welcome Desk for location / 1:30–3:30 pm / Free

You’re invited to an evening of holiday shopping and festivities at the Museum Store, Madeline F. Elder Greenhouse Shop and Lilly House Christmas Shop. The evening will feature special promotions available only during Holiday Hullabaloo, as well as refreshments, trunk shows by local and national artists and jewelers, live music, and luminarias in the gardens. IMA Members will receive a 20% discount on all purchases during Holiday Hullabaloo.

Questions? Call 317-923-1331, ext. 281.

Thursday, December 4 / 5–9 pm

Shuttle vans will run between the Museum Circle and the Lilly House entrance throughout the evening.

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Recent Events

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Annual Meeting (top) Photos by Nathaniel Edmunds Photography 1. Leonard and Kathryn Betley and Dr. Charles L. Venable 2. Sarah Barney and George Rapp 3. Tom Hiatt and Michael Kubacki 4. Marianne Glick A Garden Affair (middle) Photos by Eric Lubrick 1. David Gorden 2. Standing, from left: Edward and Ann Hathaway, Chad and Jennifer Franer, Harriet Ivey. Seated, from left: Susan and John Toevs, Kathleen and Meredith Hull, Richard Brashear 3. Patty Wilkins and Alice Appel Avant Brunch (bottom) Photos by Tascha Mae Horowitz 1. John Beeler, Erin Till, Michael Kaufmann and Scott Stulen 2. Deegan Atha and Madeleine Jurkiewicz

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Summer Solstice (top) Photos by Tascha Mae Horowitz

Face to Face: The Neo-Impressionist Portrait, 1886–1904 Opening (middle) Photos by Nathaniel Edmunds Photography

1. Ellen Lee 2. Dr. Jane Block and Ellen Lee

Innovative Museum Leaders Speaker Series: Bonnie Pitman (bottom) Photos by Nathaniel Edmunds Photography

1. Dr. Charles L. Venable and Bonnie Pitman

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To see more images of programs at the IMA, visit flickr.com/imaitsmyart

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Upcoming Donor Circle and Affiliate Group Events Art, Design, and Nature Interest Groups IMA Affiliate groups offer members unique opportunities to become more involved with the IMA by exploring their own interests. Affiliate group members can participate in exclusive tours of the IMA’s permanent collection and special events related to the mission of each group. PATRON CIRCLE AND SECOND CENTURY SOCIETY EVENTS Patron Circle and Second Century Society members are at the forefront of annual giving at the IMA. Each year, this important group of donors advances the Museum’s mission through their generous philanthropic leadership. Trip to Cleveland, Ohio September 26–28 / $1250 Annual Director’s Dinner October 8 / Location to follow / 6 pm / Clowes Circle and above Annual Founders Day Dinner and Special Preview of Georgia O’Keeffe and the Southwestern Still Life October 30 / Pulliam Family Great Hall and Deer Zink Special Events Pavilion / 6 pm / $175 / Director’s Circle and above The IMA Founders Day Dinner is presented by ITT Technical Institute, with additional support provided by JPMorgan

Director’s Tour November 13 / Meet in Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion / 6:30 pm / President’s Circle and above Holiday Reception December 11 / 6 pm / Open to all Patron Circle and Second Century Society

THE ALLIANCE The IMA’s longest established Affiliate group develops and supports activities and projects that stimulate public interest in the Museum, its educational programs, and its collection. Artful Living Series Lecture and Luncheon Talk: From Table Top to TV Tray: China and Glass in America, 1880–1980, by Dr. Charles L. Venable, The Melvin & Bren Simon Director and CEO September 10 / DeBoest Lecture Hall / 11 am / Free Luncheon and brief tours of Dr. Venable’s personal collection to follow / Deer Zink Special Events Pavilion / 12:15 pm / $55

ASIAN ART SOCIETY (AAS) AAS offers its members the opportunity to learn more about Asian art, history, and cultural traditions, and socialize with others who share a deep interest in Asian art. Talk: James Robinson: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Stories behind the IMA’s Asian Art Collection October 2 / The Toby / 7 pm / Free / Reception to follow in the Fountain Room

CONTEMPORARY ART SOCIETY (CAS) CAS is a dynamic group that promotes the understanding of and appreciation for contemporary art through educa-

tional programs, social events, and community collaborations. CAS support has improved the quality and scope of the IMA’s contemporary art collection. Exhibition Opening: Bill Viola: Capturing Spectacle and Passion with Gallery Talk by Dr. Tricia Paik September 25 / McCormack Forefront Galleries / 6 pm / Free Meet and Greet with Dr. Tricia Paik November 6 / DeBoest Lecture Hall / 7 pm / Free / Reception to follow in the Fountain Room

DESIGN ARTS SOCIETY (DAS) DAS works to promote a greater awareness of the central role design plays in our daily lives and also to help establish the IMA as an important center for design arts in the US. Talk: Hilda Longinotti: Stories from a Classic October 9 / The Toby / 6:30 pm / Free Gallery Talk: Love/Hate November 13 / Contemporary Design Galleries / 7 pm

FASHION ARTS SOCIETY (FAS) FAS seeks to promote awareness and appreciation of textile and fashion arts through the study of haute couture and cloth. Members also help facilitate the expansion and enrichment of the IMA’s fashion and textile arts collection. Trip to Chicago October 7–8 This overnight excursion will include accommodations, a special evening at Burberry, and a visit to Nick Cave’s studio, where Soundsuits are born! More details forthcoming.

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HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY (HORT SOC) The Horticultural Society celebrates the art of gardening at the IMA by helping to develop, enhance, and maintain the gardens, grounds, and greenhouse through volunteer and financial support. The Society also maintains an extensive horticultural library on the IMA campus. Dinner and Talk: Stephanie Cohen: Small Shrubs for the Perennial Garden September 11 / Woodstock / 6 pm / $30 / RSVP by Sept 5 to Susan Toevs at 317-295-9112 or suzila@aol.com Talk: Jane Roy Brown: One Writer’s Garden November 16 / The Toby / 2 pm / Free / Reception to follow at Newfield

To learn more about these events or how you can join one of these interest groups, contact Grace Meils at gmeils@imamuseum.org or 317-923-1331, ext. 295.


About the IMA ADMISSION

HOURS

DINING

FACILITY RENTAL

General admission is free.

Museum Tue, Wed, Fri, Sat: 11 am–5 pm Thur: 11 am–9 pm Sun: noon–5 pm

IMA Café IMA Café offers delicious snacks and inexpensive meals set in a chic cafeteria setting.

The IMA offers a variety of spaces to rent—perfect for any occasion from cocktail parties to weddings to business conferences.

Lilly House Open April through December, all Museum hours except closes Thur at 5 pm.

SHOPPING

For more information: imamuseum.org/special-events or 317-923-1331, ext. 419

Featured Exhibitions: Through September 7: Face to Face: The Neo-Impressionist Portrait, 1886–1904 ($12 Public, $6 Students and youth ages 7–17, Free for members and children 6 and under) November 2, 2014–February 15, 2015: Georgia O’Keeffe and the Southwestern Still Life ($15 (Tue–Thr), $20 (Fri–Sun) Public, $12 Students and youth ages 7–17, Free for IMA members and children 6 and under) The IMA also offers complimentary Wi-Fi, coat check, wheelchairs, rollators, strollers, public phone, and lockers.

GETTING HERE Location The IMA is located at 4000 Michigan Road in Indianapolis. The main entrance is approximately one block north of 38th Street and Michigan Road. Note that south of 38th Street, Michigan Road becomes Martin Luther King Jr. Street. The IMA is accessible off the Central Canal Towpath (an Indy Greenways trail). Bike racks are available on campus, including in the parking garage. By IndyGo Bus From downtown Indianapolis: #38 Lafayette Square From Michigan Road: #34 North or South Visit indygo.net/tripplanner to plan your trip. Parking Main lot and Garage: $5 Public, Free for members; Outlots: Free

Both Museum and Lilly House are closed Mondays, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park, Gardens, and Grounds Open daily from dawn to dusk.

TOURS The IMA offers free public tours of its galleries, The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park, Lilly House, and gardens. For a complete schedule, including tour themes, visit imamuseum.org.

ACCESSIBILITY The IMA strives to be accessible to all visitors. • The Museum building and Lilly House are accessible for wheelchair users. • Open captioning is available on in-gallery videos; closed captioning available with select public programs. • Assistive listening devices are available for all public tours and Toby events. • ASL interpretations during select public programs and tours or by request. Call 317-923-1331 at least three weeks prior to event. • Service animals welcome. • Family restrooms and nursing mothers room available.

Museum Store Books, jewelry, and Museuminspired merchandise. 317-923-1331, ext. 281 Madeline F. Elder Greenhouse Rare and choice plants, gardening supplies, and gifts. Museum hours except January–March closes Thur at 5 pm, April–December closes Thur at 8 pm. 317-920-2652 Shop online 24 hours a day at imamuseum.org/shop.

IMA LIBRARIES Eleanor Evans Stout and Erwin Cory Stout Reference Library A non-circulating research library that consists of thousands of resources on the visual arts. 317-920-2647

MEMBERSHIP Membership helps support free general admission at the IMA. For questions concerning membership, call 317-920-2651 or visit imamuseum.org/membership.

AFFILIATES For more information about IMA art interest groups and clubs, contact affiliates@imamuseum.org.

VOLUNTEER For more information about how you can get involved, contact volunteer@imamuseum.org or 317-923-1331, ext. 263.

By appointment only. Horticultural Society Library A non-circulating collection of books and videos on gardening and related topics, open to the public. Located at Newfield. 317-923-1331, ext. 429

CONTACT THE IMA 317-923-1331 (Main) 317-920-2660 (24-Hour Info Line) imamuseum.org

Tue, Wed, Sat: noon–3 pm

For more information: imamuseum.org/connect/accessibility or 317-923-1331.

General support of the IMA is provided by the Arts Council and the City of Indianapolis; by the Indiana Arts Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency; Lilly Endowment Inc. and The Nicholas H. Noyes, Jr., Memorial Foundation.

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4000 Michigan Road Indianapolis, IN 46208 317-923-1331 imamuseum.org

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INDIANAPOLIS, IN PERMIT #2200

Ring in 2015 at the most glamorous party of the year! New Year’s Eve at the IMA presented by The Penrod Society

Wednesday, December 31, 2014 9 pm–1 am Pulliam Family Great Hall Celebrate the New Year in style at the IMA surrounded by art, champagne, food, live music and dancing. All galleries will be open, including the special exhibition Georgia O’Keeffe and the Southwestern Still Life. Enjoy interactive food stations throughout the Museum and sip on luxury cocktails while taking in the glitz and glamour of Indianapolis. Main Event Member Ticket: $125 per guest Main Event Ticket: $150 per guest VIP Ticket: $200 per guest

For more information or to make reservations, call 317-955-2339 or visit www.imamuseum.org/NYE. Photo by Nathaniel Edmunds Photography

Profile for Indianapolis Museum of Art

IMA Magazine | Fall 2014  

IMA Magazine | Fall 2014  

Profile for imamuseum
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