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Imagine WINTER 2013

OPENING FEBRUARY 23

The Center for Care and Discovery


The University of Chicago Medicine & Biological Sciences has been at the forefront of medical care, research and teaching for more than 90 years. Located in historic Hyde Park on the South Side of Chicago, the University of Chicago

GREETINGS FROM THE FOREFRONT OF MEDICINE

Medicine & Biological Sciences includes: Patient Care » Bernard A. Mitchell Hospital » Center for Care and Discovery » Comer Children’s Hospital » Duchossois Center for Advanced Medicine » Numerous outpatient locations throughout the Chicago area Teaching Programs » Pritzker School of Medicine » Master’s and doctoral degree programs » Postdoctoral programs Research » Medical and basic science units Among our many honors and acknowledgments: 12 Nobel laureates; ranked 10th of all U.S. medical schools; one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers; ranked second in nation for National Institutes of Health grant

Care and Discovery describe our enduring mission and commitment to innovative patient care and groundbreaking research.

support per researcher. University of Chicago Medicine & Biological Sciences Executive Leadership Kenneth S. Polonsky, MD, Dean of the University of Chicago Biological Sciences Division and the Pritzker School of Medicine, and executive vice president for Medical Affairs for the University of Chicago Sharon O’Keefe, president of the University of Chicago Medical Center Richard Baron, MD, dean for clinical practice, University of Chicago Medicine T. Conrad Gilliam, PhD, dean for research and graduate education, Biological Sciences Division Holly J. Humphrey, MD, dean for medical education, Pritzker School of Medicine IMAGINE IS PUBLISHED QUARTERLy By THE UNIVERSITy OF CHICAGO MEDICINE & BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES. Editors Anna Madrzyk and Ginny Lee-Herrmann

Our Center for Care

minimized. The 240 private, light-filled

and Discovery is more

rooms, each with inspirational views of

than a new hospital;

Chicago and beyond, are wired for the

it’s an extraordinary

latest in nurse-patient communications

step forward in clinical

and remote health monitoring, ensuring

care. When it opens

that needs are met quickly and efficiently.

this month, the $700 million, state-of-

At the same time, features like flat-screen

the-art facility will bring the best minds

televisions, wood accents and space

in research and medicine together to

for family members to stay overnight

work in close collaboration, aided by the

surround patients and their loved ones

latest in technology. More than a building,

in comfort and aid recovery.

it will be a catalyst for our next wave of contributions to science and healing.

Design TOKY Branding + Design Contributing writers Katie Scarlett Brandt, Tanya Cochran, Gretchen Rubin and Anita Slomski Contributing photographers David Christopher, Stephanie Dahl,

Obviously, we are proud of our new hospital and its promises of innovative

Email us at imagineeditor@uchospitals.edu

Just as important, though, is the center’s

medical therapies and patient-centered

promise to transform patient care. With

care. We hope you enjoy reading about

leading-edge diagnostic equipment

the Center for Care and Discovery, and the

and minimally invasive surgical tools,

potential it holds for the future of science,

recoveries are quicker and discomfort

medicine and, especially, our patients.

Megan Doherty, Dan Dry, Brian Fritz, Grace Cheung Izquierdo, Jean Lachat, Bruce Powell and Thomas Rossiter ADDRESS The University of Chicago Medicine 5841 S. Maryland Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 The University of Chicago Medicine

SHARON O’KEEFE President of the University of Chicago Medical Center

Comer Children’s Hospital 5721 S. Maryland Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 Telephone 1-773-702-1000 Appointments 1-888-824-0200 Follow the University of Chicago Medicine on Twitter at twitter.com/UChicagoMed or visit our Facebook page at facebook.com/ UChicagoMed. You can read more about our news and research at uchospitals.edu/news and at sciencelife.uchospitals.edu. This publication does not provide medical advice or treatment suggestions. If you have medical problems or concerns, contact a physician who will determine your treatment. Do not delay seeking medical advice because of something you read here. For urgent needs, call 911 right away. Read Imagine online at uchospitals.edu/imagine.

KENNETH S. POLONSKY, MD Dean of the University of Chicago Biological Sciences Division and the Pritzker School of Medicine, and executive vice president for Medical Affairs for the University of Chicago


INTRODUCING OUR NEw HOSPITAL

THE CENTER FOR CARE AND DISCOVERy A hospital for the future The Center for Care and Discovery is dedicated to providing the most advanced health care to patients of today and tomorrow, with a focus on cancer, digestive diseases, neurosciences, advanced surgery and high-tech medical imaging.

A setting for world-class research The Center for Care and Discovery is strategically located near the Gordon Center for Integrative Science and the Gwen and Jules Knapp Center for Biomedical Discovery, two world-class research facilities where researchers are translating scientific discoveries into better care for patients.

240

private patient rooms

21

A focus on exceptional patient care Our new hospital is designed for familycentered care and improved communication among all members of the patient’s care team, transforming the patient experience.

operating rooms with leading-edge technology; space for up to seven additional ORs

An investment in the community

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The University of Chicago Medicine chose to make this project an economic engine for the community by partnering with local, minority- and women-owned businesses.

Intensive Care Unit beds

HE L I PA D

CA N CE R CA R E

P R I VAT E I N PATIENT ROOMS

GRE E N ROOF

The Center for Care and Discovery is located at 5700 S. Maryland Ave. on the University of Chicago campus.

S KY LO B BY S UR G E RY

DI AG N OST I C A ND F UT URE TE CH NOLOGY

I N T E RVE N T I O NAL MEDICINE

Ex PANSI ON SPACE

P H ARMACY

R E TA I L A N D DI N I N G

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SOLVING A PUZZLE ABOUT BIRD BRAINS

A seemingly unique part of the human and mammalian brain is the neocortex, a layered structure on the outer surface of the organ where most higher-order processing is thought to occur. But new research at the University of Chicago has found cells similar to those of the mammalian neocortex in the brains of birds, sitting in a vastly different anatomical structure. The work, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, confirms a 50-yearold hypothesis that a mysterious area in bird brains performs a similar function to the neocortex in mammals. Senior author Clifton Ragsdale, PhD, says the research sheds new light on the evolution of the brain and opens up new options for studying the neocortex. AT THE FOREFRONT

NUMBER ONE #1 cancer program in Illinois in U.S. News & World Report’s 2012 rankings

Imagine that! DEVILISH PLANT TARGETS CANCER

Legend has it the cure for cancer is buried in the root of some obscure plant in the Amazon rain forest. While that’s overstating what any one medicine can do to fight what are actually hundreds of different diseases, research clearly shows that natural remedies offer some valuable tools in the fight against cancer. In a paper published in Cell Death and Disease, University of Chicago Medicine researchers Wei Du, PhD, and Chun-Su Yuan, MD, PhD, reported that an extract from a Pacific Northwest shrub, ominously named devil’s club, can kill colon cancer cells without affecting the normal cells around them. Du suggests the extract, falcarindiol, a relative of ginseng, has lots of potential uses. “For example, it can be used together with chemotherapeutic drugs as a way to enhance the toxicity to cancer cells and reduce the side effects,” he said. AT THE FOREFRONT FAMILY-CENTERED CARE Patient rooms in the Center for Care and Discovery

are spacious, with comfortable furnishings for family visits and overnight stays. Amenities include Wi-Fi and flat-screen TVs with access to movies and games.

TINY DINO DISCOVERED

EVEN FAT CELLS NEED SLEEP

In a study that challenges the notion that the primary function of sleep is only to rest the brain, University of Chicago Medicine researchers found that not getting enough shut-eye has a harmful impact on fat cells, reducing their ability to respond to insulin, a hormone that regulates energy. Sleep deprivation has long been associated with impaired brain function, causing decreased alertness and cognitive ability. The latest finding, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, is the first description of a molecular mechanism directly connecting sleep loss to the disruption of energy regulation in humans, which can lead to weight gain, diabetes and other health problems. “Many people think of fat as a problem, but it serves a vital function in storing and releasing energy,” said study author Matthew Brady, PhD. “We found that fat cells need sleep to function properly.”

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There’s a new dinosaur in town. University of Chicago paleontologist and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Paul Sereno, PhD, recently described a new species of dinosaur weighing less than a housecat and covered with quills like a porcupine. The herbivore with fangs and a parrot-like jaw was excavated from South African red sandstone in the 1960s and stored in a collection of fossils at Harvard University, where Sereno noticed it while visiting there as a graduate student. The tiny dino, named Pegomastax africana, or “thick jaw from Africa,” dates back 200 million years to the first dinosaurs on our planet. Sereno says it is “very peculiar” among dinosaurian plant-eaters like Pegomastax africana to sport sharpedged oversized canines. He believes the Paul Sereno, teeth were used for PhD self-defense and competing for mates, not for eating meat or insects.


AN EXCEPTIONAL PLACE FOR HEALING [ T H E C E N T E R F O R C A R E A N D D I S C O V E R Y, S K Y L O B B Y ]

As the heart of the hospital, the Sky Lobby consists of central reception, family waiting areas, a chapel and other public spaces — a place to be welcomed, to gather, to rest and to pray. RAFAEL VIÑOLY, ARCHITECT

SKY LOBBY

ART

The Sky Lobby features floor-to-ceiling glass walls, filling the space with natural light and providing panoramic views of the campus, Lake Michigan, Washington Park and downtown Chicago.

Art can humanize the medical environment and play a role in the healing process. The Center for Care and Discovery’s Art Collector Committee selects inspiring and engaging artwork to bring respite, tranquility and confidence to the patient experience.

SOLACE

Tucked away on the seventh-floor Sky Lobby, the chapel provides patients and their families with a place for reflection, prayer and meditation. Blue tiles enclose a peaceful space in which curved wooden walls are crowned by a ring of light shining through a circle of windows.

MUSIC

Music soothes and lifts the human spirit. A baby grand piano will enhance the sense of warmth and community in the open lobby.

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READy FOR THE GREATEST CHALLENGES I N M E D I C I N E , S C I E N C E & P AT I E N T C A R E

The Center for Care and Discovery provides a home for complex specialty care with a focus on cancer, digestive diseases, neurosciences, advanced surgery, advanced cardiovascular diagnostic and treatment services, and high-tech medical imaging. 4 Âť THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO MEDICINE IMAGINE MAGAZINE | W I N T E R 2 0 1 3


CARDIOVASCULAR

Innovative Options for Patients Designed for innovation and collaboration, the Center for Care and Discovery advances the University of Chicago Medicine’s programs in cardiac catheterization, minimally invasive and robot-assisted surgery, cardiovascular surgery and heart transplantation. Interventional suites and operating rooms in the hospital feature sophisticated diagnostics and leading-edge medical technologies for cardiac and vascular care, including state-of-the-art imaging. “The imaging capabilities in the new hospital will allow us to perform highly intricate procedures in the safest possible way,” said Ross Milner, MD, a vascular surgeon and co-director of the aortic diseases program. Many heart patients who come to the University of Chicago Medicine have complex disease. Some have been turned away by other institutions. Our cardiologists, interventional cardiologists, cardiac surgeons and vascular surgeons work together to ensure patients get the most appropriate care — whether medical, interventional or surgical. “We are committed to delivering superb care to medically complex patients in substantial collaboration with our surgical colleagues,” said interventional cardiologist Sandeep Nathan, MD, MS. That care includes options for robotassisted and minimally invasive approaches to cardiac and vascular surgery, groundbreaking device therapies and clinical trials. University of Chicago Medicine cardiac surgeons are known for their expertise in ventricular assist device implants, heart valve repair and replacement, cardiac reconstruction and heart and multi-organ transplants. Our vascular surgeons are pioneers in the treatment of complex diseases of the arteries, including hybrid procedures for abdominal aortic aneurysms, carotid artery disease and peripheral arterial disease. | L E F T | Jeffrey B. Matthews, MD, is surgeon-in-chief at the University of Chicago Medicine. Read more about Matthews and the Center for Care and Discovery on page 11.

D I S COV E Ry

1900s A University of Chicago cardiac surgeon performs the first heart transplant on a dog. I N N O VAT I O N

1999 University of Chicago Medicine physicians perform the first successful heartliver-kidney transplant. ONE ROOM,

PATIENT STORY

“All the top experts are here. There really is no place I’d rather be.” SCOTT BELASCO

In October, Scott Belasco, 56, of Long Grove, Ill., became the first person in the U.S. to be implanted post-FDA approval with a new type of defibrillator with leads just under the skin rather than connected to the heart. His physician, Martin C. Burke, DO, also implanted the first such device in the U.S. clinical trial, which began in 2010.

MANy PROCEDURES Hybrid operating rooms unite the surgical suite and the cardiac catheterization lab, enabling cardiac surgeons and interventional cardiologists to perform multiple diagnostic, interventional and surgical procedures in one setting. The fully integrated hybrid ORs are equipped with the newest technology and tools, including a video X-ray system, intravascular ultrasound and videoconferencing. LIVE FROM THE O P E R AT I N G R O O M Integrated videoconferencing equipment enables surgeons to communicate directly with specialists throughout the medical center and in other facilities, conduct “at-the-point” teaching for medical trainees, and consult with patients’ family members in the hospital and anywhere in the world.

JAMES K. LIAO, MD, APPOINTED CARDIOLOGY CHIEF

James K. Liao, MD, an internationally recognized authority on blood vessel biology and vascular disease, has been named section chief of cardiology at the University of Chicago Medicine. Liao came to the University of Chicago from Harvard Medical School, where he was professor of medicine and director of vascular medicine research at LIAO Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Liao has made significant contributions to the medical literature, publishing more than 125 articles in scientific journals, including Science, Nature and Nature Medicine. “Cardiology at the University of Chicago Medicine has many traditional strengths, including leading programs in heart failure and transplantation, cardiac imaging, electrophysiology, hypertension and disease prevention,” Liao said. “I hope to build on those achievements and to help the section enhance its reputation as one of the top cardiovascular programs in the country.”

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NEUROSCIENCES

Collaborative Neurological Care When patients come to the University of Chicago Medicine following a stroke, brain injury or other neurological condition, they benefit from having a full team of specialists working together to ensure the best outcome. To foster this collaboration, the Center for Care and Discovery was organized to place physicians of related specialties side by side — physical evidence of how important teamwork is at the University of Chicago Medicine. Neuroscience facilities in the Center for Care and Discovery include two neuroangiography suites, where minimally invasive procedures are performed to treat patients with brain aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, strokes and other conditions. The team also treats patients from the adjacent University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital when they require complex endovascular neurointervention. “Everything we need to deliver leading-edge neurointerventional care will be close by and tightly organized,” said Seon Kyu Lee, MD, PhD, director of interventional neuroradiology.

A D VA N C E D I M AG I N G Neurointerventional suites in the Center for Care and Discovery are equipped with MRI, CT scan, CT angiography, ultrasound and X-ray modalities. Surgical suites feature the latest in OR technology, including intraoperative imaging.

EXPERT CARE The Neuro-Intensive Care Unit is staffed full time by neurological and neuro-critical care specialists.

CLEAN AIR ZONES

Every surgical suite features a laminar airflow system designed to create a clean zone around the patient. A curtain of air around the operating table creates an invisible barrier to microorganisms in the air.

The surgical suites feature the latest in OR technology, including intraoperative imaging modalities. These tools give neurosurgeons better localization of tumors and real-time feedback, enabling them to take on the most difficult cases and hardto-treat conditions. The Neuro-Intensive Care Unit is equipped with the latest technology, including continuous brain wave monitoring and portable CT imaging. The adjacent neurosciences inpatient unit includes high-level neuro-monitoring capabilities in every patient room. “Because the Neuro-ICU and dedicated neurosciences inpatient rooms are adjacent to each other in the new hospital, we can seamlessly move patients between the two units,” said David M. Frim, MD, PhD, chief of neurosurgery. “Moving patients out of the ICU sooner and helping them convalesce faster will greatly enhance the patient experience.” 6 » THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO MEDICINE IMAGINE MAGAZINE | W I N T E R 2 0 1 3

PATIENT STORY

“It is always important to find the best doctor to take care of you. For me, that meant coming to Chicago.” SHERRY KEDRA

Ohio resident Sherry Kedra sought out experts at the University of Chicago Medicine after experiencing a bleed into her brain. Neurosurgeon Issam A. Awad, MD, successfully removed the damaging lesion in a four-hour procedure, and neuro-critical care experts managed her post-surgical care. Using special MRI studies being developed here, our physicians will continue to monitor the 40-year-old nurse for years to come.


FASTER COMMUNICATION

Patient calls for assistance go directly to the nurse’s wireless phone, instead of ringing at a nurses’ station. The new call system also enables nurses to receive direct phone calls from other care providers and the patient’s family.

Robotic-Assisted Precision The robotic operating rooms in the Center for Care and Discovery feature two state-of-the-art da Vinci Surgical Systems. This sophisticated surgical technology provides high-definition, three-dimensional views inside the body. The device enables surgeons to perform complex operations with greater precision, improved dexterity and enhanced visualization. Patients experience the benefits of a minimally invasive procedure: fewer complications, decreased pain, less blood loss and scarring, and faster recovery. Arieh L. Shalhav, MD, chief of urology and director of minimally invasive urology, performed the first robotic surgery at the University of Chicago Medicine in 2002, removing a patient’s cancerous kidney. To date, his team has performed approximately 3,400 robotic prostatectomies.

ADVANCED SURGERY

DA V I N C I

3,400 robotic prostatectomies performed at the University of Chicago Medicine.

I N N O VAT I O N Our surgeons are recognized experts on minimally invasive surgery for children and adults. Mohan S. Gundeti, MD, director of pediatric urology, recently performed an innovative robot-assisted procedure that was broadcast live to surgeons from around the country.

“Our surgeons are highly experienced, and each one has developed a super specialization,” Shalhav said. “Now we are pushing the envelope and tackling more complex cases.” Sandra Culbertson, MD, a specialist in urogynecology, says that robot-assisted surgery offers her patients quality-of-life improvements. “We get them home in 24 hours and back to normal activities sooner,” she said. Robotic surgical instruments continue to get smaller and more flexible, allowing other specialties to apply the technology. For example, thoracic surgeons here recently began using the da Vinci system. “Patients knew about the advantages of the robotic technique and were asking for it,” said Wickii T. Vigneswaran, MD, associate chief of cardiac and thoracic surgery. “We are performing thoracic procedures with more precision than ever before.”

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ROOMS wITH A VIEw

Patient rooms are located on the perimeter of the building for greater privacy. Large windows provide stunning views of the campus, lakefront and Chicago skyline.

Highly Complex, Minimally Invasive The state-of-the art endoscopy suites in the new Center for Care and Discovery enable the University of Chicago Medicine’s interventional endoscopy experts to easily integrate emerging technology in this rapidly progressing field. “With surgical, imaging and endoscopy equipment now in one room, we can do multiple procedures on a patient at one time, which reduces hospital stays,” said Irving Waxman, MD, director of the Center for Endoscopic Research and Therapeutics. “Working with colleagues in radiology and surgery, we also can do complex minimally invasive procedures.” Advanced interventional procedures include endoscopic ultrasound to detect, diagnose and stage GI cancers, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography to evaluate and treat tumors, blockages or stones, and endoscopic removal of small tumors. The highly experienced team performs more than 2,000 specialized ultrasound and interventional endoscopy procedures annually. “This contributes to our excellent patient outcomes and low rate of complications,” said Uzma Siddiqui, MD, director of endoscopic ultrasound and advanced endoscopy training. University of Chicago Medicine specialists are recognized for their expertise in the often-complicated management of patients with pancreatitis. “Most medical centers treat complications of pancreatitis surgically,” said Andres Gelrud, MD, director of interventional endoscopy, who leads a new program for patients with pancreatic diseases. “Here we are able to remove necrotic pancreatic tissue using a minimally invasive, endoscopic approach.”

DIGESTIVE DISEASES

D E D I C AT E D S P A C E

12 rooms dedicated for gastrointestinal and pulmonary procedures.

FIRST

1934 Our physicians were the first in the U.S. to use the gastroscope.

EXPERIENCE

2,000 specialized ultrasound and interventional endoscopy procedures annually.

wITHIN REACH

Imagine a bedside table with convenient shelves that put everything a patient needs for a comfortable hospital stay within easy reach.

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PATIENT STORY

“The University of Chicago Medicine gave me my life back.” JEFFERY SHAw

Jeffery Shaw, of Phoenix, Ariz., traveled to the University of Chicago Medicine for treatment of achalasia, a rare disorder that prevents the esophageal sphincter muscle from relaxing and allowing food to pass into the stomach. By this time, he had lost 55 pounds as swallowing foods and liquids became progressively more difficult. Marco G. Patti, MD, director of the Center for Esophageal Diseases, removed a portion of Shaw’s esophagus and reconstructed his GI tract. The 36-year-old IT company owner — and soon-to-be first-time father — is rediscovering the joy of eating.


CANCER

Customized and Comprehensive Care For physician-scientist Ravi Salgia, MD, PhD, and his colleagues, it’s a short walk across the street from their research laboratories in the Knapp Center for Biological Discovery to the new Center for Care and Discovery — the ideal setting for clinical testing of promising therapies. “The new hospital will speed the translation from laboratory to treatment and enhance the quality of life and survival for patients with cancer,” said Salgia, director of thoracic oncology and vice chairman of translational research at the University of Chicago Medicine. The University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center is one of just 41 centers in the U.S. awarded the “comprehensive” designation from the National Cancer Institute. Our clinicians are committed to creating customized, comprehensive care for all patients confronting a cancer diagnosis, including novel combinations of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation; new approaches to stem cell transplant; and the pioneering use of genetics to further personalize treatment. The top floor of the new hospital is devoted to cancer care, with 36 oncology rooms and a 28-bed Bone Marrow Transplant Unit. “Each of the private rooms has telemetrymonitoring capabilities and an air filtering system for infection control,” said Andrew Artz, MD, a hematologist-oncologist.

MICHAEL R. BISHOP, MD, NAMED BONE MARROw TRANSPLANT DIRECTOR

THEN

1972 Janet Rowley, MD, identifies the first recurring chromosomal abnormality associated with cancer, paving the way for targeted treatments.

NOW

2010 The Center for Personalized Therapeutics opens, advancing efforts to tailor treatment plans to a patient’s genetic makeup.

Michael R. Bishop, MD, an expert in the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia and stem cell transplantation, has been appointed bone marrow BISHOP transplant director at the University of Chicago Medicine. Bishop came to the University of Chicago from the Medical College of Wisconsin, where he was the head of the adult hematologic malignancies section. Prior to his time there, he was a senior investigator and served as the clinical head of stem cell transplantation for the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health. In his new role, Bishop is interested in creating a comprehensive stem cell transplant program that includes a focus on the elderly population. In addition, his clinical and translational research work will focus on the prevention and treatment of relapse after stem cell transplantation, the most common cause of therapy failure following the procedure.

A TRANQUIL SETTING

Adjustable lighting, room-darkening shades and soft colors create a soothing environment.

Patient rooms in the Center for Care and Discovery are spacious to accommodate family members for extended stays. Amenities include foldout sofas, as well as family shower facilities on the floor. The unit includes two exercise rooms to help patients stay active and regain strength during hospitalization and treatment. “The unit is designed to be a place where patients can heal and recover with the support of family, friends and an outstanding nursing staff dedicated to each person’s needs,” said Richard L. Schilsky, MD, professor emeritus at the University of Chicago, who joins the American Society of Clinical Oncology this month as chief medical officer.

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BRINGING TOGETHER

THE BEST MINDS For caregivers, the building fosters crossfertilization and real-time collaboration. DAVID H. SONG, MD, MBA

David H. Song, MD, MBA, is vice chairman of the Department of Surgery and chief of plastic and reconstructive surgery at the University of Chicago Medicine. He specializes in reconstructive microsurgery for breast cancer, working in close collaboration with Nora Jaskowiak, MD, director of surgery at the University of Chicago Medicine Breast Center. Q: HOw wILL THE CENTER FOR CARE AND DISCOVERY ENHANCE SURGERY? A: All the technology out there has been crystallized to enhance patient care in the Center for Care and Discovery. For caregivers, the building fosters and promotes cross-fertilization and realtime collaboration.

Q: wHAT SETS THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO MEDICINE APART IN PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY?

Q: wHAT TECHNIQUE DO YOU USE FOR BREAST RECONSTRUCTION AFTER CANCER?

A: We “get” complex. We’re leaders in reconstructive microsurgery — sewing tiny blood vessels under a microscope — in the Midwest. We’re internationally known for complex reconstructive surgery — cleft lip or palate, burns, rebuilding a breast removed after cancer. The aesthetics of the result really are a priority.

A: We specialize in the DIEP (deep inferior epigastric perforator) flap. Patients from the corners of the earth find us for this. I use abdominal tissue to reconstruct the breast, so essentially the patient also gets a tummy tuck. Most plastic surgeons sacrifice a whole muscle. This technique spares the muscle with minimal pain. The national success rate is 94 to 95 percent. Ours is more than 99 percent — one of the highest in the world.

Q: wHY IS COLLABORATION SO IMPORTANT IN BREAST CANCER RECONSTRUCTION?

The surgical oncologist wants to make sure the cancer is absolutely gone. She knows what she has to do for me to have something to work with; I know what she has to do to make sure the cancer is out. We have the same end goal: the cancer absolutely gone and the reconstruction looking normal or better than normal. A:

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Q: wHAT ENABLES YOU TO ACHIEVE SUCH HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL OUTCOMES FOR YOUR PATIENTS? A: Cross-collaboration in real time forms the very fibers of our success, from the completion of the operation to the postoperative follow-up. That’s the main benefit of having a reconstructive surgeon know a lot about cancer, and a cancer surgeon know a lot about reconstruction.


Ask the Expert Jeffrey B. Matthews, MD, is surgeon-in-chief at the University of Chicago Medicine and chair of the Department of Surgery. He is a leading authority on the surgical treatment of diseases of the pancreas, bile ducts and liver. Q: wHAT wILL THE NEw FACILITY BRING TO THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO MEDICINE?

The new facility will provide a technologically advanced platform for M AT T H E W S the delivery of compassionate, personalized care to patients with complex clinical problems. The Center for Care and Discovery will allow the University of Chicago Medicine to continue to recruit and retain top doctors and researchers to bring the most innovative treatments and technology to more patients. A:

Q: HOw IS THE CENTER FOR CARE AND DISCOVERY A HOSPITAL FOR THE FUTURE?

The design of the hospital creates a high-tech environment for advanced care and new therapies, while at the same time meeting modern expectations of patients and families for warm, friendly and easily accessible accommodations and amenities.

A:

Q: CAN YOU DESCRIBE SOME OF THESE NEwER TREATMENTS?

Personalized cancer treatment regimens based on genomic data and molecular fingerprinting, robotic surgery and other forms

A:

of advanced minimally invasive interventions, hybrid heart procedures that combine innovative endovascular and off-pump techniques, imageguided surgery and other types of innovative emerging technologies.

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AN EASIER WAIT

Family members will be given pagers to carry while their loved one is undergoing a procedure, so they can get something to eat or go to a different floor but return quickly when it’s time to talk with the physician.

A:

Q: HOw wILL THE NEw HOSPITAL FOSTER COLLABORATION AND INTERACTIONS AMONG STAFF?

The new space is truly transformational in that it was specifically designed to increase interactions across different disciplines. Advanced care for such complex conditions as cancer and cardiovascular disease in the future increasingly will require such collaboration among surgery, medicine, radiology, pathology and other specialties.

A:

| A B O V E | Jeffrey B. Matthews, MD, an expert on the treatment of acute and chronic pancreatitis, is the president of the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract.

The Bucksbaum Institute for Clinical Excellence was created to improve patient care, to strengthen the doctor-patient relationship, and to enhance communication and decision making between patients and physicians. The Bucksbaum Institute supports training and career development at three levels: medical students, junior faculty and senior faculty. Senior faculty will serve as master clinician role models for the students and junior faculty.

MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics

Q: wHAT ExCITES YOU MOST ABOUT THE DESIGN OF THE CENTER FOR CARE AND DISCOVERY?

The flexible design of the building. Its modular configuration anticipates the need for future reconfiguration to keep pace with rapid changes in medicine and science, and to accommodate tomorrow’s technology.

Bucksbaum Institute for Clinical Excellence

HIGH TECH, HIGH TOUCH

Every patient room is equipped for advanced monitoring. A computer at each bedside will allow nurses to document information immediately.

The MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics examines ethical issues related to clinical medicine with the goal of improving the process and outcome of patient care. The first such program in the country, the center has gained national and international attention for its groundbreaking research and training in medical ethics. During the past 25 years, the MacLean Center has trained more than 300 ethics fellows, many of whom are now leaders in the field. AT THE FOREFRONT

SMART BEDS

“Smart” beds connected to a network send a signal if a patient who is a fall risk gets up.

87

NOBEL PRIZE WINNERS

associated with the University of Chicago, including 12 Nobel laureates who won for discoveries related to physiology or medicine

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COMMIT TED TO

This will do wonders for our patients.

COMPASSION & CARE

TIwANA RIVERS, RN, BSN

Tiwana Rivers, RN, BSN, finds her work as a bone marrow transplant nurse extremely rewarding. “We care for patients, but we also advise them and advocate for them,” she said. “And we see patients given another chance to live their lives, be with family and reach their goals.” Rivers is excited about working on the new bone marrow transplant unit in the University of Chicago Medicine Center for Care and Discovery.

Debra Albert, RN, MSN, MBA, NEA-BC, is a veteran administrator, nationally renowned for her leadership in improving the patient experience. She is chief nursing officer and vice president of patient care services at the University of Chicago Medicine. Q: IN wHAT wAYS wILL THE CENTER FOR CARE AND DISCOVERY CHANGE THE PATIENT ExPERIENCE?

Here’s what she is looking forward to:

“Our patients are hospitalized for four to six weeks. Offering them a spacious and beautiful room that accommodates their family and their belongings is stellar.”

THE ROOMS

“This will do wonders for our patients. It’s very difficult for them to be inside for weeks at a time. The wall of windows will bring the outside in.”

THE VIEw

TECHNOLOGY

Q: wHO ARE TODAY’S NURSES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO MEDICINE?

“There’s no better way to support our patients than to make their families more comfortable when they stay here. It’s phenomenal.”

A: We have highly trained and educated nurses at the bedside, providing an advanced level of direct care. Not only are they experts in their fields, but they are models of benevolence in their daily acts of kindness and compassion.

“Having telemetry in individual rooms helps nurses to be more efficient and to take better care of our patients.”

FAMILY AMENITIES

Q: HOw IS THE FACE OF NURSING CHANGING? A: We have multiple generations and second-career nurses coming into the field, each bringing entirely different perspectives based on their life experiences to their practice. The more diverse the profession, the more we mirror the patients we serve and the more capable we are of providing compassionate care to our patients.

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A: Advanced technologies will increase our communication with patients, allowing us to tailor our responses to their specific needs. The GetWellNetwork, an interactive platform, will give patients direct access to educational health materials and entertainment. It also gives patients the ability to rate their pain, which could trigger intervention by the nurse. Nurses will carry wireless phones, which will allow physicians and patients to talk to the nurses much faster. It’s all about empowering the patient and collaborating with physicians and other health care team members. Q: wHAT ARE YOUR GOALS AS CHIEF NURSING OFFICER? A: To provide all patients an experience above and beyond their expectations.

AT THE FOREFRONT

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clinical advanced practice nurses at the University of Chicago Medicine


FA M I LY S U P P O RT S ALS RESEARCH

A FATHER’S LEGACy

ALS research is on fire, and we have some extraordinary new findings, especially related to genes. RAYMOND P. ROOS, MD

Even after his death, Doug MacInnes was the epitome of selflessness. The stay-at-home dad and triathlete, who succumbed to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) just two years after his diagnosis, ensured that his wife of 29 years would still receive her 30th anniversary presents from him. “He got me this necklace with ‘30th’ on it and a pair of earrings. He placed them in a drawer and had our daughter Emily wrap them with a promise to deliver them on my anniversary,” said Sue MacInnes. “After he died, the next week on our anniversary, I got my presents. That’s the type of person he was.” Doug was among the nearly 5,600 people in the U.S. diagnosed annually with ALS, a neurodegenerative disorder also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. Shortly after her father’s diagnosis, Molly MacInnes, the youngest of Doug and Sue’s three children, established Steps for Doug, a nonprofit dedicated to raising money for ALS patients and their families. CONTINUED »

We want people to channel their energy into doing something good for ALS. MOLLY MACINNES

Through a variety of fundraising events, the Trout Valley, Ill., family has raised more than $45,000. The family donated most of the funds to Doug’s physician, neurologist Raymond P. Roos, MD, director of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)/ Motor Neuron Disease Clinic at the University of Chicago Medicine. “Despite all that we have learned about ALS over the last 20 years, we only have one drug that makes a difference and is FDA-approved,” he said. “That drug helps to extend life by three months, but does not improve quality of life. There is a desperate need for a more effective treatment.” Thanks to the MacInnes family and their contribution to his research, Roos, however, is optimistic about the future. “ALS research is on fire, and we have some extraordinary new findings, especially related to genes that cause ALS,” Roos said. “Next year, there will be some very exciting new understandings, as well as a host of experimental models that will lead to the development of new drugs.”

For more information or to support ALS research at the University of Chicago Medicine, please contact Abbe Temkin at atemkin@mcdmail.uchicago.edu. | L E F T | Sue MacInnes, second

from left, with daughters Molly, left, and Emily Somers, son Chris and his girlfriend, Adrienne McCauley. | R I G H T | Doug MacInnes


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OPENING FEBRUARy 23

Our family and friends have had their share of health issues, and we are so grateful to the doctors, nurses and staff for the care we’ve received at the University of Chicago Medicine. We are honored to support the new Center for Care and Discovery by providing a peaceful place for families while they wait for their loved ones in the Thrall Family Waiting Room. BROOKE THRALL

If you would like to contribute to the Center for Care and Discovery, please contact Stephanie Dahl at 1-773-834-4726.

| RIGHT | Touring the Center for Care and Discovery during construction are (from left to right) siblings Jay Thrall, Brooke Thrall, Randy Thrall, Jeff Thrall and Jan Mazza. Not pictured: mother Marilynn Thrall and sibling Chris Thrall.


Imagine - Winter 2013 - University of Chicago Medicine