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Production Committee Vincent Gagnon Annick Gaudreault Marc Lalumière Oussama Mezher Nicolas Trost Valérie Bazinet Art Direction Annick Désormeaux - atelierlapinblanc.com Cover Design Anne-Laure Jean - atelierlapinblanc.com Graphic Design Oussama Mezher - omezher.com Marc Larivière Illustrations Vigg - p.4 & 5 Marianne Chevalier - p.6 & 7 Janice Nadeau - p.68 & 69 Printing Marquis - marquisimprimeur.com Distribution We wish to thank Agencyaccess for their collaboration with the distribution. agencyaccess.com Produced by Illustration Quebec 2205, Parthenais street, # 208A Montreal, Quebec (Canada) H2K 3T3 514-522-2040 1 888-522-2040 info@illustrationquebec.com illustrationquebec.com No part of this magazine may be reproduced or adapted without the prior written authorization of Illustration Quebec or the artists. ISBN – 978-2-922021-23-3

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A WORD FROM THE PRESIDENT

GUENIN Rémy

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Interview: Annick Désormeaux, Art director 10

BATTUZ Christine BENOIT Mathieu

BERTRAND Martine

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LACHANCE Anabelle

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LAPLANTE Jacques

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LEGUERRIER Janou-Eve LEMAY Katy

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CAMPEAU DUPLESSIS Marie-Anne

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LECLERC Sophie

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BOURGEOIS Anne-Marie

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MAINGUY Marie

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MIGNACCA Tania

CAZAZIAN Roselyne

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MONTPLAISIR Amélie

CEZARD Pierre-Yves CHARBONNEAU Isabelle

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CHARETTE Géraldine

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roy Christine

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ROY Sonia

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THISDALE François

FAVEREAU Béatrice GAUDETTE Patrick

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ROBERTS Bruce

EUDES-PASCAL Élisabeth

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GAUTHIER Catherine

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TREMBLAY Marie-Ève TRUDEL Jean-Luc VIGG

GAUDREAULT Annick

GIBAULT Thomas

RENO Alain

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DION Nathalie

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POLYGONE STUDIO

CRIGHT Marc-André

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PELLETIER Katrinn

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DESROCHERS eve

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PEDNEAULT Carol-Anne

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DEFAGO Stefan

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MYTNIK-FRANTOVA Nadia ORBIE

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CHEVALIER Marianne

DUMONT Yves

MOREL Cécile

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CARBONNEAU Annie

CRÊTE Pascale

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LANDRY Marie-France

BOUCHER Sophie Rozenn

CHIODI Maira

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LALUMIÈRE Marc

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BOURGET Carine

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HENRY Mylène

BERGERON Louise Catherine

BORDELEAU PAUL

GUÉRARD-ALIE Jasmin HAMEL Suzanne

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BIZIER Patrick

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VILLENEUVE Anne

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Spoutniq By Vincent Gagnon (Vigg), President, Illustration Quebec A self-portrait. What's in it? Is it simply a portrait of oneself? The name would imply so and in a sense that would be just fine. Yet as an illustrator, I don't usually present my artwork using a picture of my head as some sort of branding, the way an actor or a singer would. That’s not how my artwork is generally recognized. So what's in it for me then? And what's in it for you?

singular way of seeing the world, the universe. Integrated in such a showcase, the portrait becomes central like a sun, illuminating everything in its gravitational field. Recognition relies not only on certain strokes of resemblance but it propagates through the whole image.

IQ magazine is published by Illustration Quebec. As you flip through these pages, you'll discover the wide diversity of styles that attest to our members' talents. We also invite you to visit our website, where you can have a look at each member’s portfolio. Let yourself be inspired by the infinite universe of illustration and the originality it could bring to your next project. Feel free to contact an illustrator directly or let us know how we can be of help in your search.

Founded in 1983, Illustration Quebec is a non-profit organization with a mission to encourage and support illustrators as well as promote and distribute their artwork. We support illustrators at all stages of their careers through advice, networking, professional development services and promotional tools.

That's what illustrators do everyday. They create small universes, sometimes ephemeral, yet universes nonetheless. Taking this literally, one sits in front of a mirror with a Just like an astronaut gazing through the porthole of his pencil and paper and renders the reflected image. A classic space capsule, you, as a viewer, may experience some observation of light bouncing off various surfaces and turbulence as you travel from one universe to the other. Some receding into shades. Doesn't life feel like a portrait that will feel distant, some almost like home, some very strange way? Bouncing and receding, light and shade. Stars shining and others as though they were part of you. Open yourself against the emptiness of space. to these fascinating new horizons. Allow these universes to meet with yours. They will bring you to places you have never What happens when the focus slightly moves off the facial even expected. See you out there! area to include its surroundings? It could be an emotion, a state of mind, the crystallization of various ideas, or simply a physical location…. In any case it sets that portrait in its Vincent Gagnon (Vigg) very own time and space. At this very moment the artist is President, Illustration Quebec not only portraying his exterior envelope but rather his very illustrationquebec.com

Thank you for supporting the illustration industry.


A portrait: Annick Désormeaux and the Atelier Lapin Blanc When we asked Annick Désormeaux to join in our new project, !Q Magazine, she did not hesitate a second even if she was still on maternity leave! With her legendary dedication and curiosity, she gave the perfect tones to the magazine you presently hold in your hands. Here is a glance at Annick’s path… Annick’s academic background It all began when she enrolled in the graphic design College program at Cégep du Vieux Montréal. Always vigilant, Annick observed closely what the second and third year students where doing. She then understood that, through this bubbling student life, she could already start developing experience and cultivate her network. At that time, she got involved in the students’ newsletter, where she was responsible for the layout and also tackled artistic direction. Among other things, she created posters for the theatre department and organized exhibitions for graphic design graduates. After her three years in College, Annick realized that her

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thirst for learning was not yet satisfied. She certainly didn’t want to miss all the intellectual effervescence that university life had to offer – she was particularly attracted by its creative and experimental angles. She enrolled in Design at UQÀM (Quebec's University in Montreal) where she met other creators with whom she still is in contact today. Again, she became very involved in student life, namely collaborating in setting up the Design Department’s screen printing workshop. Moreover, that screen-printing method will influence her work and creative process in the years to come. It is her curiosity and involvement in student life that pushed her forward and helped her discover her trade. Her approach to design is characterized by her work ethics. Her mantra: design must be above all functional and flexible enough to adapt to all clienteles! Important encounters Annick was sitting in a café one day and met by chance a graphic designer with whom she really enjoyed discussing. They promised to get together again “one of these days”.


And Annick took this very seriously! During her second year at College, she contacted her in the hope to get some small contracts. At that time, the graphic designer was attached to a group called Elastik. The people at Elastik were the first to have a look at her portfolio – and even if no contract ensued, that meeting gave her the confidence she needed. It was only a few years later that that first encounter resulted in a collaboration with Thomas Csano, former member of Elastik. Their collaboration led her to discover the amazing world of magazine production. Annick first worked on Esse magazine where she was asked to work on one issue, but her collaboration eventually expanded to a dozen “cover to cover” issues. She invested numerous hours with Esse and thanks to that mandate, she learned the basics of magazine production. During her university years, Annick also worked for NEWAD, an advertising company, distributor of the Nightlife magazine, where she met Catherine Gravel, the magazine’s artistic director. What began as a summer job became a fulltime position that gave her the opportunity to participate in NEWAD’s various projects. Her work with NEWAD was interrupted by a stay in Paris where she went on a six-month internship with Annette Lenz, specialist in "cultural design". When she returned from France, Annick resumed her work for NEWAD, which put an end to her contribution to Esse magazine. The Châtelaine adventure Her adventure with Châtelaine magazine started about a year after the end of her studies. She began as a graphic designer before becoming assistant to the artistic director of the Reporting section. There, she met Catherine Gravel again and, under her mentoring, she learned how to really “make a magazine”! It’s at that time that she got her first orders for photography and illustration. The section she was responsible for was truly auspicious to the sensibility that illustration offers. How does she choose illustrators with whom she’ll work? First, the text always dictates the choice, but the illustrator’s sensitivity and style are essential to ensure a project’s success. Annick really believes that to properly make use of illustrations in a magazine, one needs to have good instincts in order to choose the best projects and a good capacity of persuasion to be able to demonstrate to the editorial board that choosing illustration speaks for itself.

Atelier Lapin Blanc In 2008, Annick got a contract from Flammarion, a French publisher, asking her to create the all-over design of a book. That’s when she decided to start her own entrepreneurship venture. However, she soon realized that she needed help and started looking for an intern who would give her a helping hand. After reading numerous CVs, she picked Anne-Laure Jean who came from France to work with her. Although Anne-Laure came to Montreal for only three months, she is now an employee and as soon as she gets her resident status, Annick and Anne-Laure intend to become associates. Where did the Atelier Lapin Blanc find its name? Annick was actually influenced by Alice in Wonderland: “The rabbit represents the gateway to Wonderland, he is the key. I did not so much choose the character, but rather what he represents, since he is the one who takes Alice to Wonderland”. The Atelier Lapin Blanc specializes in magazine production, from infographics to art direction: their expertise makes them an undeniable choice. They also contribute to projects with the artistic milieu: poster, CD cover, etc. They have as well several projects with publishers, such as book covers and graphic layouts. In way of conclusion The Atelier Lapin Blanc is present in many different aspects in the magazine you’re holding in your hands. Annick oversaw the creation of the graphic grid with Oussama Mezher, graphic designer. Annick also played the role of art director in guiding illustrators in creating their self-portrait. Her responsibility: to bring out the very best in each illustrator! In addition, the Atelier Lapin Blanc designed the magazine’s cover. Without a doubt, the challenge of applying magazine codes to our promotional tool has been accomplished! Its solid graphic layout pertinently highlights Illustration Quebec, a non-profit association proud to support and promote professional as well as emerging illustrators. We hope you'll have as much fun to browse this magazine as we had creating it!

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A bunch of illustrators Self-portraits

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Creating Universes Christine BATTUZ What is your academic background? Bachelor  in Literature and Master’s Degree in Art, Academia delle Belle Arti Pietro Vannucci, Perugia, Italia. Just between us, whose talent would you “steal”? Lorenzo Mattotti, Hayao Miyazaki, Toru Terada. Where do you work? I work in my home studio, in the woods. What do you like the most

about being an illustrator? Being an illustrator allows me to create an infinity of words and characters and I love it! Do you have an agent? If so, why? I have an agent in London. It allows me to see what’s going on elsewhere… the world is a huge playground! What drives you when you start a new project? New project = new challenge! Paper, canvas

or screen ? All of the above and even more… An unusual object that is a must for you at work? My big box full of paper scraps and many-colored fabrics with multi-varied patterns. What kind of music do you listen to while you work? Massive Attack, Cinematic Orchestra, Berry Weight, Fink.

Create an infinity of words and characters and I love it!

kuizin.com ⁄⁄ cbattuz@kuizin.com

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Soul Nest Marianne CHEVALIER What is your academic background ? A B.A. in Graphic Design from UQÀM (Quebec's University in Montreal) and a Master’s Degree in Fine Arts from Laval University. How did your career in illustration begin? While I was in University, with an illustration for En Route magazine (Air Canada). What do you like the most about being an illustrator? Just the fact that I need to be an illustrator, I could never do

another job. It feeds my soul. How do you see the future in illustration ? I think illustration is at the crossroads. There are more openings for originality and imagery in dabbling with fine arts. Had you not been an illustrator, you would have certainly not been… ...A brain surgeon! Paper, canvas or screen ? Paper, scissors and scotch tape! An unusual object that is a must for you at work? Liquid paper! How would

you define art? To dive in deep in order to bring uncommon images back to the surface.  Illustration  rhymes  with… ...Meditation. What kind of music do you listen to while you work? I listen to various styles but I often return to ancient Renaissance music.

Bring uncommon images back to the surface.

ateliertricorne.com ⁄⁄ ateliertricorne@gmail.com

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Belle Folie Anne VILLENEUVE

Art is a mystery to me and everyday, I try to uncover it.

Represented by missillustration.com: info@missillustration.com ⁄⁄ annevilleneuve.com

Where do you work ? I will soon have a new workshop that I’ll be sharing with two other artists, in a building invaded with creators. I’m sure it will be inspiring. What do you like the most about being an illustrator ? Being master of my time. I enjoy being able to divide up my time between creation, management, promotion and contact with clients. Do you have an agent? If so, why ? My agent is Élisabeth Pelletier, a.k.a. Miss

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Illustration. Our collaboration adds a lot to my illustrator craft, as much as to my enterprise dimension as to creation itself. What most challenging illustration project have you ever worked on ? Working with directors from Cirque du Soleil. This kind of collaboration is never boring! Your best and worst color? I believe there are no worst or best colors when everything is in adequate proportion… Two jobs you

did before becoming an illustrator? I have been a waitress in a bar and I also worked in a studio that produced drawing notebooks! Had you not been an illustrator, you would have certainly not been… A secretary. Paper, canvas or screen? Ink, watercolor, mouse… and my cats! An unusual object that is a must for you at work? My coffee, in the morning. What kind of music do you listen to while you work? Silence.


Through my Window Jean-Luc TRUDEL

Discovering life hiding behind the words.

studio3810.blogspot.com ⁄⁄ jluctrudel@gmail.com

Where do you work? I share a workshop with other illustrators and graphic artists. I worked from home for a long time but I found being by myself at home may be long at times and can even slow down the  creative drive. Moreover,  meeting clients face to face doesn’t happen often, everything now takes place via email. What do you like the most about being an illustrator ? What I find the most fascinating is reading a text and imagine.

I take real pleasure in drawing sketches and discovering life hiding behind the words. How do you see the future in illustration ? I love above all drawing within an illustration. I think that despite the technical advances, drawing w ill a lways remain f undamenta l. Drawing is connected directly to our emotions even if technically, it’s the hand and the eye that do the work. The future is indeed promising. Would

you define yourself as an artist ? I prefer defining myself as a craftsman. A word and image craftsman. Artistic sensibility is important, however I have to work with very specific texts and concepts. What kind of music do you listen to while you work ? I listen to all sorts of music: Feist, Herbie Hancock, Bregovic, Jean Leloup, etc.

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Fashionista Martine BERTRAND What is your academic background ? Fashion at Marie-Victorin College in Montreal.  How did your career in illustration begin ?  I am  a costume desig ner  a nd  about  a  yea r  now, I  joi ne d  t he  i l lu s t r at ion  world . What do you like the most about being an illustrator ? Hav ing  t he privilege to invent new worlds with paper and pencils. What drives  you when you start a new project? Starting all over again… it’s always a new

beginning, a new destination. How would you define art? Art is an elevator to other worlds. Just between us, whose talent would you “steal” ? MAMAMIA! Christian Lacroix! When I look at his drawings, it gives me wings… I imagine myself walking with my ankle boots in the streets of Paris… feeling happy and light! What most challenging illustration project have you ever worked on ? Illustrating my husband’s film sets for Café de Flore, directed by

Jean-Marc Vallée. Name two jobs you held before becoming an illustrator ? I created costumes for a ballet on Elton John’s life. I was Quebec's first costume designer to create for L'Opéra de Paris and for Il Teatro della Scala in Milan. What is your ultimate goal as an illustrator? To invent a character who goes through all sorts of adventures that would supply lots of food to have huge banquets with my friends!

Invent new worlds with paper and pencils.

illustrationquebec.com/martinebertrand ⁄⁄ madame.martine@gmail.com

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One day, I will dare using mauve, one day… orbie.ca ⁄⁄ info@orbie.ca

Friendly Orbie ORBIE Where do you work? Here, there and everywhere ! I give workshops in schools so I’m often on the road. That is to say, my work place is quite movable between home, the office and hotel rooms! How did your career in illustration begin ? When I signed a contract with myself, binding me in making a drawing a day. What do you like the most about being

an illustrator ? To be able to answer “drawing” when asked “what do you do in life?” How do you promote yourself ? I live in the country and mouth-to-ear takes care of all the promotion I need! What most challenging illustration project have you ever worked on ? Create a weekly cartoon (humoristic drawing) on current affairs for a

newspaper. One can never run out of ideas! Three words to describe your workplace :  Chaotic, colorful …  and chaotic ! Your best and worst color ? Mauve and green – One day, I will dare using mauve, one day…

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Season’s Lightness Louise Catherine BERGERON What is your academic background ? I am 100% self-taught and continue to be. Where do you work ? My studio is at home, north of Montreal. There is plenty of light and it is comfortably warm in the winter and nice and cool in the summer. That’s why I’m never alone with one or two four legged companions napping and purring in the basket by the window. What kind of music do you listen to while you work? I listen to

jazz in the fall, classical music in winter and spring, and meditative music in the summer. I also listen to a lot of silence all throughout the year. Just between us, whose talent would you “steal”? Arthur Rackham and also Alphonse Mucha. Both were my inspirations when I was young. Three words to describe my workplace : Sunny, cozy and a little messy.  Paintbrushes, charcoal or mouse ?  Brushes and sometimes I

admit, even the mouse’s tail! What is your ultimate goal ? My dream goal is to become highly successful and to choose to work off a bright, spacious studio in some little village in Provence or in the Lake District in England. But of course, my down-to-earth goal is to become the best I can ever be and to put my own words to my illustrations.

illustrationquebec.com/louisecatherinebergeron ⁄⁄ lcb.bergeron@gmail.com

Sunny, cozy and a little messy.

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Island of Colors Carol-Anne PEDNEAULT What is your academic background ? A college diploma in Graphics, College Ste-Foy, Quebec  City. Where do you  work ?  Ever y where. On my island. S o m e w h e r e   e l s e .   Te c h n o l o g y   i s wonderful! Do you have an agent ? If so, why ? Yes, I do. Every one has their strengths! How do you see the future in illustration ? In colors.

Your best and worst color? The worse: the exact hue I’m looking for! The best: the one I finally come up with… What drives you when you start a new project? It’s a new venture, every time. A new universe to create. A routine ? Absolutely not! Would you define yourself as an artist ? An artist at other’s service. What is your ultimate

goal as an illustrator? That my colors will travel… What kind of music do you listen to while you work? Bon Iver and the sound of waves.

Represented by Miss Illustration: missillustration.com ⁄⁄ info@missillustration.com

A new universe to create.

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Captain Bizier Patrick BIZIER

Do everything with illustration. There are no limits. patrickbizier.com ⁄⁄ bizbizcreations@videotron.ca

What is your academic background? Bachelor of Arts with a specialization in etching. Where do you work? I work from home where I have a room for drawing illustrations and a workshop where I paint and do etching. What do you like the most about being an illustrator?  There is a similarity between being an illustrator or an artist and being a gold digger, except that in the first case, one digs and search

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within himself. It is that search that is fascinating. How do you see the future in illustration? “Nothing is lost, nothing is created, everything is transformed”. This applies to illustration which is and will always be forever evolving. Just between us, whose talent would you “steal”? I admire the creativity of illustrators like Carlos Nine, Mark Ryden and Peter de Sève. I consider Sebastian Kruger and Jan Op De Beek among

the world's best caricaturists. How would you define art, creation? It is one’s own self-expression. Illustration rhymes with… With ever ything! One can say and do everything with illustration. There are no limits. You are satisfied with an illustration when… Everything has been said and there’s nothing to add. It can be achieved with a pencil stroke or after working on the same illustration for a week.


Mischievous Way Marie-Anne CAMPEAU DUPLESSIS

The diversity of paths I can take is what motivates me. turkoise.ca ⁄⁄ marieannecd@turkoise.ca

What is your academic background? I studied at Salette College in Montreal. I got my AEC (collegial studies attestation) in graphic design in 2002 and another AEC in adver tising illustration in 2011. Just between us, whose talent would you  “steal”? I would steal from all illustrators who are honest and unique in what they do. However, I really enjoy the talents of Michael Shapcott, Florian Nicolle,

Leonardo Rodriguez, Steve Adams and Isabelle Arsenault. Your best and worst color? Beyond any doubt, turquoise is my favorite color, it makes me quiver. I don’t find any color that is the worst, I love them all! Paper, canvas or screen? All of the above – it is impossible for me to dissociate them. What drives you when you start a new project? The diversity of paths I can take. I also need to visualize the result, it compels me to

surpass myself. How would you define art? Whether we create for ourselves or for a client, the resulting creation will always be a message. Would you define yourself as an artist? Yes! And I’m 100% at ease with it. However, my realist self allows me to adapt to a client’s requests. Illustration rhymes with… Pleasure!

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Thoughtful Skills Christine roy What is your academic background ? I’m self-taught – I never took a drawing class. I have a B.A. in Filmmaking and a Master’s in Business Administration (MBA). Where do you work ? I work from home, between my indoor palm tree, my espresso machine and the big bright view outside. What do you like the most about being an illustrator? Living a life based on translating my thoughts and the client’s in relevant,

Living a life based on translating my thoughts.

agentillustrateur.com info@agentillustrateur.com

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original images. How do you see the future in illustration ? As an enormous challenge for talented illustrators to constantly reinventing their craft and keep their business skills up to date in an highly competitive landscape. Your best and worst color? There is no such thing as a best or worst color. It’s all about combining them well. Two jobs you did before becoming an illustrator ? Assistant-accountant

in a steel factory and body double in a few Hollywood movies. Paper, canvas or screen ? My screen, my tablet, and most importantly, a scanner to import my messy sketches! An unusual object that is a must for you at work? My sweet parrot standing on my shoulder while I work You are satisfied with an illustration when… I’m satisfied with an illustration when I’m surprised with the end result.


paulbordeleau.blogspot.com ⁄⁄ paul@bordeleau.qc.ca

Vivid Nature

Filled with bright colors.

PAUL BORDELEAU Where do you work? At home, near a lake with a loon family. How did you kick-start your career in illustration ? Quite young, when I was 14-15. I got a contract from another illustrator. How do you promote yourself ? I send my calendar every year to my clients since 1998. Do you have an agent? If so, why? Why an agent when you have the Internet? How do you see the future in

illustration ? Filled with bright colors. In 3-D  and odorama! Just between us, whose talent would you “steal”? A mix of Basquiat’s, Will Eisner’s and Wes Anderson’s talents. What most challenging illustration project have you ever worked on? Television credits produced in one week. Three words to describe your workplace: Relaxing. Light. Trees. An unusual object that is

a must for you at work? A little pencil offered by Victor, an artist from St. Petersburg, when I was visiting Russia. A routine ? Yoga every day with my spouse.

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Strength and Silence Anne-Marie BOURGEOIS

An unusual topic and an unlimited freedom of action. annemariebourgeois.com ⁄⁄ annemariebourgeois@yahoo.ca

Two jobs you did before becoming an illustrator? When I was a student, I did many assorted jobs. I have been a community worker with autistic kids. I organized cultural activities for adults with intellectual disabilities – bingo and dancing were big hits from which I always emerged soaking wet! What drives you when you start a new project? Motivated people, an unusual topic, and an unilimited freedom

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of action. Paper, canvas or screen? Brushes, glue, paper, pencils… I enjoy touching materials and working with my hands. But I leave it up to Photoshop when it comes to details or shadow and light effects. An unusual object that is a must for you at work? A mirror! When I hesitate on the balance of a composition, I look at it in a mirror. It gives it a new perspective, often very enlightened. How would you define art?

I see creation as sort of a game where you let your intuition scream out loud what it thinks in hushed tones. You are satisfied with an illustration when… …when the words that accompany it are singing. I am very sensitive to the written word and I think that a good illustration should shine forth on the reader’s experience.


Uplifting Ideas Marie-France LANDRY

Never disturb an artist lying on a beach.

illustrationquebec.com/mariefrancelandry ⁄⁄ landrymf@videotron.ca

  Where do you work ? W herever inspiration strikes...! Never disturb an artist lying on a beach: imagination gears might be in full motion! I often “see” a concept before I lay it out on paper, and then I work it out in my home studio. How did your career in illustration begin ? I drew penguins for Montreal’s La Fête des Neiges in 1990. Soon, they invaded newspapers, billboards, and flyers... Mascot costumes were also

made and “my” penguins came out for winter fun for many following years. Since then, I’ve been illustrating, writing, and screenwriting. What most challenging illustration project have you ever worked on ? What is the best way to uplift a project? To me, that is always the challenge. Illustration is an enhancement art that can make or break a project, much like directing brings a whole new vision to a written

play. I think children’s books bring an extra challenge because of the many images you have to create to tell a story and for the coherence the book must present overall. An unusual object that is a must for you at work ? Hey, no chef gives out their secret ingredient! Although… a toothpick can go a long w ay.  Il lust rat ion rhy mes  w it h… Freedom. Worlds of Possibilities. And, Recreation.

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Love, Create, Live Carine BOURGET What is your academic background ? Laval  University,  Quebec  Cit y.   I explored Political Sciences right up to Fine Arts… and that enabled me to obtain a B.A. in Graphic Design followed by a Master’s Degree in Visual Arts (with a specialization in illustration). Where do you work? At home. On a glass desk supported by white trestles on which the word “Love” is written in a dozen different languages.What do you like

the most about being an illustrator? I work, I create! And I love it. That’s life! What drives you when you start a new project? That once again, life is ahead. It feels good to realize this, as often as possible. An unusual object that is a must for you at work? Old illustrated albums and books… I enjoy salvaging them, in many different ways. A routine? A good breakfast, a warm café au lait (with a bit of chocolate),

varied moments of inspiration (from web surfing to knitting) and then, I can start my day… Would you define yourself as an artist? Maybe. As no one knows what an artist truly is. And then, each one of us is, in her/his own way. There are such infinite possibilities of interpretation! Illustration rhymes with… Season… You are satisfied with an illustration when… It makes me smile.

illustrationquebec.com/CarineBourget ⁄⁄ carinebourget@hotmail.com

I work, I create! That’s life!

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Defying Spirit Stefan DEFAGO Do you have an agent? If so, why ? No… and indeed, I wonder why not?How do you see the future in illustration? In pink… and blue also. Just between us, whose talent would you “steal”? There are so many! But recently, I’d love to steal Brian Cronin’s talent. What most challenging illustration project have you ever worked on? Nothing and nobody has defied me in illustration, yet.  Three words to describe your

workplace :  Lu xur y, ca lmness and sensual delight... Your best and worst color? Yellow, and yellow again… violet and also violet. Two jobs you did before becoming an illustrator? Esthetician and sales representative for a Russian carmaker. What drives you when you start a new project? Stop cooking so I don’t waste any time and buy sushi. Had you not been an illustrator, you would have certainly not been… Politician.

Paper, canvas or screen? Lead pencils 0.5 mm 2B and screen lotion SPF 50. An unusual object that is a must for you at work? Paper? Illustration rhymes w it h…  Im moderat ion, f i lt rat ion, exaltation, excavation, gratification, germination. You are satisfied with an illustration when… The client doesn’t tear it up. What is your ultimate goal as an illustrator? To have an exhibit at Montreal’s Fine Arts Museum.

illustrationquebec.com/stefandefago ⁄⁄ stefandefago@gmail.com

Nothing and nobody has defied me in illustration, yet.

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I have a love-hate relationship with blue.

anniecarbo.com ⁄⁄ annie.carbo@gmail.com

Church and Beer Annie CARBONNEAU Where do you work? I work in my flat, located in an old church rooftop above the clouds. What is your academic background ? I have a graphic design degree. Your best and worst color? Blue. I have a love-hate relationship with blue. An unusual object that is a must for you at work? It’s not really an object, but I have these lovely hermit crabs to keep me company – during daytime! A routine? A coffee and a toast with Nutella

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are all it takes to get me started. What is the most challenging illustration project you have ever worked on ? I’ve done beer labels for a local brewery. I loved their project so much and wanted it to be perfect. The biggest challenge was giving cohesion to the labels. What is your ultimate goal as an illustrator? Doing a music album cover is the main reason why 15-years-old-me wanted to be an illustrator – and it still is! What

kind of music do you listen to while you work? I listen to music that inspires the ambience I wish to bring to my work during the creation phase. When I’m into the production phase, good beats like hip-hop or electro, help me keep the pace. Is there a website you would recommend? You should pay a visit to Helpx.net. It’s a brilliant and cheap way to travel, eat good food, learn and meet lovely people.


In Orbit VIGG What is your academic background ? Pol it ic a l sciences, l iteratu re a nd anthropology. Creating  illustrations for a living was of logical order. Where do you work? Mostly inside my head, but sometimes in the shower or at the grocery store. How did your career in illustration begin? By a curious coincidence in the late nineties: I walked into an exhibition by Illustration Quebec and never returned. How do

you promote yourself ? I’m doing it right now! Two jobs you did before becoming an illustrator? I have been a bank officer and a frame maker. Really! What drives you when you start a new project? That everything is still possible. Had you not been an illustrator, you would have certainly not been… a bovine inseminator amongst several other fine occupations. Would you define yourself as an artist? I’m a bit

tired about the Fine Arts vs. Illustration debate. I think it’s all about creativity and that, in essence, comes from the same place but is simply presented differently. I don’t need to define myself, I just am. You are satisfied with an illustration when… ...I’m still pleased with it the next morning and/or when the check comes in.

ateliertricorne.com ⁄⁄ ateliertricorne@gmail.com

I don’t need to define myself, I just am.

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Off Limits Roselyne CAZAZIAN

The creative mind never sleeps.

studiokazaz.com ⁄⁄ studiokazaz@sympatico.ca

What is your academic background ? None.  Where do you work ? The creative mind never sleeps – so I work everywhere! How did your career in illustration begin? I've worked as a freelance artist since my early 20s, doing portraits, airbrush t-shirts and murals. My first real job as an illustrator came much later – in my 40s – when I joined Illustration Quebec and published an illustration in their directory. Your

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best and worst color ? Why is this question always asked to visual artists? No one would think to ask a musician what her/his favorite note is. Colors – like music notes – work together to create symphonies! Two jobs you did before becoming an illustrator? At 17 I got a job at TD-Visa as a bill collector. I was fired after 9 months for being unproductive and distracting my coworkers from their work. My

favorite job was as a cook in a Jamaican restaurant. Sadly I was fired about a year later because I refused to handle meat. And no, I wasn't a vegetarian! What drives you when you start a new  project ?  Sur v iv ing /overcome my insecurities and completing the project. A routine ? Yoga then emails then breakfast. Then I'm ready to forget about the world and face my demons.


Shaman eve DESROCHERS

evedesrochers.com titev@hotmail.com

An overwhelming sense of possibilities. Just between us, whose talent would you “steal”? If indeed talent follows the 10,000-hour Rule, I wouldn’t bear “stealing” talent from anyone. What most challenging illustration project have you ever worked on? Every project feels like the ultimate challenge to me. It’s what gets me out of bed. Three words to describe your workplace : Rackety, smoky, cozy. Two jobs you did before becoming an illustrator? I

was once quite an unskilled barmaid. I also spent a whole summer in a pedal boat, picking-up golf balls on a lake.  What drives you when you start a new project? An overwhelming sense of possibilities. Paper, canvas or screen? All of the above. Whatever medium suits the project. An unusual object that is a must for you at work? Earplugs. How would you define art? I believe art is a form of shamanism.

A way of manipulating words, forms, sounds, colors, in order to trigger shifts in consciousness. What is your ultimate goal as an illustrator? Be the best shaman I can! Is there a website you would recommend ? TED.com, an infinite source of inspiration.

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A rubber band battle a day... Keeps the doctor away! polygonestudio.net ⁄⁄ info@polygonestudio.net

The Three-Headed Beast POLYGONE STUDIO Where do you work? Since the inception of our Art-Coop, over ten years ago, we’ve been working in a slightly worn-down but comfy loft located above a Montreal downtown brewpub. Beer isn’t free yet but still it’s close enough! What most challenging illustration project have you ever worked on ? Undoubtedly, when we produced a three-headed self-portrait for this special edition! Two jobs you

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did before becoming an illustrator? Chocolate maker, home renovator, car washer, photo lab technician, cashier at a grocery's store and barmaid. (There are three of us!) Paper, canvas or screen ? All of the above, depending on the style needed for the project and partly, how we feel at that moment. But in the end, all of our work - either 2D or 3D - involves some Photoshop editing. An unusual object that is a must

for you at work? Chantal’s singing cucumber, Eric’s suction cup cow and Carl’s moose finger puppet. A routine? A rubber band battle at least once a day... Keeps the doctor away! Illustration rhy mes w ith… Com pre h en s i on , i n t e r p r e t a t i o n ,  d e m o n s t r a t i o n , vulgarization, reflection, apprehension, ac tion, spontaneous gener ation, electromagnetic radiation, bacon, fire station, Martian and... vacation!


Cabinet of Curiosities Thomas GIBAULT Where do you work? I work in a studio called Studio Lounak, a great place to work and meet people in the graphic field. I can exchange advice, constructive critics, and share contacts. How did your career in illustration begin ? I wanted to be able to do lots of things, so I created and worked on many different projects like animation series, character design, illustrations for kids. The more diverse, the better! And later

on, I knew exactly where I wanted to focus my work. Just between us, whose talent would you “steal” ? It would be Leonardo Da Vinci, because I think that the best artist is one who opens his mind to the widest domains, who can create from the most diverse sources. What most challenging illustration project have you ever worked on ? It’s yet to come. Three words to describe your workplace :  Cabinet of  curiosities. An

unusual object that is a must for you at work? My toys: they watch me, advise me and help me dream a thousand worlds. Would you define yourself as an artist ? I’ve never understood those who think that illustrators aren’t artists… does narration get in the way? Or is it the reproducibility ? Didn’t Picasso and Warhol make vinyl jackets ? Aren’t Moebius or Spigelman having exhibits of their works ?

Represented by Miss Illustration: missillustration.com ⁄⁄ info@missillustration.com

Shake something into the people who see my work.

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Versatility Isabelle CHARBONNEAU What is your academic background ? I studied Fine A r ts at Cégep du Vieux-Montréal and have a B.A. in Graphic Design from UQÀM (Quebec's University in Montreal). Where do you work? I share a studio with a dozen cartoonists, illustrators and other creators: it is very stimulating. How do you see the future in illustration ? It is going through a huge mutation

towards more flexibility with a view to adjusting to new technologies.  Just between us, whose talent would you “steal” ? Richard Scarry. What is the most challenging illustration project you have ever worked on ? The most challenging project: to be responsible for every step of creating a book up to its printing, including  choosing the format, paper, design, layout and

- of course - creating the illustrations! Had you not been an illustrator, you would have certainly not been… A ship captain! Paper, canvas or screen ? Graphics tablet. A routine ? Nibbling while preparing the colors I will use and listening to different programs on the web. What is your ultimate goal as an illustrator ? Make a living off my copyrights.

isabellecharbonneau.com ⁄⁄ info@isabellecharbonneau.com

The most challenging project: to be responsible for every step of creating a book.

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Elements Mylène HENRY Where do you work? In winter, I work in Montreal where I have a workshop with a view on the most beautiful snowstorms in town. In summertime, I have a workshop in Percé, Gaspésie, and from my window, I can see whales jumping in the sea. How did your career in illustration begin? I free-lanced for women’s magazines. What do you like the most about being an illustrator? The freedom! Juggling with colors.

Playing with various materials. Team working with clients as passionate as I am. How do you promote yourself ? I own an art gallery in Percé where I exhibit my work in the summer. Percé is filled with tourists at that time of year and I meet people from all over the world. How do you see the future in illustration? There are a lot of new markets for us, we have to know how to adapt. Your best and worst color ? Violet - it is the vilain's colors,

those who chose the obscure side. Violet - because there is not a more beautiful color for the shadows it carries. What drives you when you start a new project? Seeing a new image come to life, an image that existed only in my soul. An unusual object that is a must for you at work? Audio books with fiction from Stieg Larsson, Michael Connelly, Marc Levy, J.K. Rowling, etc. They allow me to spend hours in front of my easel.

Represented by Miss Illustration: missillustration.com ⁄⁄ info@missillustration.com

Seeing a new image come to life, an image that existed only in my soul.

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Imagination, Freedom, Creativity.

geraldinecharette.com ⁄⁄ geraldinecharette@gmail.com

Visual Elegance Géraldine CHARETTE  Where do you work ? I work  at home, in a room that acts as my office/ workshop. What do you like the most about being an illustrator? Drawing, of course, and also the freedom of working wherever I want as long as I have my pencils and laptop with me!

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Paper, canvas or screen ? Lead pencils and then, the screen! Your best and worst color ? The worst : ora nge. The best: blue. Had you not been an illustrator, you would have certainly not been… A car salesman. What k ind of music do you listen to

while you work? Mostly reggae but nowadays, I listen to a lot of Chinese Man.  Illustration rhymes with… Imagination, Freedom, Creativity.


The Traveler François THISDALE Where do you work? I work from home in an ancient farmhouse in the middle of fields, only 20 minutes from downtown Montreal. How did your career in illustration begin? When I was 20 years old, I did a one-year tour of Europe by bike with my sketchbooks, every day drawing cities and landscapes. When I returned, I became a freelance illustrator because I needed to draw every day and to continue to feel that passion inside of

me. And my passion for traveling with sketchbooks continues…What do you like the most about being an illustrator ? Being able to communicate only with images, without words and having the chance to differently complement a text, adding something unsaid. Having fun, a lot of fun, even after doing this for nearly 27 years. Just between us, whose talent would you “steal” ? Eugene Delacroix for his Moroccan

sketchbooks. What most challenging illustration project have you ever worked on? I’ve illustrated a children’s book I wrote about the adoption of my daughter. It was a wonderful challenge, having to say intimate things with words and images. Paper, canvas or screen? All of these. I like to blend traditional mediums with digital imagery. In fact, paper, canvas and screen mean the same to me, different creation tools.

A bridge between soul and mediums.

thisdale.com info@thisdale.com

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Cup of Joy Maira CHIODI How did your career in illustration begin? A friend of mine was working in a publishing house and they needed someone to illustrate a book. He called me and I said yes! What do you like the most about being an illustrator? The fact that I can use my imagination to create something that makes me happy. Do you have an agent? If so, why? No.

I don’t know why, in fact I would love to have a great agent… Three words to describe your workplace: Colorful, organized (most of the time) and bright. Your best and worst color? The best is any color that reminds me of water, and the worse is probably mustard. What drives you when you start a new project? Making it my best work

so far. Paper, canvas or screen? Paper and screen. An unusual object that is a must for you at work? Not an object, but I would say music. A routine? Coffee with milk every morning before starting my day. You are satisfied with an illustration when… I look at it and smile!

Imagination to create something that makes me happy.

mairachiodi.blogspot.com ⁄⁄ mkchiodi@yahoo.com

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A Fabulous Ride Marie-Ève TREMBLAY What is your academic background? I studied Visual Arts in College and Graphic Design at UQÀM(Quebec’s University in Montreal) What do you like the most about being an illustrator? Being able to synthesize an idea into an illustration and the possibility of working on varied projects. Do you have an agent? If so, why? Yes.

Colagene has been representing me by from the start so I can concentrate on illustration while they handle the rest! Paper, canvas or screen ? All of them. It took me a while to start using the computer and now that I do, I seek to give my work a handmade feel. But I still do my sketches on paper. A routine ? Music. Tea. Start work on illustration.

C at s w a l k i ng on t he ke y b o a rd . Resuming work on illustration. More tea. More cats. Illustration rhymes with…  Interpretation. Motivation. What kind of music do you listen to while you work? There’s always music at home. The recipe includes folk/indie/ rock, 50s jazz and a touch of 60s bossa nova on the side.

There’s always music at home.

Represented by Colagene: colagene.com ⁄⁄ troupeaudepoules@hotmail.com

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If I ’m not an artist, who the hell am I?!

Represented by Miss Illustration: missillustration.com ⁄⁄ info@missillustration.com

The Veteran Alain RENO How did your career in illustration begin ?  Actually my first assignment came from a Montreal  magazine  25 years ago, this year! Back in the days, magazines were printed on paper! What do you like the most about being an illustrator? Creating images that have a life of their own. Posters, books, CD covers, all those things from the past… How do you promote yourself ? I send telegrams and faxes of my work.How

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do you see the future in illustration? Oil, pastels, pencils and maybe tempera. Just between us, whose talent would you “steal”? Hank Williams or Billie Holiday. What most challenging illustration project have you ever worked on ? Illustrations using typography on a 16’x40’ cow for a children’s museum in Winnipeg. An assignment with l’Atelier du Presse-Citron. Had you not been an illustrator, you would have certainly

not been… A lawyer... Paper, canvas or screen? Canvas these days. This is certainly the future of illustration. A routine ? Put the children to bed and back to work! Would you define yourself as an artist? I’m certainly not an accountant since I draw for a living. If I ’m not an artist, who the hell am I?! What is your ultimate goal as an illustrator? Get rid of all theses right wings policies,you know, all those politics from the past.


Sketching Words Pascale CRÊTE What is your academic background ? I studied Fine Arts in College and Graphic Communication at Laval University. What do you like the most about being an illustrator? The way I live my life makes me an illustrator. I walk in the street and take pictures, I’m an illustrator. I read a book and seize a word, I make a sketch, I’m an illustrator. I watch a sunrise, I admire the colors of dawn, I’m an illustrator. Two jobs you

did before becoming an illustrator ? I worked in a publishing house and as artistic director in an advertising agency. What drives you when you start a new project? It starts with words, a message, a need and I have to translate these into images, look for leads, and find creative solutions that will render the client’s request to the best. Paper, canvas or screen ? Brushes, charcoal and mouse… and also a camera, scanner,

a coffee spot on the table’s corner… anything that catches my eye can become a tool for creation. How would you define art? Starting something inside of you and make it visible to the outside world. You are satisfied with an illustration when… The message comes through. What is your ultimate goal as an illustrator ? Create images that are strong, that have a meaning, that communicate, that are true.

creerunmonde.com ⁄⁄ pascale.crete@creerunmonde.com

Starting something inside of you and make it visible to the outside world.

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The Explorer Marc-André CRIGHT What is your academic background ? I have a diploma in graphic design and am currently studying towards a second degree in illustration. Where do you work? I like to work in as many places as possible. My favorite places are cafés, of course, but also in the subway, on a terrace, on the poolside, at the library. I am rather a nomadic person when it’s time for illustration. What do you like the most about

being an illustrator? Two things: to create universes from scratch and collaborate with extraordinary people! How do you promote yourself ? I make gorgeous cards to thank those who encourage me: would you like one? Just between us, whose talent would you “steal”? Antoni Gaudi. OK, he’s not exactly an illustrator but I’m totally fascinated by his ingenuity and his being  pioneer. Awww! Two jobs you

did before becoming an illustrator ? I’ve been a clown in children’s birthday parties and a mascot; these were tough financial times (laughs)! How would you define art ? When we step back to help make way for what’s bigger than us. Illustration rhymes with… Vision. You are satisfied with an illustration when… I’ve come out of my comfort zone and am amazed at myself.

about.me/cright7 ⁄⁄ ma.cright@gmail.com

Step back to help make way for what’s bigger than us. 40


Peaceful Tsunami Annick GAUDREAULT What most challenging illustration project have you ever worked on ? Working directly on 19 by 36 feet acetates for the Polar Spheres Project featured on Place des Arts’ Esplanade in Montreal, an outdoors open space, winter 2010-2011. Illustration rhymes with…Sensibility, Textures, Amazement, Daring.  W hat is your ultimate goal as an illustrator? Initiate or be part of innovative and

stimulating projects. What drives you when you start a new project? The expected hiccup that triggers creation. Three words to describe your workplace: Bright, Yellow and Alive. How would you define art? I’ll quote Oscar Wilde: “A work of art is the unique result of a unique temperament”. How do you see the future in illustration ? I think we will find more illustrations in our everyday life, in unusual and

unexpected places. I wish illustration will keep on surprising us. An unusual object that is a must for you at work? Q-tips. Would you define yourself as an artist ? I live, think, eat… as an artist. If I may say so. Just between us, whose talent  would you “steal” ?  Lorraine Fox, Nor m a n  Roc k wel l,  M i r a nd a Skoczek… Did you ask for only one person?

The expected hiccup that triggers creation.

annickgaudreault.com ⁄⁄ contact@annickgaudreault.com

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I’m satisfied with an illustration when it makes me grin.

Represented by Anna Goodson: agoodson.com/nathalie-dion ⁄⁄ anna@agoodson.com

Grace and Wit Nathalie DION Where do you work? A few years ago, I made a hole in my ceiling and built a staircase to access what became my studio. It’s like an attic or a house in  a tree. How did your career in illustration begin ? By illustrating catalogues for a fashion company’s collections in  Montreal.  What do you like the most about being an illustrator? Watching my neighbors go to work. Do you have an agent?

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If so, why ? Ye s , A n n a  G o o d s on management represents me. Because I really don’t like to discuss budgets and they do it so gracefully! Just between us, whose talent would you “steal” ? Isabelle Arsenault’s! Your best and worst color ? I think there is no such thing. What drives you when you start a new project ? Thinking that this time, it will be the One. An unusual object that is a must for you at work ? A magic

bag for my sore neck. You are satisfied with an illustration when… It makes me grin. What is your ultimate goal as an illustrator ? I look forward to the day I will think of myself as an illustrator and not an impostor. Impostors have to work very hard! What kind of music do you listen to while you work ? Terry Riley and other minimalist music, or silence.


Elisabeth III Élisabeth EUDES-PASCAL What is your academic background ? I have a Master’s Degree and a PhD in Numbers and Toe Painting from Schtroumpf University.  W here do you work? In bed. What do you like the most about being an illustrator? Being millionaire and working in my pajamas. Two jobs you did before

becoming an illustrator? Stockbroker and shoe-shiner. What drives you when you start a new project? Caviar and champagne at the end. Had you not been an illustrator, you would have certainly not been… Pamela Anderson. An unusual object that is a must for you at work? My husband. Would you

define yourself as an artist? I would define myself as a Doctor in Numbers and Toe Painting with a diploma from Schtroumpf University. What is your ultimate goal as an illustrator ? Caviar and champagne. What kind of music do you listen to while you work? Barnyard sounds.

Doctor in Numbers and Toe Painting with a diploma from Schtroumpf University.

z-e-p.com ⁄⁄ z.eudes-pascal@videotron.ca

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Filled with Fun Yves DUMONT

I’m satisfied when all the elements that give meaning to an illustration are there! yvesevy.blogspot.com ⁄⁄ yvesushi@gmail.com

What is your academic background? I did part of my high school in SaintLuc de Tournai Institute and four years at École de Recherche Graphique en Illustration in Brussels. Where do you work? I work from home. Do you have an agent? If so, why? For the time being, I’ve managed to find contracts by myself, but maybe one day… Your best and worst color? The best color is orange because it blasts! There’s no

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worse color! Two jobs you did before becoming an illustrator? Projectionist and florist. Paper, canvas or screen? A graphic tablet! A routine? Coffee to start with! Would you define yourself as an artist? Yes! Illustration rhymes with… Revelation! You are satisfied with an illustration when… I’m satisfied when all the elements that give meaning to an illustration are there! What is your ultimate goal as

an illustrator? To make a youth album without any text. What kind of music do you listen to while you work? Jazz, R&B, soul, pop, classical, songs…


My Inner Voice Janou-Eve LEGUERRIER

“This story is a hundred per cent true since I imagined it from start to finish.” Boris Vian janoueve.com ⁄⁄ info@janoueve.com

What is your academic background ? I have a degree in Graphic Design from  UQÀM (Quebec’s University in Montreal). I also did a stay in illustration and printed image at the École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs in Paris. Just between us, whose talent would you “steal” ? Edward Hopper for his use of light, Piero Della Francesca for his colors, Japanese prints for their composition

and Picasso for his whole body of work! What do you like the most about being an illustrator? A desire to constantly improve and surpass myself. You are satisfied with an illustration when… a little voice within me is astounded and exclaims: “This is it! I’ve got it!” What is your ultimate goal as an illustrator? Have as many moments as possible when a little voice within me is astounded and exclaims: “This is it!

I’ve got it!” Paper, canvas or screen ? All of them! Three words to describe your workplace: White, bright and pleasantly shared. How would you define art ? “This story is a hundred per cent true since I imagined it from start to finish.” Boris Vian Two jobs you did before becoming an illustrator? Flight Attendant & Graphic Designer.

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Aerial Grace Béatrice FAVEREAU Where do you work? Mainly from home, or on a mountain top with Wi-Fi. How did your career in illustration begin ? Being kick-out of math class for drawing the teacher’s caricature. Do you have an agent? If so, why? Yes, she does the parts I hate: copyrights and promotion. She gives good advice on my illustrations – I haven’t known her long enough to rate her coffee, but I have a good feeling about it. Three

words to describe your workplace : Aerial, messy, yellow. Two jobs you did before becoming an illustrator? I was a painters’ model: I got paid for doing nothing, literally. Selling art supplies: it was the closest thing to working in a bakery – my next dream job after being an illustrator. An unusual object that is a must for you at work? Mon Chéri chocolates. A routine ? First thing in the morning: listen to the weather forecast ,

it predicts what the day will be. Would you define yourself as an artist? Yes – even when I’m not drawing. You don’t have to make art to be an artist. My risotto is  art. Illustration rhymes w it h…  S en s at ion, Vibrat ion,  a nd Confabulation. What kind of music do you listen to while you work? World music, and the best of all – silence.

Represented by Miss Illustration: missillustration.com ⁄⁄ info@missillustration.com

Sensation, Vibration, and Confabulation.

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Symbolic Poetry Sonia ROY How did your career in illustration begin? By chance. I used to work in web design and I had done a series of images in my free time that I had sent to Colagene Illustration Clinic just to see what would happen. They immediately offered that I join their team! What do you like the most about being an illustrator ? To tell stories using images and symbols and compose images. Do you have an agent? If so, why ?

I’m with Colagene since I started. The illustration world was totally unknown to me and working with them helped me to develop a clientele. It provided me with the support I needed at the legal and administrative levels, which lifts a great weight off my shoulders. Your best and worst color? There is no such thing as a nest or worst color! However, I have my own personal palette. Cyan is a dominant color in my work and I

often use red-orange to accentuate. What drives you when you start a new project? The desire to communicate a message through a strong image. How would you define art? Communicating our vision of the world. Paper, canvas or screen ? The computer and Internet are my working tools. If there is a power failure or I lose Internet connection, I’m in a total panic!

Communicating our vision of the world.

Represented by Colagene: colagene.com/en/illustration/sonia-roy ⁄⁄ soniaroy.com ⁄⁄ sonia@soniaroy.com

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Smiling without Counting Marie MAINGUY What do you like the most about being an illustrator? Each illustration is a new challenge. It’s a wonderful task: capturing the spirit of a text with only one image. Like a hunter, I set a trap to catch the readers’ attention. I love it! What most challenging illustration project have you ever worked on ? A contract for 30 illustrations on “savings and retirement” for L'actualité Magazine. It was a big challenge

for someone who isn't particularly comfortable in dealing with numbers. I'm proud of the result! What drives you when you start a new project? Thinking that the illustration I'm about to draw could be the best one I ever did. I'm excited to see which ideas I’ll come up with. I'm always amazed at what's hidden inside my head! Had you not been an illustrator, you would have certainly not been... Someone counting

numbers all day long without smiling. An unusual object that is a must for you at work? Are dogs objects? Because I have two little sweet hairy objects, Lilli and Victor, who keep my feet warm while I'm working. Essential! A routine ? Before starting a new project, I like to clean up my office space. It's like I was also clearing my thoughts. Everything becomes clearer and ideas come faster.

I'm always amazed at what's hidden inside my head! mariemainguy.com ⁄⁄ mainguymarie@hotmail.com

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suzannehamel.com suehamel@videotron.ca

…I can feel life going through the illustration.

Dressing Images Suzanne HAMEL What is your academic background? I have two College Studies Diplomas: Fine Arts in Sept-Îles and Fashion Drawing at Lasalle College in Montreal. Then I got a B.A. in Graphic Design from  UQÀM (Quebec's University in Montreal). Where do you work? I work from my home workshop in Montreal. What most challenging illustration project have you ever worked on ? Creating a 3D book with illustrations

based on different versions of the word “thread”. That project allowed me to use different materials like paper, wood, fabric and embroidery floss. That’s when I discovered my passion for 3D, the object within an illustration. Three words to describe your workplace: Spacious, bright and functional. Paper, canvas or screen ? As I’m more of a tactile person, I enjoy working with materials. I save the computer for the

end… An unusual object that is a must for you at work? A shaving brush… A routine ? I like to tidy up to be able to work in a clean space. Then I sing a few high-pitch notes, stretch a bit and hop! I’m ready to take on the project! You are satisfied with an illustration when…I can feel life going through the illustration… like a presence. The image has to be inhabited.

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Curiously Real Anabelle LACHANCE

Expressing the invisible and give it life. anabellelachance.com ⁄⁄ info@anabellelachance.com

What is your academic background? I learned traditional cartoon animation in a private program. I had fascinating drawing classes, from constructing a character to perspective design to the ABC of hand-drawn animation. Where do you work? In my workshop, next to a café, located in a small village near a vineyard. It is the ideal size and location. Working outside of home keeps me very focused. What most challenging

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illustration project have you ever worked on ? Working on a graphic tablet and learn that technique midway in a contract – that meant starting over my illustration on the tablet with a tight deadline. Installing the tablet program was already a challenge for me! Your best and worst color? None! Each and every color can give different impressions and volumes depending on the other colors they interfere with.

How would you define art? Expressing the invisible and give it life. An academic background is quite important to me: it should be recognized as an act of courage. Would you define yourself as an artist? Yes, totally. It’s impossible for me to operate within an imposed and structured routine. I perform when I do my own thing.


Mise en Abyme Patrick GAUDETTE

We need visual bids / proposals that don’t give all the answers.

homepage.mac.com/pgaudt ⁄⁄ pgaudt@mac.com

What do you like the most about being an illustrator? Let’s be immature and enjoy the pleasure of giving life to characters on paper. Then comes the satisfaction of expressing an idea by hijacking it or by skirting around it to better define it. How do you see the future in illustration ? Illustration makes way to interpretation. We need visual bids/proposals that don’t give all the answers, while opening doors

to other questions at the same time. I see a future beaming with surprises. Just between us, whose talent would you “steal” ? I admire but I am not necessarily envious. I would say I admire Gary Larson for his universe and humor and Ralf Steadman for his graphic (hemorrhagic) frenzy. You are satisfied with an illustration when… When, say 70% of the feeling I wish to communicate is still present in the final result. Or

conversely, if an illustration is miles away from what it should be, it amazes me and takes me somewhere else. What is your ultimate goal as an illustrator? Having fun, make myself smile. Yes, I know, it’s a bit selfish. But when I’m pleased with an illustration, others smile as well.

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sophierozenn.com sophierozenn@yahoo.ca

A bridge between a vision and the visible.

Whimsical Dream Sophie Rozenn BOUCHER What is your academic background ? I have studied the trees, the leaves, the birds and the mountains. They make excellent teachers. Two jobs you did before becoming an illustrator? One of my jobs as a student was to paint the white and yellow lines in parking lots. Quite a linear experience... I later became a primary school teacher with an artistic twist. Where do you work? I carry my pencils and paintbrushes

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outside whenever possible. But in the long winter months, I try to find a spot near a window, allowing the light to become part of my work. How did you begin your career in illustration ? It started with a dream. As a little girl, I used to imagine my drawings come to life in the margins of my notebooks and I knew that one day, I would become an illustrator. What do you like the most about being an illustrator ? I

particularly enjoy the fact that, while others are working on serious stuff, my job allows me to get in touch with the whimsical. What drives you when you begin a new project? The idea that it is the beginning of all possibilities. Paper, canvas or screen ? Paintbrushes, pencils and watercolor are non-negotiable. But I love to take my work a step further on the screen. Illustration rhymes with… Intuition.


Looking at You Catherine GAUTHIER What is your academic background ? I did a certificate in Art History followed by a B.A. in Visual and Media Arts. Later on, I returned to school to get a diploma in Digital Graphics. What do you like the most about being an illustrator? I enjoy having the freedom to create images that follow a narrative thread, while using all the materials I want. How do you see the future in illustration ?  I believe t here w ill

always be a need for that discipline. No photograph can replace the power of evocation and the sensitivity of a good illustration.  Just between us, whose talent would you “steal” ? I’d steal Aubrey Beardsley’s meticulousness and the expressive lines of Honoré Daumier.  Three words to describe your workplace : Minuscule, chaotic and filled with drafts. Your best and worst color? Black (even though it’s not

technically a color). One has to know how to measure it out. Had you not been an illustrator, you would have certainly not been… A mathematician. Numbers drive me nuts! Paper, canvas or screen ? Screen, def initely. But that doesn’t stop me from drawing or creating textures with more traditional materials – however, I really appreciate the freedom of expression allowed by digital graphics.

catherinegauthier.carbonmade.com ⁄⁄ catherineenligne@hotmail.com

No photograph can replace the power of evocation and the sensitivity of a good illustration. 53


Sparkling Spring Katrinn PELLETIER What do you like the most about being an illustrator ? I really  enjoy editorial  illustration  because I like having a text as a starting point and be inspired by the words in finding concepts. It allows me to learn about many different topics and to collaborate with clients from all horizons. Through my illustrations, I convey my vision of things, my points of view. I can express myself even if instructions are very

precise and to me, that’s fascinating and precious. Do you have an agent? If so, why? Since I started in illustration, Colagene Illustration Clinic has been representing me. We have developed quite a complicity along the years and I have complete confidence in them. It’s an expanding dynamic team that offers interesting opportunities. Three words to describe your workplace : Comfor ting, stimu lating,  chaotic.

What drives you when you start a new project ? I always feel a little vertigo that quickly becomes an engine! The unknown is an excellent driving force! Paper, canvas or screen ? I work with brushes and watercolor. I collect spots I make accidentally, spontaneously and I preciously keep them. I do the rest of my work with my graphic tablet transforming it into a digital image.

The unknown is an excellent driving force!

Represented by colagene: colagene.com ⁄⁄ montreal@colagene.com

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Looking Within Marc LALUMIÈRE What is you academic background ? Fine Arts, but that’s not where I learned illustration. Where do you work? From home but my workspace also expands to many coffee shops in downtown Montreal. Paper, canvas or screen ? Two technological extremes… pencil and screen. Just between us, whose talent would you steal ? There are lots of people’s works I admire, especially an early 20th century painter named

Csontváry. Like him illustrator should develop their own visual language flowing out from their personal life experience. There are many “lighthouses” to guide us out there but we have to stay on our own path! Illustration rhymes w it h…  C om mu n ic at ion ! Wit hout an audience illustration is nothing and an audience without art become a herd… How do you see the future of illustration ? Bright! New technologies

are changing the way we create and look at things. They also offer new perspectives for traditional mediums. From my point of view, illustrators are truly visual artists because they create original visual solutions.

Without an audience, illustration is nothing.

lalumiereillustrations.com ⁄⁄ marc@lalumiereillustrations.com

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Profile Jasmin GUÉRARD-ALIE

I’m satisfied when I stop questioning or doubting my illustration.

jasminguerardalie.ca ⁄⁄ jasmin.guerard.alie@gmail.com

How did your career in illustration begin? I first started out doing some freelance work by designing skateboard and t-shirt graphics. It was awesome for an 18 years old skateboard addict. What do you like the most about being an illustrator? I like the freedom of it and the creative challenges it presents. How do you promote yourself ? By making cold calls: I ask to speak to the art director and then send him some

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samples of my work. I call again to get feedback, I’m a stalker (laughs!).I believe in human contact! Just between us, whose talent would you “steal” ? M.C. Escher. Three words to describe your workplace : HOME SWEET HOME. Had you not been an illustrator, you would have certainly not been… A lawyer Paper, canvas or screen ? I work with paint, ink and paper. I use the computer to scan my work and adjust

some colors or contrasts. Would you define yourself as an artist? I don’t define myself as an artist but more as a creative person. Being an artist is another job altogether. You are satisfied with an illustration when… I’m satisfied when I stop questioning or doubting my illustration.


Forever Child Sophie LECLERC

Imagination, Emotion, all in a pencil stroke! sophieleclerc.com ⁄⁄ sophie@sophieleclerc.com

Where do you work? I work mainly from home in Montreal but I have a “mobile workshop” that I carry in my satchel between the city and the country. I enjoy the nomadic illustrator life. How did your career in illustration begin ? I fell in it when I was little, with a painter mother and a graphic designer father. After a meal, we had that family activity which we called “observation drawing”: we’d put an object on the

table and hop! out came our pencils… and careful: you could only use the right side of your brain! Just between us, whose talent would you “steal”? Jean-Jacques Sempé: for his gestural, funny, sensible and expressive strokes. For all my childhood, I immersed myself in Le petit Nicolas books, he still is a real source of inspiration to me. What drives you when you start a new project ? Just the idea of drawing is

a pleasure in my eternal child’s heart! There is also a certain inquisitiveness in finding how my inspiration will get to surprise me yet again with new ideas… Paper, canvas or screen ? All of the above. I start with a pencil on paper sketch or I daub a few spots of watercolor with a brush that I’ll scan and then, I compose with Photoshop by adding some textures or photographic elements…

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Underneath Beauty Tania MIGNACCA  W here do you work ? I have  a studio at home, located in a historical industrial borough of Montreal – it has an important influence in my artistic process.  How did your career in illustration begin ? I've always loved drawing and after my graphic design studies, many people suggested that I start doing freelance illustration. So I gave it a shot and I don't regret it! What do you like the most about being an

illustrator ? The best thing about being an illustrator is that I get to work with clients from many different disciplines and it keeps me challenged. Three words to describe your workplace: Eclectic, warm and fun. Two jobs you did before becoming an illustrator ? I've worked in a home decorating store and I've also been a volunteer graphic designer and translator for a Japanese newspaper. Paper, canvas or screen ? All of them!

When I create an illustration, I always incorporate traditional and digital media. I find digital tools help create new innovative effects and traditional tools add warmth and a more tactile feeling. Would you define yourself as an artist ? I consider myself as a multidisciplinary illustrator who tries to portray the beauty that lies underneath industrial and decaying landscapes by applying it to different subjects.

I get to work with clients from many different disciplines and it keeps me challenged.

minyaka.com info@minyaka.com

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Not exactly a job, it’s a lifestyle!

jacqueslaplante.com ⁄⁄ jacques@jacqueslaplante.com

Being Jacques Laplante Jacques LAPLANTE What do you like the most about being an illustrator? It’s not exactly a job, it’s a lifestyle! How do you see the future in illustration? Less CMYK, more RGB. Just between us, whose talent would you “steal”? Tadahiro Uesugi, Soledad Bravi. Modigliani. Gaudi… as long as it ends with “i’’! What most challenging illustration project have you ever worked on ? Working in Europe without leaving

my chair. Two jobs you did before becoming an illustrator? I’ve been workman in a factory that produced thick brown wrapping paper used to cover cardboard boxes. I’ve always enjoyed painting on that rough material. When the factory closed, I was given a roll that is about the size of a fridge. I should have enough until I retire in 2045! What drives you when you start a new project? When I’m sought for my

ideas, not for simply executing a preestablished concept. Paper, canvas or screen? Hybrid! My illustrations are an assemblage of numeral and traditional elements put together with Photoshop. An unusual object that is a must for you at work? Credit cards: I use them as spatulas to paint color backgrounds. You are satisfied with an illustration when… It seduces and communicates.

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Organized Chaos Katy LEMAY Where do you work? I work from home, in a very well behaved suburb. What do you like the most about being an illustrator? I really like to go my own sweet way, well, most of the time… Do you have an agent? If so, why ? Yes: Anna Goodson, because she’s the best! What most challenging illustration project have you ever worked on ?

I made over 250 illustrations for a Weston’s corporate book. I also illustrated  HAR PERS’ Magazine's cover page. Three words to describe your workplace : Luminous, aerated, my life space. What drives you when you start a new project? To push my style as far as possible. A routine ? A peanut butter and jelly bagel with

orange juice. Illustration rhymes with… Flexibility, definitely. You are satisfied with an illustration when… I have succeeded in illustrating a concept within a very tight deadline. What is your ultimate goal as an illustrator? To do The New Yorker’s cover page.

I really like to go my own sweet way, well, most of the time…

Represented by Anna Goodson: agoodson.com/katy-lemay ⁄⁄ info@agoodson.com

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Utter Utter Art Bruce ROBERTS How do you promote yourself ? I carry around an enormous pencil. How do you see the future in illustration ? Il lustration has to become more personal. As an artist grows, his illustrations become more like a story of himself. Just between us, which talent would you “steal” ? Some combination of beaut y and the beast – Naomi Campbell and Francis Bacon. What

is the most challenging illustration project have you ever worked on ? A cover for Time magazine: a tongue-incheek illustration of President Kennedy with Marilyn Monroe. Three words to describe your work place ? Utter, utter mess. What drives you when you start a new project? Fear. A ritual, a routine ? Tomorrow. How would you define art ? I define a drawing as life

without time, without sound, without three dimensions. Would you define yourself as an artist ? Yes of course, but it’s a really pretentious word. You are satisfied with an illustration when ? I am satisfied with an illustration when it talks back to me. What kind of music do you listen to while you work? Opera.

brucerobertsartist.com ⁄⁄ madeinquebec@sympatico.ca

... illustrations become more like a story of himself.

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Mother Art Amélie MONtPLAISIR

Beautiful, uncommon and improbable creations! ameliemontplaisir.com ⁄⁄ ameliemontplaisir@gmail.com

What is your academic background ? I did my college studies in visual arts and then went to university to get my B.A. in Stage design with a specialty in Costume design and puppets. How did your career in illustration begin ? Illustration was a childhood dream and it came naturally into my life when I had children. My first collaboration project came to life when I met another mother, a writer, at the market and,

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each with a baby in our arms, we created Amandine et le chocolate.  Three words to describe your workplace: Luminous, peaceful and green. Your best and worst color? Red… and red! It is a wonderful and incomparable color. Red can pass on so many emotions. But then, it is very hard to get the right red, especially on silk, my favorite material. How would you define art? A perpetual movement, a search, a bubbling inside

that brings about beautiful, uncommon and improbable creations ! Would you define yourself as an artist? My daughter asked me once what my job was and I said: yes, I’m an artist! I didn’t dare using that qualification before but I had to give her a clear and simple answer and, in the end, that word encompasses everything I do!


Behind the Screen Mathieu BENOIT

mathieubenoit.net info@mathieubenoit.net

I’m satisfied when the end result is better than what I had in mind. Where do you work? I work from home, in an isolated corner of my basement.  Just between us, whose talent would you “steal” ? Hayao Miyazaki’s. Three words to describe your workplace : Red. Brick. Wall. Paper, canvas or screen ? Definitively

screen.  You are satisfied with an incorporate elements of animation. illustration when… I’m satisfied when Had you not been an illustrator, you the end result is better than what I had would have certainly not been……a in mind. How do you see the future professional football player. in illustration ? With the propagation use of tablet computers and e-readers, I think illustration will eventually

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Observation–Reaction Rémy GUENIN What do you like the most about being an illustrator? To be able to make a brush or ink spots express something! And, by inventing a visual and emotional vocabulary, to be able to provoke a reaction within the person looking at the illustration. What most challenging illustration project have you ever worked on ? Also the craziest: I created close to 300 illustrations over a threemonth period for a musical tale, satirical

and filled with innuendos. But then, of corse, the best challenge is yet to come… Your best and worst color ? The best color is honesty, without nuances. The worst color is a diluted compromise. What drives you when you start a new project ? The excitement of novelty and the way that allows to get there: the journey, the trials and errors, the doubts and obstacles that nourish creativity. Once the project is finished, I think of the

next journey. Paper, canvas or screen ? All these are simply tools that serve the idea and are guided by the hand. And often, the intimate hand–brush–paper contact facilitates linking with the heart, the direct transmission of an emotion. Illustration rhymes with… Reaction and observation. A visual reaction to the world, to constructive or destructive huma n energies. A nd a n humble observation of nature and society.

To be able to make a brush or ink spots express something!

illustrationquebec.com/remyguenin ⁄⁄ amergyn18@sympatico.ca

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I think that art asks for dialogue.

illustrationquebec.com/CécileMorel ⁄⁄ ccile.morel@gmail.com

Within my Head Cécile MOREL What drives you when you start a new project? I’m impatient and curious and become very excited to see something new happening on the paper. Had you not been an illustrator, you would have certainly not been… A sport teacher: I am a bit lazy! Paper, canvas or screen ? Paper and pencil to begin with. Then, Chinese ink and a brush on a "lighted table" of my own creation: a rectangular

piece of glass set on two piles of books, with a lamp underneath! An unusual object that is a must for you at work? There are a lot of little things that I like to have around, such as a Korean old fashion chime. A routine ? I scratch my head all the time, especially when I have to focus on something. I feel like a monkey at times! How would you define art? Art is a way to communicate,

to transmit an emotion, to make people think, feel, relax, critic, and react in many ways. I think that art asks for dialogue.  Illustration rhymes with… Imagination. What is your ultimate goal as an illustrator? Write stories and illustrate them.

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Inked Life Pierre-Yves CEZARD Where do you work? Either from my living room with blasting music, either from a workshop I share with other illustrators above Montreal’s roofs from where I can observe passers-by coming and going, with Mount Royal in the background. In summertime, you can see storms appearing on the horizon; in winter, snowstorms isolate us in the clouds: it is a very inspiring place. How did your career in illustration begin ?

I started working with advertising agencies, then for an event-organizing agency where I learned the three basic rules on which I base my illustration practice today: listen to understand correctly the client’s needs; flexibility to adapt to my best to these needs; and, pleasure so that passion remains intact! That is what allows me to progress and never get bored with my craft. What drives you when you start a new

project ? I like the stress coming from the unknown result, both on a personal and technical level. That is a necessary stress because it drives me out of my comfort zone, every time for the best! Illustration rhymes with… Passion!

Represented by Miss Illustration: missillustration.com ⁄⁄ info@missillustration.com

The future of illustration is without limits.

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Eye Translation Nadia MYTNIK-FRANTOVA What is your academic background? Moscow  State University of Printing Arts and Film Animation at Concordia University, Montreal. Where do you work? I usually work at home. How did your career in illustration begin? While I worked as a graphic designer in a Moscow publishing house, I was offered to make some illustrations. What do you like the most about being an illustrator? I like the process

of visualization, translating from the written language to the visual language of illustration. What most challenging illustration project have you ever worked on ? My very first illustration project. Three words to describe your workplace :  Stimulating, comfortable and inspiring. Your best and worst color ? Light blue, and dirty brown. Two jobs you did before becoming an illustrator ? Textile designer and

graphic designer. What drives  you when you start a new project ? In order to start a new project, I always need an inspiration, a feeling that I’ll learn something new and have a new kind of experience. Paper, canvas or screen ? I like to mix hand-drawn techniques with  digital ones. How would you define art ? In the first place, Art means harmony for me.

nadfrant.sharemyartwork.com ⁄⁄ nad.frant@gmail.com

Art means harmony for me.

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IQ Magazine  

IQ Magzine presents 58 illustrators.

IQ Magazine  

IQ Magzine presents 58 illustrators.

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