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Book at ion De sign

The

COMPILATION OF SELECTED SUBMISSIONS

m for Int erna r In o f tional Institute

2011


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What does IIID mean by „information design“? Information design aims at transforming data into high-quality information. The idX project made us aware that high-quality information must serve a purpose. We condensed our insights to IIID‘s tag line: Data transformed into high-quality information empower people to attain goals. Thus IIID welcomed submissions ranging from visualizations that help people understand undisputed facts, situations and processes for whatever imaginable purposes to information and information systems facilitating understanding as well as enabling goal oriented action. Referring to the last of the listed evaluation criteria „Attractiveness and elegance of the designed information“ – shouldn‘t information designers restrict themselves to design well understandable and easily applicable information irrespective of its appeal and aesthetic value? Would the latter be really needed to empower people to attain goals? I may quote David Hume from his undisputed A Treatise of Human Nature, first published 1739/40: „Reason is, and ought only to be the slave of the passions“. Thus, let‘s not forget about passions, which perhaps manifest themselves best through attractiveness and elegance. In 2011, the International Institute for Information Design was celebrating its 25th anniversary. While many things have changed since its founding, the aim of IIID was, and still is, to promote and expand design knowledge and research. With 25 years of experience, IIID is recognized as the world leader in information design development. The time is ripe for us to acknowledge the best in what information design has to offer which is why we are presenting the inaugural IIID Awards competition this year. The Awards competition will be held every three years, with the next competition taking place in 2014.

DI Peter Simlinger, Director, IIID International Institute for Information Design

www.iiidaward.net

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endorsed / promoted / sponsored by:

International Institute for Information Design International Institute for Information Design

The International Council of Communication Design

Austrian Federal Ministry for Education, Arts and Culture

Taiwan Design Center

rmation research

rmation design 61

Information Design Journal

Information Design Journal

Research and

Information Design Journal / Benjamins Publishing 2011, Volume 19, No. 1

f multiple

Climate-smart information design: Visualizing residential electricity use over the internet Cajsa Bartusch and Thomas Porathe

Rouet

Volume 19/1 2011 pages 1–89

m).

Graphical symbols: The effects of proximate context and educational background on recognition performance Tzu Fan Hsu and Pin Chang Lin

AXIS Magazine Japan

Examination of the legibility of isolated characters of onscreen typefaces Barbara S. Chaparro, Edgar C. Merkle, Doug E. Fox and Alex Chaparro Headline section in patient information leaflets: Does it improve reading performance and perception? Simone Dolk, Fritz Peter Knapp, Henk Pander Maat, Leo Lentz and Theo Raynor

star-cooperation.com J O H N B E N J A M I N S P U B L I S H I N G C O M PA N Y

30-Jun-11 14:50:51

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A LCLLUSIVE

IIID

Universal Design

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IN

od go

Healthcare 8

ape sh

UP

GRAND PRIX

Keep it GOal!

tiCket pleaSe

Wayshowing 22

Traffic and Public Transports

NEXT! S

Social Affairs

S

it!

60

82

Emergency 92

B2C C2B

like

Financial 16

CD & CC

94

Products and Services

104

Didactics 112

GOT IT.

Editorial 128

?pu S‘tahw what‘S up?

thAt‘S it!

Future Concepts

132

FOUND

Research 140

THIN K!

Sustainability 156

Student Works

162

Editor´s Choice

174

MASTER

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Jury Members

4

Prof. Per Mollerup Swinburne University, AUS

Prof. Wibke Weber Hochschule der Medien, Germany

Prof. Konrad Baumann FH Joanneum, Austria

Alejandro Brizuela Garcia Universidad de las AmĂŠricas Puebla Mexico

Prof. Ryozo Takeyama University of Toyama, Japan

Claude-Henri Meledo Aldecis, France

Yo Kaminagai RATP, France

Alan Chiou, National Yunlin University of Science & Technology, Taiwan


Prof. Rob Waller, Simplification Center, UK

Prof. Kirti Trivedi, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India

David Gibson Two Twelve, USA

Prof. Claudine Jaenichen Chapman University, USA

Katsutoshi Ishibasi AXIS, Japan

Prof. Karen Cheng University of Washington, USA

Angela Morelli Londin, UK

Martin Foessleitner Editor, Austria

Waller

Gibson

angela morelli

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Universal design Museums and visual impairment. The case study of the Venice Accademia Galleries

Category: Project:

What was the challenge? This project is aimed at the use of the artistic heritage by blind and visually impaired people. The project was carried out by the research unit “New Design Vision” of the Università Iuav di Venezia in 2010 for the Italian Ministry for Cultural Heritage. Tools are designed specifically for one of the most important museums of the world: Accademia Galleries of Venice. The museums have always been at the center of the disclosure process as well as preservation of culture and its heritage. In these years, their mission is particularly committed to the tasks of communication and the evolution of technologies have contributed significantly to strengthening the role of the media. Paintings, architecture, sculpture and drawings, archaeological artefacts and objects have enhanced their use in the compositions from the most different media. Rarely, however, these projects turn their attention to the use of cultural heritage by the visually impaired or blind people. Our project is based on the ethical principle of accessibility in communication design, on forms of communication that ensure the transmission of knowledge and informa-

Contact: name: Laura Badalucco organisation: Università Iuav di Venezia (Italy) e-mail: laurabada@iuav.it website: www.newdesignvision.eu

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tion to all population groups, including the weakest. Our research-project is an emblematic case of communication design of the accessibility. The task was presented with an apparent contradiction: a visual communication project aimed at people with permanent reduction in visual acuity or visual field. But the results have shown how practical and useful has been the commitment to evidence of increased sensitivity gained by the culture of communication design to the needs of the consumer with a visual disability. What was the solution? The address in terms of design has led to develop tools that meet the needs of visually impaired and blind people, but also know how to inform and guide the wider audience of those who have visual impairments that are not legally recognized and who has no visual impairment. To this end, we made use of techniques and technologies who are able to concentrate in a single instrument multisensorial ways of information’s transmission that are suitable for the use of sight, but also of touch and hearing. Each user can then use their skills to best advantage in perceptual and use, in the most convenient way, the potential of the

various instruments on the basis, from time to time, of the exclusive use of one sense or on a multiple possible combinations. For this we have used, alongside the more traditional technologies, also the digital ones (already widely used for other purposes in museums), and this has allowed us to make the information available on site or remotely, using Internet. We have identified different types of communication (from architecture to sculpture, painting, drawing) and different methods and techniques. We have chosen to use all three modes of representation for visual-tactile exploration: the allround, the bas-relief and the design. We therefore carried out a series of tools described below. The various components of visual-tactile tools can be used jointly to strengthen the knowledge of architecture, sculpture, paintings, drawings, photographs, objects, etc.. It was realized a synthetic model of the Accademia Galleries architectural complex (in wood and scale 1:200) also suitable for tactile exploration and with an exploration’s guide. The six blocks that now make up the complex of Galleries (traced back to different periods, architects and original intended use) may be picked up and touched separately to understand those characteristics.


ALCLLUSIVE IN

GRAND PRIX WINNER Two panels have embossed-serigraphy maps, information and guidance systems, visual-tactile illustrations in order to be suitable for all users. The first panel describes the architecture of the Galleries, the second tells the story of the Palladian building and its bas-reliefs. The chosen type of screen printing uses a special ink that turns design into transparent touch rilief so that you can have a double level of reading: visual and tactile. The panels are joined by the exploration guides in audio and text (large print or Braille characters). As an example for the tools needed for paintings, it was made a Giorgione’s Tempest bas-relief prospective, suitable for tactile exploration and comprehensive guides. To enable visually impaired and blind (but also to a wider public) to have prior knowledge acquired in the Accademia, home or in associations and libraries, digital technologies were used and three-dimensional printing. It was produced a transposition of the tactile drawing by Leonardo da Vinci said “Vitruvian Man”, accompanied by 9 boards in relief and integrated with audio, Braille, large print and postcards. Visual-tactile maps and drawings were made from an infrared oven for visual-tactile printing with microcapsules paper. These instruments allow the blind and partially sighted people to enjoy works of art, but also to orient themselves and get other information about the museum. Web media designed, features and tactile graphics are combined in order to be read either by the visually impaired, but also by a wider audience, providing an example of a solution that ensures seamless integration of various audiences. At the end, it was produced a book containing the guidelines to the design and that describes the obtained results.

What was the effect? The elements described here are used in new exhibitions of the Accademia Galleries, in particular in a room specially designed. The “Vitruvian Man” tactile designs were tested in an exhibition on Leonardo da Vinci’s works and have had excellent evaluations. This project also represents a significant opportunity to take ideas and suggestions that are also applicable to other museums. For this reason, the knowledge has been translated into guidelines for designers that are now used in other Italian organizations. The design guidelines were based on the systematization of knowledge about the issues to be addressed and solutions to make available the works of art to people with visual disabilities. Such techniques and solutions have been compared in the different types of work, the various visual impairments and the different techniques and are useful to those who must project, choose, plan or purchase tools and subsidies to museum visits. It was made for this a publication entitled Musei e superamento delle barriere percettive. Il caso delle Gallerie dell’Accademia di Venezia (“Museums and overcoming barriers of perception. The case of the Accademia Galleries in Venice”) in which are

presented the guidelines, the description of significant cases at the international level, and the solutions adopted for the Accademia. Since there is not a mode of representation or a technique better than the others by far, the objective was to provide that information which is necessary for a correct choice of the best solution to the museum context specific. The publication is accompanied by a CD with audio-files, in order to ensure full usability of content. Work Group Università Iuav di Venezia - Venice - Italy Research Department - Research unit “New design vision” and Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities Project Manager: Medardo Chiapponi Iuav team: Laura Badalucco - Enrico Camplani - Erika Cunico Elisabetta Facchinetti - Paola Fortuna - Gianluigi Pescolderung Venice Accademia Galleries: Annalisa Perissa Venice Superintendence for architecture and landscape: Renata Codello

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Category: Project:

Healthcare Hablamos Juntos Universal Symbols in Healthcare Set

What was the challenge? SEGD and Hablamos Juntos have been working together since 2003 to develop design and educational tools to support wayfinding systems in healthcare environments. These efforts are part of Hablamos Juntos’ ongoing mission to provide practical solutions to language barriers in healthcare. What was the solution? The symbol set was designed in two phases. The first phase included design professionals; the second phase was done with students from 4 universities. Phase I In 2003, Yolanda Partida, director of Hablamos Juntos (We Speak Together), with funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, contracted with JRC Design to complete an initial study to determine the feasibility of using symbols as an alternative to text-only signs in healthcare settings.The study concluded not only that symbols were a viable option for wayfind ing in healthcare, but that a set of tested symbols, publicly available, would give designers and healthcare facilities a muchneeded alternative to typical word signage. Under the leadership of Jamie Cowgill, JRC also contracted and led the development of an initial set of 30 symbols. The project design team also included Kate Keating, Meg Faye, Jack Biesek, Gladys Brenner, and Jim Bolek. Wendy Olmstead provided technical expertise for symbol recognition testing, and completed data analysis. The Phase I research, completed in 2006, resulted in a set of 28 Universal Symbols in Health Care.

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Phase 2 After the release of the original USHC set, it became clear that the selection, design, and integration of symbols into one unified set—a set that could be adapted universally by healthcare facilities of varying size, function, and complexity—would be an ongoing process. There was a need for additional symbols, guidance on their selection and use, and integration of symbols into a holistic wayfinding system including print and web-based support.

What was the effect? The symbol set is now available for usage by healthcare systems around the world.

These questions became the focus for our Phase 2 research, begun in 2008, which was designed to encourage widespread adoption of the symbols by healthcare facilities serving LEP or limited-reading populations. Phase 2 had three primary objectives: Support implementation of symbolsbased wayfinding systems using evidence-based practices. Document the implementation experience, produce tested best practices for healthcare facilities, and promote awareness of symbols-based wayfinding as a solution for multilingual environments. Add 20 to 30 new symbols to the Universal Symbols set. Phase II research was completed in August 2010; it included both the design and testing of new symbols, and symbol testing at four Innovator Health Care Facilities. A consortium of four university design schools (University of Cincinnati, Iowa State University, California Polytechnic, and Kent State University) developed a process for researching, designing, and testing new symbols. Professors Oscar Fernandez, Kathryn McCormick, Lisa Fontaine and David Middleton collaborated on the academic consortium. Professor Lisa Fontaine of Iowa State University supervised the user testingof the new symbols from phase 2, which was conducted by faculty and students at University of Cincinnati, Iowa State University, and Kent State University. Mies Hora of Ultimate Symbols refined the symbol set.

Contact: name: Lisa Fontaine organisations: Society of Environmental Graphic Designers and Hablamos Juntos e-mail: fontaine@iastate.edu website: http://www.segd.org/learning/ hablamos-juntos.html


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WINNER Produced by

Universal Symbols in Health Care Clinical & Medical Services Clinical & Medical Services CM01 CM02 CM03 CM04 CM05 CM06 CM07 CM08 CM09 CM10 CM11 CM12 CM13 CM14 CM15 CM16 CM17 CM18 CM19 CM20 CM21 CM22 CM23 CM24 CM25 CM26 CM27 CM28 CM29 CM30 CM31 CM32

Health Services Care Staff Area Intensive Care Inpatient Outpatient Pharmacy Diabetes (Education) Family Practice Immunizations Nutrition Alternative / Complementary Laboratory Pathology Oncology Ophthalmology Mental Health Neurology Dermatology Ear, Nose & Throat Respiratory Internal Medicine Kidney Cardiology Women’s Health Labor & Delivery Pediatrics Genetics Infectious Diseases Dental Anesthesia Surgery Physical Therapy

Facilities & Administrative Services FA01 FA02 FA03 FA04 FA05 FA06 FA07 FA08 FA09 FA10 FA11 FA12

Emergency Ambulance Registration Waiting Area Administration Medical Records Billing Medical Library Health Education Interpreter Services Social Services Chapel

CM01

CM02

CM03

CM04

CM05

CM06

CM07

CM08

CM09

CM10

CM11

CM12

CM13

CM14

CM15

CM16

CM17

CM18

CM19

CM20

CM21

CM22

CM23

CM24

CM25

CM26

CM27

CM28

CM29

CM30

CM31

CM32

Imaging MA01 Radiology MA02 Mammography MA03 Cath Lab MA04 MRI / PET MA05 Ultrasound MA06 Imaging (Root Category) MA07-10 Imaging (Alternatives)

Facilities & Administrative Services

Imaging

FA01

FA02

FA03

MA01

MA02

MA03

FA04

FA05

FA06

MA04

MA05

MA06

FA07

FA08

FA09

MA07

MA08

FA10

FA11

FA12

MA09

MA10

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Category:

Healthcare

Project:

Child-fair switching of medical diagnoses with informationgraphic.

What was the challenge? The challenge was to develope a new type of informationgraphic to explain the range of medical diagnoses for the special target group of children aged 6 to 11 years. What was the solution? As the conclusion i created the project »aha!« which is a special tool for information for kids, during their stay in a hospital. Every child gets its own and individual information-set. A map which attends them during their stay on the station and helps to understand their symptoms by means of infographics. The map is divided into the information area with different infographics of the desease picture, the general methods of treatment and a diary, which invites to experience the proceedings in demanding times and to document and process the impressions actively. What was the effect? The aim is the creation of a new tool in order to improve the communication between the patients, their parents and the personal of the hospital. In addition, a new character of informationgraphic, that focuses on the needs of children, is developed.

Was im Körper los ist Unsere Verdauung Verdauung nennt man den Vorgang im Körper bei dem die Nahrung in verwertbare Bausteine umgewandelt werden. Die Verdauung beginnt im Mund, wenn wir Essen zerkauen, und wird im Magen und in den Gedärmen durch fortgesetzt. Dies geschieht mit Hilfe von besonderen Proteinen, den Verdauungsenzymen.

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Mit jedem Herzschlag zieht sich dein Herz zusammen und pumpt dabei Blut in andere BlutgefäßesArterien nennt. Auf seiner Reise gelangt dasBlut durch winzige Blutgefäße überall in unseren Körper und gibt dort Nährstoffe ab. Danach nimmt es die schlechten Abfallstoffe auf und fließt über die Venen zurück ins Herz wo es wieder gereinigt wird und ein neuer Kreislauf beginnt.

Unser Blutkreislauf

1 Die Leber ist das größte und schwerste innere Organ des Menschen. Sie reinigt unseren Körper von Giftstoffen

2 Der Magen sitzt unter der Leber, darüber liegt der Pankreas und dahinter ist die Milz versteckt.

3

4

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Der Dünndarm liegt im Hintergrund und ist mit dem Dickdarm verbunden. Der Dickdarm endet in den Anus, also in deinem Po!

Die Lungenflügel liegen unterhalb des Herzens und werden vom Sauerstoff der durch das Blut transportiert wird ernährt.

Der Blutkreislauf transportiert sauerstoffreiches Blut in den Venen (blau) und Sauerstoffarmes Blut in der Arterie (rot)

? Was ist was?

Der Bludruckmesser misst den Druck mit dem dein Herz das Blut durch deine Adern pumpt

Contact:

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2

5

Das Stethoskop macht den Herzschlag und andere deiner Körpergeräusche hörbar

Daniela Lochbrunner Dipl.-Designer (FH) me@dancewithclouds.com www.dancewithclouds.com

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Wenn du mehr wissen willst, dann frag einfach deinem Arzt!

Die Ohrenlupe macht den Blick ins Innere deines Ohres möglich.

Wenn der Arzt den Spatel holt, musst du »AAAAH!« sagen, damit er gut in deinen Hals sehen kann

Der Reflexhammer dient zur Kontrolle deiner Reflexe wie z. B. an deinem Kniegelenk

Mit der Pupillenleuche sieht der Arzt in dein Auge, darum leuchtet sie nicht so hell wie eine echte Lampe

Mit dem Stauschlauch wird das Blut vor der Abnahme gestaut.

Das Thermometer zeigt an ob du Fieber hast.


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SHORTLISTED Design of an informationgraphic

Header Body of Navigaton (left)

Wie man dir Blut abnimmt! 1

Additional information of the illustration

2

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Je fester du die Faust drückst, desto besser kommt der Arzt an dein Blut.

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Durch Unterdruck, also durch ein Vakuum, wird dein Blut direkt über die Kanüle in das Proberöhrchen gesogen.

Der Arzt kann bei jeder Blutabnahme mehrere Proberöhrchen an den Adapter anschließen

1

Der Stauschlauch wird vom Arzt oberhalb der Entnahmestelle an deinem Arm angelegt.

2

Ein Desinfektionsmittel wird dir auf die Stelle wo das Blut abgenommen wird gesprüht.

Not observable details or internal processes get an enlarged explanation

5

3

4

Mit einem Tupfer wird dir das Mittel wiederabgerieben. Jetzt ist die Stelle frei von Keimen.

Der Arzt sticht nun die Schmetterlingsnadel in deine Vene, um an dein Blut zu kommen.

5

Explanation of the procedure

Nach der Abnahme bekommst du noch ein Pflaster.

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Category:

Healthcare

Project:

The Health Machine

What was the challenge? Today, the world faces a global healthcare challenge from the increase of obesity and type 2 diabetes. In 2007, 23.6 million people in the United States had diabetes; one in seven low-income, pre-school-aged children were obese. The medical treatment cost was approximately $132 billion. It doesn’t have to be this way. Armed with information plus guided by persuasion, people can make changes in nutrition and exercise that can improve their situation dramatically, even in instances of lower income or less education. Today, people are more aware, but not enough are making changes in nutrition and exercise to impact their health. In November 2009, AM+A became interested in how mobile technology could be used to inform and persuade people to make shortterm and long-term behavior changes. This approach was based on the success of its earlier Green Machine project. In the summer of 2010, Aaron Marcus organized a team of AM+A Associates, in particular an international team of Designer/Analyst Interns, to help him research, design, and document a new approach to mobile applications that combined information design (and visualization) with the principles of behavior change. This team included these interns: • Arne Berger, Germany • Phoebe (Xuewei) He, China • Bartu Fuad Pirincci, Turkey • Rosa (Jue) Yuan, China Many organizations that treat addictions use persuasion, such as Weight Watchers, Alcoholics Anonymous, and SmokeEnders. Several theorists and analysts have

Contact: Aaron Marcus, President Aaron Marcus and Associates, Inc. Aaron.Marcus@AMandA.com http://www.AMandA.com

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described the philosophy, principles, and techniques such as Robert Cialdini (e.g., in “The Science of Persuasion,” Scientific American, February 2001) and B. J. Fogg. (e.g., in Mobile Persuasion, 2009). AM+A distilled a five-step process for achieving behavior change: • Increase frequency of using application • Motivate change in some nutrition and exercise habits: e.g., smaller portions, walking more, etc. • Teach how to change nutrition and exercise habits • Persuade users to change their habits (short-term change) • Persuade users to change their lifestyle (long-term change) President Obama’s wife Michelle became interested changing the “nutrition pyramid) in 2011 to assist People. Similar data can be provided by mobile apps and associated Web portals to help all “stakeholders” who are concerned with a user’s health. In today’s communication media, nutrition and exercise data can be collected and managed, together with other statistics, charts, maps, news, images, in a social context that is familiar to users of mobile media. AM+A investigated and compared about 24 mobile applications to consider how more could be done by not only providing information but combining that information with a program for behavior change. What was the solution? AM+A developed an information architecture for the Health Machine, a mobile application concept design incorporating the steps of behavior change identified above. The key ingredients of the design are expressed in the five buttons at the bottom of every screen: • Dashboard: How am I doing now? In this case, one’s current nutrition (e.g., the ingredients of a recent meal or the day’s summary) or exercise (a recent

session or the day’s summary) • Model of the future: What will I be like in the future, or what will an avatar (a cute pet that lives seven times faster than I) be like if I keep consuming food and exercising as I am now • Friends network: With whom am I connected? Who can provide support? • Tips and advice: How can I start with small steps? How can I increase my behavior changes? • Competitions and challenges: What available games, puzzles, or other incentives can make things fun? Following a user-centered design process, AM+A focused on user profiles or personas representing three typical users (a Caucasian owner of small business, 67; an African-American single-parent, 57; and a Hispanic small-business owner, 70) and use scenarios (recording meals, comparing behavior/results with others, checking with friends, getting advice, etc.). Keeping these two aspects in mind enabled AM+A to design a set of key functions and data for the application. AM+A organized these functions and data into the information architecture of the Health Machine, which is shown in the accompanying Figure 1. Based on the information architecture, AM+A designed preliminary screens for key components of the application focused on improving nutrition and increasing exercise: • My Condition: Dashboard • 2000: Model of the future • Friends: Social networking among family, friends, and professionals • Tips: Advice about starting small, how to make progress, how to improve • Challenges: Games and competitions providing entertainment and incentives AM+A showed the initial designs to a trainer for patients with diabetes. In general, the trainer reacted favorably toward the prototype and its potential to motivate behavior change.


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SHORTLISTED What was the effect? Based on feedback, AM+A revised the screens as shown in the accompanying Figures 2 through 7. AM+A published a case study in Information Design Journal and an article in the Proceedings of Design, User Experience, and Usability (DUXU) 2011. A third article is scheduled for publication in a leading user-experience design magazine. AM+A has presented the Health Machine at healthcare, design, and mobile conferences worldwide and is actively engaged in finding a corporate/organizational patron or sponsor for further research and development. The future of the Health Machine project could follow the success pattern of the Green Machine, which was taken up by SAP in 2010. Future design challenges include adapting the Health Machine for very different age groups, cultures, and use contexts. The potential for incorporating information design and persuasion design principles into healthcare enterprise and consumer mobile software products has a large potential worldwide impact in improving health conditions that plagues many worldwide.

Figure 1: Health Machine Information Architecture

Figures 2 through 7: Health Machine Revised Screens

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Category:

Healthcare

Project:

New York University Langone Medical Center Wayfinding Communications Masterplan

What was the challenge? The New York University Langone Medical Center campus in New York City is in a period of tremendous growth and development. Major gifts have led to the renaming and re-branding of this world-class institution and its several facilities in Manhattan’s emerging East Side bio-science district. New building projects headed by Ennead Architects and NBBJ are improving and expanding facilities and the institution’s capacity to care for more people in new and innovative ways. Two Twelve has been contracted to develop state-of-the-art wayfinding and visitor communications systems as part of NYULMC’s ongoing Campus Transformation master plan. Our challenge was to create integrated, patient-centered, multi-lingual wayfinding communications that would further the Center’s mission to provide world-class care. What was the solution? With the long term goal in mind, Two Twelve began developing a new wayfinding program that will provide people with useful, consistent, and sustainable communications across multiple media. For this comprehensive and integrated approach to wayfinding communications, Two Twelve teamed with integrated wayfinding and technology consultants to help coordinate strategies for wayfinding, communication design, architecture, and new technologies in the development of a NYULMC Wayfinding Master Plan.

Contact: name: Sarah Haun, Chief Marketing Officer company/organisation: Two Twelve e-mail: shaun@twotwelve.com website: www.twotwelve.com

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To help visualize the strategy solution and show how visitors would experience and use the recommended tools, Two Twelve created a video that illustrates a future hospital visit, step by step, from the patient’s home to a specific room. The system will provide maps and directions on NYU’s website, clear directions in the visitor’s language of choice, and will aid navigating the public areas of the medical center via interactive kiosks, thus allowing the visitor easy access to personalized support along every step of his or her journey. This video proved extraordinarily effective in helping senior management and stakeholders understand and embrace the opportunity to vastly improve the visitor experience through wayfinding design. It was then distributed across the entire Medical Center staff to garner support for the new system. What was the effect? The Wayfinding Master Plan has clearly outlined the overall strategy and detailed the rationale and tactics for implementing the integrated wayfinding system. The Plan has been approved by NYULMC’s executive leadership team, and the design and content details of signage, touchscreens, website, handouts, and staff training materials are being developed. CREDITS: Technology consultants Herman Dyal & Leslie Wolke, Video Production by Two Twelve and Robert Pietri, Narration by Amy Forburger.


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MORE THAN ADEQUATE

Visitors find directions online on how to reach Medical Center

Visitors reach Main Lobby entrance

People follow color pathways to reach appropriate elevator

Vistor reaches patient room for an enjoyable visit!

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Category:

Financial

Project:

The Money Machine

What was the challenge? Today, baby boomers, who are retiring in ever greater numbers in the USA, control 80% of personal financial assets and more than 50% of discretionary spending power. The AM+A Money Machine concept design for a mobile (phone and tablet plus associated Web portal) seeks to provide baby boomers with retirement, investing, and budgeting information in a way that helps them change their spending and saving habits appropriately. AM+A targeted baby boomers aged 47-55 after investigating data about them, because they need to plan for retirement and are more likely to use newer technology. AM+A’s objectives were to make the Money Machine easy to use, appealing, able to motivate behavior change, and able to help people to make small changes that show personal benefits. Armed with information plus guided by persuasion, people can make changes in their retirement plans that can improve their situation dramatically, even for people with low-income and less education. In 2011, AM+A became interested in using mobile technology to inform and persuade people to make behavior changes. This approach was based on the successful Green Machine energy use project. Aaron Marcus organized a team of AM+A Associates, in particular an international team of Designer/Analyst Interns, to help him research, design, and document a new approach to mobile applications that combined information design (and visualization) with the principles of behavior change. This team included these interns: • Chris Chambers, USA • Catherine Isaacs, USA

Contact: Aaron Marcus, President Aaron Marcus and Associates, Inc. Aaron.Marcus@AMandA.com http://www.AMandA.com

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• Carlene O’Keefe, USA • Hélène Savvidis, France • Tim Thianthai, Thailand Many organizations that treat addictions use persuasion, such as Weight Watchers, Alcoholics Anonymous, and SmokeEnders. Several theorists and analysts have described the philosophy, principles, and techniques such as Robert Cialdini (e.g., in “The Science of Persuasion,” Scientific American, February 2001) and B. J. Fogg. (e.g., in Mobile Persuasion, 2009). AM+A distilled a five-step process for achieving behavior change: • Increase frequency of using application • Motivate change in spending and saving habits: e.g., making and living according to budgets, comparing with others, etc. • Teach better spending and saving habits • Persuade users to change their habits (short-term change) • Persuade users to change their lifestyle (long-term change) Financial data can be provided by mobile apps with Web portals to help all stakeholders concerned with a user’s financial health, including children, parents, or caretakers. In today’s media, financial data can be collected and managed, together with other statistics, charts, maps, news, images, in a social context that is familiar to users of mobile media. AM+A investigated and compared about 20 mobile applications to consider how more could be done by not only providing information but combining that information with a program for behavior change. What was the solution? AM+A developed an information architecture for the Money Machine, a mobile application concept design incorporating the steps of behavior change identified above. The key ingredients of the design are expressed in the five buttons at the bottom of every screen:

• Dashboard: How am I doing now? User’s current financial status (e.g., current expenditures compared with budgeted amounts) or a longer-term summary • Model of the future: What will my assets be in the future, if I keep spending and as I am now? • Friends network: With whom am I connected? Who can provide support? • Tips and advice: How can I start with small steps? How can I increase my behavior changes? • Competitions and challenges: What available games, puzzles, or other incentives can make things fun? Following a user-centered design process, AM+A focused on user profiles or personas representing four typical users of varying ages, genders, races, and ethnicities, and use scenarios (recording data, comparing behavior/results with others, checking with friends, getting advice, etc.). Keeping these two aspects in mind enabled AM+A to design a set of key functions and data for the application. AM+A organized these functions and data into the information architecture of the Money Machine, which is shown in the accompanying Figure 1. Based on the information architecture, AM+A designed preliminary screens for key components of the application focused on improving ones retirement/financial status: • My Money: Dashboard. Includes budgets, personal and group accounts, net worth, and quick access to a financial advisor • Future: Model of the future. Includes financial templates, goal setting, and retirement planning • Friends: Social networking among family, friends, and professionals. Includes announcements, profiles, and a Money Machine Wall for postings • Tips: Advice about starting small, how to make progress, how to improve. Includes market updates and Money


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WINNER Machine partnership opportunities • Achievements: Games and competitions providing entertainment and incentives. Includes a points store and circles or groups of communities AM+A showed the initial descriptions and design sketches to people of different ages to get their general reactions to planned information architecture and screen design. What was the effect? Based on feedback, AM+A revised screens as shown in the Figures 2 through 7. AM+A has only recently completed the initial designs in October 2011 and is planning to publish a case study and a professional publication article based on its white paper. AM+A intends to present the Money Machine at finance, design, and mobile conferences worldwide and is actively engaged in finding a corporate/ organizational patron or sponsor for further research and development. AM+A has sent its white paper about the Money Machine to two major investment firms for feedback and plans to send to others. The future of the Money Machine project could follow the success pattern of the Green Machine, which was taken up by SAP in 2010. Future design challenges include adapting the Money Machine for different age groups, cultures, and contexts. The potential to incorporate information design and persuasion design principles into financial enterprise and consumer mobile software products has a large potential worldwide impact in improving retirement planning that challenges many people worldwide.

Figure 1: Money Machine Information Architecture

Figures 2 through 7: Money Machine Revised Screens

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Category:

Financial Services

Project:

BT Financial Group Disclosure Document

1 1 Before and after The redesigned Disclosure document is 55 pages

2 Navigational contents page We made the document easier to navigate by using

shorter than its previous incarnation, saving financial advisers nearly 40% of their printing costs (based on a job around 20,000).

icons and aligned the content with the questions that are important to investors, based on our user-based research.

What was the challenge? BT Financial Group, one of Australia’s leading investment companies, approached Second Road to reinvent the disclosure document for one of their flagship investment products called “BT Wrap”. A product distributed via financial advisers, BT Wrap essentially is a tool that ‘wraps’ around an investment portfolio, shielding an investor from the complication of managing multiple investments from varying providers.

What was the solution? Using a process of user-based research, co-design, prototyping and testing, Second Road and BT Financial Group created a new short-form disclosure document consisting of no more than 20 pages. Our goal was to create a document that genuinely promoted customer understanding of the product, and could be used effectively as a tool during the financial advice process.

In Australia, regulators require financial institutions to supply disclosure documents to prospective investors in any financial product, to make sure they understand what they are investing in. The current disclosure document was 75 pages long and primarily a legal document in its content and style. Its challenging format and content meant that very few financial advisers actually used it for explaining the product and very few investors actually read it.

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We reshaped the structure and tone of the content to reflect the perspective of the customer, used visual diagrams and plain English to help explain key concepts, and moved the legal terms and conditions to a user-friendly CD-Rom placed in a pocket in the back. We also added new features such as an ‘experience pathway’ to help explain what fees would be paid (as opposed to a bland table), and also some new material on the rights of the investor.

2

What was the effect? The new disclosure document has been extremely well received by both investors and the financial planners who provide it to them. Investors are now a lot more engaged and clearly understand the offering – as one investor declared, “compared to others out there, this one’s great... It’s easier to understand.” Complex financial products have always struggled to achieve this within the Financial Services industry. Financial planners have benefitted from having a document that supports both their communication and their brand. One planner explained the transformation: “I never used the disclosure document before – it detracted from the value proposition. Now, it’s a selling point.” And the smaller size has lowered printing costs by 40% and also reduced the consumption of paper. A senior executive within BT hailed it as setting a new benchmark for disclosure documents.


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SHORTLISTED

3 Visual aids We replaced heavy text with visual aids to better explain how the product works, creating real benefits for both financial advisers and investors. The ‘What is Wrap?’ visual was particularly powerful in promoting understanding of the product. In the words of one adviser, “This diagram is priceless. I can explain the whole value proposition to a client from one page. It’s clear and it’s useful, which is what I need.”

4 Experience pathway We used an experience pathway to make the fees and costs more tangible for customers. In this way, we tried to connect the fees to the real situation of the investor, rather than cloaking them in marketing and legal jargon.

3

4

5 Next steps The last spread extends the value of the disclosure document, by explaining to the customer in simple terms what will happen if they choose to use “BT Wrap”. This helped to connect the document both to the wider application process and to their ongoing relationship with their adviser.

5

Contact: name: Julian Jenkins company/organisation: Second Road and BT Financial Group e-mail: julian.jenkins@secondroad.com.au website: www.secondroad.com.au

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Category:

Financial

Project:

Simple Super

What was the challenge? In Australia, it is compulsory in many employment situations for a percentage of your earnings to be put into an investment fund for you to access once you reach a certain age and stop working. This is called ‘superannuation’ (or ‘super’). The industry and products within it are quite complex, which is often magnified by poor communication design. Many information pieces are not only overwhelming and hard to understand, but often also seem irrelevant to the person receiving them. Despite feeling that superannuation is important for reasons like future financial security, I found it intimidating. It seemed so complicated and out of sight, and I consequently struggled to find the motivation to try and understand it. After speaking to a broad range of people I discovered that I was not alone in this dilemma, and some people were not even sure which super fund(s) their money is in. What was the solution? After conducting user research and taking the time to gain a general understanding of superannuation, I developed a website concept and printed materials to help explain the basics. My target audience was young adults (aged 15-25) who are entering or already in the workforce, and I aimed to communicate superannuation information in a more visual, accessible and engaging way. The intention behind this was to give people enough knowledge to more confidently access existing superannuation information, and empower them to make informed decisions about their own superannuation.

Website concept The website is designed to utilise multiple forms of media (including animations) to cater for various learning styles. Varying levels of existing understanding have also been considered. As well as providing

information about superannuation, it allows you to select which content you are interested in and export a customised pdf that acts as an information pack specifically relevant to your needs.

1

2

3

4

1. Initial screen with options of what to view first. 2. Website home page explaining the structure. 3. Page of content also allowing you to select information to add to your information pack. 4. Information pack page allowing you to see selected content, select more and export a pdf.

Contact: name: Lisa Svensson company/organisation: University of Technology, Sydney e-mail: lisa.emma.svensson@gmail.com

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Example information pack pages (contents page and information page from ‘add to your super’ section)


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MORE THAN ADEQUATE Printed materials I designed an information booklet and a document wallet to be received with a form that legally must be filled out when you start a new job. The information booklet outlines basic ideas behind superannuation such as things to look for when choosing a product and how to manage it. The document wallet is designed to encourage recipients to keep track of their superannuation documents so they know where their money is.

Booklet and document wallet

Visualisation is used to help explain topics and show elements within a larger context. It also makes the information more accessible and visually engaging.

Front cover fold-out in the booklet acts as a checklist of information covered.

What was the effect? When testing the solution, people both within and outside my target audience found the designs helpful in better understanding superannuation and becoming more aware of what they can do to manage it well. Although not published, I have shown the project to teams within two large financial services organisations. Seeing what is possible has inspired them to believe that although superannuation itself is complicated, they can empower their customers and help them understand the industry and products within it through intuitive and well thoughtout information design. Information is presented in different ways for visual interest and to enhance readability.

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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

Derby Wayfinding and Public Art

The Challenge Derby City Council sought to create new wayfinding for Derby city centre that would would be unqiue to the city, reinforce key routes spaces and destinations, and encourage visitor exploration. The Solution In collaboration with Eaton Waygood Public Artists and Arup Associates technology team, Placemarque developed the scheme designing a range of bespoke structures and mapping supported by digital mobileweb based information, location specific applications and barcodes that deliver a wide range of information and stories to reinforce the local character and distinctiveness of Derby to visitors and residents. The wayfinding system includes a number of key components to enable it to deliver the right information at the right time in the right way. Map panels and directional information had to be incorporated into the sign structures, along with interpretive information and electronic tags. Our approach was to develop this range of wayfinding structures in a way that reflected and celebrated the public art themes of engineering and technology. These core structures provide the necessary wayfinding information required to create a legible and easily navigable environment. Our references for designing the system where to use the themes of technology and innovation; Derby is renowned for the manufacture of the jet engine and a

Contact: name: Sue Manley company/organisation: Placemarque e-mail: sue@placemarque.com website: www.placemarque.com

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connection with flight along with several older crafting industries. The manufacturing tradition is of well engineered, functional and innovative solutions, exemplified by the jet engine with its beautiful and sculptural quality, with Rolls Royce of Derby being one of the two leading aircraft engine manufacturers in the world.


GOal! WINNER The finned column became a key visual statement connecting the sign design. This rotor form is symbolic of cogs as part of early industrial technologies connected to clock-making spinning and steam, waterwheels, rail engine wheels, and the jet engine fan – a linking device for all types of past and present industrial and transport technologies. Taking the shape of the rotor and extruding it into a 3-dimensional form creates a column and forms the structural core element for the wayfinding information system. The graphic panels containing the directional and interpretation information are hung from the column which symbolically forms the hub.The top of the column is concluded by slicing at an angle revealing the rotor shape to the pedestrian as well as indicating movement and direction. Digital Delivery Digital information was integrated into the strategy through the use of QR tags and smart phone applications to deliver a much wider level of information and interpretation and provide an opportunity for temporary events and information to be delivered. The Effect Through a combination of form, colour and graphic devices these structures stand out from the competing plethora of other signage and street furniture in the city. The system provides interpretative stories, trails, what’s on guides, tourist information and links to tourism web sites. In addition it provides a mobile mapping ‘app’ to enable visitors to find their way using their smart phone. Mapping on the signs and the app is consistent ensuring a seamless delivery of the information system.

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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

Revised Tsuanmi Evacuation Route

What was the challenge? After reviewing evacuation wayshowing material distributed to residents by emergency management departments in the United States, it became clear that wayshowing and wayfinding methodologies were absent. The challenge was defining criteria and performance tasks, if any, developed by stakeholders, and how decisions were being made in creating and distributing these materials. What was the solution? The wayshowing redesign heavily relied on distribution prior to an evacuation in achieving better cognitive recall. Fundamentals in wayshowing practice and theory guided decisions of visual variables and were constructed towards an instructional approach rather than a geographical one. Lengths of components were reduced achieving better levels of organization. Cognitive variables in the psychology of emergency ingress and egress, collective behavior, tunnel vision, and issues in temporary cognitive paralysis were also considered and applied to the redesign. What was the effect? The City of Santa Barbara incorporated the proposed research and design methodology for a tsunami evacuation campaign in 2011. They have incorporated information design standards when creating wayshowing material for the public. Currently, with Dr. Steve Schandler (Director, Cognitive Psychophysiology Laboratories at Chapman University) and Santa Barbara Emergency Management, a quantitative study on measuring the cognitive recall of the design (including visual, audio and written formats) is in progress. The data will continue to influence design and logistical revisions in conjunction with a continuous cyclical distribution plan.

Contact: name: claudine jaenichen company/organisation: chapman university e-mail: jaenichenstudio@yahoo.com

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A model of reading situations that do not always act or respond in a sequence. Change in demand trigger changes in cognitive processing.

CURRENT MODEL CURRENT MODEL Distribution of information is currently given at

time of evacuation.

PREVIOUS EVACUATION EXPERIENCE PREVIOUS EVACUATION EXPERIENCE PREVIOUS PATH KNOWLEDGE PREVIOUS PATH KNOWLEDGE

TIME OF EVACUATION TIME OF EVACUATION

LEARNING NEW PROCEDURES LEARNING NEW PROCEDURES

DEVELOPING NEW MENTAL MAP DEVELOPING NEW MENTAL MAP

reading level demand:

Urgent and Emergency

reading level demand: more susceptible to cognitive deficiencies

Urgent and Emergency

Proposal for an information campaign prior to evacuation.

optimal for retention and learning new material Examples of current evacuation wayshowing used in the United States by city and county Emergency Management Departments.


Map previously given to residents for evacuation wayfinding in Santa Barbara County, California.

GOal!

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SHORTLISTED

Revised wayshowing instructions based on research and study in cognitive recall, semiotics, length of components and level of organization.

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Category: Wayshowing

Project: Yeongwol Museum Story Map

Challenge Yeongwol is located in southern Gangwon-do, the middle inland of the Korean peninsula. It also has a sad history about Danjong (1441~1457), King of the Joseon Dynasty, who was exiled and killed there. His tomb has been designated as one of UNESCO world heritage. The city has a population of fifty thousand and contains 20 museums. Millions of tourists visit the city per year and now it hopes to be known as a museum city. Yeongwol wants to let people know about its fluent cultural and natural assets through the improvement of information design of the city map and guide system. The existing map typically shows the general information for physical space regarding the geographical features, location, roads, etc. So the city wants to create a new type of information map to upgrade its level of communication and image of the city. We thought that one of the methods to solve these problems was the theme-based map. It shows intellectual space information of the phenomena along with geographical information. It's not just about adding some supplementary information, but emphasizing more distinctive themes and stories onto the physical space information.

Solution In order to apply the concept of a thematic map to Yeoungwol, we created the museum story map including museum guide map and sign design. We collected the spacial stories of the city including the physical and intellectual space information. Then those were sorted and organized in hierarchy for visual mapping. With the museum story map, applied information design principles regarding the data organization and information visualization, the city will empower the communication function with the users. Creating information structure and visualization for the map are as below.

t1IZTJDBMTQBDFJOGPSNBUJPO -The information of the area separates into 3 groups, and the directory is offered in accordance with the coordinate system. t*OUFMMFDUVBMTQBDFJOGPSNBUJPO -The map shows stories regarding the most meaningful content of each museum and the city. t.FBOJOHGVMMZPSHBOJ[FEJOGPSNBUJPO -We organized content stories for all museums and tour sites into information layers.

+

-All museum information were categorized into history&culture, natural history, arts, and other themes.

Effect t&BTZUPmOEMPDBMJOGPSNBUJPO -The information layers, a directory system, visual mapping will help users to find what they want. t(FUUJOHBUUFOUJPOGSPNUPVSJTUT t0GGFSJOHNPSF'VO -Collecting stamps from museums and offering the giveaways makes visitors more excited. t4VHHFTUJOHOFXUZQFPGDJUZNBQ -Comparing to typical city maps, this map shows what the appropriate thematic map is. t3FJOGPSDJOHCSBOEJNBHFPGUIFDJUZ -This map system conveys very identified and sophisticated local information and the brand image of the city.

+

[The component of theme-based Yeongwol information map system]

Contact: name: Oh Byungkeun, Moon Yearan, Cho Yeyoung organization: Dept. of Visual Communication Design of Yonsei University in korea e-mail: bko@yonsei.ac.kr. ry0720@naver.com shell823@naver.com

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GOal! SHORTLISTED

[Museum guide map]

[Museum signs]

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Category: Wayshowing Project: Sunshine Coast Council Regional Wayfinding Strategy What was the challenge?

What was the solution?

What was the effect?

The Sunshine Coast is a major local and international tourist destination in Australia. It covers 3000 square kilometres of sub tropical environments including 220 kilometres of coastline of golden surfing beaches.

The solution aimed to combine a clear hierarchical wayfinding system with strong landmark elements that gave a sense of place to the local towns as well as provide consistent unifying urban elements from town to town in the region. A key strategy was to create strong information landmarks at public arrival and gathering points. These landmarks set a strong visual language that was then echoed in subsequent supporting signage.

“Amalgamating three separate Councils into one has not been without its difficulties, and this project was seen as having the potential to galvanise the community as seeing itself as a whole, as the Sunshine Coast. At the same time, the region is dominated by strong local characteristics - a community of communities. The challenge for this project was not just one of legibility and wayfinding, but also one of identity and “look and feel”. If we are to install something into the street environment, it had to be both functional and sympathetic to the community character, rural, urban and coastal. It had to have both a sculptural quality and disappear. It had to service both pedestrians and cyclists, locals and tourists, and have a high quality finish but be affordable. The success of this project lies in its ability to have met all of these competing criteria by developing a range of attractive suites for various locations that has referenced the local context and is more than just a sign - it is a flexible, responsive and unified system. A client couldn’t ask for more!”

The communities there include small hinterland farming towns as well as bustling high-end beachfront resort towns. The challenge was to seamlessly connect a ‘community of communities’ by assisting many diverse user groups to discover and locate all types of destinations and activities from transport connections to the local beach, from national park hiking trails to the nearest police station. The challenge was also to develop a kit of parts of sign types that could sit comfortably in the different hinterland and beachside environments.

While the design elements are consistent they also change to respond to the different regions. The high tourism coastal sites use rounded concrete plinths as landmarks that suggest the erosion of the wind and the ocean. The hinterland uses simpler timber blades that convey a rural warmth. The map design was a critical element on the information landmarks designed to attract and engage the new arrival. The map also used visual erosion to show only the relevant precinct and used a colour palette that attracted the viewer and focused on the main attractions.

Leigh Abernethy Place Coordinator - Transport & Engineering

Contact: name: Heath Pedrola company/organisation: Dot Dash e-mail: heath@dotdash.com.au website: www.dotdash.com.au

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GOal! SHORTLISTED

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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

Falls Creek Wayfinding and Signage

What was the challenge? Büro North were engaged by The Falls Creek Alpine Resort to develop a new wayfinding system for one of the largest alpine resorts in Australia. Falls Creek is in the process of changing from a typical alpine ski resort to an all year round destination, the challenge for Büro North was to develop a wayfinding system that met the needs of both the summer and winter users of the resort. The wayfinding system was required to adapt between both summer and winter modes of operation where key destinations and principle routes would fundamentally change depending on the time of year. The wayfinding system also needed to be an environmentally conscious solution to match the resort’s position as the first alpine-based organisation to be benchmarked by Green Globe 21: the international certification program for sustainable tourism. What was the solution? Büro North developed a modular wayfinding system to provide information in a wide variety of directions to suit the complex village layout and changing seasonal functions. The system was developed using a limited number of modular components, enabling a range of sign types to be created from a limited number of elements reducing manufacturing costs and minimising the environmental impact of the system. The modular design was also driven by the requirement to provide a system that could be repaired and updated by staff in bulky

Contact: name: Amy Johnstone company/organisation: Buro North e-mail: amy@buronorth.com website: www.buronorth.com

30

winter clothing, in often hostile conditions typical of the Australian Alps. The design of the signage was inspired by the natural environment, specifically the native Snow Gums that are unique to the region, the branch like arrangements and shifting vertical forms were developed to allow the signs to integrate with the unique landscape Fall’s Creek. The materials and finishes were developed to withstand the freeze and thaw conditions and abuse from skiers, snow transport and the harsh alpine environment. What was the effect? The new system effectively responds to the seasonal changes within the resort and has been an important factor in the development of Falls Creek from a100 day per year economy to a vibrant year round destination. With the system in place Falls Creek have also been able to maintain their classification in the Green Globe international program.


GOal! SHORTLISTED

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Category: Wayshowing Project:

Ways4all

What was the challenge?

What was the solution?

System - GPS -. This helps you to get

In the past few decades finding ones

Currently visually impaired and blind

to a target destination, which is also de-

way has become much easier. Tech-

people travel with the help of a white

fined by absolute coordinates. In buil-

nologies like GPS, Wi-Fi and GSM have

cane, a dog or are escorted by a friend

dings, satellite-based systems are not

paved the way for navigation with

or mobility trainer. Our new individual

available and the internal construction

mobile devices. The prerequisites for

navigation system „ways4all“ can incre-

can change very easily. Therefore, our

this kind of navigation are a mobile

ase accessibility to public transport for

indoor navigation system uses passive

navigation device, an open connection

this group of people.

RFID tags to identify routes and barriers

with satellites and the knowledge to use

Our navigation system uses RFID tags

stairs for a wheelchair user).

the navigation. The main problem with

for routing in the indoor area and GPS

GPS based navigation is the inaccuracy

in the outdoor area. Additionally, com-

The requirements for the RFID based

of the navigation, the deviation of which

munication between the navigational

indoor navigation system are as follows:

is up to five meters. Therefore, this kind

device and the respective means of pu-

• passive RFID tags (134.2 kHz),

of navigation cannot be used by every-

blic transportation (bus, tram, train and

• no absolute position data stored on

body. For visually impaired and blind

subway) is developed for information

people an inaccuracy of more than one

exchange (route number, entry request,

meter can be deadly. For this reason,

exit request, etc.).

they can only use the common naviga-

A user-oriented design for mobile

tion as an audio-visual supplement

devices is made to ensure the visually

when travelling. The next problem is

impaired and blind people can use the

that visually impaired and blind people

navigation system.

need a continuous travelling aid. In

In the future real-time information

and navigating designed for blind

the indoor areas, GPS is not available,

(static and dynamic information), like

people.

which makes the use of indoor travel-

timetables, platform changes is aimed

ling for this group almost impossible.

for, increasing the feeling of safe travel.

The basis for the routing is the tactile

Yet, our vision for a new navigation sys-

Furtermore, the software will be exten-

guidance system. At all the strategic

tem can increase the accessibility to the

ded with outdoor navigation by GPS.

spots inside the building (entrance,

the tags, • simple and cost-friendly distribution of the RFID tags, • recording, data enrichment and sto ring of the tags in a central database and • mobile application for tag-reading

platforms, intersections) a passive RFID

public transport system for this group of people. The main goal of our project

Our system functionality is presented in

tag is placed into the tactile guidance

“ways4all” is to develop an overall

the figure bellow.

system and the tags unique identifica-

navigation system (for indoor and out-

tion number is stored in a central data-

door use) to aid blind and handicapped

base by the self-developed recording-

people in finding their way. This way,

software. When travelling through the

the visually impaired and blind people

building, the RFID-reader reads the

can live an independent life.

tags unique identification number of the RFID tags and sends it to the user’s smart phone by Bluetooth. The mobile application calculates the shortest path with help of the Dijkstra algorithm, our developed “Gerwei method” and the Indoor navigation description

Contact:

Most navigation systems require a

name: DI Martijn Kiers

certain method to define ones absolute

Organisation: FH-Joanneum, EVU

position within a closed system. For

e-mail: martijn.kiers@fh-joanneum.at

example, you get the longitude and

website: www.fh-joanneum.at/evu

latitude from the Global Position

32

user’s profile. As a result, the user gets a description that navigates him or her from one tag to the next. The mobile application creates a Bluetooth connection to the RFID reader to receive the tag tags unique identification number


GOal! SHORTLISTED and is sent via the Bluetooth Serial Port

leaving point, user profile, etc. All the

What was the effect?

Protocol. The tags‘ unique identification

given information is read by the text to

In the first real test, four blind men tes-

number sent is encapsulated in a data

speech software. The biggest disadvan-

ted the system. All of them were able

telegram and must be parsed from the

tage from this platform (Symbian) is

to quickly install, launch and control the

incoming data stream. The number re-

that it is quite unclear program struc-

software. They all were able to mount

ceived is compared to the locally stored

ture. So with Android a new platform

the RFID reader on their shoes and

routing list and the appropriate naviga-

was found. Here, the biggest problem is

connect it to the phone via Bluetooth.

tion text is displayed on the screen or

that visually impaired and blind people

All of them choose their destination

read by the screen reader.

could not use a touch screen for naviga-

in the software program without any

The information given to the user is

tion. We solved this problem by splitting

support from an extra person. All

either navigation instructions (left, right

up the screen in four equal parts. By

men were able to reach their chosen

in ten meters, go downstairs) or loca-

moving the finger over these parts, the

destination with the help of the tactile

tion descriptions (e.g. you are at the

possible action / choice is spoken by

guidance system, the RFID reader and

(subway), No (1), at the (main square),

the phone. A double tap on the screen

software. One test person walked too

on the way to destination (central sta-

starts the given action. On this way

quickly for the speech software, thus

tion)), depending on the settings in the

different stations can be chosen: depar-

missing his turn. The software noticed

user profile.

ting time can be entered, routes can be

this immediately, because the next tag

In our software, different user profiles

calculated, etc... Visually impaired and

tags unique identification number did

are pre-programmed, like visually im-

bind people has tested the android soft-

not correspond with the tags unique

paired user, blind user, wheelchair user

ware and after a short trying out phase

identification number expected. The

and physically impaired user, but also a

they could navigate through the phone

software recalculated the route and told

profile for tourists is pre-programmed.

like with the normal Symbian phone

the test person to turn around. After

and T9 keyboard.

this routing correction, the test person

The simplified and intuitive user inter-

found his destination without any other

face

difficulties.

The most important equipment for the navigation is the mobile device.

Summary: A cost effective RFID based

To improve the usability for visually

mobile indoor navigation system for

impaired and blind people, a simplified

visually impaired and blind people has

and intuitive user interface has been

been developed. The main advantages

built. The program is named after

of the application are:

the project “ways4all” and is functio-

the low cost and broad accessibility,

ning on two different kinds of mobile

the intuitive user interface,

phone‘s platforms. The first platform is

with normal T9-keyboard, navigation

button and text to speech software. The

• •

the system is expandable to out door navigation and,

the Symbian phone. With the navigation different menus and confirm a possible

hardly any extra equipment is RFID reader),

Visually impaired people can easily

button, he/she can scroll through the

no absolute coordinates or building

necessary (just a foot mounted

speech software. navigate through the program by using

audio-enabled navigation, plans are required,

second platform is android, which is running on a touch screen phone with

the communication with different means of public transport,

Symbian, which is running on a phone

the navigation is made accessible for other user groups.

action, like filling in a station name,

33


Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

Australian Centre for the Moving Image

What was the challenge? Recent changes to the architectural layout of ACMI, and the addition of major new exhibition and research facilities, demanded a thorough review of wayfinding at the site. What was the solution? The wayfinding strategy focused on developing a detailed understanding of user profiles, their behaviour and abilities, as well as the operational requirements of ACMI. The strategy focused on a major audit of the site and its context, focusing on pedestrian behaviour within Federation Square, on major approaches from public transport and Flinders Street. What was the effect? Largely the result is a more functional space, removing many of the navigational issue ACMI was experiencing. This included entry confusion, functional and process problems, as well helping with a smooth transition with its architectural changes. The integrated and considered design solution also contributes to the fabric to one of Melbourne’s cultural landmarks.

Contact: name: Amy Johnstone company/organisation: Buro North e-mail: amy@buronorth.com website: www.buronorth.com

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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

Harpa, Reykjavík Concert Hall and Conference Centre

What was the challenge? To design a wayshowing system for the new concert hall in Iceland. A system that is very practical, usable and user friendly. All the while not being to visually aggressive so it would compete with the architecture and feel of the building, but to build on it. What was the solution? The building being very dark and matte (black concrete walls) in contrast to its dominent glass facade, we decided not to attract attention to the signs using colours, but rather to use the contrast in materials. For the matte walls we designed signs having only a high-glossy front. And for the glass walls we use a matte film. All the signs have a black background with gray type and/or pictograms. The plexiglass versions are 1-2 cm thick. Both decisions made to honor the design of the building. To get this glossy front on the signs we needed to design a completely new system to mount the signs. They should have a close to invisible mounting system and yet a simple way to change the graphics if needed. And thus the current system was designed showing only a thin black stripe of metal on top and bottom of the plexiglass front. What was the effect? The effect is a very nicely balanced wayshowing system in this brand new concert halls. A system in perfect harmony with the architecture.

Contact: name: Atli Hilmarsson & Hörður Lárusson company: Atelier Atli Hilmarsson e-mail: atli@atli.de website: www.atli.de

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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

University of Iceland

What was the challenge? To make a system of information-signs all around the university campus. These signs give basic information about the surrounding buildings and the campus as a whole. And also to visually tie the 28 buildings, in 6 locations around the country, together. What was the solution? A system of four basic types of signs and window graphics. The largest being a gateway into the campus area and a 2,5 m high stand showing the whole campus on a map with basic information. Then a 2 m high sign that is located in front of the entrance of buildings to give detailed information about that building. When leaving a building, the backside of a sign shows you the location of the nearest buildings as wall as the transport possibilities. Lastly various window graphics with details about that entrance and building. The colour scheme uses the university blue as a main colour and the department colours to signify which departments are in which building. The information is designed in units, arranged from top down. Thus giving us a simple system to make each complex sign differently while keeping a very recognisable visual look. What was the effect? Visual landmarks all around the university campus, presenting necessary information and a visual guide to the grounds. A system that has in a very short timespan become the visual landmark of this now 100 year old university.

Contact: name: Atli Hilmarsson & Hรถrรฐur Lรกrusson company: Atelier Atli Hilmarsson e-mail: atli@atli.de website: www.atli.de

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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

Europeum, Mariazell

What was the challenge? The challenge was to create a guidance system which reflected the intrinsic character of the building and fully utilised the spatial resources available, yet at the same time, would not create an abundance of signs. After 850 years as a pre-eminent crossroads of human spiritual encounters, the pilgrimage town of Mariazell gave birth to a modern, multi-functional convention centre and christened it the Europeum. Apart from wide-ranging conference and convention facilities, a permanent exhibition also presents an artistic display of the European community as a walking-hand-inhand of people from a plethora of heritages and cultures, by means of depicting the life stories of 27 selected Europeans. The architecture exemplifies this European concept by being utterly wide open itself. Eye contact between the various floors is always possible, and has extremely high ceilings as a consequence. What was the solution? The solution takes up the central and identity-defining idea of a borderless Europe comprising many peoples and cultures. Based on a population map of Europe’s religions, a flexible grid was distilled with wayfinding information to the most important goals of the building integrated into it. Onto each wall, an individual section of the European map was transplanted which fulfils both the functional requirements of wayfinding and the aesthetic/ thematic requirements of the building. Thus, oversized typographical murals with high visibility from a distance covering several floors were devised. What’s more,

Contact: name: Mag. Markus Scheiber company/organisation: motasdesign e-mail: scheiber@motasdesign.com website: www.motasdesign.com

40

the overall guidance network (with very few exceptions, e.g. door signs) became a sign-free system. What was the effect? The solution, based as it is on large transparent map overlays, is perceived as an integral part of the architecture. Enhanced by the glass facade, the solution unleashes its own effect extending far beyond the limits of its function and the limits of the building. In addition, the viewer is enticed to encounter the overall theme itself, by being attracted to perceive the European sections and city landmarks. For maintenance purposes, standard terms such as WC, convention rooms, etc. were chosen in collaboration with the builders so that they could remain unchanged over the long term. New objectives can easily be added to the necessary walls. The system fulfils its core function: showing the way. But it goes beyond its utilitarian task and fulfils additional functions, creating new values by telling a story, linking the story to the character of the building, and becoming part of the exhibition.


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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

Hartmann Hospital, Vienna

What was the challenge? The aim of motas is to connect the identity of a given site to the requirements of a wayfinding system. Our principle is: function takes precedence over visual experiment. Hartmann Hospital is a Catholic hospital in Vienna run by the Order of Franciscan Nuns, bearing the stamp of Christian love. For a long time it was plagued by a classic problem-syndrome: a forest of white signs, many lifts and staircases, a confusion of mezzanines (direct access from first floor of old building to second floor of new building), inconsistent and antiquated guidance system, puzzling descriptions, bewildered patients, complex wayfinding.

celebrate project completion including staff and sisters. The descriptive terms selected were tested for ease of comprehension. For each Franciscan personage, a symbol of his/her life was devised. The life story of each and the symbol for each are depicted in the entrance lobby, providing immediate clarification to all visitors. The identification of the correct lift and the path to it were the uppermost priority. As a font, Avenir was chosen, developed by Adrian Frutiger as humane grotesque font and highly suitable for wayfinding systems. The system utilises direct speech: “You are on the first floor of Francis.” All signs are defined by the golden mean, the divine proportions.

What was the solution? The solution created a framework which is both rational and emotional - satisfying on both levels. It establishes a mental map which also includes an emotional code. The cornerstone is linking up the values of the religious order to the functional imperatives of a wayfinding system. The system is built on Franciscan principles of simplicity and humanity. It is both visually perceptible and orally communicable. Its foundations lie in utilising the hospital’s intrinsic ressources: a rich history, the values of the religious order, a highly involved project team, backing of the management, a unified circulation system on all floors and well positioned lifts and staircases around which a zoning strategy containing 4 tracts can be designed. Employees and staff members were integrated into the project at an early stage, e.g. through joint selection of the four Franciscan personages after whom the 4 tracts were to be be named; and festivities to

What was the effect? After completion and in 2011, the new system was evaluated and discussed in depth by the staff. The result: orally dispensed directions were reduced from 16 to 4 descriptive terms. Staff members now actually enjoy giving directions. Positive patient feedback about the “beautiful wayfinding system” and the easy orientation in the hospital is heard ongoingly. Swift user identification with the new descriptive terms, e.g. from Station 2A to Station Restituta 2. After an introductory phase as brief as one week, the new terms were utilised by all the referring doctors. New staff members can get to know the hospital much more rapidly. The details of Sister Restituta’s life (editor’s note: a nun who was murdered in WWII, after whom a tract was named) are often inquired about, to the immense pleasure of the nuns. The atmosphere of the hospital, according to employees and patients, has markedly improved. The maintenance of the system is simple and inexpensive. The differentcoloured lifts, coupled with the dots on the floor, work perfectly. The management division has confirmed that all the targeted goals have been reached.

Contact: name: Mag. Christian Lunger company/organisation: motasdesign e-mail: lunger@motasdesign.com website: www.motasdesign.com

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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

AAA | AcessAllAreas Wiesbaden

What was the challenge? Fuenfwerken provided direction in the framework of the Wiesbaden design days. The “Access all Areas – Wiesbaden design days” (AAA) initiative has, since 2007, presented the diversity of the Hessian capital’s creative sector – several events plus the open design office day during which agencies and institutions let you peer over their shoulders into their rooms, once again lured a multitude of people interested in design. In order for them to be able to find their way, we developed and implemented not only the corporate design and a mailing concept, but also an individual signage system. What was the solution? For orientation purposes, but also to generate attention for the design days as well as to demonstrate the practical potential of creative design, we positioned signage stations with blue concrete stacks of boxes in the AAA design around the city. The access points and event venues were marked on streetmaps under the slogan “You are here.” QR-Codes give access to more information about destinations and the routing via google maps. What was the effect? The overall concept was not only a complete success during the Wiesbaden design days: Along with the online aspect, the corporate design, mailing, and signage system received

Contact: Helmut Ness Fuenfwerken Design AG helmut.ness@fuenfwerken.com www.fuenfwerken.com

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GOal! MORE THAN ADEQUATE

1.050 BOXES

1.500 Programs

18 Info Pillars

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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

Volksschule Tschagguns, Signage

What was the challenge? Lang Vonier Architects invited us to bring in our competence in the field of signage: to guide, to give orientation, to reflect corporate identity, to welcome visitors, to amuse ‌ One of the targets was to involve the pupils of the school. What was the solution? We asked the children from the kindergarten and the primary school to illustrate the signs. They drew arrows, stairs, figures, tools, computer and even the dangerous birds along the 13-meter glass wall of the connecting building. We combined the drawings with a roman type. Everything is cutted out from high quality foil, mounted on glas, timber and concrete. There is no signboard on the whole site. One the glass walls are 400 occupation titles. Some of them do really exist, others are imaginary. What was the effect? The signage is unique, designed by the persons that use the building. It goes perfectly with them. Its colorful and comes to the point through the straight way children think. All participants had a lot of fun.

Contact: name: Sigi Ramoser company: Sägenvier Designkommunikation e-mail: ramoser@saegenvier.at website: www.saegenvier.at

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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

AK Vorarlberg, Signage

What was the challenge? The building of the Arbeiterkammer Vorarlberg (Federal Chamber of Labour) in Feldkirch – planned by Drecher & Kubina Architects consists of the matured stand and a four-storied new contruction. The parameter for the signage had been: building identification, blinds, codification of the elements, communication of the Arbeiterkammer’s service, waiting situations, content information and atmosphere. What was the solution? We designed glass-blinds with wording in content of the clients services, lawer-content and service devices. We also designed wallpaper-wording-typografie with stories about the history - designed on the whole wall - looks like a big book typografie. And we combined the sentense “Bildung geht mit der Beratung in die Bibliothek” ( education is going with the advice into the library) - that communicates in smart and charmy style, the content of the three service parts of the AK Vorarlberg. What was the effect? The straight form and content of the building and the institution became a casual charism and inform in a further level with our szenographic. The people feel invited, informed and entertained - while they are searching for the right rooms. The wayfinding system is a synergie of information and room-speaking, combined best.

Contact: name: Sigi Ramoser company: Sägenvier Designkommunikation e-mail: ramoser@saegenvier.at website: www.saegenvier.at

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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

1zu1 Prototypen

What was the challenge? To create an image, a corporate design for a technical company. The company has set it’s values in the environment, regionality and in it’s employees - so the challenge was to combine the technical structure and public image with a inovative concept. What was the solution? To bring a creative design in combination with a clear structure in the architecture of the building and to engage the employees with a comfortable and handsome workingclothes. The advertising of the company has a clear structure and a leading, significant colour and design. The employees got business cards which are helping them to identify with the company and which are underlining their individuality. What was the effect? The employees and also the customers can feel relaxed in their workplace and they can see the beauty of their region by looking out of the window, forced by the design of legending ...

Contact: name: Sigi Ramoser company: Sägenvier Designkommunikation e-mail: ramoser@saegenvier.at website: www.saegenvier.at

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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

Signage System Trade Fair Stuttgart

What was the challenge? A multilingual hubbub, a colourful sound, a confusion of voices and concert of colours. The visitor’s mood is set – for the exhibition, for contact with countless colleagues, for new impressions and encounters. What was the solution? The signage system takes him by the hand and guides him to the right place so that he won’t get lost in the maelstrom. And to make the walk seem shorter, it’s entertaining: outside the visitor is greeted by a welcoming committee of flags, inside he is accompanied by rainbow-striped signs and big walls of colour. They provide a constant compass and companion, just in case he forgets for a moment where was it he wanted to go. What was the effect? The combination of colours and lettering creates a distinctive identity for the venue and the trade fair company. The chord of colours is like a pattern, like colourful wallpaper that makes the uptake of information both pleasant and easy. The use of paired shades brings the architecture to life, the colour coding of the various destinations works at subliminal level. The colourful stripes inside lead visitors to their destination: pink leads to the conference centre, blue to the exits, red to the exhibition halls.

Credits: Communication Design: büro uebele Architect: wulf & partner, Freie Architekten BDA Stuttgart Product Design: ZieglerBürg, Büro für Gestaltung Photos: Andreas Körner, Christian Richters

Contact: büro uebele visuelle kommunikation info@uebele.com, www.uebele.com

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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

Signage System Offenbach Hospital

What was the challenge? A visit to hospital is usually associated with less-than-positive feelings – unless, of course, it’s for some minor ailment or to greet a new-born baby. In all other cases the touch of warmth and sympathy provided by a signage system that presents its factual information in a welcoming way offers a little comfort in an otherwise cool and clinical space. What was the solution? An array of attractive geometrical coloured patterns guide visitors to their destination and lighten the mood of this sterile setting. Each of the numerous locations – over 70 of them spread across the hospital – has its own special combination of pattern and colour to set it apart. A signage system that relied entirely on colours or shapes wouldn’t have worked. And with so much information to communicate, a conventional list would have been too confusing. It’s only through the characteristic combination of colour and pattern that this large number of destinations can be clearly designated. What was the effect? Clearly comprehensible and unambiguous names have been selected for the various locations, avoiding any technical or in-house jargon. This simple and appealing system can be rapidly understood by anyone. In sum, it’s a small but important feel-good factor in an otherwise critical or unpleasant situation.

Credits: Communication Design: büro uebele Architect: woernerundpartner Product Design: ZieglerBürg, Büro für Gestaltung Photos: Andreas Körner

Contact: büro uebele visuelle kommunikation info@uebele.com, www.uebele.com

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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

Gasteiner Heilstollen – Icons and Floorplans

What was the challenge? ... to develop Icons for orientation and behavior guidance in the Gasteiner Heilstollen, a natural radon gallery, according to an existing Corporate Design. As most People are very unsure with orientation inside a mountain and the mining shafts are kept low in lighting, a simple yet clear guidance system is of significant value. What was the solution? Based on blueprints we created a floor plan for every station, using given color coding in addition. Temperature and air humidity are shown with level indication. Every floor plan indicates the main shaft which leads to other stations and the exit. A special focus went into the gender determination. As visitors inside the Heilstollen don’t wear clothes, we decided to picture the common towel use: man around the hips; women above the breast. Indicating their separated mining shaft areas, we referenced as additional CD support the mountain shape used in the Gasteiner Heilstollen logo. These and additional Icons were used in the floor plans for detailed guidance. What was the effect? some patients smiled … Our client reported that the visitors responded positive to the new guidance system. Also we got a lot of positive response from our client and their patients about the creative approach in gender visualization.

Contact: name: Barbara Weingartshofer company/organisation: nau*Design e-mail: nau@spacenau.com website: www.spacenau.com

56

37– 39 °C

75– 80%

nach Bedarf

41 °C

95 %


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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

Asiada : Information and wayshowing system for the Asian Winter Games 2011 in Almaty (Kazakhstan)

What was the challenge? The cities of Astana and Almaty in Kazakhstan were selected to conduct the 7th Asian Winter Games in January and February 2011. Kazakhstan became the first country in the post Soviet Union territory to organize such games. Besides great investments on infrastructures, the government paid special attention to orientation and transportation of visitors to the events. The issue at that time was the lack of efficient city map, and the absence of street nameplates at every crossroad, making it difficult to find its way in the city. Attoma and its local partner Pocket Agency worked hand in hand with the Almaty authorities and the Asian games organization to create an Information and orientation system and to deploy a transportation service able to connect the center of the city with the different sport sites during the games.

What was the solution? Attoma and Pocket Agency created a global information and orientation system for the Almaty city. This system was created in 2 languages, Kazakh (the state language of Kazakhstan) and English, and addressed different types of users: foreign tourists, residents of Kazakhstan and Almaty citizens, whether they were pedestrians or car drivers. Visitors arriving to the airport or railway stations were given an orientation kit, containing a city map with the program of the

Contact: name: Marine Rouit company: ATTOMA & Pocket Agency e-mail: marine.rouit@attoma-design.com website : www.attoma-design.com

58

games, general information about the city and the localization of sport sites, shuttle stops, hotels and city attractions.

distributed in different places in the city such as hotels and info centers and were displayed at every bus station.

The main feature of the old city map was rather unusual: it presented mountains at the top of the map instead of the North (mountains being the main landmark for people from Almaty). Maps were also

For the Asian Winter Games 2011, Attoma also designed a signage system for pedestrians. It has been implemented on every crossroad of the city center (assembling was made in 1 night).


GOal! MORE THAN ADEQUATE And for drivers, specific signage was designed to show the direction to the sport sites. During the games, sport sites inside or around the city were served by 60 shuttles on 6 different routes. Attoma and Pocket Agency designed the elements of this new transportation service : codification of the signs for this service (bus numbers, etc.), labelling on the vehicles and at the bus stops. Also, identification signs were created for each sport site to welcome visitors, as well as onsite directory boards showing the site map with main facilities to help visitors orient themsleves within the sport site. What was the effect? Asiada welcomed more that 10 000 people from 27 countries. Due to noticeable design and readable content, citizens and tourists paid attention to signage straight away.

The Big Sports Event atmosphere was created in the city. People were genuinely surprised by this new signage which made the traffic easy around the city. For the first time, the coherent pedestrian system was created for the city, with the pocket city map including bus and shuttle stops and using the same strong identity. It is remarkable that even after the Asiada games ended, people (including drivers) still continued using signage with gratitude. Thanks to this first project in Almaty, authorities have realized the importance of such information and orientation service for any city. At the moment, authorities are planning to create a comprehensive wayfinding navigation system for the city of Almaty.

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Category:

Traffic and Public Transport

Project:

Passenger information system for the TCL network (Lyon)

What was the challenge?

What was the solution?

TCL Network is the third larger public transportation network in France. It is managed and organized by SYTRAL (the public authority) and operated by Keolis Lyon (private transportation operator, branch of the SNCF).

From November 2010 to September 2011, a team of four people has worked on the new TCL user information system targeting meaning and readability of the signs, consistency of the system and accessibility. In addition, Attoma worked closely with SYTRAL and Keolis on specifying of the new TCL services and transportation lines.

For the last thirty years, the TCL network has evolved with superimposing new rolling stock and communication campaigns. The result is a complicated and inconsistent network where only metro and tramway modes are really readable. The TCL network has to adapt to the evolutions of urban area of Lyon and its European ambitions. In 2009, “Atoubus” project was launched. It widely reorganised the bus network to raise efficiency and to follow new economic development and citizens’ way of life. The implementation of the “Atoubus” project and its 26 BRT lines, as well as new metro and tramway extensions, imply a new multimodal travellers oriented information system. Furthermore, “Universal design” considerations are legal issues in France since 2005. In 2010, Attoma won the overhaul of TCL’s information system, especially signage and mapping. The main requirement for the project was “a network that speaks one single language, a network designed for all”.

Contact: name: Armand Teychené company/organisation: Attoma e-mail: armand.teychene@attoma-design.com website: www.attoma-design.com

60

Fully integrated to the transportation chain, travel information designed by Attoma is a strategic issue for TCL. It participates to a fluid travelling experience and to perceived quality of the service.

1 6 14 26 31 62 3 4 184 The information syntaxe used, and the linked rules, are the “building blocks” that travellers will find before, during and after their trip. Those elements apply on traditional static materials, especially the signage system and maps, but also on dynamic systems such as information screens or the TCL website. All those media give a clear information available both before travelling and during the trip. All elements created for the project, especially pictograms and readability rles (like size of the text, contrast, etc.) have been created following ISO guidelines. Attoma has developed with Patrick Paleta a specific font, “la TCL”, which is optimised for multisupport legibility and has a strong heritage identity.

abefoup AGENCE

All concepts and graphic vocabulary have been embedded in a single document. Principles and detailed specifications are presented in the simplest way. This allows declining this system on all static equipment or dynamic hardware, even if they are out of the project scope. Furthermore, numbers of specific items as the new TCL network map have been developed by the Attoma agency.


tiCket pleaSe WINNER

What was the effect? The design approach has brought a comprehensive and seamless traveling experience on the TCL network and in the city of Lyon. The consistency of the experience enhances the image of the city and its leading position in Europe. Like all meaningful work that facilitates the use of public transport, the project will indirectly reduce motorized personal mobility and minimize by 30% carbon emissions. This project illustrates also the importance of a long time investment on diagnosis, pedagogy and conception in order to link together designers with clients, policy makers and business world within the project.

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Category:

Traffic and Public Transport

Project:

Dubai Roads & Transport Authority

What was the challenge? New public transport infrastructure is central to the Dubai government’s strategic plan to improve the urban environment through less reliance on private vehicles. Dubai Metro, the first passenger railway in the Gulf, opened in 2009 and enhanced marine passenger services followed in 2010. The design challenge was to establish a dual language wayfinding and signing system intuitive to navigate by locals and international visitors alike, especially first time metro users. What was the solution? The project involved public signing and the detailed elements for directional, name, location and statutory signs. Having initially worked on Dubai Metro, TDC went on to develop an integrated signing system for marine services, trams and street signs. A bespoke dual language typeface (designed by Dalton Maag) and matching pictograms ensure clarity and consistency across all signage applications. What was the effect? The signing system has an international look and feel that reflects modern Dubai while respectfully taking into account traditions of Arabic culture. The signs with their distinctive graphics have been instrumental in ensuring a seamless adoption of metro and marine travel by people in Dubai and are a key component of the network’s visual identity. For the future, an integrated approach to signing and passenger information will be important to people travelling on an increasingly complex public transport network.

Contact: name: Tony Howard company/organisation: TDC e-mail: tony@transportdesign.com website: www.transportdesign.com

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tiCket pleaSe SHORTLISTED

A2 A6 A7

B3 B7

F2

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Category: Traffic and Public Transport Project: Bath City Information System What was the solution? A transport information system was developed as an integral part of the wider Bath City information System. It includes a suite of graphics and maps, which deliver transport information both onstreet and on-line. Bath’s DNA is delivered through the graphic language and a suite of transport products, including bespoke shelters and bus flags.

Bus Shelter and Integrated Bus Flag

What was the challenge? The Bath City Information System is about revealing and presenting the city of Bath in a way that improves the experience of all the city’s users. Central to the concept is the need to deliver a seamless, connected system of information products that cross delivery channels and modes of travel. The concept for the Bath City Information System forms a central part of the Bath Public Realm and Movement Strategy (PRMS). The strategy puts forward a bold, long-term plan that gives

Contact: name: Angus Tilbury company/organisation: fwdesign e-mail: angus@fwdesign.com website: fwdesign.com

64

pedestrians, cyclists and public transport vehicles priority over cars, and delivers a network of beautiful, refashioned streets and public spaces. The aim of the PRMS is to encourage more vibrant and diverse public life within the streets, spaces, parks and gardens of the city centre and along its riverside, helping to make the city a more active, inclusive and engaging place. The Transport component of the system aimed to reveal the network of transport options in an easy-to-understand way to residents and visitors. It was recognised that by increasing knowledge and understanding of the network and the relationship between different modes, patronage would be improved.

The illustrative pedestrian mapping is complemented with a diagrammatic transport mapping system, consisting of corridor diagrams and a transport network diagram. They successfully merge the pedestrian and transport experience, making it a seamless journey for the user. Congestion at key stations is eased by encouraging movement between transport hubs and delivering whole journey times. All transport information is contained in a singular integrated on-street product. The Network Diagram provides a composite network of routes for Bath and the surrounding area. Key landmarks and pedestrian routes between transport hubs are identified to make the transport system more legible. The overlap of these elements seamlessly integrates the public transport and pedestrian wayfinding systems. Bus flags followed TSRGD guidelines and regulations for information provision. Bespoke pictograms communicated bus type including Tour Bus, Park & Ride as well as regular bus services.


tiCket pleaSe SHORTLISTED Individual bus routes are displayed as Corridor Diagrams. Whilst linear in their representation, they reflect true geographic relationship between routes. Following user research, this was identified as an important aspect for understanding and acceptance by locals.

The process confirmed the overriding success of the system. The approach was seen as highly intuitive and described as “wholly innovative” and “the first of it’s kind”.

Dr Steve Cassidy states: ”I have looked at many public transport maps in many cities and to me the Bath reconfiguration really is top rate.”

Corridor Diagram

Timetabling

Timetable information was interrogated and simplified by displaying times between services rather than each arrival time. This reduction of content makes information easier to interpret and allows for an increased text size (key to on-street feedback of the existing system). Additional products and maps were designed for use at Bristol Airport, Park & Ride sites and cycle stations, all with specific content relevant to their function and user type. Each of the family of transport maps were modified for online applications, with additional map types being developed for transport options further afield.

What was the effect? The on-street pilot scheme was installed in March 2011. The on-street products underwent rigorous testing process which involved reviews of users on-street as well as an intensive stakeholder feedback exercise. The evaluation process included interviewing members of the public to measure and assess the systems’ success across a range of criteria. Criteria included usability, functionality, appropriateness of design and improved user experience. Network Diagram

65


Category:

Traffic & Public Transports

Project:

qando

What was the challenge? In the context of public transport, the passenger wants to know the quickest and easiest route to their destination and get information in real time about any deviations from the timetable. The key challenge was to transform a high amount of complex structured data from different sources into an easy-to-handle, clearly structured and intuitively graspable information service. A cleverly designed information system should support travel via multiple transport options more efficiently and offer flexibility.

Easy handling and fast access. The modular structure clusters different kinds of information in five groups. The interface allows you to easily access each module at any time: You can get your route, attain departure times, look at the map, see the lines and see further information.

What was the solution? qando shows how information can be designed in a user friendly and appealing way, easy-to-handle and fit for everyday use. It is a cross-media application that offers the user up-to-date travel information on the go. Complex data is transformed into a service with an intuitive user experience. The intuitive interface allows the user to easily plan routes and provides them with public transport real time information. What was the effect? The information service supports the user during their journey and makes traveling with public transport easier and a more appealing option. Moreover, it promotes the contact between customers and network operators.

Contact: Michael Kieslinger Fluidtime Data Services GmbH michael.kieslinger@fluidtime.com http://fluidtime.com

66

Realtime Information on smartphone. qando shows information design at its best: Complex data is visualised clearly structured and aesthetically in different modes. Text & icons and graphics concentrate relevant information on each single screen.


tiCket pleaSe SHORTLISTED FInd your way from door to door. The route planner with its intuitive interface lets you easily choose your start and destination.

You can quickly find your way to your destination: Enter the name, look for it on the map or on the list of stops.

qando suggests routes from here to there including the most relevant information.

An icon shows you that you can get real time departure information for public transport.

A map shows you the exact position of stops and destination.

67


Category:

Traffic and Public Transport

What was the challenge? The main challenge of the Project, undertaken from mid-2009 to mid-2010, was to evaluate and update Santiago’s public transport information system in order to help passengers navigate through the transport system more efficiently. The previous passenger information system was poorly implemented and outdated, due to frequent changes in the transport services. The Graphic Standards Manual, official document that regulates the passenger information system, was also updated to assist the authorities in charge of implementing and managing the transport system in the production process of signs and other information elements. Santiago’s new public transport system,

68

Project:

Evaluation and Redesign of Passenger Information for Santiago’s Public Transport System

Transantiago, was launched overnight February 10, 2007, and it has meant a radical cultural change for users due to the introduction of new transport infrastructure, bus routes and types of transport services (a grid of trunk and local routes replaced an unorganized array of long routes across the city), payment methods (a pre-paid card replaced cash) and a new passenger information system. Before this Project, there wasn’t any formal study to determine the way passengers actually used the transport system and the information they needed to get from one point of the city to another. Doing research about how public transport users search for information and use the transport system, was also part of the challenge.

What was the solution? During the first part of the Project, the aim was to understand how passengers actually used the transport system and passenger information. One of the main problems detected was the distrust of Santiago’s citizens of using signs and printed information. Due to cultural factors, most people in Santiago prefer to ask someone for directions rather than reading a sign, but this practice was aggravated by the fact that the public transport information signs were mostly outdated. The study’s results prompted the creation of a new passenger information system and an update of the Graphic Standards Manual so it could be easily implemented and updated by the transport system authorities. The


tiCket pleaSe MORE THAN ADEQUATE

before

after

solution involved the design of graphic information for the different instances of the trip (before, during and after the trip), such as new bus stop signs, and bus routes and metro lines maps. Another important part of the solution was the design of templates that could later be compatible with a data-merge process, in order to speed up the production process. The study also included a report that accounts for the major research findings and guidelines to manage and keep the new system up to date. What was the effect? The update of Santiago’s public transport passenger information generated a consistent and coherent system allowing users to navigate in a more efficient and confident

way throughout the city. The optimization of the production process noticeably reduced the time and errors in the design and implementation of the different information elements. As an example, before the Project, the transport authority was able to produce 100 bus stop signs in a day; now they produce 1500 signs in 10 minutes. This drastic reduction in production time allows the transport authority and responsible entities to maintain information up to date and relevant, resulting in a more reliable system for users.

Contact: name: José Manuel Allard company/organisation: Department of Typographic Studies, Design School, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile e-mail: jallard@uc.cl website: www.det.cl Team members: José Manuel Allard, Rodrigo Ramírez Francisco Gálvez, Sergio Ramírez María de los Ángeles Briones Carola Zurob, Cristina Rivera Beatriz Hamilton, Rodrigo Mora Juan Américo Pastenes Sebastián Ureta, Phil Berczuk María Paz Trebilcock Ursula Velarde, Juan Pablo Rioseco

69


Category: Traffic & Public Transports Project: Moreton Bay Cycleway Wayfinding System What was the challenge?

What was the solution?

The 150 kilometre long Moreton Bay Cycleway (MBC) is the longest planned cycle route on Australia’s east coast running across four local government areas from Bribie Island in the North to Redland Bay in the South. The MBC project is planned to roll out over a 5 year program linking and upgrading existing paths with new paths.

We have developed a simple ‘Kit of Signs’ that can be applied as specific sections of the MBC are completed. The signs strength is in their use of a simple identifier, use of colour in the landscape as well as detailed information tailored to meet the needs of the cyclists.

The MBC will not only assist regular cyclists and commuters, it will also be part of a wider tourism campaign for Moreton Bay promoting greater recreation such as cycling trips to nearby islands. Our brief was to develop a simple, cost effective sign system that could be rolled out over time. The signage system was intended to clearly identify the cycleway and then provide information and advice for cyclists travelling on the cycleway. The signage would give all visitors a sense of confidence when travelling and assist with public safety and security.

Contact: name: Mark Ross company/organisation: Dot Dash e-mail: heath@dotdash.com.au website: www.dotdash.com.au

70

Also, traditionally, signs for cyclists may carry information that is high for their riding position forcing the cyclist to look up. The positions of the new signs provide safe and user-friendly viewing planes for cyclists in motion. The ‘MBC’ identifier incorporates an international bicyclist pictogram and is intended for quick recognition used in different ways in different environments. The family of wayfinding signs introduces a distinct colour palette into the landscape. The green identifier graphics are contrasted with orange place identification names. Sign types include major information signs, distance markers, and various directional signs including on-road route markers.

Both micro and macro mapping are used to allow the cyclist to both plan their journeys as well as know which services are located in their immediate vicinities such as public facilities, police and local tourism opportunities. Distance marker signs are also used to assist cyclists in monitoring their progress on their journeys. The sign construction is intended to be simple and cost effective as different manufacturers may produce the signage over time. Given the bay side location, stainless steel posts and fixings are used to minimise corrosion. What was the effect? The cycleway symbolises an important linkage across many different environments where all parties can benefit by providing greater public access and use of Moreton Bay’s many recreational sites. The sign system has been embraced by the four Councils (literally).


tiCket pleaSe MORE THAN ADEQUATE

71


Category: Traffic and Public Transports Project: Sunshine Coast Council Regional Wayfinding Strategy What was the challenge?

What was the solution?

What was the effect?

The Sunshine Coast is a major local and international tourist destination in Australia. It covers 3000 square kilometres of sub tropical environments including 220 kilometres of coastline of golden surfing beaches.

The solution aimed to combine a clear hierarchical wayfinding system with strong landmark elements that gave a sense of place to the local towns as well as provide consistent unifying urban elements from town to town in the region. A key strategy was to create strong information landmarks at public arrival and gathering points. These landmarks set a strong visual language that was then echoed in subsequent supporting signage.

“Amalgamating three separate Councils into one has not been without its difficulties, and this project was seen as having the potential to galvanise the community as seeing itself as a whole, as the Sunshine Coast. At the same time, the region is dominated by strong local characteristics - a community of communities. The challenge for this project was not just one of legibility and wayfinding, but also one of identity and “look and feel”. If we are to install something into the street environment, it had to be both functional and sympathetic to the community character, rural, urban and coastal. It had to have both a sculptural quality and disappear. It had to service both pedestrians and cyclists, locals and tourists, and have a high quality finish but be affordable. The success of this project lies in its ability to have met all of these competing criteria by developing a range of attractive suites for various locations that has referenced the local context and is more than just a sign - it is a flexible, responsive and unified system. A client couldn’t ask for more!”

The communities there include small hinterland farming towns as well as bustling high-end beachfront resort towns. The challenge was to seamlessly connect a ‘community of communities’ by assisting many diverse user groups to discover and locate all types of destinations and activities from transport connections to the local beach, from national park hiking trails to the nearest police station. The challenge was also to develop a kit of parts of sign types that could sit comfortably in the different hinterland and beachside environments.

While the design elements are consistent they also change to respond to the different regions. The high tourism coastal sites use rounded concrete plinths as landmarks that suggest the erosion of the wind and the ocean. The hinterland uses simpler timber blades that convey a rural warmth. The map design was a critical element on the information landmarks designed to attract and engage the new arrival. The map also used visual erosion to show only the relevant precinct and used a colour palette that attracted the viewer and focused on the main attractions.

Leigh Abernethy Place Coordinator - Transport & Engineering

Contact: name: Heath Pedrola company/organisation: Dot Dash e-mail: heath@dotdash.com.au website: www.dotdash.com.au

72


tiCket pleaSe MORE THAN ADEQUATE

73


Category:

Traffic and Public Transport

Project:

Bangalore Metro

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What was the challenge? Signing and wayfinding design for a new metro system, including dual and triple language signs in the local Kannada script, Hindi and English. The design challenge was to make the system understandable, including how to navigate stations and platforms, for people unfamiliar with travelling by metro and for the high proportion of local people unable to read.

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What was the solution? Text on signs is reinforced by bold pictograms for clarity of communication. Directional signs tell a story in graphics without necessarily having to rely on text to assist passengers reach their destination. The sequence for graphics on signs begins with a directional arrow followed by pictograms showing the service or facility a passenger may be aiming for (such as a train or toilet) and how to get there, for example by lift or escalator, with text in Kannada and English confirming the message. The scheme’s colour palette has local cultural references to aid familiarity.

Bangalore International Airport

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Outer ring road

Bellary Road

CV Raman Road

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NR Road

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Ro

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Albert Victor Road

Hosur Road

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ag

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La tR

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74

Jayamahal Road

Chord Road

Magadi Road

name: Tony Howard company/organisation: TDC e-mail: tony@transportdesign.com website: www.transportdesign.com

Chowdaiah Road

Sampige Road

What was the effect? Bangalore Metro is scheduled to commence services later this year (2012). The consistent approach to station signing throughout the network should reassure people using the service for the first time that Bangalore Metro is passenger friendly and easy to navigate. The new metro should also help reinforce Bangalore’s reputation as India’s leading technology hub. The project was undertaken in collaboration with local partners Tata Elxsi, the design arm of the Tata Group.

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Bannerghatt

Bangalore University


tiCket pleaSe MORE THAN ADEQUATE

75


Category:

Traffic and Public Transport

Project:

Marconi Express Branding and Wayfinding

What was the challenge? ‘Marconi Express’ is a high-frequency shuttle service connecting Bologna Central rail station with Bologna Marconi Airport. The main infrastructure is a driverless suspended monorail. The main users are expected to be international travellers going to and from the airport to Bologna and to the wider region through a new high speed rail hub. The terminal stations are integrated within the airport and in the rail station terminal. Branding and signage had to be distinctive, recognisable and immediate. What was the solution? The visual identity, delivered with support of the local studio ‘Kitchen’, reflects the system’s distinctive architectural design to communicate a contemporary and sustainable service. The result is a very individual graphical language - carried through all user touchpoints, and a wayfinding system based exclusively on pictograms. Particular care was put into creating a clear and logic structure for the information to be provided, achieved by definining an information hierarchy of messages targeted to inbound and outbound passengers - allowing for streamlined directional information. What was the effect? The wayfinding system extends the visual identity through the use pictograms, and a product family consistent with the architectural language and the environment. Extensive use of environmental graphics avoids physical clutter, ensures clear sightlines and makes navigation to/from and within station environments simple and intuitive.

AERO Pictograms Designed to emphasise the very individual character of the service. They are the primary means of wayfinding provision - making the information immediately understandable beyond any language or cultural barrier.

Bologna Centrale FS

Aeroporto G. Marconi Lazzaretto

Contact: name: Fred Gangemi company/organisation: Steer Davies Gleave e-mail: f.gangemi@sdgworld.net website: www.steerdaviesgleave.com

76

Uscita di Emergenza

direzzione Bologna Centrale FS


tiCket pleaSe

Referentes BRADING

MORE THAN ADEQUATE

Wayfinding A coordinated family of signing structures that blend seamlessly with station environments, integrating information elements with other functions. The environmental graphics are used to reinforce directional information: ‘active’ infrastructure (lift shafts, escalators, opening doors) are highlighted through the use of the lime green colour, while supergraphics provide destination signifiers.

Grove is the latest addition to Middlesex University’s Hendon campus. The building will host many of the activities currently housed at Cat Hill, while also acting as a new high-quality space for the entire University community. It is formed of three distinct units, with each unit comprising a mixture of teaching rooms and facilities. There are spaces available for exhibitions and installations - some of which may be open to the public. The building also hosts a cafe and a food outlet. Each unit can be accessed directly from external campus areas and also from the other units via stairs and walkways on the ground and first floors. As a campus destination, it will follow the Hendon Campus wayfinding strategy convention and be identified by its head letter “G”.

Aiuta Help Point

Premere il pulsante in caso di emergenza push the button in case of an emergency

Non lasciare il bagaglio incustodite Do not leave luggage unattended

Area videosorvegliata CCTV in operation

Accessibility assistance accessibilità assistenza

Marconi Express Branding e Wayfinding | page 2

Uscita di Emergenza

77


Category:

Traffic and Public Transport

Project:

Dundee Travel Info

What was the challenge? Refresh and invigorate Dundee’s award winning Dundee Travel Info website by introducing a new look and feel, a revised information architecture, customisable and personalised information and a re-designed multi-modal journey planner. The main challenge was to provide the same excellent level of information service and improve on the existing usability and functionality. What was the solution? Using visitor data from Google Analytics we established the most popular site functions. These included bus real time information, journey planning and the interactive map. Through a workshop approach we developed a ‘customisable’ homepage concept that would allow users to choose what information they wanted on the homepage. This allows users to access key functions via moveable and collapsible ‘blocks’ which also provide links to other information. Any blocks that are not required by the user can be shifted or removed from the homepage altogether. A fixed block allows the client to provide news updates and promote initiatives. A further layer of ‘personalisation’ allows users to quickly access information for frequently used bus stops, rail stations and address data. What was the effect? User traffic to the Dundee Travel Info website increased by 57%. The website saw a rise in repeat visitors – over 60% of visitors will return. 500 users registered with the site to enable personalisation and receive newsletter updates on bus timetable changes. 10% of all traffic is now via the mobile app. During the winter of 2010 the website became a focal point for transport information. On one day of particularly poor weather the website received 7,000 visitors.

Contact: name: Craig Nelson company/organisation: Steer Davies Gleave e-mail: c.nelson@sdgworld.net website: www.steerdaviesgleave.com

78

Real Time Information Visitors can view next bus and rail departures, in real time where available.

Multi-platform Travel information data is presented on a mobile app for access on the go.

Bus stop locations A simple click gives real time and further user information.

Step-by-step Bespoke journey plans offer step-by-step directions with clear iconography.


tiCket pleaSe MORE THAN ADEQUATE Multimodal / Integrated Simple comparison of time, distance and carbon footprint.

Customisable Users can choose exactly what they want on their homepage, via a simple interface.

Personalisation For quick journey planning and real time look-up, users can register their ‘favourites’.

http://www.dundeetravelinfo.com

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Category:

Project:

Traffic and Public Transport

Neuss RE 7

Dormagen

Rail Services

Map for Barrier-free Train-Riding

Dormagen Bayerwerk S 11 K-Worringen

Cologne Region 2011

What was the challenge? In the Public Transport Rail Network of the Cologne Region a lot of stations are suitable for handicapped people.

KLongerich

Pulheim

4

Bocklemünd

RE 1, 9 RB 38

very simple design-elements were chosen: The colours Red, Yellow and Green – known

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Mommsenstr.

9

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Fr

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Frechen Bahnhof

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i+d Verkehrsplanung und Design GmbH

Lindenburg

kontakt@id-verkehr.de www.id-verkehr.de

80

9

Euskirchener Str.

13

Berrenrather Str. / Gürtel

Eifelwall Weißhausstr.

18

Arnulfstr. Sülzburgstr.

Sülzgürtel

18

13

HürthKalscheure

Efferen

RE 12, 22 RB 24

Kiebitzweg Hürth-Hermülheim

9 Cent/Min. aus dem dt. Festnetz, Mobilfunk max. 42 Cent/Min.

Fischenich 2011June

c

1 7

Moltkestr. Mauritiuskirche

(Universitätsklinik)

++ 49 (0) 180 3.50 40 30

Kölner Verkehrs-Betriebe AG Verkehrsverbund Rhein-Sieg GmbH

5

Friesenplatz 3 4

Klettenbergpark

www.kvb-koeln.de

Chr /M

RE 5, 12, 22 RB 24, 48 Zülpicher MRB 26 Platz 12 Gleueler Str. Dasselstr. / Gürtel / Bf Süd 15 9 Köln Weyertal Süd Universität

Information

Wolfgang Brandenburg Dipl.-Ing.

12

Rudolfplatz

Wüllnerstr.

the different stations.

Contact:

15

Köln West

Hans-Böckler-Platz / Bf West

Zülpicher Str. / Gürtel

Sülz Hermeskeiler Platz

what kind of conditions he will come across at

5

Piusstr. 3

sd

nk

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Haus Vorst

7

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his trip with the map, showing him at a glance

7

Marsdorf

Fr ec he n

Now the handicapped passenger can plan

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Brahmsstr. Stüttgenhof

FrechenBenzelrath

4

Körnerstr.

K Hans

RE 5, 12, 22 RB 24, 48 MRB 26

Gutenbergstr.

1 7 Melaten

Dürener Str. / Gürtel

RE 1, 9 Aachen S 12 (S 13) Düren

by everybody from street traffic lights. What is the effect?

1

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conditions and the diversity of situations

Oskar-Jäger-Str. / Gürtel

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Nußbaumerstr.

13

Venloer Str. / Gürtel Weinsbergstr. / Gürtel

R

To clarify the complexity of the structural

FrechenKönigsdorf

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completely redesigned:

RB 38

W

improving the design, the latest issue was

1

S 11

Lenauplatz

Leyendeckerstr.

ru

K-Weiden West

After previous updates of the map focused on

4

3

Äußere Kanalstr.

K-Lövenich

What was the solution?

K Geldernstr. / Parkgürtel

Rektor-Klein-Str.

Iltisstr.

K-Müngersdorf / Technologiepark

S 12 (S 13)

Mollwitzstr.

Margaretastr.

Akazienweg

Düsseldorf Neuss RB 38

Longerich Friedhof

Alter Flughafen Butzweilerhof

Wolffsohnstr.

RE 8 RB 27

Herforder Str. Altonaer Platz MeerfeldN 12 15 str. WilhelmSollmann-Str. Scheib

IKEA Am Butzweilerhof

Westfriedhof

The design tries to meet the needs of wheel-chair users, the group with the severest handicap – and other people with restrained mobility will benefit as well.

Heimersdorf

15

Sparkasse Am Butzweilerhof

5

M

Chorweiler

Longericher Str.

S 11

3 Schaffrathsgasse

Merke

15

K Volkhovener Weg

RE 7

12

K-Chorweiler Nord

K-Blumenberg

K-Chorweiler

Mengenich Ollenhauerring

Mönchengladbach RE 8 RB 27

To enable those passengers to plan their trips, a special issue of the normal Rapid Transit Plan was created first in 2002.

S 11 Neuss / Düsseldorf

Kierberg Konzeption / Gestaltung // Vertrieb Fon: 0214 / 24 55 8 Fax: 24 28 4 kontakt@id-verkehr.de

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Brühl N

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Euskirchen

18


tiCket pleaSe

MORE THAN ADEQUATE RE 7 RB 48

K-Stammheim

9

kirche

12

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1 7 9

Severinsbrücke

4 18

15

Poststr.

3 Severinstr.

16

Eifelstr.

Eifelplatz

15

Chlodwigplatz

16

Heinrich-LübkeUfer

Pohligstr.

Zollstock

12 Südfriedhof

Bonn Hbf

Kölner Str. Westhoven Berliner Str.

16

Rodenkirchen

7 Gilgaustr. Ensen Kloster Porz Markt

Michaelshoven

Brühl

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S-Bahn (commuter traffic) most stations elevated RE RB MRB regional trains long distance traffic

S 13

not barrier-free

Porz-Wahn not S 12

7

Godorf

low-floor vehicles 1 7 9 12 15 light rail lines regular vehicles 3 4 5 13 16 18 station ground level underground elevated in cutting

RE 8

Rosenhügel

Sürth

assistance needed full access to platforms and vehicles

Zündorf

Wesseling Nord

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Köln / Bonn Flughafen

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Porz Steinstr.

Wesseling Süd

Brühl Mitte

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Brühl-Vochem Brühl Nord

Baumschulenweg

Siegstr.

Zollstockgürtel

RE 5 MRB 26 RB 48

Poll Salmstr.

Bayenthalgürtel

Gottesweg

HürthKalscheuren

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Marienheide Gummersbach

Rösrath

RB 25

Raiffeisenstr.

Schönhauser Str.

pforte

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2, 22 24

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Ubierring

15 Ulre-

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Poller Kirchweg

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9 K Frankfurter Str.

Drehbrücke

Barbarossaplatz

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S 12 S 13 RB 25

RE 8 RE 9 RB 27

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K Trimbornstr.

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(Fachhochschule)

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Neumarkt

1 7

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Bf Deutz / LANXESSarena

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Appellhofplatz / Breite Str.

Reopening expected 2011-Dec-11

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18 16

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Breslauer Platz / Hbf

www.nord-sued-stadtbahn.de

Buchforst Waldecker Str. RE 1 RE 5 RE 7 RB 48

ut

Appellhofplatz / Zeughaus 5

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Thielenbruch

Buchheim Frankfurter Str.

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Breslauer Platz / Hbf

18

3

tr

12

18

18

Buchheim Herler Str.

O st he im

Stegerwaldsiedlung

Ebertplatz

4

Bergisch Gladbach

Duckterath

K-Dellbrück

MariaHimmelfahrtStr.

13

el

15

Conversion

RE 5, 12, 22 24, 48 26

12

5

Wichheimer Str.

13

KBuchforst

Grünstr.

Reichenspergerplatz

Lohsestr.

K Hansaring

8

Mülheim Wiener Platz Bf Mülheim

Zoo / Flora

16

RB 25 S13

18

Boltensternstr.

18

K-Holweide

Holweide Vischeringstr.

KMülheim

ap

K-Nippes

E7

Kinderkrankenhaus

Florastr.

S6

13

4

13

al

12

15

Slabystr.

Amsterdamer Str. / Gürtel

K

13

Keupstr.

K

Neusser Str. / Gürtel

S 11

Von-Sparr-Str.

Nesselrodestr.

S11 only

Im Weidenbruch

Mülheim Berliner Str.

Sebastianstr.

Leuchterstr. Am Emberg

S6

16 Niehl

Scheibenstr.

itzstr.

4

rS

in

Niehl

12

Odenthaler Str.

RE 7 RB 48

Bayerwerk

Fordwerke Süd Geestemünder Str.

RE 1, 5

LEV Mitte

Fordwerke Mitte

naer

Barrier-free Train-Riding

Schlebusch

ae

he

Fordwerke Nord

4

LEV-Küppersteg

R

Merkenich Mitte

LEVSchlebusch

ld

Merkenich

Fu

12

Opladen

LEV-Rheindorf

eu

Langenfeld

Wuppertal

M au sp fa d

S 6 Düsseldorf RE 1, 5

Bonn-Beuel Neuwied

66 67 RE 8 RB 27

Au (Sieg) S 12

RE 9 Betzdorf Siegen

66 67

transfer-station, only partially barrier-free 15

16

barrier-free access for one line only lift, elevator / very long ramp

Bonn

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Category:

Social Affairs

Project:

Measure of America Series

What was the solution? Humantific collaborated with American Human Development Project authors Sarah Burd-Sharps and Kristen Lewis to create the first ever American Human Development Report introducing the HDI Index, a single measure of well-being for all Americans based on indicators in three key areas: Health, Education and Income.

EXPANDED opportunities and choices

WE L L - B E ING

What was the challenge? How might we make the United States a better place for all citizens? Are we really living the American Dream? When 1 in 6 Americans have no health insurance, 30 million Americans lack the basic literacy skills to fill out a job application, and 60% of households have only 4.2% of the country’s wealth...What’s stopping us from doing better?

CONSTRAINED

EVERYONE HAS A DIFFERENT STARTING POINT

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

opportunities and choices

Those with few capabilities face the steepest climb.

T IME

What was the effect? Sensemaking is an important step in the changemaking process. The Measure of America series has helped policymakers around the nation shape crucial policies and fiscal decisions. Measure of America has become a social sensemaking phenomenon that has influenced how information design can play a role in changing the world for the better, not by appealing to emotion, but by clearly presenting facts and figures.

START

Elizabeth Pastor Humantific ask@humantific.com www.humantific.com

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END

Supportive institutions

Strong motivation

Quality education

One’s outcome is the result of forces acting both within and outside of one’s control.

Strong family

0

Contact:

Poor health

Job loss

20

40

60

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SOCIETY

INDIVIDUAL

CAPAB IL IT IES culture

IDENTITY: I am an Asian American Man living in the Bay Area.

politics

religion

AGENCY : I am empowered to further goals that matter to me.

laws

economy

community environment

T HR EE D IM EN SION S

A Long and Healthy Life

Access to Knowledge

A Decent Standard of Living

L EN SES GEOGRAPHY

GENDER

RACE / ETHNICITY

NATIVITY

IN D IC ES

Health INDEX

Education INDEX

Income INDEX

American Human Development INDEX

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Category:

Social Affairs

Project:

Social Mobility in Mexico. Graphs for different levels of understanding

What was the challenge? To help users understand intergenerational social mobility data related to education to promote self-consciousness and motivate change. The project offers relevant data to people from different levels of understanding: from policy-makers and specialised professionals to people who can hardly read. What was the solution? Seven interactive graphics with three different perspectives: 1. The data as it is... 2. How do I [user] identify with this data...? 3. The meaning of data... The graphs are placed on the website and will be part of an itinerant exhibit. The graphs’ headings are written in plain language and specialised terms —in the subheading—, they contain: images from the levels or situations depicted, short text descriptions and sound for those who do not want or can not read. In each graph the users could find out their own particular situation and that of their parents’. What was the effect? Low and high income level people were shocked by the situations depicted: Low income level people felt identified and concerned with images and issues. Policy-makers and specialised professionales faced images and not only abstract numbers and lines which made them react to the present situation. People suggested to show these graphs to Primary and Secondary school children, teachers and parents so they become aware of the importance of education.

Contact: name: María González de Cossío company/organisation: CEAD e-mail: mdecosio@yahoo.com.mx www.cead.org.mx

84

Each pictures shows a screen of a different graph. Each one of them deals with a different topic, all related to the Mexicans socio-economic level. Top figure. Graph on: “How many children have overcome their parents‘ schooling” Middle figure. Graph on: “How many people have changed their socio-economic level from their parents level” Below figure. Graph on: “Where do Indigenous people work”.

Top figure. Graph on: “How do we consider our present socio-economic situation in relation to our parents’?” Middle figure. Graph on: “How many people have more services and products than their parents?” Below figure. Graph on: “Where do Mexicans work and how much do they earn” The graphs can be seen on-line at: www.ceey.org.mx/site/movilidad-social/ graficas-interactivas-sobre-movilidadsocial-mexico


NEXT! SHORTLISTED

These pictures show several screens of the Graph: “The amount you study, the amount you earn. Relationship between schooling and socio-economic level�. The process is explained in IDJ 2009, vol 17, no. 3. pp 246260, and all graphs can be seen at: www. ceey.org.mx/site/movilidad-social/graficasinteractivas-sobre-movilidad-social-mexico

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Category:

Social Affairs

Project:

TLEX Online Library

What was the challenge? Within the US there are over 270 federally recognized Indian tribes that have created individual formal tribal justice systems. These tribal courts exercise jurisdiction and are developing bodies of indigenous law spanning a number of substantive legal contexts. Access to the legal materials of individual tribal courts is varied, and in many cases, difficult. For example, court decisions might be archived, in hard copy, in a tribal court office. The challenge was to enhance access to legal materials of American Indian tribal justice systems.

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What was the solution? The Tribal Law Exchange Online Library, TLEX, was developed through a grant from the National Science Foundation. TLEX is a repository created for the dissemination of legal materials of American Indian tribal justice systems for the purpose of research and to assist in the practice of law in Indian country. The concept of ‘exchange’ was incorporated to communicate the idea that participation in the TLEX system is mutually beneficial. By entering into an agreement, materials are archived on the TLEX system. Since its formal inauguration, TLEX has become the only truly free, non-fee based website providing access to tribal court opinions.

What was the effect? More comprehensive legal research can be conducted. Law practitioners in Indian country can access case law from participating tribal courts. Participating tribal justice systems have a searchable digital archive of their legal materials. Self-governance of individual nations is reasserted as awareness of legal pluralism in the United States is raised.

Contact: name: Delphine Keim-Campbell company/organisation: College of Art & Architecture, University of Idaho e-mail: delphine@uidaho.edu website: uidaho.edu/caa


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87


Category:

Social Affairs

Project:

A Semantic Landscape of the Last.fm Music Folksonomy

What was the challenge? The challenge for this design was to visualize what the world of music looks like according to tags on Last.fm. How can we use the musical annotations of casual listeners and diehard fans alike from the social radio website last to represent this world? How can the resulting model--over a domain as broad and deep as music--be realized clearly and completely as a map that is easy to read and explore? Last.fm is an Internet radio site where users discover new music based on their listening history. They can annotate musical items such as artists and songs with arbitrary tags, ranging from “rock” or “jazz” to “seen live” or “songs I absolutely love”.t What was the solution? Our analysis used the self-organized map method, an unsupervised neural network training algorithm that generates a model where similarity is realized as proximity. Proximity inspired a geographic metaphor, and we painted the model as a “landscape” of music using cartographic tools. What was the effect? The result is an unfamiliar landscape of a familiar place. Listeners from every corner of this shared musical geography can explore the borders of their own stomping grounds or see how history, culture, and technology have shaped the ever-expanding world of music.

Contact: name: Michael J. Stamper company/organisation: CNS Center e-mail: mstamper@indiana.edu website: http://cns.iu.edu

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Download the full-sized PDF poster version of this visualization here: http://cns.iu.edu/research/10-Last.fm.pdf

A self-organizing map (SOM) is a form of artificial neural network that generates a low-dimensional geometric model from high-dimensional data. It transforms nearness in the input space to nearness in the map space. The map is a landscape made up of a grid of small neurons, each having some level of association with each of the tags in the tag space. The map is randomly seeded and then trained on a collection of data by repeatedly (1) finding the most similar neuron for a piece of training data and (2) pulling each neuron’s tag associations closer to the matched piece of training data. Early in the training, the pull extends across most of the map. By the end, it affects only a tiny range around the most similar neuron.

Self-Organizing Maps

The original data set, collected during the first half of 2009, was sampled by removing all but the 1,000 most frequently used tags (out of 281,818 total), then discarding items not annotated with one of those tags. This reduces the number of items from 1,393,559 to 1,088,761. After sampling, the average item has 6.8 tags (3.8 unique tags). The top ten tags include: rock, electronic, seen live, indie, alternative, pop, female vocalists, jazz, classic rock, experimental.

Last.fm is an Internet radio site where users discover new music based on their listening history. They can annotate musical items such as artists and songs with arbitrary tags, ranging from “rock” or “jazz” to “seen live” or “songs I absolutely love”.

Data

Joseph Biberstine, Russell J. Duhon, Katy Börner, Elisha Hardy, Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center, School of Library and Information Science, Indiana University, Bloomington, and André Skupin, San Diego State University

The last.fm data was originally collected for: Schifanella, R., Barrat, A., Cattuto, C., Markines, B., and Menczer, F. (2010). Folks in Folksonomies: Social Link Prediction from Shared Metadata. Proc. 3rd ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining (WSDM).

This work is funded by the Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center at Indiana University, the James S. McDonnell Foundation, and the National Science Foundation under grant SBE-0738111. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

Acknowledgments

Note that tags can appear in multiple locations, especially if they have strong associations with multiple terms that are not themselves strongly associated. For instance, “alternative” shows up as a second-level region within “seen live”, but also exists as a top-level region elsewhere on the map.

The size and shape of each tag roughly reflects the extent of its region. The actual size and shape are somewhat flexible to guard against label overlap.

first second third forth fifth

Dark blue tags identify regions defined by the secondstrongest association of each neuron, and so on, as shown in the legend below.

Dark brown borders separate regions defined by each neuron’s single strongest tag association; those regions are marked with black tags.

Regions on the landscape are labeled by the tags with which their constituent neurons associate most strongly.

The landscape is a 180 by 180 grid of hexagonal neurons.

Project

A Semantic Landscape of the Last.fm Music Folksonomy Using a Self-Organizing Map

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89


Category:

Social Affairs

Project:

Markets for Good: Giving Ecosystem Visual Models

What was the challenge? How might we explain the existing landscape of philanthropy today and the future landscape of tomorrow? The philanthropy landscape is large with lots of inherent challenges, and has never before been visualized. This changemaking project helps inform what it now is and might in the future become. What was the solution? Humantific UnderstandingLab created a series of visual sensemaking diagrams working with multiple constituents including The Gates Foundation, Hewlett Foundation, Liquidnet For Good, etc. The final results represent a synthesis of multiple views which were used to inform future cocreation sessions that were focused on building the future system as shown in the visual models. What was the effect? The models created a unifying effect among all constituents. The effect of making these visual models was the collection of multiple perspectives into one shared view, which was then taken on the road and shared with many others in order to stimulate broader participation. In each futuring session, the models were used to inform discussion regarding who might build and/or contribute what aspect of the future model. These sensemaking acceleration models are being shared at many social changemaking conferences around the world.

Contact: Elizabeth Pastor Humantific ask@humantific.com www.humantific.com

90


NEXt! MORE THAN ADEQUATE

Today/Tomorrow Diagrams A Today/Tomorrow Diagram is a visual representation of the present state compared to a desired future state. It is used to clarify how a proposed solution will address the current problems and how it will work in context.

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Category: Project:

Emergency / Safety User interface for Thales Hypervisor, a surveillance application. A new generation of intelligent and modular supervision systems.

What was the challenge? Thales is a world leader in mission-critical information systems for defence and security, aerospace and transportation. Since 5 years Attoma helps Thales to develop the Human Machine interface of the Hypervisor solution, concieved for supervision of complex infrastructures. The Hypervisor solution permits to real time manage aspects related to security or operations, and is particularly adapted to complex infrastructures like big cities, transportation systems, urban and rail networks, airports, industrial or military facilities. The HMI aggregates thousands of data and supervision operators spend up to six hours straight staring at luminous screens, shifting their attention among various intercom, phone and radio systems while keeping an eye on CCTV monitors. Sometimes interfaces span several screens and a single mouse-drag cannot cover the entire distance. Consequently, supplementary mouses and keyboards are sometimes implemented. Such elaborate arrangements only exacerbate an already complex use situation that is characterized by a high degree of stress, profuse sensory input and a heavy cognitive load. The challenge of designing the Hypervisor user interface, was to present a great amount of data in a unified and consistent way and to provide the operators with an advanced and powerful decision support system.

Contact: name: ATTOMA | Marine Rouit company/organisation: Attoma & Thales e-mail: marine.rouit@attoma-design.com website: www.attoma-design.com

92

What was the solution? Our objective has been to provide a definitive and integrated system that could be used in very various fields (transportation, cities, oil & gas...). To do so, a particular attention has been devoted to information design and graphical taxonomy. The user interface relies on very simple design principles that permit to ensure consistency and reduce cognitive load. It efficiently provides a single, structured interface for hypervision tasks. The interface was concieved to be distributed both on two screens or on one single screen. With two screens, default hierarchy follows western reading standards : from left to right. Screen One is broadly considered the « decision screen » while Screen Two is the « action screen. ».

Screen One displays a broad overview and mainly serves the purpose of a dashboard composed of five boxes or panes: Navigation; Location; Alarm Diagram; Alarms; Emergency Calls. Each of these boxes or panes displays a specific « view » of a portion of the system and designed for a specific purpose in user activity. The main objective was to minimize redundancy and superfluous information while enhancing complementarity. Screen Two is the command and control screen. It is dedicated to the presentation of a synoptic view of an area or sub-levels of a system for an operator to take action on the devices it contains. Screen Two is the operator’s main screen, as it can also contain business-specific interfaces designed to be included within the Hypervisor’s interface.


S

S

SHORTLISTED

To reduce cognitive friction, the interface is based on a dark background and is mostly composed of gray objects. Color is used sparingly in order to avoid superfluous visual signals. Besides using varying shades of gray, the GUI employs two main functional colors: yellow (used to signify a prompt or an alarm) and light blue (used to signify when an object is « active », i.e. currently subject to the command and control of the user). The choice of these two colors successfully fulfills the criteria of accessibility, since their significance is mainly conveyed through a variation of light energy and not of hue. Indeed, even if the GUI is degraded to display only in shades of gray, prompts

and active objects remain visible and clearly distinguished from background information. In the GUI, functional objects are characterized by their material, tangible attributes, especially through the use of shade variations to simulate the effects of light and shadow on a physical surface. Beyond simple variations in light intensity and color, this type of rendering can be used to further enrich the perception of depth. Thus, functional objects appear to take on physical qualities like weight and volume. These qualities distinguish them from uniform areas of shade or color, which appear « flat » in comparison.

What was the effect? The design of the Hypervisor user interface was a cornerstone of the Hypervisor solution . It permited to Thales to build a structured vision of the supervision activity. This vision, materialized by the interface, is a strategic issue for this company specialized in complex information systems. The hypervisor interface is now used by Thales when implementing new surveillance systems for cities, military or industral facilities, transportation networks, but its framework is also used for cybersecurity applications or cloud computing systems management.

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Category:

Corporate Design and Communications

Project:

Website Leitz | www.leitz-wein.de

What was the challenge? The superb Rßdesheim wines of the Josef Leitz Vineyard, which has borne the name of its founder for 250 years, are coveted worldwide. Since 2000 Fuenfwerken has been responsible for all aspects of design for the vineyard. Fuenfwerken has now conceived, developed, designed and programmed the website for Johannes Leitz who was proclaimed vintner of the year 2011 by the Gault Millau WeinGuide. What was the solution? The website itself is restricted to one page. In keeping with Leitz corporate design it encourages you to browse in a simple and elegant way, without having to leave the homepage – the top section provides an overview of the content and as well as classic scrolling and the unobtrusive dropdown menu it enables navigation via neatly arranged teaser boxes, which take you smoothly across the page to your objective when clicked What was the effect? With its new website Leitz the traditional winegrower represents not only its international achievements at the highest level in technical and design terms but also its long-established taste and world class when it comes to wine. The new website won several international designawards, some in gold. More details: http:// www.fuenfwerken.com/index. php?inhalt=interaktiv_projekte_ detail&id=2477&sprache=en

Contact: Helmut Ness Fuenfwerken Design AG: helmut.ness@fuenfwerken.com www.fuenfwerken.com

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B2C C2B WINNER

www.leitz-wein.de

95


Category:

Project:

Corporate Design and Communications

Corporate Identity Design Guidelines for the National Tourist Information Offices

What was the challenge? The main challenge of the project was to generate a recognizable identity for the National Tourist Information Offices, adjusting them to visitor’s needs and expectations. Up to this point, the different information offices that exist throughout the country did not have a clear and unifying identity that was easily recognized as an official tourism information point. On another hand, before the redesign took place, the office’s staff sat behind their workstation and waited for tourists to approach them and take a seat across the desk. According to the initial

research, the experience did not reflect on key aspects of tourism and travelling, like the need to “discover” and be “surprised”. Visitors could not make a good use of waiting times since there was no information available for them to browse meanwhile they were attended. Another part of the challenge was that most of these offices once a year received large amounts of brochures and graphic material. Most of the offices had very little storage space so in most cases they were cluttered with boxes and improvised storage bins.

96

What was the solution? The solution consisted on turning the different elements in the office in supports for travel information. The furniture and graphic design for the new office allows visitors to find information according to their needs and interest, either by themselves or seeking help from the informers. The main information elements that were designed as part of the project are giant wall maps that represent the country, the greater region where the office is located and a city map. A new central table is printed with curious facts about Chile and its


B2C C2B SHORTLISTED

Touristic activities_Land

Avistamiento de aves

Cabalgata

Canopy - Tirolesa

Caza

Ciclismo

Rappel

Golf

Montañismo

Motociclismo

Deportes en generel

Equitación - Hípica

Escalamiento

Esquí

Excursión - Trekking

Rodeo

Mountain bike

Paleontología

Snowboard

Canoísmo - Remo

Esquí acuático

Surf

Observación de fauna marina

Windsurf

Natación

Rafting

Parapente - Deportes aeronáuticos

Hotel

Refugio

Hospedaje rural

Cabañas

Camping

Aeródromo - Cancha de aterrizaje

Embarcadero

Actividades turísticas_Agua

Buceo

Servicios turísticos

Náutica con motor

Náutica sin motor

Pesca recreativa

Alojamiento

Servicios de transporte

Estancia - Hacienda

Centro de convenciones

Alimentación - Restaurant

Picnic

Lodge

Centro de esquí

Aeropuerto

Estación de trenes

Estacionamiento de bicicletas

Plaza peaje

Rol 1

Rol 2

Terminal de buses

Agua potable

Estación de servicio

Banco - Cambio

Basurero

Bomberos

Cajero automático

Correo electrónico - Web

Wi-fi

Hospital - Primeros auxilios

Información turística

Mecanica

Precio

Terminal de cruceros

Teleférico - Andarivel

Transbordador

Servicios complementarios

Túnel

Correo

Cementerio

Primeros auxilios

Teléfono público

Atractivos turísticos_Culturales

Información complementaria

Información turística Tourist information

Carabineros

Servicios higiénicos

Accesibilidad asistida

Accesibilidad autónoma

Clima

Extintor

Ascensor

Casino

Centro comercial

Degustación de vinos

Etnoturismo

Galería de arte

Galería de arte

Iglesia

Mina

Mirador

No fumar

Artesanía

Fuerte

Estadio

Feria - Mercado

Folklore - Cultura tradicional

Observatorio astronómico

Mirador fotográfico

Moai

Museo -Centro cultural

Zoológico

Horario

Atractivos turísticos_Naturales

Palafito

Petroglifos

Pueblo o arquitectura interesante

Teatro

Tren temático

Viñedos

Acantilado

Caverna

Granja educativa Turismo rural

Cascada

Dunas

Fauna

Flora

Flora y fauna

Geología Formación geológica

Géiser

Glaciar

Termas

Humedal

Lago o laguna

Montaña - cerro

Parque nacional

Parque o plaza

Playa

Río

Salar

Volcán

Área de protección del Consejo de Monumentos Nacionales

Tranque - represa

main tourism destinations. Every furniture element designed for the office also serves as storage points for printed material, reducing the clutter and problems identified in the diagnose stage of the project. Another part of the solution was the development of a graphic standards manual for printed information that regulates brochures and maps provided by the National Tourism Service. The new brochures are exhibited in the office, reinforcing the office’s graphic identity.

What was the effect? The main effect of the redesign of the tourist information offices is the complete renewal of the way the service is provided. The new design allows the staff to move around the office and to approach visitors. The information delivery is dynamic and horizontal, since most of the process occurs as the informer shows the tourist the different travel and tourism options on the wall maps. Only at the end of the experience, the informer leads the tourist back to his workstation to hand out the different brochures and printed information he requires.

Arqueología -

Monumento

Centro arqueológico

histórico

Área de protección CONAF Medio Ambiente

Monumento público

Zona típica o pintoresca

Patrimonio de la humanidad

Sitio Ramsar

Parque marino -

Monumento nacional -

Reserva marina - Área marina costera protegida

Reserva nacional Reserva de regiones vírgenes Santuario de la naturaleza Reserva de la biósfera

Another important effect of the project is the construction of a consistent corporate identity for the official tourist information offices throughout the country, which is clearly recognized by national and international visitors.

Contact: name: José Manuel Allard company/organisation: Department of Typographic Studies, Design School, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile e-mail: jallard@uc.cl website: www.det.cl

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Category:

Corporate Design

Project:

annual report video in print Star Cooperation GmbH

What was the challenge? The challenge was to get a special an innovative annual report with integration of new media elements. Combining video and audio element in a classic print product. What was the solution? An annual report with a built-in video modul (called “video in print”). What was the effect? Presenting a cutting-edge annual report, with a unrivaled innovative character for a excluisive target group. It generates high involvement, invites to explore contents through it’s completely new sense and likable transmits the key messages the company wants to tell. Details: Storage of up to 45 minutes of video material Up to 5 chapter buttons available Battery rechargeable via Mini-USB New movies loadable via Mini-USB LCD screens available in different sizes (2,4’’/4,1’’/5’’/7’’)

Contact: name: Stefanie Stöckermann company/organisation: Star Cooperation GmbH e-mail: Stefanie.Stöckermann@Star-Cooperation.com website: www.star-cooperation.com

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B2C C2B SHORTLISTED

99


Category: Project:

Corporate Design and Communications Printed Side-Tables What was the effect?

What was the challenge? Just as you said: “helping companies/ business to fully and completely express themselves and what they have to offer“ What was the solution? A very easy to handle spontaneously usable little object, that allows as a side effect to transport different messages. It does’nt fight for attention, it rather surprises the user, in a rather playful way. Logos and good graphic design for names, and other icons are very useful. But there is more, that can be done meanwhile. Since we can individualize clothing and other objects, I propose to do the same with a small furniture with a printed surface, a side-table that a client of a company or business finds - next to an arm chair in the entrance hall of a company, while waiting, - in the conference rooms, for the glasses and the water - next to a lounge chair in the Lobby of his Hotel where he puts his newspaper and the espresso - at the side of his bed in his Hotel room, for the lamp, the alarm clock and his book - in a doctors cabinet, in the waiting area, fort he magazines - in a store... where ever the small side-tables can serve as a practical, functional furniture but at the same time carry a message, that reminds the client of the place where he finds himself at that moment, and of the specific qualities of that place, by the decorative print on the surface of the table.

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The printed side-table – designed by Angela Wiegand – is cut out of a molding panel for concrete. (plywood boards, finnish birch, with a perfect surface) by a computer-controlled (CNC) milling machine. It’s practically only one cut: an ellipse taken out of a rectangular board. What’s left gets the sharp edges cut off and is broken up into two symmetric pieces : the legs. There is very little loss of material. Cept 1 is custom-made in a carpenter’s workshop, on demand. Set up in seconds – without screws or tools, the sidetable can be taken apart and stowed away again just as quickly. The small table is 50 cm high, the oval tabletop 75.5 cm by 44.5 cm by 1.5 cm. The cutting edges are showing the natural color stripes of the plywood layers. They are treated with oil. Almost everything that can be digitised, can be printed on the tables. A painting, drawing, a poem, graffiti, photos... What ever the client feels can represent his place or corporation or even interpret it in a more abstract way, reflecting the idea of the place. There are almost no limits, and there is a chance to allow a truly artistic attempt for establishing print-motives. This way art and (furniture-) design get fused in a truly individual object.

Unique pieces with the option for reproduction: The printed tables can be produced as single pieces or small series. options fort he client: 1. The customer has a choice of existing patterns that we developed in cooperation with artists. For example with an online gallery which focuses on the art of handicaped artists. 2. We create a new motiv specially for the customer, according to his wishes. He sends us his logo, text, foto, drawing etc. We prepare his data for printing and have the printing done in full service. This way the companies and business are offered a new and almost unlimited option for a different and surprising communication of what their specialities are. They purchase a piece of art, and a functional furniture at the same time.

Drawing on the table by Joseph Wong published with his friendly permission

This submitted table is printed with a motive for Jean Paul Gaultier, a drawing by Joseph Wong (old Master Q). It is exemplary for the above mentioned solution.

Contact: name: Angela Wiegand company/ organisation: Angela Wiegand-Design e-mail: info@angela-wiegand.de website: www.angela-wiegand.de


B2C C2B SHORTLISTED

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Category:

Corporate Design Wayshowing

Project:

annual report video in print Star Cooperation GmbH Myer Head Office

What was the the challenge? challenge? The challenge waslargest to get adepartment special an store innoMYER, Australia’s vative annual reporttheir withhead integration recently relocated office toof new media elements. Docklands. BVN Architects commissioned Combining and audioembellishments element in a Büro North tovideo design graphic classic print product. and signage throughout the space. What the solution? After awas thorough research phase, we An annual report withevolves a built-inthroughout video crafted design which modul (called print”). the nine floors;“video each in floor is themed by a

specific decade in twentieth century fashion, What startingwas withthe theeffect? 1910’s and working up Presenting cutting-edge annual report, through the abuilding to the 1990’s. with a unrivaled innovative character for a excluisive target group. The challenge faced by Buro North was Ittogenerates high involvement, invites to exincorporate many different aesthetics plore contents through it’s completely across a century of fashion into one new sense andcontemporary likable transmits the key messeamless solution. sages the company wants to tell. What was the solution? Details: Storage of up towere 45 minutes of video material Wall Graphics relief routered and Up to 5 chapter buttons available signage developed using a feature material Battery viatoilet Mini-USB relevantrechargeable to the decade, pictograms New movies loadable via Mini-USB were given the same decade relevant LCD screens available in different sizes treatment creating a subtle and sophisticated (2,4’’/4,1’’/5’’/7’’) interpretation of MYER’s heritage. What was the effect? Overall this has created a truly integrated solution, incorporated requirements from all parties involved, MYER, BVN, and staff. Merging heritage, aesthetic and production ideas that blend seamlessly into its architectural and fashion surounds. The solution has contributed to a inspirational and informative work environment.

Contact: name: Stefanie Stöckermann company/organisation: Star Cooperation GmbH Contact: e-mail: name: Amy Johnstone Stefanie.Stöckermann@Star-Cooperation.com company/organisation: Buro North website: www.star-cooperation.com e-mail: amy@buronorth.com website: www.buronorth.com

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B2C C2B SHORTLISTED

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Category:

Products and Services

Project:

BT Financial Group Disclosure Document

1 1 Before and after The redesigned Disclosure document is 55 pages

2 Navigational contents page We made the document easier to navigate by using

shorter than its previous incarnation, saving financial advisers nearly 40% of their printing costs (based on a job around 20,000).

icons and aligned the content with the questions that are important to investors, based on our user-based research.

What was the challenge? BT Financial Group, one of Australia’s leading investment companies, approached Second Road to reinvent the disclosure document for one of their flagship investment products called “BT Wrap”. A product distributed via financial advisers, BT Wrap essentially is a tool that ‘wraps’ around an investment portfolio, shielding an investor from the complication of managing multiple investments from varying providers.

What was the solution? Using a process of user-based research, co-design, prototyping and testing, Second Road and BT Financial Group created a new short-form disclosure document consisting of no more than 20 pages. Our goal was to create a document that genuinely promoted customer understanding of the product, and could be used effectively as a tool during the financial advice process.

In Australia, regulators require financial institutions to supply disclosure documents to prospective investors in any financial product, to make sure they understand what they are investing in. The current disclosure document was 75 pages long and primarily a legal document in its content and style. Its challenging format and content meant that very few financial advisers actually used it for explaining the product and very few investors actually read it.

104

We reshaped the structure and tone of the content to reflect the perspective of the customer, used visual diagrams and plain English to help explain key concepts, and moved the legal terms and conditions to a user-friendly CD-Rom placed in a pocket in the back. We also added new features such as an ‘experience pathway’ to help explain what fees would be paid (as opposed to a bland table), and also some new material on the rights of the investor.

2

What was the effect? The new disclosure document has been extremely well received by both investors and the financial planners who provide it to them. Investors are now a lot more engaged and clearly understand the offering – as one investor declared, “compared to others out there, this one’s great... It’s easier to understand.” Complex financial products have always struggled to achieve this within the Financial Services industry. Financial planners have benefitted from having a document that supports both their communication and their brand. One planner explained the transformation: “I never used the disclosure document before – it detracted from the value proposition. Now, it’s a selling point.” And the smaller size has lowered printing costs by 40% and also reduced the consumption of paper. A senior executive within BT hailed it as setting a new benchmark for disclosure documents.


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it!

WINNER

3 Visual aids We replaced heavy text with visual aids to better explain how the product works, creating real benefits for both financial advisers and investors. The ‘What is Wrap?’ visual was particularly powerful in promoting understanding of the product. In the words of one adviser, “This diagram is priceless. I can explain the whole value proposition to a client from one page. It’s clear and it’s useful, which is what I need.”

4 Experience pathway We used an experience pathway to make the fees and costs more tangible for customers. In this way, we tried to connect the fees to the real situation of the investor, rather than cloaking them in marketing and legal jargon.

3

4

5 Next steps The last spread extends the value of the disclosure document, by explaining to the customer in simple terms what will happen if they choose to use “BT Wrap”. This helped to connect the document both to the wider application process and to their ongoing relationship with their adviser.

5

Contact: name: Julian Jenkins company/organisation: Second Road and BT Financial Group e-mail: julian.jenkins@secondroad.com.au website: www.secondroad.com.au

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Category:

Products and Services

Project:

Morgenstelle Cafeteria, Tübingen University

What was the challenge? The Morgenstelle Student Cafeteria is a plain, functional 1960s building. Following its renovation, the owners and users wanted a new interior design to create a friendly atmosphere for the space and the people in it. What was the solution? “hin und wieder aber dennoch” (now and then but nonetheless) Large-scale, luminous words accompany the students at Tübingen University not – as we might expect – while they are studying but while they are eating. Suspended from the ceiling in the cafeteria where the food is served, the words and their possible meanings add an element of interest and diversion to the time spent in this functional space. They are a playful adaptation of words by the philosopher Hannes Böhringer selected specifically for this location. Light sequences of different colours create an ever-changing atmosphere, bringing the whole cafeteria to life. What was the effect? Words, colours, image and time constantly re-define the sensory experience of the space, so that its functionality fades into the background.

Credits: Communication Design: büro uebele Interior Design: ZieglerBürg, Büro für Gestaltung Copy: Hannes Böhringer Photos: Daniel Fels

Contact: büro uebele visuelle kommunikation info@uebele.com, www.uebele.com

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107


Auflagefläche der Reifen, um die gesamte Motorleistung eines Pkw sicher auf die Straße zu bringen. « Horst Wildemann Univ.-Prof. Dr. Dr. h. c. mult. TU München

BRIEFING

Kunde

Products and services

Project:

LANXESS “Green Tires” Stefan Fichtel

Datum

15. Juni 2011

s ist nur noch eine Winterreifen-Saison hin, denn ab November 2012 schreibt die Europäische Union für alle Autoreifen ein Label vor, das die Qualitäts- und Leistungseinstufung erleichtert. Anlass sind die ehrgeizigen Ziele der EU, Kohlenstoffdioxid-Emissionen zu reduzieren, die sich wohl nur erfüllen lassen, wenn auch Autos weniger Treibstoff verbrauchen und damit weniger CO2 ausstoßen. In den Reifen schlummern tatsächlich große Einsparpotenziale. Inzwischen ist von „Grünen Reifen“ die

R s l d R E z w t B s

Andreas Dickmann, Martin Hunold

Mitarbeiter

Ort

E

Lanxess

Category:

Ansprechpartner

sicheren, sparsamen und lei

EU-LABEL: JE GRÜNER, DESTO BESSER Ab November 2012 werden alle Autoreifen beim Kauf mit einem Label versehen, das die Qualitätseinstufung anhand der Merkmale Nasshaftung, Treibstoffeffizienz und Geräuschemission zeigt. Das Label ist ähnlich der Energieeinstufung von Kühlschränken oder Waschmaschinen.

Leverkusen

What was the challenge? Rollwiderstand und Nasshaftung und Kraftstoffeffizienz Bremsleistung The beginning of all conceptual work is alIxtract was asked to reduce three hundred ways a very reduced first idea, and this is pages of content, compiled from five differhow it all began with this project - very simient presentations and plenty of other matelar to where we ultimately arrived. The inforials, to their key messages and to visualize graphic was designed to replace a common these arguments on two single pages. The ad campaign with a more modern approach main motivation for this spread was driven to deal with complex, information-driven by the upcoming EU tire label - which will communication and customer interests. be implemented in 2012 and is supported by Lanxess. The project’s conception had to Kommunikationsziele fully focus on the hard task set before us: Die Grafikseite soll bis zum 21.09 dem „Rubber-Day“ von Lanxess geschaltet werden. Hier 3. SPRIT SPAREN werden zunächst vor allem die Automobilindustrie und Fachjournalisten vertreten sein, später to communicate the central product features richtet sich die Anzeige an ein breiteres Publikum. Der Treibstoff wird vom Motor in opfert. Es lo Ziel ist es „Lanxess - Inside“ künftig als Premium-Hersteller von synthetischem Kautschuk zu SPARSAM. LEISE: EUROPA SETZTAntriebsenergie AUF „GRÜNE umgewandelt, die REIFE spritsparend of Green Tires based on independent facts, etablieren (nicht als Reifenhersteller.) SynthetischerSICHER. Kautschuk machgt insgesamt rund 50% zur Überwindung des Fahrwider- setzen, um des Umsatzes von Lanxess ausmacht (weiter Verwendung z.B. in feuerfesten Leitungen, Taustandes benötigt wird. Auf das zu senken. to plant the message of the Lanxess brand cheranzügen etc.), die Reifensparte ist insgesamt jedoch ein tragender Geschäftsbereich. Konto der Reifen entfallen dabei derstand v » Vier Postkarten – das ist die Es gilt dasAuflagefläche Thema „Green Tires“ durch Lanxess zu besetzen und als technischer durchschnittlich 20 bis 30 Pro- Vergleich, w der Reifen, um(Arbeitstitel) die gesamte Motorleistung eines Pkw to a customer, and to create an infographic Enabler fürsicher zent. Das heißt, rund jedes Viertel Standardrei künftige Entwicklungen im Bereich der Hochleistungsreifen zu positionieren. auf die Straße zu bringen. « E einer Tankfüllung wird automa- Reifen“ best tisch für den Rollwiderstand ge- von einer Ra which could be easily adapted to multiple Geräuschemission Bei der Einführung des EU Reifensigels soll eine ähnliche Kommunikations- / PR-Misere wie bei Normalreifen der Einführung des E10 Kraftstoffes vermieden werden. size formats. 100% ixtract GmbH Gneisenaustr.111 10961 Berlin 0049 1520 855 1018 www.ixtract.de info@ixtract.de Geschäftsführer Stefan Fichtel

Amtsgericht Charlottenburg HRB 129781 B

Mit einem neuen Reifenlabel bekommen Verbraucher die Chance, einen möglichst sicheren, sparsamen und leisen Reifen zu erkennen.

s ist nur noch eine Winterreifen-Saison hin, denn ab November 2012 schreibt die Europäische Union für alle Autoreifen ein Label vor, das die Qualitäts- und Leistungseinstufung erleichtert. Anlass sind die ehrgeizigen Ziele der EU, Kohlenstoffdioxid-Emissionen zu reduzieren, die sich wohl nur erfüllen lassen, wenn auch Autos weniger Treibstoff verbrauchen und damit weniger CO2 ausstoßen. In den Reifen schlummern tatsächlich große Einsparpotenziale. Inzwischen ist von „Grünen Reifen“ die

Horst Wildemann Univ.-Prof. Dr. Dr. h. c. mult. TU München

farbige Abstufungen von grün nach rot bzw. die Klassen A bis G ablesen. Der reduzierte Rollwiderstand macht sich übrigens besonders bei Elektroautos bezahlt. Hier hat der Rollwiderstand einen deutlich höheren Anteil am Gesamtenergieverbrauch (33 % beim Elektroantrieb gegenüber 20 % beim Verbrennungsmotor). Aber auch für das Rollgeräusch gilt, dass die „Grünen Reifen“ dieses erheblich reduzieren können, denn auch Lärm durch Straßenverkehr stellt eine erhebliche Umweltbelastung dar.

Zusatz: Die Kautschukherstellung wie sie Lanxess betreibt wurde so vor 100 Jahren bei Bayer (Mutterkonzern) von Fritz Hofer entwickelt.

What was the solution? Zielgruppe We divided the story into five road sce- Shareholder und potentielle Shareholder, B2B und Endkunden. narios, not only emphasizing the main product advantages, but also making the 3D-infographic adjustable to many different dimensions. Additional comparisons in the side frames complemented the main infographic with relevant information about the product’s key values and advantages for the environment, which would increase the customer’s loyalty to the brand. BLZ 10050000 Berliner Sparkasse Konto 6604101167

Rede, mit denen sich eine ganze Menge Kraftstoff sparen lässt. Durch den Einsatz besonders leistungsfähiger synthetischer Kautschuke werden die Reifen leichter und kommen mit weniger Rollwiderstand aus – beides bewirkt die von der EU geforderte Verbrauchsreduzierung bei gleichzeitiger Verbesserung der Sicherheitsaspekte wie etwa guter Nasshaftung und hoher Laufleistung. Besonders die Beschaffenheit der Pneus in Bezug auf die genannten Eigenschaften lässt sich beim neuen EU-Label nun einfach über

Geräuschemission

HÄTTEN SIE’S GEWUSST? 2. LEISERE REIFEN

Der Begriff Kautschuk hat seinen Ursprung bei den Azteken und Mayas: „Ka-houtschou“ heißt übersetzt „Stamm der Tränen“.

Der Treibstoff wird vom Motor in Antriebsenergie umgewandelt, die zur Überwindung des Fahrwiderstandes benötigt wird. Auf das Konto der Reifen entfallen dabei durchschnittlich 20 bis 30 Prozent. Das heißt, rund jedes Viertel einer Tankfüllung wird automatisch für den Rollwiderstand ge-

opfert. Es lohnt sich also, hier auf spritsparende „Grüne Reifen“ zu setzen, um den Gesamtverbrauch zu senken. Wie sich der Rollwiderstand verbessert, zeigt der Vergleich, wenn man ein Auto mit Standardreifen oder mit „Grünen Reifen“ bestückt und ohne Antrieb von einer Rampe rollen lässt.

Erst im Jahr 1763 entdeckten die ersten Europäer die Vorteile des Kautschuks und nutzten den Stoff für Schläuche und Schuhe.

Normalreifen 100%

„Grüne Reifen“ 160%

1909 gelang es Friedrich Hofmann, Chemiker bei den „Farbenfabriken vormals Friedr. Bayer & Co.“, deren Erbe heute von LANXESS fortgeführt wird, Kautschuk synthetisch herzustellen.

Rollwiderstand: Lässt man ein Auto antriebslos von einer Rampe rollen, zeigt der Vergleich, dass die zurückgelegte Strecke mit „Grünen Reifen“ bis zu 60% länger ist als mit normalen Reifen

HÄTTEN SIE’S GEWUSST?

name: Stefan Fichtel company/organisation: ixtract GmbH e-mail: info@ixtract.de website: www.ixtract.de

108

mindestens ein Drittel v

Nasshaftung und Bremsleistung

3. SPRIT SPAREN

Contact:

1975 entspricht 100 Rollwiderstand Nassbremsen

Laufleistung Rollwiderstand: Lässt man ein Auto antriebslos von zeigt der Vergleich, dass die zurückgelegteFortschritt: Strecke m Die Eigens haben sich im V 60% länger ist als mit normalen Reifen Reifens 1975 durchschnittlich u

Ab November 2012 werden alle Autoreifen beim Kauf mit einem Label versehen, das die Qualitätseinstufung anhand der Merkmale Nasshaftung, Treibstoffeffizienz und Geräuschemission zeigt. Das Label ist ähnlich der Energieeinstufung von Kühlschränken oder Waschmaschinen.

Rollwiderstand und Kraftstoffeffizienz

What was the effect? The infographic was published in some of Germany’s most important newspapers (Handelsblatt, FAZ) and other magazines. Lanxess’s global advertising campaign was partly substituted with ixtract’s Green Tires infographic, because of its great payoff.

1. SICHERER GRIP ÜBERALL

Besonders im Gebirge, wo die Reifenverformung auf kurvigen Straßen sehr stark ist, machen sich energieeffiziente „Grüne Reifen“ bezahlt. Aus Hochleistungskautschuken von LANXESS hergestellte Reifen weisen einen deutlich geringeren Rollwiderstand auf und sparen dadurch Kraftstoff. Außerdem sind sie langlebiger und verfügen über hervorragende Haftungseigenschaften.

EU-LABEL: JE GRÜNER, DESTO BESSER

Der Begriff Kautschuk hat seinen Ursprung bei den Azteken und Mayas: „Ka-houtschou“ heißt übersetzt „Stamm der Tränen“.

4. BESSER BREMSEN Erst im Jahr 1763 entdeckten die ersten Europäer die Vorteile des Kautschuks und nutzten den Stoff für Schläuche und Schuhe.

1909 gelang es Friedrich Hofmann, Chemiker bei den „Farbenfabriken vormals Friedr. Bayer & Co.“, deren Erbe heute von LANXESS fortgeführt wird, Kautschuk synthetisch herzustellen.

Über eine Milliarde Pkw-Reifen sind derzeit auf den Straßen Europas im Einsatz.

Über einederMilliarde Pkw-Reifen sind derzeit Metern gegenüber Klasse A rechnen, bei der Klasse E sind es bereits sechs Meter. Insgesamt istEuropas im Einsatz. auf den Straßen die Entwicklung deutlich vorange-

Ein wichtiger Aspekt des neuen EU-Reifenlabels ist die Haftung auf nasser Fahrbahn. Wer einen Reifen der Kategorie B kauft, muss bei einer Geschwindigkeit von 80 km/h bereits mit einem verlängerten Bremsweg von drei bis vier Lebensretter in Aktion Bei Pkws mit „Grünen Reifen“ verkürzt sich der Bremsweg bei 80km/h im Vergleich zu herkömmlichen Pneus um mindestens sechs Meter

schritten – vor 30 Jahren war der Bremsweg eines Autos etwa um die Hälfte länger als heute.

Straßenverkehr Nachbarn

6%

Flugzeuge

7%

17%

16%

Abgase

Subjektive Lärmbelastung

Etwa 17 Prozent aller als störend empfundenen Geräuschemissionen in Deutschland gehen auf das Konto des Straßenverkehrs. Häufig ist das Rollgeräusch der Reifen sogar lauter als der Motor. Durch den Einsatz geräuscharmer „Grüner

Leise Profile Spezielle unregelmäßige Reifenprofile führen zu einer Reduzierung des Rollgeräusches

4. BESSE

Reifen“ könnten unsere Innenstädte deutlich leiser werden – und gesünder, denn laut Weltgesundheitsbehörde (WHO) stellt der Verkehrslärm direkt hinter der Umweltverschmutzung das zweitgrößte Gesundheitsrisiko dar.

Ein wichtig EU-Reifenla auf nasser Reifen der K bei einer Ge km/h bereit ten Bremsw

Lebensrette

Bei Pkws mit verkürzt sich 80km/h im V herkömmlich mindestens s 5. LÄNGERE LEBENSDAUER Ein „Grüner Reifen“ steht für Hightech und Höchstleistung. Nicht nur Sparsamkeit und Fahrbahnhaftung sind besser, sondern auch die Laufleistung ist auf höchstem Niveau. Im Vergleich zu einem herkömmlichen Reifen verlängern Hochleistungskautschuke von LANXESS die Haltbarkeit wie Spritfalle Luftdruck 1Bar weniger Druck als vom Hersteller angegeben bedeutet rund 0,5l mehr Treibstoff auf 100km

auch die Abriebfestig fen deutlich. Kombini optimalen Luftdruck fenlebensdauer noch werden. Ein zu niedrig steigert nicht nur d Treibstoffverbrauch, s im Extremfall auch ein Sicherheitsrisiko dar.


n und leisen Reifen zu erkennen.

reifen-Saison 012 schreibt lle Autoreifen nd Leistungsdie ehrgeizid-Emissionen füllen lassen, verbrauchen In den Reifen insparpotenReifen“ die

Rede, mit denen sich eine ganze Menge Kraftstoff sparen lässt. Durch den Einsatz besonders leistungsfähiger synthetischer Kautschuke werden die Reifen leichter und kommen mit weniger Rollwiderstand aus – beides bewirkt die von der EU geforderte Verbrauchsreduzierung bei gleichzeitiger Verbesserung der Sicherheitsaspekte wie etwa guter Nasshaftung und hoher Laufleistung. Besonders die Beschaffenheit der Pneus in Bezug auf die genannten Eigenschaften lässt sich beim neuen EU-Label nun einfach über

farbige Abstufungen von grün nach rot bzw. die Klassen A bis G ablesen. Der reduzierte Rollwiderstand macht sich übrigens besonders bei Elektroautos bezahlt. Hier hat der Rollwiderstand einen deutlich höheren Anteil am Gesamtenergieverbrauch (33 % beim Elektroantrieb gegenüber 20 % beim Verbrennungsmotor). Aber auch für das Rollgeräusch gilt, dass die „Grünen Reifen“ dieses erheblich reduzieren können, denn auch Lärm durch Straßenverkehr stellt eine erhebliche Umweltbelastung dar.

LIK

1. SICHERER GRIP ÜBERALL

EI

Besonders im Gebirge, wo die Reifenverformung auf kurvigen Straßen sehr stark ist, machen sich energieeffiziente „Grüne Reifen“ bezahlt. Aus Hochleistungskautschuken von LANXESS hergestellte Reifen weisen einen deutlich geringeren Rollwiderstand auf und sparen dadurch Kraftstoff. Außerdem sind sie langlebiger und verfügen über hervorragende Haftungseigenschaften.

t!

1975 entspricht 100 Rollwiderstand Nassbremsen

SHORTLISTED

Laufleistung

Fortschritt: Die Eigen Reifens haben sich im V 1975 durchschnittlich mindestens ein Drittel v

2. LEISERE REIFEN

Straßenverkehr Nachbarn

6%

Flugzeuge

7%

17%

16%

Abgase

Subjektive Lärmbelastung

Etwa 17 Prozent aller als störend empfundenen Geräuschemissionen in Deutschland gehen auf das Konto des Straßenverkehrs. Häufig ist das Rollgeräusch der Reifen sogar lauter als der Motor. Durch den Einsatz geräuscharmer „Grüner

in opfert. Es lohnt sich also, hier auf

E die REIFEN“ spritsparende „Grüne Reifen“ zu

eras ei oel ae-

Leise Profile Spezielle unregelmäßige Reifenprofile führen zu einer Reduzierung des Rollgeräusches

Reifen“ könnten unsere Innenstädte deutlich leiser werden – und gesünder, denn laut Weltgesundheitsbehörde (WHO) stellt der Verkehrslärm direkt hinter der Umweltverschmutzung das zweitgrößte Gesundheitsrisiko dar.

setzen, um den Gesamtverbrauch zu senken. Wie sich der Rollwiderstand verbessert, zeigt derSPRITSPARENDE REIFEN Vergleich, wenn man ein Auto mitRECHNEN SICH Standardreifen oder mit „GrünenNICHT NUR FÜR DIE UMWELT om neuen EU-Label verspricht sich Brüssel nicht Reifen“ bestückt und ohne Antrieb zuletzt ein größeres Bewusstsein für kraftstoffsparende Reifen. Schließlich legen die Pkws in von einer Rampe rollen lässt. Europa jedes Jahr rund 5.000 Milliarden Kilometer zurück.

V

Ein einzelner Mensch müsste dafür 17.000 Mal von der Erde zur Sonne fahren – und wieder zurück. Das Einspar Einspar-

potenzial ist also enorm. „Grüne Reifen“ 160%

Normalreifen 100%

GRIP ÜBERALL

e, wo die kurvigen achen sich e Reifen“ ungskauthergestelln deutlich tand auf Kraftstoff. anglebiger orragende

1975 entspricht 100% Rollwiderstand Nassbremsen

17.000 x

Erde

Sonne

Heute -37%

MEHR REIFEN, MEHR GELD

+35%

+71% Rampe rollen, Laufleistung to antriebslos von einer gelegteFortschritt: Strecke mit „Grünen Reifen“ bis zu Die Eigenschaften eines haben sich im Vergleich zu fen Reifens 1975 durchschnittlich um

Würden in Europa alle Fahrzeuge mit „Grünen Reifen“ ausgestattet, ließen sich jährlich mehrere Milliarden Liter Treibstoff sparen.

Here you can see some of the different sizes differcreated, e.g. broadsheet, tabloid, two differ ent magazine-versions, and the iPad format.

Aber was bedeutet das für den Einzelnen?

50€ x 4 = 200€

mindestens ein Drittel verbessert

Ein Satz „Grüne Reifen“ kostet ungefähr 200 Euro mehr als herkömmliche Reifen. Durch die Einsparung von 0,5 l Treibstoff auf 100 km spart man jedoch bei einer jährlichen Fahrleistung von 15.000 Killometer 75 Liter Treibstoff.

0,5l/100km x 15.000km =

75l

Bei einem Spritpreis von 1,40 Euro liegt das Sparpotenzial bei jährlich 105 Euro.

75ll x1,4€/l 1,4€/ €/ € l = 105€

SICHER. SPARSAM. LEISE: EUROPA SETZT AUF „GRÜNE REIFEN“

4. BESSER BREMSEN

nnenstäden – und eltgesundstellt der inter der das zweito dar.

ROLLENDE KLIMASCHONER In Europa könnten jährlich 15 Millionen Tonnen CO2-Emissionen eingespart werden. Diese Menge entspricht dem Emissionsvolumen des aktuellen Verkehrsaufkommens der drei größten deutschen Städte Berlin, Hamburg und München. Um diese Menge zu neutralisieren, müsste man eine Fläche von ca. 12.000 km2 mit Bäumen bepflanzen. Das entspricht rund einem Achtel der gesamten Waldfläche in Deutschland – oder annähernd der Fläche von Schleswig-Holstein.

Rollwiderstand und Kraftstoffeffizienz

SICHER. SPARSAM. LEISE: BRÜSSEL SETZT AUF „GRÜNE REIFEN“

1. SICHERER GRIP

Ein wichtiger Aspekt des neuen Metern gegenüber der Klasse A EU-Reifenlabels ist die Haftung rechnen, bei der Klasse E sind es auf nasser Fahrbahn. Wer einen bereits sechs Meter. Insgesamt ist Reifen der Kategorie B kauft, mussSchleswig-Holstein die Entwicklung deutlich vorangeDas nördlichste Bundesland fast komplett mit bei einer Geschwindigkeit von 80müsste schritten Bäumen bepflanzt werden, – vor 30 Jahren war der um genauso viel CO zu km/h bereits mit einem verlänger-kompensieren, Bremsweg eines Autos etwa um wie sich mit spritsparenden Reifen in einsparen ließe. ten Bremsweg von drei bis vierEuropadie Hälfte länger als heute.

1975 entspricht 100% Rollwiderstand

Heute -37 %

Nassbremsen

+ 35%

Laufleistung

+71%

E

s ist nur noch eine Winterreifen-Saison hin, denn ab November 2012 schreibt die Europäische Union für alle Autoreifen ein Label vor, das die Qualitäts- und Leistungseinstufung erleichtert. Anlass sind die ehrgeizigen Ziele der EU, CO2-Emissionen zu reduzieren, die sich wohl nur erfüllen lassen, wenn auch Autos weniger Treibstoff verbrauchen und damit weniger CO2 ausstoßen. In den Reifen schlummern tatsächlich große Einsparpotenziale. Inzwischen ist von „Grünen Reifen“ die Rede, mit denen sich eine ganze Menge

Reifen-Fortschritt Die Eigenschaften eines Reifens haben sich im Vergleich zu 1975 durchschnittlich um mindestens ein Drittel verbessert.

Kraftstoff sparen lässt. Das Geheimnis liegt im reduzierten Rollwiderstand. Dasselbe gilt für das Rollgeräusch, denn auch Lärm durch Straßenverkehr stellt eine Umweltbelastung dar, die sich um ein gutes Stück reduzieren lässt. Ein weiterer Aspekt, der die EU-Kommissare zum neuen Reifenlabel bewogen hat, ist das Thema Sicherheit. Besonders die Beschaffenheit der Pneus in Bezug auf die Nasshaftung lässt sich nun einfach über farbige Abstufungen von grün nach rot bzw. die Klassen A bis G ablesen.

2

2. LEISERE REIFEN Etwa 17 % aller Geräuschemissionen in Deutschland gehen auf das Konto des Straßenverkehrs. Durch den Einsatz „Grüner Rei-

Geräuschemission

E

Lebensretter in Aktion Bei Pkws mit „Grünen Reifen“ verkürzt sich der Bremsweg bei 80km/h im Vergleich zu herkömmlichen Pneus um mindestens sechs Meter

LEBENSDAUER

steht für stleistung. und Fahrr, sondern t auf höchgleich zu Reifen verautschuke arkeit wie

m eutet rund 0km

auch die Abriebfestigkeit der Reifen deutlich. Kombiniert mit einem optimalen Luftdruck kann die Reifenlebensdauer noch weiter erhöht werden. Ein zu niedriger Luftdruck steigert nicht nur deutlich den Treibstoffverbrauch, sondern stellt im Extremfall auch ein erhebliches Sicherheitsrisiko dar.

DIE ZUKUNFT IM BLICK LANXESS ist ein führender Spezialchemie-Konzern, der 2010 einen Umsatz von 7,1 Milliarden Euro erzielte und aktuell rund 16.000 Mitarbeiter in 30 Ländern beschäftigt. Das Unternehmen ist derzeit an 46 Produktionsstandorten weltweit präsent. Das Kerngeschäft von LANXESS bilden Entwicklung, Herstellung und Vertrieb von Kunststoffen, Kautschuken, Zwischenprodukten und Spezialchemikalien.

Nassbremsen

2. LEISERE REIFEN 3. SPRIT SPAREN Auf das Konto der Reifen entfal entfallen durchschnittlich 20 bis 30 Prozent des Spritverbrauchs. Das heißt, jedes Fünftel einer Tankfül Tankfüllung opfern Sie automatisch dem Rollwiderstand. Um den Gesamt-

verbrauch zu senken lohnt es sich also auf spritsparende „Grüne Reifen“ zu setzen. Denn diese reduzieren im Vergleich zu herkömmlichen Reifen den Spritverbrauch um 5 bis 7 Prozent.

4. BESSER BREMSEN Unterteilt in Klassifizierungen von A bis G lässt sich das Bremsverhalten eines Reifens erkennen. Wer heute einen Reifen der Kategorie E kauft, muss bei einer Geschwindigkeit von 80 km/h mit einem sechs Meter längerem Bremsweg gegenüber der Klasse A rechnen.

Ein Satz „Grüne Reifen“ kostet ungefähr 200 € mehr als herkömmliche Reifen. Durch die Einsparung von 0,5 l auf 100 km spart man bei einer jährlichen Fahrleistung von 15.000 km jedoch 75 l Treibstoff.

Lebensretter in Aktion „Grüne Reifen“ verkürzen den Bremsweg bei 80km/h im Vergleich zu normalen Pneus um mindestens sechs Meter

75 l

Bei 1,40 Euro je Liter Sprit spart man im Jahr 105 Euro.

75 l x 1,4 €/l = 105 €

5. LÄNGERE LEBENSDAUER Ein „Grüner Reifen“ steht für Hightech und Höchstleistung. Nicht nur Sparsamkeit und Haftung sind besser, auch die Laufleistung ist auf höchstem Niveau. Und durch die Hochleistungskautschuke von LANXESS verlängert sich die Haltbarkeit deutlich.

3. SPRIT SPAREN

Der Treibstoff wird vom Motor in Antriebsenergie umgewandelt, die zur Überwindung des Fahrwiderstandes benötigt wird. Auf das Konto der Reifen entfallen dabei durchschnittlich 20 bis 30 Prozent. Das heißt, jedes Fünftel einer Tankfüllung

opfern Sie automatisch dem Rollwiderstand. Es lohnt sich also, hier auf spritsparende „Grüne Reifen“ zu setzen, um den Gesamtverbrauch zu senken. Lässt man ein Auto ohne Antrieb von einer Rampe rollen, zeigt der Vergleich, dass die zurückgelegte Strecke mit „Grünen Reifen“ bis zu 60 % länger ist als mit normalen Reifen.

50€ x 4 = 200€

5. LÄNGERE LEBENSDAUER

Reifen, die aus LANXESS Hochleistungskautschuken hergestellt werden, weisen einen deutlich verringerten Rollwiderstand auf und sparen dadurch Kraftstoff. Außer Außerdem sind sie langlebiger und verfügen über hervorragende Haftungseigenschaften. Besonders im Gebirge, wo die Reifenverformung auf kurvigen Straßen sehr stark ist, machen sich energieeffiziente „Grüne Reifen“ bezahlt.

Laufleistung

50 € x 4 = 200 €

Die Mehrkosten für „Grüne Reifen“ sind nach zwei Jahren wieder eingefahren, bezogen auf eine jährliche Kilometerleistung von 15.000 km, mehr als 6 l Verbrauch pro 100 km und ein Fahrprofil von 40 % Stadt, 20 % Land und 40 % Autobahn.

Vom neuen EU-Label verspricht sich Brüssel nicht zuletzt ein größeres Bewusstsein für kraftstoffsparende Reifen. Schließlich legen Pkws in Europa rund 5.000 Milliarden Kilometer zurück. Das Einsparpotenzial ist also enorm.

1. SICHERER GRIP ÜBERALL

1975 entspricht 100% Rollwiderstand

fen“ könnten unsere Innenstädte leiser und gesünder werden, denn Lärm durch Straßenverkehr stellt auch eine Umweltbelastung dar.

s ist nur noch eine WinterreifenSaison hin, denn ab November 2012 schreibt die Europäische Union für alle Autoreifen ein Label vor, das die Qualitäts- und Leistungseinstufung erleichtert. Anlass sind die Ziele der EU, CO2-Emissionen zu reduzieren, die sich wohl nur erfüllen lassen, wenn auch Autos weniger Treibstoff verbrauchen und damit weniger CO2 ausstoßen. In den „Grünen Reifen“ schlummern große Einsparpotenziale, wobei sich gerade der Rollwiderstand reduzieren lässt. Ein weiterer Aspekt ist das Thema Sicherheit. Die Beschaffenheit der Pneus in Bezug auf die Nasshaftung lässt sich nun einfach über farbige Abstufungen von grün nach rot bzw. die Klassen A bis G ablesen.

0,5 l/100 kmx15.000 km =

SPRITSPARENDE REIFEN RECHNEN SICH NICHT NUR FÜR DIE UMWELT

Mit einem neuen Reifenlabel bekommen Verbraucher die Chance, einen möglichst sicheren, sparsamen und leisen Reifen zu erkennen.

Nasshaftung und Bremsleistung

Etwa 17 % aller Geräuschemissionen in Deutschland gehen auf das Konto des Straßenverkehrs. Häufig ist das Rollgeräusch der Reifen sogar lauter als der Motor. Durch den Einsatz „Grüner Reifen“ könnten unsere Innenstädte deutlich leiser werden.

Ein Satz „Grüne Reifen“ kostet ungefähr 200 Euro mehr als herkömmliche Reifen. Durch die Einsparung von 0,5 l auf 100 km spart man bei einer jährlichen Fahrleistung von 15.000 km jedoch 75 l Treibstoff.

0,5l/100km x 15.000km =

75l

Ein „Grüner Reifen“ steht für Hightech und Höchstleistung. 75l 1,4€/l = 105€ Nicht nur Sparsamkeit und Fahrbahnhaftung sind besser, sondern auch die Laufleistung ist auf höchSCHICHTWERK UNTER DEM PROFIL stem Niveau. Im Vergleich zu einem herkömmlichen Reifen verlängern Hochleistungskautschuke von LANXESS die Haltbarkeit wie Heute -37 %

+35% +71%

Reifen-Fortschritt Die Eigenschaften eines Reifens haben sich im Vergleich zu 1975 durchschnittlich um mindestens ein Drittel verbessert.

Bei 1,40 Euro je Liter Sprit spart man im Jahr 105 Euro.

x

Die Mehrkosten für „Grüne Reifen“ sind nach zwei Jahren schon wieder eingefahren, legt man eine jährliche Kilometerleistung von 15.000 km, einen Verbrauch von mehr als 6 l pro 100 km und ein Fahrprofil von 40 % Stadt, 20 % Land und 40 % Autobahn zugrunde.

Leise Profile Spezielle unregelmäßige Reifenprofile führen zu einer Reduzierung des Rollgeräusches

Lauffläche

Seitenwand

Unterlauffläche

Oberer Stahlgürtel Unterer Stahlgürtel Karkasse

Innerliner

auch die Abriebfestig fen deutlich. Kombini optimalen Luftdruck fenlebensdauer noch werden. Ein zu niedri steigert nicht nur Treibstoffverbrauch, s im Extremfall auch ei Sicherheitsrisiko dar.

Stahldrähte enthält Kautschuk

Ein moderner Autoreifen besteht aus acht unter-

4. BESSER BREMSEN Ein wichtiger Aspekt des neuen EU-Reifenlabels ist die Haftung. Unterteilt in Klassifizierungen von A bis G lässt sich das Bremsverhalten des Reifens erkennen. Wer einen Reifen der Kategorie B kauft, muss bei einer Geschwindigkeit von 80 km/h mit einem verlängerten Bremsweg von drei bis vier Metern gegenüber der Klasse A rechnen, bei der Klasse E sind es bereits sechs Meter. Lebensretter in Aktion „Grüne Reifen“ verkürzen den Bremsweg bei 80km/h im Vergleich zu normalen Pneus um mindestens sechs Meter

schiedlichen Schichten. Insbesondere durch die Spritfalle Luftdruck Kautschukmischung in der Lauffläche werden der Kraftstoffverbrauch, die Haftung und das 1Bar weniger Druck als vom Rollgeräusch beeinflusst. Hersteller angegeben bedeutet rund DIE ZUKUNFT IM BLICK LANXESS ist ein führender Spezialchemie-Kon5. LÄNGERE LEBENSDAUER 0,5l mehr Treibstoff auf 100km zern, der 2010 einen Umsatz von 7,1 Milliarden Ein „Grüner Reifen“ steht für Hightech und Höchstleistung. Nicht nur Sparsamkeit und Haftung sind besser, auch die Laufleistung ist auf höchstem Niveau. Im Vergleich zu einem herkömmlichen Reifen verlängern Hochleistungskautschuke von LANXESS die Haltbarkeit deutlich.

Spritfalle Luftdruck 1Bar weniger Druck als vom Hersteller angegeben bedeutet rund 0,5 l mehr Treibstoff auf 100 km

Euro erzielte und aktuell rund 16.000 Mitarbeiter in 30 Ländern beschäftigt. Das Unternehmen ist derzeit an 46 Produktionsstandorten weltweit präsent. Das Kerngeschäft von LANXESS bilden Entwicklung, Herstellung und Vertrieb von Kunststoffen, Kautschuken, Zwischenprodukten und Spezialchemikalien.

For the smallest print versions the scene could easily be reorganized to fit accordingly. The production team consisted of eight people doing research, programming, 2D, and 3D graphics.

109


Category:

Products and Services

Project:

User Manual Package for a Gaggenau Fully Automatic Espresso Machine

What was the challenge? Gaggenau needed a user manual for their new line of fully integrated espresso machines. The following points were required: – a 40 page booklet per language. In total 18 languages, including central and eastern european languages plus, arabic and chinese were transcribed. – a Quick Reference Guide – Instruction text accompanied with graphic examples. – Installation instructions with graphics in required languages – description of the special water filter – description of the special milk container A fully automatic espresso machine for domestic use is as complex as their professional counterpart found in the hospitality industry. Because of this, a detailed description of all functions and capabilities of the machine is needed. What was the solution? Our major aim was to design a clear and easy to follow user manual. – ISO 216 size A4 portrait format (210mm x 297mm) – 2-column layout – graphics of the hardware – text in the corporate font of Gaggenau – symbols which appear in the display screen and on the appliance interface were specially converted into a new font we created for use as a regular type in explaining relevant symbols and their function both in text and graphics, in all languages. The main user manual is formatted as follows:

1. Front page 2. Table of Contents 3. Safety instructions 4. Standard equipment with all parts 5. Assembly and components 6. Display and controls 7. Accessories 8. Starting the machine 9. Switching on/off and hibernate mode 10. Loading water and coffee beans 11. Preparing drinks

ca. 25 Minuten

1

3

2 Bitte entkalken

ì Descaling programme

Please descale

approx. 25 minutes

4

f

ì

ë í ì ï Entkalkungsprogramm Descaling programme

5

ï

g

8

6

g

7

3

1

Entkalkungsprogramm Descaling

h h min min

00:25

00:25

9

h min

2

m 11

10

12

 q

0,5 l 17 fl.oz.

13

The Quick Reference Guide is formatted as follows: – 4- colour concertina leaflet measuring 210mm x 544mm – graphic instruction in 89 pictures – placed directly in the machine

max. 0,5 l 17 fl.oz.

k 14

 q

15

Reinigungsprogramm ca. 7 Minuten

16

17

3

1

ca. 1 Min.  approx.  1 min.

k

ca. 24 Min.  approx.  24 min.

k

2

k

1

2

3

ë í ì ï

f

Bitte reinigen

í

Cleaning programme

4

í

a

5

g

ï

00:07

Please clean

approx. 7 minutes

6

7

00:07

What was the effect? The main objective of creating this package of user manuals was to construct and design an attractive, comprehensive manual which would guide the user through the functions and features of the machine, while corresponding with the „look and feel“ of Gaggenau’s identity.

h min

2

m

9

8 b

k

10

11

12

1 Bitte entkalken und reinigen

2

3

c

ca. 1 Min.  approx.  1 min.

a

 q

k

ca. 6 Min.  approx.  6 min.

Entkalkungs- und Reinigungsprogramm ca. 32 Minuten

Descaling and cleaning programme approx. 32 minutes

4

k

ï Please descale and clean

ï

ë í ì ï Entkalkungs- und Reinigungsprogramm Descaling and cleaning programme

00:32 8

h min

5

00:32

0,5 l 17 fl.oz. 13

k

min

2

m 11

 q

 q

c a

max. 0,5 l 17 fl.oz.

15

ca. 7 Min.  approx.  7 min.

12

b

ca. 1 Min.  approx.  1min.

14

k

7

3

1

10

9

Contact:

6

g

ï

g

Entkalkungs- und Reinigungsprogramm Descaling and Cleaning programme Descale and Clean h

 q

16

3

1

2

18

k

CM 250

Olaf Hoffmann Designer: Olaf Hoffmann Wolfgang A. Peghini Hazel Ang Company: Olaf Hoffmann Design e-mail: olaf.hoffmann@olaf-hoffmanndesign.de website: www.olaf-hoffmann-design.de

h min

 q

3

1

g

Reinigungsprogramm / Cleaning programme

Entkalkungsprogramm Descaling

Munich 2011_10_06

110

Entkalkungsprogramm

k 17

ca. 2 app 2 m


like

it!

SHORTLISTED fr Chère Amatrice de café, cher Amateur de café, l’eau utilisée joue un rôle décisif dans la préparation d’un café aromatique. En effet, elle représente 98 % d’une tasse de café. C’est pourquoi, afin de libérer tous les arômes et d’assurer une protection optimale contre les dépôts de calcaire, nous vous recommandons d’utiliser la cartouche BRITA INTENZA spécialement adaptée à votre machine.

7

1

Plonger la bandelette durant 10 s dans l’eau du robinet et lire le résultat au bout de 1 min environ.

2

Adaptez le réglage à la dureté de l’eau :

□ Niveaux 1 et 2 □ Niveau 3 □ Niveau 4 3

in.  .  .

Sélectionner la valeur nécessaire sur la bague de réglage de l’arôme figurant sous la cartouche de filtrage. Immerger la cartouche filtrante dans de l’eau froide et la secouer doucement pour évacuer les bulles d’air.

Comme la teneur en calcaire de l’eau joue un rôle décisif sur l’arôme et sur la crème de votre café, une bague de réglage d’arôme est prévue sous la cartouche filtrante BRITA INTENZA. Il suffit de tourner cette bague pour sélectionner la position correspondant à votre eau (A, B ou C).

17

Placer ensuite la cartouche filtrante à la main dans le réservoir d’eau (en vous aidant si nécessaire de la cuillère de dosage du café).

k

Retirer le réservoir et le remplir d’eau froide jusqu’à la marque « max ».

Pour déterminer le réglage de la bague de réglage d’arôme, utilisez la bandelette de test ci­jointe.

ì ï

– Réglage de la bague C

Pour les changements de filtre suivants cochez la case correspondant au résultat obtenu.

La cartouche filtrante BRITA INTENZA réduit non seulement la teneur en calcaire de l’eau, mais filtre aussi les substances qui ont une influence négative sur l’odeur et le goût comme le chlore contenu dans l’eau du robinet.

CM 250

– Réglage de la bague B

La mise en place de la cartouche filtrante BRITA INTENZA est très simple. Procéder comme indiqué ci-après :

INTENZA

12

– Réglage de la bague A

de

Milchbehälter

sv

Mjölkbehållare

en

Milk container

no

Melkebeholder

fr

Pot à lait

fi

Maidonsäilytysastia

nl

Melkreservoir

el

Δοχείο γάλακτος

it

Recipiente per il latte

tr

Süt haznesi

es

Recipiente para la leche

ru

Емкость для молока

pt

Recipiente de leite

cs

Nádoba na mléko

da

Mælkebeholder

zh

牛奶盒

ar

‫حاوية اللبن‬

g

rogramm / gramme

00:07

6

8

Accessories

b c

n.  . 

x. l oz.

h min

The fully automatic espresso machine contains dedicated compartments for storing accessories and the quick reference guide. These compartments are located on the right-hand side of the machine as you face it and can be accessed with the machine in access position 1 (see “Access system”).

a

The short milk hose can be kept in the coffee dispenser: simply slide the sliding door to the left and slot the hose into the corresponding bracket. This can be done without disconnecting the hose.

The machine includes the following standard accessories:

• • • •

Ground coffee spoon for loading ground coffee

Short milk hose for the milk container

Long milk hose for use with milk cartons or bottles

Milk container, insulated

Milk hose connection

7 The following accessories can be ordered by contacting after-sales service (see enclosed “Service Worldwide” brochure):

• • • •

Water filter (order no.: 467873) Cleaning tablets (order no.: 310575) Descaling tablets (order no.: 310967) Grease (order no.: 311368)

12

 q

k

8

ca. 2 Min.  approx.  2 min.

17

Lighting

f f

g Lighting

g

The cup lighting feature consists of three lamps and can be switched on or off in a variety of combinations. Each lamp is indicated by a separate symbol: = this lamp is lit

b

= this lamp is not lit = this lamp is lit only when a drink is being prepared The lamps light briefly during the configuration process to demonstrate the settings currently selected. Set capacity

f f

g Capacity: Coffee

g

b

ú

f

g

The specified capacity – à, â or ä – can be set to match the size of cup used. The capacity can be adjusted to suit the drink selected, for example a Espresso. The a setting displays the volume of coffee or, in the case of drinks containing coffee and milk, such as h White coffee, the volume of coffee and milk (froth) together. Select the drink using the middle row keys and then press the ú key to enter the next level of the configuration process.

Gaggenau Kurzanleitung / Quick Reference Guide

e

Coffee small

d ml

b

Use the top row keys to select the capacity you wish to change and then set the new capacity using the middle row keys. Press the b key to return to the settings menu. Important: The selected capacity in millilitres (ml) is a guideline figure only. The actual volume dispensed can vary significantly as a function of crema formation, the grind fineness setting and the type of milk used.

27

111


112


GOT IT.

WINNER

113


Category:

Didactics

Project:

Orientation & Identity

What was the challenge? In the beginning of this self-initiated project was the question how to impart design projects in a completely new way. What’s really of interest for designers and their clients? The aim was to convey a look behind the scenes and project backgrounds, the motifs and motivations of all parties involved in the realms of orientation. What was the solution? The special field of orientation and corporate architecture was examined by the example of 16 international projects. Instead of using slick representative image pictures, the projects and their players were photographed individually to accompany interviews with the project teams. Therefore, the book transports a very personal view on multifarious projects from all areas: from semi-public to public, from state-owned to privately owned, cultural and commercial, temporary and permanent – all projects form up to convey a variegated overall picture. A widespread glossary makes this publication a true reference book collecting dates, complexity and characteristics of the projects.

Final Book published internationally at Springer Wien NewYork

Cover

Theory Sections

Opener Interview

Interview Section

Glossary

Content structure of the book

What was the effect? Today, the book is considered to be a standard work in the realms of orientation, which provides a different view on this multi-faceted field. Designers, as well as real estate developers and other contractees, educators, city planners and politicians are reading the publication: Therefore the book managed to achieve its goal – not to depict design for designer only, but to entrench it within a broader social context.

Contact: Erwin K. Bauer bauer – konzept & gestaltung gmbh office@erwinbauer.com www.erwinbauer.com

114

Opening page with the project’s icon and introduction text / Short description of project and designers / Easy navigation through the book due to different types of paper and a swaged index with icons


SHORTLISTED GOT IT.

Centerpiece of the book: project portraits with interviews of the team – from building contractor to designer; the diversity provides a good picture on the young field of signaletics, abudant in background information and useful for everyone interested

Consistent visual language: for a better comparability, all pictures were taken directly on site

Explanatory project portrait – example: analysis using information design / Layout sample

Utilitarian compendium instead of superficial design: an extensive glossary encloses all important dates regarding the planning and realization of each project

115


Didactics SCIENCE VISUAL RESOURCES 67

Water as a solvent slightly negatively charged oxygen atoms water molecules

Mediterranean Sea

GEOGRAPHY OF THE OCEANS Key words

Connections

molecular size solvent

ocean precipitation runoff salinity sea strait

Atlantic Ocean

positively charged sodium ions negatively charged chloride ions

Black Sea

France Italy 2

3

4

Syria

Mediterranean Sea

Cyprus 1

The Mediterranean Sea is situated between Europe, Africa, and Asia.  It gets its name from the Latin mediterraneus which means “in the middle of land.” 

Morocco

Israel

Mediterranean Sea

Tunisia

Algeria

5 Egypt

Libya

Sea currents

Connections 1 Strait of Gibraltar to Atlantic

Atlantic Ocean

Black Sea

France

Ocean

Italy

2 Dardanelles to Sea of

Turkey

7

Marmara

Greece

Spain

3 Sea of Marmara to

Syria

Bosphorus 4 Bosphorus to Black Sea 5 Suez Canal to Red Sea 6

In the Mediterranean, seasurface evaporation is about three times greater than precipitation and runoff. Sea level is maintained by water flowing in from the Atlantic Ocean.  The water in the eastern Mediterranean is slightly warmer and more saline than that in the western Mediterranean. 6 Atlantic cold water enters through the Strait of Gibraltar and travels along the North African coast. 7 Warm, more saline, water returns to the Atlantic along the European coast.

The universal solvent Water

can dissolve a greater range of substances, in greater amounts, than any other common liquid. unique dissolving power is related to its small molecular size and the water molecule’s polar nature. Polar and ionic substances tend to be soluble in water; covalent substances are generally less soluble in water. A crystal of sodium chloride dissolves readily in water because positively charged sodium ions tend to be pulled into solution by the slightly negativelycharged oxygen atoms of water molecules. Negatively charged chloride ions are pulled into solution by the hydrogen atoms in water with a slight positive charge.

CI–

negatively charged chloride ions

hydrogen atoms with slight positive charge

© Diagram Visual Information Ltd.

Water’s

6

Tunisia

Algeria

Morocco

crystal of sodium chloride

7 Cyprus

6

Sea currents

7 Mediterranean Sea

Israel 6 Egypt

Libya

Component seas Atlantic Ocean

Black Sea

France Italy

Spain

b

Turkey Greece

a

Syria

d c Cyprus

Facts about Area 1,145,000 square mile (2,966,000 km2)

Tunisia

Algeria

Morocco

Israel

Mediterranean Sea Egypt

Libya

Component seas Geographically, the Mediterranean includes several other seas, including:

Mean depth 4,760 feet (1,450 m)

a

The Tyrrhenian Sea

b

The Adriatic Sea

c

The Ionian Sea

Maximum depth 16,707 feet (5,092 m) in the Hellenic Trough

d

The Aegean Sea

Locator map

46

Proteins

are molecules made of amino acids joined in a particular sequence. If these amino acids are arranged in the wrong order, the protein will not function. The sequence of amino acids is coded by a sequence of organic bases in DNA molecules in the nucleus. Each amino acid is coded by a sequence of three bases called a codon (see top diagram). So MET codes for methionine, ACC codes for tryptophan. Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a copy of the codons on the DNA. The mRNA molecule can pass out of the nucleus to the ribosomes on the endoplasmic reticulum.

117

Messenger RNA translation mRNA translation in the cytoplasm

© Diagram Visual Information Ltd.

the ribosome the mRNA acts as a template for other RNA molecules to attach to. These molecules are the transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules that carry amino acids needed for protein synthesis. A tRNA molecule with an anticodon that fits the next available space on the mRNA molecule slots into position. Its amino acid is held in the correct position for enzymes to join it to a growing chain of amino acids formed at the other end of the tRNA molecule. Once the amino acid is joined on, it is released from the tRNA, which detaches from the mRNA. The tRNA can be reused when it has had the correct amino acid reattached from the pool in the cell.

Lateral view

tRNA

ribosome

cephalothorax

antenna

A

C

A

U

G

U

G

G

A

U

C

G

C

The

Crustacea are a mainly marine group including crabs, lobsters, crayfish, and woodlice. Woodlice are terrestrial but need to live in cool damp places to avoid drying out.

C

C

A

The Crustacea

abdomen

chela

codon

U

DIVERSITY Key words abdomen exoskeleton segment thorax

Crayfish

P

TR

MET tRNA with anticodon UAC and carrying methionine (MET) binds to correct codon AUG on mRNA.

C

Crustacean body structure mRNA

MET

tRNA molecule with the correct anticodon binds to the codon at the second site. It carries tryptophan (TRP).

U

A

C

A

C

C

A

U

G

U

G

G

U

C

G

C

A

C A

U

G

A

C

C

U

A

G

G

G

A

U

C

cheliped

first antenna

labrum

A

compound eye palp of mandible

ILE

U

mandible

C

G

third maxilliped

G

cephalic groove

first pereiopod (walking legs)

C

G

carapace

C fourth pereiopod

MET

A

AL

TRP

Dorsal view

C

peptide bond

A

second antenna

G anticodon

A

MET

Crustaceans

pleopods

Ventral view

U

A peptide bond forms between methionine and tryptophan. U The first tRNA molecule returns to the cytoplasm to pick up another methionine molecule. The ribosome shifts, and a third tRNA molecule binds to mRNA.

The process is repeated.

walking legs

ILE

TRP

Translating the message At

Kingdom Animalia: Crustacea

C

TRP

pleopods

ALA

ILE

have highly segmented bodies, although in some of the more advanced species the segments have fused together into larger blocks. The overall body plan follows standard arthropod structure with head, thorax, and abdomen, although the head and thorax are fused into a region called the cephalothorax. The head is well supplied with sense organs, including two pairs of antennae. In many crayfish and lobster species, a pair of front legs has been highly modified into pincers (chelipeds). The marine crustaceans like lobsters and crayfish grow in size by molting their exoskeleton, growing rapidly, and then reforming a tough exoskeleton. This can occur a number of times during an animal’s life. The molting and redevelopment of the exoskeleton imposes a significant cost on the animal in terms of calcium, and this is recovered from the old exoskeleton before it is shed. Crustaceans can lay eggs containing either larvae (small shrimps, lobsters, and crabs) or fully formed, but small, adult forms (crayfish).

tergite (dorsal exoskeleton)

sternite (ventral exoskeleton)

© Diagram Visual Information Ltd.

UNITY Key words anticodon codon messenger RNA ribosome transfer RNA

Codons

uropod protopodite

C

U

A

G

U

C

C

G

G

G

C

C

uropod exopodite

A

U

G

U

G

G

A

telson uropod endopodite

45

109

Desertification in Africa

Contact:

Vulnerability to desertification in Africa

Lunar phases

LAND AND HABITAT

THE SUN’S FAMILY

a Sun’s light

Key words

b Earth

desertification soil degradation

c Moon: half lit by Sun’s light as it orbits Earth

d

d appearance of the Moon as seen from Earth

The situation in Africa has had its greatest impact in Africa, where 60 percent of the continent is already desert or drylands and droughts frequently occur. the past 50 years, an area the size of Somalia has become desert along the Sahel—the southern fringe of the Sahara.  Desertification now threatens more than 33 percent of the African continent.  The Sahel countries are home to approximately 22 million people, and are particularly vulnerable.  A further 330 million people (more than 40 percent of the African population) live in areas of high or moderate vulnerability.

 Half

Expanding desert  The

Sahara Desert extends south by an average of three miles every year. 180 tons of soil per acre may be blown away from denuded land around the Sahara every year.

b

 Around

Causes in Africa  The

name: Robertson company/organisation: Diagram Group 116 e-mail: brucerobertson@diagramgroup.com website: www.diagramgroup.com

main cause of desertification in Africa is not drought but the mismanagement of land. and the felling of trees and brushwood for fuel are prime causes.

 Overgrazing

Worldwide desertification drylands cover around 40 percent of Earth’s surface. puts at risk more than one billion people who are dependent on these lands for survival. than 25 percent of Earth’s land surface has already suffered erosion and soil degradation.

orbit

phases refer to the regular cycle during which the appearance of the Moon changes as seen from Earth. of the Moon’s surface is constantly illuminated by the Sun (except during a lunar eclipse).  As the illuminated portion is very bright compared to the nonilluminated portion, only the illuminated portion is visible to the naked eye from Earth.  At different times, varying amounts of the illuminated portion of the Moon’s surface are visible from Earth.  Lunar phases are a result of the constantly changing relative positions of Earth, the Moon, and the Sun.  At times only a small crescent of the illuminated area of the Moon can be seen. At other times the entire illuminated area is facing Earth and is clearly visible.  The amount of the illuminated area of the Moon that is visible increases until a full Moon is visible, and then decreases again until nothing of the Moon is visible.  A full Moon is when the entire illuminated area is visible.  A new Moon is when none of the illuminated area is visible.  One lunar cycle, from new Moon to new Moon, takes 29.5 days.

c

 Over

arid areas

full Moon lunar cycle lunar eclipse lunar phase new Moon

 Lunar

 Desertification

vulnerable areas

Key words

Lunar phases

 Susceptible

 Desertification

 More

© Diagram Visual Information Ltd.

The effect Pupils, teachers and parents in a vast range of inaccessible locations now use the source. Oil rig villages in Alaska, Indian reservations in New Mexico, slums in New Orleans, all have simultaneous access with no consumption of trees for paper, warehousing of books, remote distribution.

Turkey

Greece

Spain

Na+

The solution Offer 10,000 diagrams and supporting text on an on-line service. EARTH SCIENCE WEATHER & CLIMATE ENVIROMENTAL ISSUES MARINE SCIENCE SPACE & ASTRONOMY SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY PHYSICS ANATOMY ANIMAL ANATOMY CELL BIOLOGY GENETICS

20

CHEMISTRY OF THE OCEANS Key words

a

© Diagram Visual Information Ltd.

The challenge 1. Create clear and simple diagrams which explain the principles of science for teachers and pupils. 2. Make the resource available to everyone in United States. 3. Avoid costly manufacture of books, storage and distribution. 4. Free teachers from curriculum books and provide a resource from where they could select and construct their own programs.

© Diagram Visual Information Ltd.

Category: Project:


SHORTLISTED 154

148

The greenhouse effect

AIR POLLUTION Key words

Sources of the greenhouse effect

greenhouse effect greenhouse gas

Carbon dioxide

Causes and effects

ASTRONOMY

celestial north pole celestial south pole hemisphere

(right ovary removed)

Complete life cycle undergo a complete metamorphosis during their life cycle. Their juvenile form is a tadpole that has no lungs or legs and lives entirely in water. The adult frog has lungs and legs and can survive out of water for extended periods. The change from tadpole to frog is a continuous process—there is no pupal stage as there is in metamorphosing insects. Tadpoles live for three to four months, with the exact time depending on certain environmental conditions. Adult frogs can survive the winter and live for many years, provided the temperature does not drop too low.

Northern celestial hemisphere

Frogs

 The

infrared radiation becomes trapped between the layer of greenhouse gases and Earth’s surface, bouncing back and forth.  The radiation is absorbed by the planet and its atmosphere and contributes to the phenomenon known as global warming.

oviduct

fat body ovary

testis

kidney

kidney

ureter

ureter

ovisac

seminal vesicle

cloaca bladder

cloaca

Water vapor

Methane gas  Methane

gas is a product of the decomposition of organic material.  It is also produced within the guts of herbivorous livestock and by rotting vegetation.

CFCs were used until recently as coolants in refrigerators and propellants in aerosols. They readily escape into the atmosphere.

© Diagram Visual Information Ltd.

 CFCs

Water vapor  Water

vapor is produced by water evaporating into the atmosphere. lakes, oceans, and plants all generate vast amounts of water vapor.

 Rivers,

Metamorphosis from tadpole to frog

protective jelly remains of tail Tadpoles one day old mouth widens

external gills mucous gland Sigma Octanis

three months old forelimb three weeks old

mouth

external gills

one month old

hindlimb

eye

two months old spiracle (opening of gill chamber)

63

c´ #

d´ #

f´ #

g´ #

a´ #

(d´)

(e´)

(g´)

(a´)

(a´)

Spring and neap tides Spring

First quarter: neap tide

Sun Full Moon: spring tide

and neap tides are generated by the gravitational attraction of the Sun adding to, or counteracting the effect of, the Moon’s gravitational attraction. When the Sun and Moon are aligned, their gravitational attractions are added and create a higher-than-normal high tide and a correspondingly lowerthan-normal low tide. Such large-range tides are spring tides. These occur at the full Moon and the new Moon. When the Sun and Moon are at right angles (90 degrees) relative to Earth, their gravitational attractions have opposing effects. This creates lower than normal high tides and higher than normal low tides. Such small-range tides are neap tides. These occur when the Moon is in its first and third quarters. In a lunar month (29.5 days) there are two sets of spring tides and two sets of neaps, with tides of intermediate size in between.

262

294

330

394

392

440

494

523

c´´

Frequency ratio between each of the 13 notes and the next is 1.0595 (chromatic semitone) Keyboard scale (equally tempered) A compromise with diatonic scale

Staff notation

doh

ray

me

fah

soh

lah

te

doh

Tonic sol-fa notation

2 Frequencies (scientific)

The

256 Intervals

ITones

288 320 341

384 427

9 8

10 9

16 15

9 8

10 9

Major

Minor

Semi

Major

Minor

480 512 9 8

16 15

Major Semitone

diatonic scale frequency octave

active site enzyme inhibitor substrate

Scales

Inhibitors

 As

Inhibitors

Competitive

Dates are in millions of years before the present Eras

Periods

CENOZOIC 65–present

Quaternary 1.8–present Neogene or Late Tertiary 23.8–1.8

Time units  Earth

history is divided into four major units of time known as eons. eon is divided into eras. era consists of subdivisions called periods. period can be further split into epochs.

 An

MESOZOIC 248–65

Paleogene or Early Tertiary 65–23.8

Epochs Holocene (Recent) 0.01–present Pleistocene 1.8–0.01

Animal cell: electron microscope pinocytotic vesicle

cytoplasm

Miocene 23.8–5.3

 Each

Cretaceous 144–65

rough endoplasmic reticulum

PALEOZOIC 543–248

ribosome

Paleocene 65–55

Golgi body

Triassic 248–206 centrioles

Permian 290–248 Proterozoic eon 2.5 billion–543 million years ago

Carboniferous 354–290 Pennsylvanian 320-290 Mississippian 354–320

nucleus nuclear envelope

Devonian 417–354 Archean eon 4–2.5 billion years ago

nuclear pore

Silurian 443–417

nucleolus chromatin lysosome

© Diagram Visual Information Ltd.

Hadean eon 4.5–4 billion years ago

ecliptic gas giant inner planet orbit planet

mitochondrion plasma membrane ribosome

Smaller sizes

Observations

The

A

Ordovician 490–443 mitochondrion

Cambrian 543–490

The inhibitor is displaced by excess substrate molecules.

rocky planet solar system solar wind

Beginnings of the solar system Temperature and formation of the solar system

good theory of solar-system formation has to explain certain facts observed in our own solar system:  In our own solar system the planets orbit very close to the plane of the ecliptic (the plane of Earth’s orbit around the Sun).  All of the planets orbit around the Sun in the same direction.  The inner planets are much smaller and have very different compositions to the outer gas giants.

electron microscope can see much smaller objects than the light microscope is able to see.

cell uses a double-layered membrane to build many structures: the plasma membrane, Golgi body, lysosomes, and the endoplasmic reticulum. The plasma membrane covers the whole of the outside of the cell. The endoplasmic reticulum is a meshwork of the same membrane that runs throughout the cell. It is used for intracellular transport. Ribosomes, usually found on the rough endoplasmic reticulum, synthesize protein.  The Gogli body is involved with the creation of the endoplasmic reticulum and in the secretion of some substances from the cell. It is the packaging center of the cell. Lysosomes contain digestive enzymes.

a 0.3 au

Modern theory Sun was formed from a condensing cloud of gas and dust. this cloud shrank, any rotation it had would have been accelerated by the conservation of angular momentum.  This caused the cloud to flatten into a broad rotating disc. The planets are thought to have formed from material in the outer part of this disc. The Sun is thought to have formed from material in the inner part of the same disc.  Temperatures were higher in the regions of the disc closer to the protoSun than they were in more distant regions.  Higher temperatures and a strong solar wind would have driven lighter elements out of the inner solar system allowing only small dense planets to form.  Lower temperatures farther away from the proto-Sun would allow lighter elements to clump together, resulting in large gaseous planets.

3.5 au

 The  As

Other structures nucleus controls the cell. It is separated from the cytoplasm by the nuclear envelope. The nucleus contains the nucleolus, which contains the DNA templates for ribosomal RNA, and chromatin, the substances from which chromosomes are made. Openings in the cell's nuclear envelope, called nuclear pores, allow the exchange of materials between the nucleus and the cytoplasm.  Mitochondria are the site of aerobic respiration, which gives the cell energy. The mitrochondrion is sometimes referred to as the “powerhouse” of the cell.  Pinocytotic vesicles contain soluble molecules from outside the cell.  Centrioles, found only in animal cells, help the cell to divide.

substrate molecules

30 THE SUN’S FAMILY Key words

Membrane structures

Oligocene 34–23.8 Eocene 55–34

Jurassic 206–144

Phanerozoic eon 543 million years ago–today

non-competitive inhibitor does not bind to the active site. It binds with a different part of the enzyme molecule. distorts the shape of the enzyme so it cannot function properly. inhibitors are not released from the enzyme molecule so the enzyme cannot be regenerated. Even a low concentration of a noncompetitive inhibitor can be very dangerous. Cyanide is a non-competitive inhibitor that completely blocks an essential enzyme in the respiration pathway. It is therefore a very powerful poison.

The

 Each

The four eons

smooth endoplasmic reticulum

plasma membrane

Pliocene 5.3–1.8

substrate molecules

The inhibitor is not displaced by excess substrate molecules.

Non-competitive

UNITY

centriole endopasmic reticulum Golgi body lysosome

enzyme

This

Key words

Animal cell

active site

competitive inhibitor

A

The

© Diagram Visual Information Ltd.

eon epoch era period

The geologic column

enzyme

Non-competitive inhibitors

21

Geologic time

A competitive inhibitor binds to the active site and blocks it.

inhibitors bind with the active site of an enzyme. In effect, they “compete” with the normal substrate for this site and block it. Many competitive inhibitors are released from the active site so the enzyme can be regenerated. The higher the concentration of the “normal” substrate compared with the inhibitor, the less effect the inhibitor has.

evolved along different lines in different parts of the world and scales were adopted accordingly. In Europe, music came to be based on the diatonic scale. This consists of eight notes and can be shown in a variety of ways.  For scientific purposes the diatonic scale has been standardised as a sequence of notes between middle C (c´) and upper C (c´´). Middle C has the frequency 256 Hz while upper C has the frequency 512 Hz. Scientific tuning forks pitched at these two notes are however, not suitable for tuning musical instruments.  As far as music is concerned the ratio of the pitches of the various notes on the scale is more important than the actual pitch of the notes. In the eighteenth century it would be unlikely to find two organs, for example, with middle C pipes of exactly the same pitch but this did not create a problem provided the ratios between the notes was the same for all instruments.  In 1939 an international committee agreed to standardise absolute pitch based on the note middle A at 440 Hz.

36 EARTH’S HISTORY Key words

reduce or destroy the activity of an enzyme—sometimes to dangerous levels. are two types of inhibitors: competitive inhibitors and noncompetitive inhibitors.

There

 Music

intervals have been given specific names. A ratio of 9:8 is a major tone, 10:9 is a minor tone and 16:15 a semitone. The interval between the top and bottom notes of a scale is 2:1 and is called an octave.

A noncompetitive inhibitor binds to another part of the enzyme and blocks the active site. noncompetitive inhibitor

Competitive inhibitors

 Certain

Enzymes and inhibitors Inhibitors

1 Keyboard scale

2 Frequencies (scientific)

© Diagram Visual Information Ltd.

Third-quarter: neap tide

Key words

music developed it became obvious that some combinations of notes of certain frequencies gave pleasing results while others did not. The results of these observations gave rise to musical scales.

Unusually large spring tides term “spring tide” derives from the greatest tides of the year, which occur at the vernal (spring) and autumnal equinoxes. At these times, a lunar perigee (Moon closest to Earth) and an equinox (Sun directly overhead at the equator) coincide to create spring tides. These spring tides have on average a 20 percent wider tidal range than normal.

16 UNITY

Key words

© Diagram Visual Information Ltd.

Moon

Southern celestial hemisphere

WAVES, SOUND, AND LIGHT

1 Keyboard scale

equinox neap tide perigee spring tide

New Moon: spring tide

anus

© Diagram Visual Information Ltd.

Moon’s orbital path

Earth’s orbital path

Northern celestial hemisphere

Eggs

zygote and yolk

Scales

AIR AND OCEANS Key words

Effect of the Sun and Moon on Earth’s tides

For an observer standing at the South Pole, Sigma Octanis is almost directly overhead. It is the closest star to the celestial south pole that is visible with the naked eye—though with a magnitude of 5.4, it is only barely visible.

Adults mating

in frogs is primarily internal with mating pairs of frogs exchanging gametes by bringing their cloacas close together. The cloaca is an opening that connects the bladder and the reproductive systems with the outside world. Mating frogs do not just mate in pairs. If sufficient numbers of compatible males and females are available in an area, they will mate in larger groups, implying that some fertilization takes place externally. The eggs are covered in an outer shell of protective jelly, which swells in contact with water. The female lays her eggs in a sheltered pond or creek. The eggs hatch into tadpoles, which gradually develop into froglets— resembling adults but retaining a vestigial tail—and then mature frogs. Tadpole development is strongly affected by temperature and oxygen availability. The presence of meat or a source of iodine encourages early change into a frog and produces very small adults.

137

Tides

Polaris

Frog life cycle

Fertilization

 The

For an observer standing at the North Pole, Polaris—the Pole Star—is directly overhead. It is the closest star to the celestial north pole that is visible with the naked eye.

Southern celestial hemisphere

bladder

Fertilization and development

Carbon dioxide

© Diagram Visual Information Ltd.

Consequences

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs)

magnitude North Pole South Pole star

fat body

Methane

greenhouse effect is caused by an accumulation of certain types of gases in the upper atmosphere. gases include carbon dioxide, methane, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and water vapor.  Infrared radiation in the Sun’s rays bounces back off Earth into space.  Greenhouse gases act as a barrier to the infrared radiation and reflect some of it back down onto Earth.  Theses

burning of organic and fossil fuels produces large amounts of carbon dioxide.  Wood, coal, oil, and petroleum-based fuels produce CO2 when they combust.

Sky map

Key words

Frog urino-genital systems

cloaca fertilization gamete life cycle metamorphosis

 The

© Diagram Visual Information Ltd.

78

Reproduction: frog

MAINTENANCE Key words

© Diagram Visual Information Ltd.

chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) fossil fuel global warming

GOT IT.

b

c

a

Sun

d

b rocky planets c

frost line

d

gaseous planets

Two types of planet  Within

about 0.3 au of the Sun temperatures are too high for rocks, metals, or hydrogen compounds to exist as solids. No planets have been formed within this limit.  Between about 0.3 au and 3.5 au of the Sun temperatures are low enough for rocks and metals to condense as solids, but too high for hydrogen compounds to

do so. Rocky planets have formed within this band.  Beyond

about 3.5 au of the Sun (known as the “frost line”) temperatures are low enough for hydrogen compounds such as CO2 and H2O to condense as solids. Gaseous planets have formed beyond this limit.

117


Category:

Didactics

Project:

Curriculum for Creativity of Story Design

Description of Project: It is the new digital-culture age that has been exhibited by the creativity of digital-media in current. The animation technique education plays a main role on the education of digital design in past 20 years in Taiwan. It emphasizes the learning of technique on software in animation curriculum. However, the software function would limit the originality and result in skill in performance of software for student. One could know that the animation lacks of the content creativity would be hard to communicate the information to audience. The animation is one of the most important types on communication in this generation. A good animation would include not only good skill performance, but also the good content creativity and originality. The goal of curriculum is to guide the student to own the creativity ponder on the designation of animation script. The guide would be consisted of the principle of story creativity ponder, industry expert’s pondered pattern, teaching strategy, and practice of story creativity ponder. The teaching object student, without design background, is sophomore in department of information management. We ensure the guide would increase the creativity of story script, enhance the ability of design of digital media for student. It is undoubted that the code value of digital media is creativity ponder that would be the power

Contact:

?

name: WuLee2 name: Pei-Fen Sou-Chen company / organization: Changhua company/organisation: 2National Department of University Education Multimediaofand Game Science, Lunghwa Republic UniversityofofChina Science and Technology, e-mail: Taoyuanpfwu@cc.ncue.edu.tw County 33306, Taiwan. (Communi-

cation Author) e-mail: sclee@mail.lhu.edu.tw

118

of the new digital-culture. The final goal is to prompt the quality of creativity industry in Taiwan with the education of creativity ponder to train the junior animator.

4. Forming script: Integrating ones creativity after term discussion to complete the creativity script.

The curriculum of “Creativity of Story Design” aims at the problem solution of creativity ponder in short film animation. The teaching strategy of curriculum is assembled by principle introduce, the practice of case study, industry application, and discussion of various expert’s thinking patterns (e.g. Figure). The teaching method should be modified from the interaction with student momentarily to make a higher performance in curriculum.

What was the challenge?

The 18 hours curriculum is carried on within 6 weeks, and 3 hours per week with the type of interactive teaching. There are four stages included: 1. Subject guidance: Association with subject that would find the root of script, the derivative and creativity would be generated from the deep ponders. 2. Development pattern of creativity: Processing the actually design and creativity development, the mind mapping generates the ponder element that associated with subject after term brainstorm. 3. Forming the decision of creativity: Reify the creativity from associating expert’s thinking pattern, and chose the practicably story to further develop creativity script. If something is deficiency, re-ponder is needed. It is necessary to make sure the practicability by simulating the every role interaction.

1. The animation curriculum was focused on learning of technique, and was weak on the learning of creativity. The curriculum should contain more creativity to promote the quality of learning for student. 2. The student in the department of information management without the design background, how to promote the ability of creativity bases on their background of information manage? What was the solution? The good creativity would be integrated from the begin elements; either it is good or bad. The expert’s experience would be reified for student as rules on creativity ponder. The characteristic of curriculum is as following: 1. Merge the industry pattern into education: The teaching goal would depend on the industry trend to avoid the gap occurred between industry and education. The experience in industry would be merged into teaching and guide the student’s creativity development. 2. Personalize the curriculum with feasible and creative: The detail of curriculum is feasible for each teacher that would make the student learn the code value of creativity and feasibility from curriculum.


GOT IT.

SHORTLISTED

Figure The discussion of various expert’s thinking patterns

3. Development stage: It step by subject guide, processing and decision in creativity, forming the script; make a statement, discussion, and problem shooting are asked for each student in court. What was the effect? The curriculum make the student without the design background has a very nice

result in digital media: 1. Taiwan animation design prize, the top one award and Best Visual Arts award. 2. Action figures design competition. The top one and 3rd place award. IndustryUniversity

3. Cooperative Research Project: design film for exhibition , National Palace Museum. 4. Industry-University Cooperative Research Project: plan and manufacture of interactive device with story and program design, National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts.

119


Category:

Didactics

Project:

Skedular.com

Touch Screen interactive Skedular

What was the challenge? At the Industrial Design Centre, IIT Bombay Printed timetables were getting cumbersome and tiring. With increase in the number of disciplines tracking courses and planning future courses were troublesome for faculty as well as the students. The challenge was to come up one glance view of a complete semester of four months of IDC timetable to make it more comprehensive and release it from the complex and confusing representation of rows and columns. What was the solution? The solution was www.skedular.com an interactive timetable scheduler designed for Industrial Design Center (IDC), IIT Bombay. It is a Printed version and a Rich Internet Application (RIA). Some advantages of Skedular are semester view at a glance. Colour coding for segregation, Roll overs to display personal involvement , inside a dayview, front end with a complimentary back end, updating automated and user friendly. What was the effect? Printed timetable excel sheets of continuous mesh of rows and columns disappeared. Students felt very comfortable with customized versions of disciplines. The online version gave semester view at a glance. The head of the department could get an overview of all the disciplines as well as individual faculty could glance courses only relevant to them. A touch screen kiosk was designed and installed in the department. The timetable is powered by a SQL/PHP back end interface which populates the visualization on the front end.

T

What is Skedular?

Skedular is an interactive timetable scheduler specially designed and customized for viewing active Semester timetables for Industrial Design Center (IDC), IIT Bombay. It is a Rich Internet Application (RIA) currently suited and crafted for Design Institutes running their courses in modules.

Contact: name: Mandar Rane company/organisation: IDC, IIT Bombay e-mail: mrane@iitb.ac.in website: www.mrane.com

120

Before

After

A


SHORTLISTED

Got It.

Top: Skedular interaction Interface, Bottom: One day view pop up Frontend with a complimentary Backend? Skedular hosts a back end interface which has pre-populated fields already embedded in the database. This customizing is done specifically for IDC that reduces input effort tremendously and a discipline timetable can be generated on the fly.

ter

Backend

Frontend

Admin interface

Skedular.com interface

Current time schedules arranged in rows & columns requires lots of visual scanning. IDC currently runs five disciplines and each semester hosts around 150 students with 20 permanent faculty members. Timetables of each discipline to be displayed in a print format occupies a lot of space and makes it tiresome to search. Skedular allows multiple view of months, Core courses, Electives and Common courses, well categorised and segregated. Moreover all of this in a single view for the whole semester without the need to scroll.

********

Make Changes

Administrator Interface

Reflect changes

Whereas the front end dictates how the information has to be arranged to make it usable. Rational visual design decisions in Skedular enables the audience to process less information and helps them extract the required and relevant. Skedular maps the time horizontally and colour codes the courses to allow quick comprehension. At a glance overview (the primary USP of the product) enables planning of time for students as well as faculty more efficiently and error free.

Skedular facilitates a month, week and day-view. Colour coding makes recognition easier and roll overs highlights the particular information, switching off the generic information. This toggle allows customised views and eases the search need of an individual, of at times being specific and sometime being generic.

121


Category:

Didactics

Project:

Mendeley’s Evolving Network of Expertise and Knowledge

What was the challenge? The challenge for this design was to visualize (in a beautiful and meaningful manner) a very large data set providd by Mendeley (http://www.mendeley.com), “a free reference manager and academic social network that can help you organize your research, collaborate with others online, and discover the latest research.” On September 26, 2011, there existed a total of 29,780,677 unique papers and 30,470 public groups in the Mendeley network. Each group organizes references and scholars by an area of interest so that they can effectively collaborate in public or private. Every group is associated with one of the 25 Mendeley disciplines. We were interested in analyzing this data and understanding charateristics of the many (and few) collaborations that occur between disciplines. What was the solution? We approached the project by breaking the data down into three different levels (macro, meso, and micro) that would provide us what we wanted to see and help us (and others) understand this data. We used the Mendeley API (http://dev. mendeley.com) for data harvesting, Science of Science (Sci2) Tool (https://sci2.cns. iu.edu) for data analysis and basic layout, and Gephi (http://gephi.org) for node and edge rendering. Adobe Illustrator was used for the final design. By importing the exported files from the above open-soucre software into Illustrator, we were able to

Contact: name: Michael J. Stamper company/organisation: CNS Center e-mail: mstamper@indiana.edu website: http://cns.iu.edu

122

break the initial visualization apart and then apply color and scale to better see the data in a beautiful and meaningful manner. The main visualization is a bimodal network graph of group owners and their associated group disciplines, this provides the macro view of the inter-discipline collaborations. We show group owners that own more than one group and their association with the 25 group disciplines. Group owner nodes are circular and size coded by the number of categories they are associated with. Category (discipline) nodes are circular, red, and have the Mendeley logo on them. All nodes are labeled and type font size corresponds to number of in-links. The search and zoom functionality of the PDF file can provide the meso view where users can find and explore Mendeley’s expertise and knowledge network in detail. What was the effect? The effect is that we were able to visualize the our data and come to a few conclusions that could help researchers. By using color, scale, we were able to see and make sense of the data in a visually dynamic manner. Technically, we found that four disciplines (Biological Sciences, Computer and Information Science, Mathematics and Psychology) have a tendency towards higher cross-disciplinary collaboration compared to other disciplines. The discipline categories of Arts and Liberature, Astronomy / Astrophysic / Space Science, and Humanities disciplines are more selfproductive and self-producing where the researchers are more focused on topics in their own disciplines.


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SHORTL STED

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Category:

Didactics

Project:

An Innovation Interactive Software and Presentation Technique on General Multimedia Didactics Application

What was the challenge? In some classrooms, the traditional white board had been replaced by interactive whiteboards (IWB) which combine video/ media systems and show a modernized teaching/presenting instrument. Many schools use IWB to connect internet/district network to develop digital video distribution system for on-line/off-line study that can provide distance learning or e-learning courses. Moreover, an on-line IWB uses interactive vector based graphical websites to share annotation and drawing environments. In recent years, IWB become popular in many schools. It suits for teaching need in any level, but its price is pretty high. For example, a common IWB with basic function costs 1,000 US dollars or higher. Therefore, it motivates us to explore and create a more convenient and cheaper IWB based on our multimedia expertise. Ifwewanttomakea convenient and cheaper IWB, the first consideration is how to use the facilities in a classroom, such as projector, screen, pointer, and so on. The answer “Wii” is just right flashing in our mind. Wii is the official main engine in video games, it was created by Nintendo in 2007; Wiimote is the Wii’s standard controller, and it uses the blue tooth wireless transmission with main engine’s segment. These two instruments are all setting a high quality infrared detector and infrared LED, but they have an opposite arranged. The biggest challenge comes from how to change infrared detectors become

Contact: name: Sou-Chen Lee2 company/organisation: 2Department of Multimedia and Game Science, Lunghwa University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan County 33306, Taiwan. (Communication Author) e-mail: sclee@mail.lhu.edu.tw

124

a common laser point tracker and still keep the fully functions of a presenter. To develop a cheaper IWB is another concern in our design, because we want to show an innovation and interactive presentation skills with a general multimedia effect in classroom. What was the solution? To combine laser guide and wireless control multi-technology on an innovation design was proposed in this work, as shown in Figure 1. We have succeeded to develop an useful design for general multimedia didactics purpose. The solution of the cheapest IWB provides a complete presentation function by utilizing the laser point which comes from a laser diode pointer to emit a red spot onto a screen, and it cooperates with an optic camera and a laser point image tracing software. After some image processes and software program operations, the movement of laser point images can be transformed into a command signal to control the mouse’s cursor on the screen. About the main work on our design is

Figure 2 The concept of our innovation design

We use laser guide technology to control laser points which emit from the pointer managed by the instructor (teacher). Then, we use a web cam with special light filter lens receiver to detect the laser source on the screen. The lens can filter out the visible light on the majority of projection screens effectively. After some image process and computer software program operations, the movement of image can be transformed by a cursor command to guide the laser point precisely. The calibration comes from a four point localization method to calibrate the coordinate of mouse cursor on the screen at the outset. One point calibration takes approximately a few seconds for each. This four point localization calibrates the coordinate of mouse cursor followed by a defined sequence for completing four points calibration. When each point is captured by the web cam the tracking process can be started, the cursor tracking is set up completely, which is shown in Figure 3.

Figure 1 The laser guide and wireless control multi-technology on an innovation design was proposed in this work.

divided into two parts, the following gives a more detailed explanation. The first part is calibration. The system has some facilities including projector, screen, pointer, web cam, a personal computer (laptop) and an instructor which are shown in Figure 2.

Figure 3 The laser source spot on the screen to guide the computer mouse cursor


MORE THAN ADEQUATE The second part of this work is presentation. The trajectories of mouse movement, such as the trajectory path, icon pattern, and writing symbol could all be possibly changed by various commands for a computer in the first part step to execute a superior performance with multimedia, multi-functional and touchless behavior. The presentation work proposes a practical application on general multimedia didactics. In a general case, when use a projector, the user (teacher) stands in front of screen and faces to the projector, Figure 4 are shown the situation. The user eyes have to sustain a high luminance light under this embarrassing.

on the screen effectively. Thus, we can say that it is a distance free (touchless) for the detection. Due to the excellent property, the proposed design can operate in a large classroom as well as a large screen for more attractive didactics, which are shown as Figure 9.

Figure 6 The proposed design performs air mouse and air presenter function.

Figure 7 The proposed design performs air writing function.

Figure 4 In general case, the user eyes always sustain from high luminance projector light.

To compare with the Wiimote IWB, which uses coordinate tracking and guides the computer mouse cursor by detecting the IR spot. But, it has the distance limitation, which is shown as Figure 8. Because of the

The proposed design wisely offers a perfect solution. The user can operate a far distance control didactics, and the IWB provides an interactive, precise and multimedia teaching method in front of the screen, which is shown as Figure 5.

Figure 8 The Wiimote IWB system has the distance limitation for its detection.

What was the effect? This work provides an innovation interactive software and presentation technique on general multimedia didactics. The proposed design utilizes laser point which comes from a common laser pointer to emit a red spot onto a screen, it cooperates with a web cam (optic camera) and a laser point image tracing software. After some image processes and software program operations, the movement of laser point images can be transformed into a command signal to control the mouse’s cursor on the screen. When associates with multimedia presentation software from cloud top technique, the proposed design can efficiently present a superior performance with multimedia, multi-functional and touchless behavior by controlling the mouse’s loci. The future version is shown as Figure10. In conclusion, the effect of the proposed design for enhancing didactics for multimedia presentation could be summarized as the following: 1. This technique creates a more convenient and cheaper IWB. 2. Accompanying with projector, pointer, screen, PC and web cam, it is easy to show innovation and interactive presentation skills in classroom. 3. The superior performance is demonstrated on multimedia, multi-functional and touchless behavior.

Figure 5 The proposed design provides the user a feel free, interactive, precise and multimedia teaching method.

For a conventional IWB, the user has limited functions in presentation work, it just use infrared detector and infra LED, like Wiimote. This proposed design provides a full solution for presentation needs, such as air mouse, air presenter (shown in Figure 6) and air writing function (shown in Figure 7), as well as far distance control onto the screen.

Figure 9 The proposed design suits for a large size screen in a big classroom

detection distances limitation, the screen size is also confined in a certain short range. The proposed design utilizes a web cam (optical camera) and a special light filter lens in order to detect the laser spot

Figure 10 Combining with the cloud top technique, the proposed design presents a superior performance with multimedia, multi-functional and touchless behavior.

125


Category:

Didactics

Project:

Visualizing Timor-Leste Education Data

What was the challenge? The challenge was finding a way to present statistics and information in a national report to assess the gender gap in education that would be engaging and easy-tounderstand for senior decision-makers, as well as staff. What was the solution? Through the help of various organizations, the Ministry of Education was collecting massive amounts of education and sexdisaggregated data. Using basic statistical formulas and simple yet representational graphics and typography, the data and information was designed to highlight the gender trends/gaps for various indicators. Factsheets like the ones shown provided a one-page reference for policy makers, advisors and staff to understand and derive programs. What was the effect? Senior managers and staff of the Ministry took the issue more seriously, the issue of gender and the gaps in education translated into more tangible and visual understanding, making the issue and problems much more relevant to the local context. This eventually led to addressing these gender gaps and issues in the 5-year national education strategic plan.

Are Girls and Boys Equally Represented in Education? A Gender Assessment

Human Resources

Ministry of Education, Timor-Leste

Management - National Level Senior Leadership M - 5 (100%) F - 0 (0%)

5

Directors M - 7 (78%) F - 2 (22%)

9

Afonso Soares

of Department Director of Policy Planning and Heads Development M - 18 (72%) Ministry of Education F - 7 (28%)

25

Muriel Lauvige Management - Regional Level Gender and Development Adviser Ministry of Education

Directors M - 5 (100%) F - 0 (0%)

5

Heads of Department M - 26 (72%) F - 10 (28%)

36

Inspectors M - 62 (95%) F - 3 (5%)

65

Contact: name: Vincent Fung company/organisation: e-mail: vfung26@gmail.com website: http://www.vincentfung.ca

Ministry of Education Staff

126 Permanent Staff M - 4782 (72%) F - 1855 (28%)

6637

Temporary Staff M - 1641 (39%) F - 2558 (61%)

4199


GOT IT.

MORE THAN ADEQUATE

Student Enrolment in Timor-Leste

Boys 52%

244974

1000 boy students

Student Enrolment by School Levels

53%

47%

200700 Primary

50% 50%

27827 Pre-Secondary

1000 girl students

Girls 48% Source: EMIS 2007-2008, Ministry of Education Contact: muriel.lauvige@unifem.org Date: 25 March 2009

52% 48%

16447 Secondary

127


Category:

Editorial

Project:

Report connecting excellence for health

What was the challenge? In its annual report the Helmholtz Research Center Munich focused on the issue of cooperation in providing information about its functions and services. The institute and its scientists wish to explore across disciplines how health and the environment are connected and develop new treatment methods on the strength of this. The main emphasis here is on the link between research and applications. What was the solution? The annual report design addresses the main issue of overall cooperation with the appropriate content and extensively in terms of layout and illustrations. Organizational and information charts or radial dendograms highlight the personal and internal institutional links but also the center’s involvement with research associations. Processing-based generative design makes this aesthetic of knowledge possible, whereby the individual is always the focus of attention – including in portraits. The design concept is already expressed on the cover – relief lacquer on the uncoated paper makes tangible the almost invisible cooperative connections that characterize the Helmholtz Zentrum München at all levels of networking. What was the effect? Growth of transparency “how research at the Helmholtz Research Center Munich works” . Awarded.

Contact: Helmut Ness Fuenfwerken Design AG helmut.ness@fuenfwerken.com www.fuenfwerken.com

128

Typ-1-Diabetes mit neuen Markern AP2γ – Schlüsselfakt Disease-Management-Programme verbessern frühzeitig erkennen Versorgungsqualität bei Diabetikern Kooperationspartner / Autoren

Kooperationspartner / Autoren

Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institut für Gesundheitsökonomie und Management im Gesundheitswesen • Renee Stark • Michaela Schunk • Reiner Leidl • Rolf Holle

Helmholtz Zentrum München und Technische Universität München • Peter Achenbach

Technische Univ Helmholtz Zentru • Luisa Landherr Pinto • Ulrike • Steffi Krause Helmholtz Zentru

Helmholtz Zentrum München • Kerstin Koczwara • Christiane Winkler • Maren Pflüger • Thomas Illig • Harald Grallert

Technische Univ Helmholtz Zentru • Ezio Bonifacio

Helmholtz Zentrum München, KORA-Studiengruppe und Institut für Epidemiologie • Christa Meisinger

San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Mailand • Vito Lampasona

Kooperationspa

Technische Unive • Johannes Beckers

Research London • Daniela Drechsel

Helmholtz Zentru Ludwig-Maximili • Monika S. Brill

Helmholtz Zentru München und Mü (CISPM) • Magdalena Götz

Helmholtz Zentru • Marie-Theres Sch • Jovica Ninkovic • Martin Irmler


?pu S‘tahw what‘S up?

SHORTLISTED

Neurologische Erkrankungen Zilles K

Arenas E Arzt E

Wojtak CT Wolf E

Vogt-Weisenhorn DM Stewart F

Björklund A

Bally-Cuif L Bradley A

Ueffing M

Brodski C

Spanagel R

Brown S

„Mit dem Europäischen Netzwerk zur konditionalen Maus-Mutagenese EUCOMM

Bruestle O

Skarnes B Simeone A

betreten wir Neuland bei der Herstellung von Tiermodellen und Krankheitsmodellen

Gasser T

Sillaber IMV

6.1.1 – 6.1.54

zur Funktionsbestimmung aller Gene im

Götz M

Säugetiergenom. Die wissenschaftliche Diskussion mit meinen Partnern ist gelebte

Haass C

Schmidt MV

Innovation, sie gibt mir und meiner Forschung immer wieder neue Impulse.“

Holsboer F

Ruiz P

Hrabˇe De Angelis M

Rossant J Rosenthal N

Hyman A Joyner A

Riess O

Kahle P

Rein Jles E

Klein R

Puelles E

Klopstock T

Prochiantz A Partanen J

Landgraf R

Paez-Pareda M Martin G Pääbo S

Nagy A

Nikkah G

Müller MB

von Melchner H Mewes HW

Lutz B

Martinez S

Meitinger T

Die Grafik beschreibt ein literaturbasiertes soziales Netzwerk. Quelle: www.biomedexperts.com

Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Wurst

Im EUCOMM-Labor am Institut für Entwicklungsgenetik entstehen Zellklone zur Erforschung neurologischer und psychiatrischer Erkrankungen im Mausmodell. EUCOMM, das Europäische konditionale Maus-Mutagenese Programm, ist eine der größten Plattformen zur Erforschung von Genfunktionen weltweit. Es wird am Helmholtz Zentrum München koordiniert.

6.1

ist Direktor des Instituts für Entwicklungsgenetik am Helmholtz Zentrum München und Inhaber des Lehrstuhls für Entwicklungsgenetik an der Technischen Universität München. Als einer der führenden Köpfe der Gen-Funktionsanalyse im Säugetiermodell koordiniert er das „Europäische Konditionale Maus-Mutagenese Programm“ (EUCOMM) und die Helmholtz-Allianz „Geistige Gesundheit in einer alternden Gesellschaft“, die sich mit den Mechanismen neurodegenerativer Erkrankungen befasst.

6 Basis für neuen Therapieansatz für triple-negatives Mammakarzinom

HER2-positiv, Hormonrezeptor-negative Brustkrebszelle

HER2-GEN HER2-Rezeptor

Kooperationspartner / Autoren

HER2

Helmholtz Zentrum München • Claudia Böllner

CK7 Knoten triple-negative bzw. Rezeptor dreifach negative Brustkrebszelle

Imperial College London • Gerry Thomas Helmholtz Zentrum München und Technische Universität München • Mike Atkinson • Heinz Höfler • Irene Esposito • Michaela Aubele

seit 2007 stellvertretende Direktorin des Instituts für Pathologie 2004 Habilitation an der Technischen Universität München 1995 – 2007 leitende Wissenschaftlerin am Institut für Pathologie 1986 – 1995 Post-Doc im Bereich Biomedizinische Bildanalyse, Helmholtz Zentrum München bis 1995 Studium und Promotion, Ludwig-MaximiliansUniversität München

Dr. Daniela Schulz Helmholtz Zentrum München seit 2007 wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin am Helmholtz Zentrum München 2002 – 2006 Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin an der Universität Leipzig, Promotion an der Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg bis 2002 Studium der Agrarwissenschaften, Schwerpunkt Agrarbiologie an der Technischen Universität MünchenWeihenstephan

NME1-2

Annexin A1

Milchgänge Drüsenlappen

5.2.1

Ein Vergleich von dreifach-negativem (TN-)Brustkrebs mit HER2-positivem/ Hormonrezeptor-negativem Brustkrebs auf Molekülebene zeigt, dass mehr als

Zellkern

30 Proteine in unterschiedlichen Mengen exprimiert werden. Einige dieser down- oder up-regulierten Pro-

5.2 PD Dr. Michaela Aubele Helmholtz Zentrum München und Technische Universität München

Fibronektin

TN

5.1.1

Beim triple-negativen (TN) Brustkrebs liegen die Rezeptoren für den Wachstumsfaktor HER2 und die der weiblichen Geschlechtshormone Östrogen bzw. Progesteron in den Zellen gar nicht oder in geringer Konzentration vor. Da die bisher erhältlichen Therapeutika gegen eine erhöhte Konzentration dieser Rezeptoren gerichtet sind, greifen sie im Falle von TN-Brustkrebs nicht. Eine aktuelle Studie des Helmholtz Zentrums München hat erstmals die Basis für einen Therapieansatz für diese Brustkrebsform gefunden.

teine könnten sich bei TN-Brustkrebs als Angriffsziel für eine medikamentöse Therapie eignen.

5.1

Weitere Untersuchungen werden triple-negativen Brustkrebs noch detaillierter charakterisieren und zur Entwicklung neuer Therapieoptionen beitragen. Langfristig soll dadurch die Prognose auch beim TN-Mammakarzinom deutlich verbessert werden, gegen das derzeit noch keine medikamentöse Therapie existiert.

5

wachsen hormonabhängig, bei wiederum etwa 25 Prozent davon tritt eine Überexpression von HER2-Rezeptoren auf. Rund 15 Prozent werden als triple-negativ (TN) bezeichnet – das bedeutet: Weder der Östrogen-, noch der Progesteron-, noch

4.3.1 – 4.3.5

Bei dreifach Rezeptor-negativem oder triple-negativem (TN) Brustkrebs findet keine oder nur eine geringe Expression von Östrogen- und Progesteronrezeptoren sowie von HER2Rezeptoren statt, die Angriffsziel einer medikamentösen Therapie beim Mammakarzinom sind. Das Forscherteam um Michaela Aubele hat nun TN-Tumore genauer untersucht und deutliche Unterschiede in der Konzentration von etwa 30 Proteinen gegenüber den HER2positiven / Hormonrezeptor-negativen Krebsarten gefunden. Davon werden 13 Proteine bei TN-Brustkrebs in höherer Konzentration bzw. über 20 Proteine in geringerer Menge als bei HER2-positiven / Hormonrezeptor-negativen Mammakarzinomen gebildet. Als Untersuchungsmaterial dienten 34 Proben gefrorenen Brustkrebsgewebes (15 von triple-negativen und 19 HER-2 positiv / Hormonrezeptor-negativen Tumoren). Zu den identifizierten Proteinen gehören z. B. Annexin A1 und A2, Laktoferrin, NME1-NME2 Protein, Fibronektin und L-Plastin. Die physiologische Rolle einiger dieser Markerproteine ist bekannt: Sie sind an Signalketten beteiligt, die relevant für Wachstum und Invasion von Tumoren in das umgebende Gewebe sind.

80 Prozent aller Mammakarzinome

der HER2-Rezeptor werden im Tumor in höherer Konzentration gebildet. HER2Rezeptoren können mit dem Antikörper Trastuzumab (Herceptin) blockiert werden. Tumore mit hoher Konzentration an Hormonrezeptoren sind mit Tamoxifen oder Aromatasehemmern therapierbar.

4.3

Originalpublikation Daniela Schulz et al.: Identification of differentially expressed proteins in triple-negative breast carcinomas using DIGE and mass spectrometry. J. Proteome Res. 8: 3430-3438 (2009) doi: 10.1021 / pr900071h

90

Weitere Forschungshighlights

91

4 4.2 4.2.1 4.1 3 4.1.1 – 4.1.5

2

3.3 3.2 3.1 3.3.1 – 3.3.3

2.2

129


Category:

Editorial

Project:

Eine Frage der Vernunft

What was the challenge? The challenge was to design a series of ten double-sided visualizations as part of the annual report of the Generation CEO – an initiative to promote female talents for management positions. In addition to the editorial section of the annual report the visualization part should playfully depict the cumulative competences of the 81 female managers currently joining the network.

15 JAHRGäNGE, 3105 LEBENSJAHRE *1966

*1967

*1968

*1969

*1970

*1971

*1972

*1973

*1974

*1

What was the solution? The visualization series was designed in a diversified way regarding both content-related and visual aspects. Among management-specific issues (such as fields of study or professional experience) playful aspects were allowed (such as haircuts or number of children). The various graphic and pictorial means alternate and refer to the content that has to be communicated. ø = 38.81 JAHRE

What was the effect? The visualization series delivers a multifaceted and differentiated picture of the 81 managers. The illustrative, narrative and non-linear visualizations allow a free exploration of the data. They enable surprising insights in the environment of the female managers by playful means. By enabling and stimulating individual readings the visualizations tell many different stories. Visualizations that combine content-related and aesthetic aspects allow not only quantitative but rather qualitative statements.

55 STUDIENFäCHER, 17 STUDIENLäNDER 1x

2x

Drittstudium

3x 4x

8x

19 x

Contact:

130

18 x

Zweitstudium

6x

Barbara Hahn / Christine Zimmermann Hahn und Zimmermann mail@von-b-und-c.net www.von-b-und-c.net

49 x

Erststudium

ø = 1.96 STUDIENABSCHLüSSE

Erststudium, Zweitstudium, Drittstudium

8x

5x

2x


?pu S‘tahw what‘S up?

SHORTLISTED

49 ARBEITSORTE

73

*1974

*1975

*1977

*1978

*1979

*1980

Altendorf

Mülheim

Kopenhagen

Bochum

Neu-Isenburg

H

Unterföhring

London

Köln

Unterneukirchen

D

Wiesbaden Stockholm

Herzogenaurach

Kronberg Berlin

Dübendorf

Hongkong

Zürich

Barcelon

Leverkusen

Madrid Turin

Hildesheim

Dortmund Vevey

Sc

München Hagen

Preisträgerin:

2007,

2008,

2009,

12 x

6x

4x

4 Jahre

2x

1x 7 Jahre

St Bad Homburg Nürnberg

ø = 1.63 MANAGERINNEN PRO STADT

2010

88 KINDER

1106 JAHRE BERUFSERFAHRUNG 49 x

Bonn

Paris

Neuss

dium

8 Jahre

9 Jahre

10 Jahre

11 Jahre

12 Jahre

18 x

udium

dium

*1976

12 x

8x

3x

2x

13 Jahre

14 Jahre 8x

5x

2x

1x

15 Jahre

15 x

16 Jahre

18 x

17 Jahre

36 x

18 Jahre

ø = 13.83 JAHRE BERUFSERFAHRUNG, 6.55 KARRIERESTATIONEN

20 Jahre

ø = 1.1 KINDER PRO MANAGERIN

21 Jahre

22 Jahre

Preisträgerin:

2007,

23 Jahre

2008,

2009,

2010

131


Category:

Future Concepts

Project:

I Walk New York: A Plan for Pedestrian Wayfinding for New York City

What was the challenge? The New York City Department of Transportation commissioned Two Twelve to study the pedestrian experience throughout the five boroughs and develop a wayfinding master plan to help people navigate more easily, conveniently and with confidence. The primary goal of the project was to develop a wayfinding design strategy that encourages people to walk, with the related aims and benefits of easing vehicular congestion, reducing crowding on subways and buses, improving human health and mobility, and easing the flow of foot traffic that is the lifeblood of the city’s numerous commercial, cultural and recreational attractions. What was the solution? Given the international success of the innovative Legible London wayfinding program in the UK, Two Twelve chose to work with the inventor of that system, London-based Applied (formerly AIG: Applied Information Group) to develop the strategy and recommendations for New York. The first step was to benchmark the present situation to understand where improvements were needed and what behaviors needed to be supported or changed. The team worked with Beresford Research to survey various pedestrian populations in different types of neighborhoods, from the destination-dense streets of midtown Manhattan to the wide boulevards of Queens. The research team used observation and questionnaires to identify the common challenges people have navigating the city and the cues and tools people use to orient themselves to their surroundings.

Contact: name: Sarah Haun, Chief Marketing Officer company/organisation: Two Twelve e-mail: shaun@twotwelve.com website: www.twotwelve.com

132

Among the quantitative findings of interviews with more than 400 people in four neighborhoods were:

for providing orientation information and easy-to understand directions where there presently are none or not enough.

• 13% of locals are not familiar with the area • 48% of visitors could not give directions to a local landmark • 9% of New Yorkers have been lost in the past week • 27% of visitor admitted to getting lost in the previous week • 33% of locals did not know which way was north

Among the most important recommendations are to use consistent cues and information throughout the five boroughs, to incorporate existing sign systems, to involve local community organizations in the development and maintenance of the program, to use technology to support traditional forms of visual communication, and to leverage graphics and other visual cues in the streetscape that people already recognize and use to navigate New York City. A system design that meets these overall objectives will ensure ease and affordability of implementation, allow for a balance between a citywide identity and the individual character of each neighborhood, and improve the pedestrian experience.

These statistics serve two important functions: first, they affirm the need and opportunities for a citywide wayfinding system, and second, they ensure accountability to the public by establishing benchmarks that the city agency can use later to evaluate the effectiveness of any recommendations that are implemented. A qualitative component of the research methodology involved asking residents and visitors to draw “mental maps” -- to actually illustrate their perceptions of the city and its neighborhoods in relation to one another. The I Walk New York team used results of these personal sketches, combined with the quantitative findings and field observations, to establish a strategic framework for a pedestrian wayfinding system for New York City. The team built on this framework to make numerous recommendations, including both incremental and dramatic elements, that the DOT could use to support walking. What was the effect? “I Walk New York: A Plan for Pedestrian Wayfinding for New York City” outlines a clear, branded strategy and feasible tactics

“‘I Walk New York lays out a vision for a pedestrian experience that is well organized and user-friendly without sacrificing the energy and diversity that make New York a unique and vibrant city,” says Two Twelve’s principal-in-charge of the study, David Gibson. The program will be implemented over a 10-year period starting in 2012.


thAt‘S it! SHORTLISTED

133


Category:

Future Concepts

Project:

Online wayfinding

What was the challenge? To create an online wayfinding tool using enhanced 3D maps and virtual-reality systems to allow people to navigate stations or other terminal buildings and plan their journey or visit in advance. What was the solution? Combining 3D station models and 360° VR photography allows people to explore the whole building environment without leaving home. TDC and specialist photographic services company Spheroview have set up a test website based on one of the new Dubai Metro stations to illustrate how the wayfinding tool works. Please visit the website to see the system for yourself, simply click on any of the hot spots to see different station areas: www.spheroview.com/nakheel/20.html On each view a set of navigation aids allow the user to pan around the scene, zoom in and out, or choose a different location by clicking on the hot-spots marked on the master station plan. What was the effect? The service promises to be particular useful for disabled people, people with luggage or people with small children in pushchairs needing to plan for step-free access to services and facilities. TDC has recently designed updated station maps for Network Rail in the UK, utilising site surveys and 360° photography for accurate 3D representation. The maps will eventually be used as part of Network Rail’s online services to passengers.

Contact: name: Tony Howard company/organisation: TDC e-mail: tony@transportdesign.com website: www.transportdesign.com

134


thAt‘S it! MORE THAN ADEQUATE

135


Category: Project:

Future Concepts Visualizing the impact of terror attacks on India

What was the challenge? India is world rank second, in facing terrorist threats emanating from diverse groups with various objectives. Terrorists have adopted different tactics, ranging from hit and run to fidayeen (suicide) attacks. The focus of perpetrators is to ensure that events are unrelated, random and seemingly innocuous. Peace conflict research institutes have been collecting detailed information of activities on an hourly basis, often with the help of media agencies. How can one give meaning and structure to this data? Continuously increasing data set sizes, challenges fundamental methods. This manifests itself in methods across many fields, from computational complexity to database organization to the visual presentation and exploration of the data. What was the solution? I have used different, appropriate and interactive visualizations, for respective data sets under the grid of parallel coordinates, such as geo- spatial plotting, interactive node diagram, line plot, visual cluster mapping and dot mapping. What was the effect? One can construct a holistic visual representation of complex patterns. Also, the visualization system supports a variety of user interactions to help understand hidden patterns, for example, identifying future targets leading to preventative actions.

Contact: Mitushi Jain National Institute of Design mitushi.jain@msn.com

136

Figure 1: Final visual impact achieved. (Dummy data)

I explored a large data-set of terrorist incidents with the visualization system, and presented a selection of interesting patterns. Further, I realized that giving visual form to such database can be quite challenging. However, dynamic visualization with real time database, and drawing lines connecting different variables as per time selection, solves it all. The impact of this visualization system lies in the complexity and diversity of patterns that it can present. In other words, it can simultaneously visualize data across several dimensions (including geography, time, and/ or multiple attributes) and can explore different types of patterns with a unified environment. (Fig.1)


thAt‘S it! MORE THAN ADEQUATE TIMELINE Documents collected were based on the time variant. This led to the conclusion of making the visualization time driven, which can be further filtered, with the help of range slider. LOCATION Exact location has been plotted using longitude and latitude value over Microsoft virtual earth. The diameter of the circle varies in relation to the number of casualties to depict the impact of destruction. (Fig.3)

Figure 3: Range Slider is used to select the time period.

TARGET, ATTACK, WEAPON TYPE Three major variables of the data consisting of similar level of information been denoted with shape, size and color. (Fig.4) LINE Each line represents an attack which is being drawn in runtime, as per the time selection. Multiple lines of attacks can be selected with the visual feedback of red color to analyze various relationships and patterns. (Fig.4) PERPETRATOR INFORMATION There are over 200 terrorist organizations, categorized under 11 subcategories, some active and some dormant in their activities. Therefore, a node diagram is implemented on an interactive scale. (Fig.2) Figure 2: Interactive node diagram.

Figure 4: Selection of particular line of attack. (Actual data)

The application is built using Silverlight 3 platform for dynamic data visualization. Data warehouse chosen is SQL Server 2008. All values are calculated using simple SQL queries to plot at runtime. (Fig.2,3,4: are actual application screenshots)

For video demonstration: http://www.vimeo.com/7923854

137


Category:

Future Concepts

Project:

Of B and C – Data visualization beyond pie charts and bar graphs

What was the challenge? The majority of data visualizations are designed according to existing conventions, traditions and trends. Data is often entered into interchangeable models like pie charts or bar graphs, whereby it is only seldom that the optimal presentational format for the corresponding information is sought after and the maximum visualization potential achieved. The challenge within this project was to develop new presentation formats for information visualization, to exploit the unexhausted visualization potential and to test its boundaries. What was the solution? In addition to nine developed visualizations, the book contains all data that was collected during the work process. Using a Japanese book-binding method, the exterior pages contain the primary material – the data – while the inner pages present the visuals. The nine developed visualizations present a wide spectrum of new forms of representation, in which the graphic and pictorial means refers to the content presented and precisely communicate the information. Both the informative and aesthetic quality of the visualization are thereby equally considered. What was the effect? The book demonstrates how depictive knowledge can be won from data records by means of innovative visualizations – beyond conventional graphical representations – and that language that is committed to content and readability can take on surprising form and travel unfamiliar paths.

Contact: Barbara Hahn / Christine Zimmermann Hahn und Zimmermann mail@von-b-und-c.net www.von-b-und-c.net

138


thAt‘S it! MORE THAN ADEQUATE

139


Category:

Research

Project:

Inclusive Information Environments in Public Transport

Research challenge The distribution of passenger flows in public transport environments can be predicted through simulations of flow characteristics. The flow characteristics are usually based on average values, they assume, that all users know the infrastructure and use the shortest route to reach their goal. They do not include behavioural characteristics of people with mobility impairments such as wheelchair users, individuals with prams and small children, older people or people with sensory impairments. The overall research project was aimed at 1) improving the quality of such pedestrian flow simulations by incorporating information about group-specific orientation and navigation behaviour and 2) linking the simulation to the information environment. Within this project qualitative design research was formulated to elaborate on information design content. Use cases were based on the Praterstern transport interchange with high density commuter travel as well as being a tourist and weekend attraction. The main question for information design was to identify a relationship between the information environment and orientation strategies of these groups of passengers. Results may point towards group-specific information requirements beyond the obvious and known physical requirements.

Contact: name: Veronika Egger company/organisation: is-design GmbH e-mail: veronika.egger@isdesign.at website: www.is-design.at

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Methods used • Pre- and post-task interviews with all respondents from eight categories: 70+ years old, adult with push-chair, mobility impaired, wheelchair users, visually impaired, blind, hearing impaired, deaf. • Definition of two realistic scenarios: within one transport system and changing between two different transport systems (one scenario per respondent). • Telling a story to make the tasks plausible, i.e. visiting a friend and buying some flowers on the way. • Documentation of the tasks employing three different techniques: “Thinking aloud” comments recorded from the respondent; “Shadowing” of each respondent; time/motion tracking on a tablet-PC with annotations of defined events. Results The insights gained were in some respects surprising but also confirmed us in our conviction that context and a holistic view of the information environment are paramount to successful information design. 1) The quantitative measure revealed an overall slightly slower walking speed for the groups we looked at compared to what is usually assumed in pedestrian flow simulations. It was surprising, however, that across the groups we found no significant difference in the speed of completing the tasks. 3) By matching the thinking aloud data with walking speed and observations a pattern of “moving with confidence” and “insecure movement” emerged. Thus a complete narrative for each task was created, incorporating the personal profile of the respondents, their movement pattern, speed, comments and observations.

4) People’s expectations and experience determine what they are looking for in the (information) environment. This was demonstrated in two ways: when onscreen information was available but not expected, it was “invisible”; when buses and trams were arranged in a parallel platform style people were confused and had trouble finding the bus stop located behind the tram. (In both cases Vienna city transport adopted new strategies that were usually associated with the railways but unfamiliar in a city transport context.) 5) High concentration of the most used features in the environment on one side of the concourse (access to lifts and escalators, info screens, supermarket, cash point, take-away), caused conflicts between “gathering information mode” and “moving along mode”. Conclusions Regardless of physical ability, respondents across all groups had similar problems when navigating the environment: placement and recognition of functional features/information; readabiltiy/audibility of information; clarity of content. Leaving us with the observation that the design and organisation of the environment and of information seem to have greater influence on navigation and orientation behaviour than age, gender or any physical requirement.

The research was carried out in the context of MASIMO – Multiagent System for Group-specific Movement and Orientation Behaviour of Pedestrians in co-operation with the Austrian Institute of Technology (AIT), supported by the IV2Splus programme of the Austrian Federal Ministry for Infrastructure and Transport (bmvit). Lisa Ehrenstrasser, inklusiv Design & research, contributed towards defining the research and evaluation methods.


methods FoUND

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Two scenarios/tasks: one remaining within the Vienna city transport system, one changing from Vienna city transport to the Austrian railways. Participants with voice recorders (in the case of deaf participants the interpreter). Comments are time-synchronised with the path.

Observer taking notes

!!!! !!!! Observer with tablet-PC, tracing the path and marking two types of events: standing, looking around information located

Path trajectory: events and comments mapped onto the path, building a narrative of qualitative and quantitative data that can be linked to features in the environment. moving with confidence

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Overall slightly slower walking speed measured (0,84 m/s) compared to what is usually assumed in pedestrian flow simulations (1,3 m/s). However, surprisingly across these groups we found no significant difference in the speed of $333 completing the tasks.

$233 The info screens introduced by Vienna city transport were not noticed by any %333 of the users who remained within the city transport system. Only those who were looking to change to the railway %233 system noticed this screen – primarily a matter of expectation, even before content, visual design or placement 4333 are considered.

The high functional concentration to one side of the main station concourse created a conflict between different modes of use i.e. searching, standing, reading and simply wanting to move as quickly as possible. Graph: all trajectories scenario 1, source AIT Austrian Institute of Technology 2011

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Category:

Research

Project:

Maximizing the Social Impact of Cancer Registry Data, California

What was the challenge? This transdisciplinary project includes experts in epidemiology from the Cancer Prevention Institute of California (cancer statistics), public health researchers at Washington University in St. Louis (communications), and design researchers at Washington University in St. Louis (visual and interaction design). The general goal of this project is to improve the social impact of cancer registry data for the public. The specific challenge of this segment of the project was to design two sample interfaces to house cancer incidence data (colorrectal cancer in the state of California), and to measure the effectivenss of these displays in relation to displays with similar data that are commonly viewed online. What was the solution? The solution was the design of the two displays to the right, the first of which is an interactive “snapshot� that shows average colorectal cancer rates in a given moment, broken down by ethnic group and region; the circles are rollovers only, so the user can have the experience of quickly scanning through the numbers. The second solution is a trends chart, which shows colorectal cancer rates over time. In this example, the user can click on any chart line and roll over the others to compare; alternatively, the user can select categories from the lists at the bottom, and the corresponding line will highlight, colorcoded by ethnic group.

Contact: name: Heather Corcoran, Associate Professor company/organisation: Washington University in St. Louis e-mail: hcorcoran@wustl.edu website: www.corcoranfordesign.com

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What was the effect? The effectiveness of the first display is currently being evaluated by approximately 200 members of the general public, living in the state of California. Clarity, retention, volume of information, and accessibility are among the factors to be tested. It is anticipated that results from the study, which will be available in late fall, will

help establish some benchmarks in cancer registry data presentation. The transdisciplinary team has also developed a graphics generator, which allows researchers to upload Excel files from any region in the U.S. to create either of the two visualization approaches shown here.


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Category:

Research

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Get Out Safe: Designing Emergency Exit Maps That Work

What was the challenge? Emergency exit maps in public buildings— whether in schools, hospitals, hotels, airports, or government offices—are surprisingly hard to locate and difficult to understand. They fall far short of being useful navigation tools to aid emergency preparedness and public safety. What was the solution? A study of how the visual language of emergency exit maps and systems can be improved is part of a research project supported by the University of California, Davis. One specific challenge of this phase of the project is how to represent a three-dimensional experience in two dimensions so that the viewer creates a clear mental model of the space and where they are in it. Subsequent phases of the project move beyond the map to consider the entire evacuation experience, investigating aspects such as directional sound, tactile elements, networking, and change of state. What was the effect? The outcome of this project is the development of best practices and models for improvement that can be adapted for use in a variety of public buildings. The process includes mobilizing research and design professionals, engaging students from several academic institutions, advocating for the need to design prototypes and guidelines for broader implementation, and providing tools and methods to accomplish this effectively.

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Visual studies of color, contrast, perspective, and orientation (left) inform a redesign of the emergency exit map for Walker Hall on the UC Davis campus— a case study for the project.

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Research

Project:

Elevator “Door Open/Door Close” Icons

What was the challenge? The “door open/door close” buttons, ubiquitous in public elevators, are a frequent source of confusion and even embarrassment. Recognizing the correct icon quickly enough to prevent the door from shutting in the face of a friendly stranger is a challenge for many of us.

What was the solution? A visual exploration of alternative symbols—part of the Orphan Projects in Design Initiative at the University of California, Davis—seeks to alleviate the perplexity of this all-too-familiar situation. Twelve proposals for a new symbol set explore change-of-state and dimensionality to create symbols that are more intuitive to use at a glance and in a hurry.

What was the effect? The overarching goal of the Orphan Projects initiative is to identify artifacts that need improved clarity and accessibility and propose design solutions that benefit all.

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In addition to issues of proximity and placement, the button icons themselves are confusing. The “door” never changes state. The symbol for is actually more compressed and closed In addition to issues“open” of proximity and placement, looking. And arrows appear as static shapes rather the button icons themselves are confusing. than activators. The “door” never changes state. The symbol for “open” is actually more compressed and closed looking. And arrows appear as static shapes rather than activators.

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Twelve proposals for a new symbol set. Exploring “change of state” and dimensionality to make the action and the object being acted upon more Twelve proposals forintuitive. a new symbol set. Exploring “change of state” and dimensionality to make the action and the object being acted upon more intuitive.

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Category: Project:

Research Design Methods to obtain Formal Coherence in Pictographic Systems

What was the challenge? This is a research project to obtain formal coherence in pictographic systems. This formal coherence is very important when applied to universal spaces, like Airports or Olympic Games facilities, because the user must be comfortable decoding the pictograms. So, they should work as a family, where all the shapes and graphic style have to uniform and coherent. The main goal was to propose one (or more then one) Design Methods, which improve the creative process, helping the designer to achieve formal coherence. I chose six great examples of Universal Pictography, three Airport Systems and three Olympic Systems. This was a research centred in a qualitative data analysis.

What was the solution? Through an intense analysis I achieve four different Design Methods to generate pictographic systems: [1] Modular System in a Grid Pattern, [2] Modular Pathway Pattern, [3] Geometric System and [4] Freehand Systems. After that I tested the results with a group of 60 design students.

[1] Main characteristics: When we combine a skeleton (structural attribute) with a certain number of modules (formal attributes), articulated in a grid (coordinative element) we can achieve formal coherence trough all the system. These ideas where collected mainly from Otl Aicher’s work (Munich Olympics) and then validated by the students. [2] Main characteristics: When we combine a skeleton (structural attribute) with a module (formal attribute), from A to B, we can achieve formal coherence trough all the system. These ideas where collected mainly from Min Wang’s work (Beijing Olympics) and then validated by the students. [3] Main characteristics: When we combine a skeleton (structural attribute) with geometric forms (formal attribute), we can achieve formal coherence trough all the system. These ideas where collected mainly from AIGA’s and Mijksenaar work (Shiphol airport) and then validated by the students. [4] Main characteristics: When we combine a skeleton (structural attribute) with freehand forms (formal attribute), we can achieve formal coherence trough all the system. These freehand forms must come from the same tool, like a brush or a “software tool”. These ideas where collected mainly from Josep Maria Triás work (Barcelona Olympics) and then validated by the students.

What was the effect? I can conclude: 1.To generate the pictograms we should use three elements: A] Structural attributes, that I named skeleton B] Formal attributes, like modules for example C] In some cases we should use a Grid, that I named Coordinative Element. 2.The Modular System in a Grid Pattern is the best method to achieve formal coherence. 3.The Geometric System is the worst to obtain formal coherence, because it doesn’t use a specific element that we could repeat like in the modular systems. 4.I can say that the Freehand Systems are the best to generate an original and different graphic style approach. I can say that I am already using these different Design Methods in pictographic projects. For example a Portuguese architect invited me to create two different systems of pictograms to use in 14 Portuguese Schools. I also wrote a book about Olympic Pictograms. The invitation came from the Portuguese Olympic Committee. -I think these methods are a fantatic tool to help designers when they need to create pictographic systems for universal contexts.

Contact: Carlos Rosa Independent Designer/ Owner: Carlos Rosa Designers and Cheif Designer at RMIDS || Design Professor at IADE [www.iade.pt] design@carlosrosadesigners.com www.carlosrosadesigners.com || www.rmidstudio.com

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Category:

Research

Project:

Visualizing Indicator Systems

What was the challenge? Using the example of the measuring data of sustainable development in Switzerland this research project aimed to develop and evaluate alternative visual representation forms for complex indicator systems. Based on the abstract data of the MONET indicator system with its 75 indicators the challenge was to make the multilayered and complex information accessible, communicate it effectively and deliver a working tool to explore the underlying data. What was the solution? By means of a visually conducted and reflected design process and a systematic employment of various graphic design tools a wide range and variety of visual representation forms was developed. The entire data of the MONET indicator system was finally equally visualized by means of three selected visualization systems (rhomb, circle, typography) with the objective to test their usability and compare them. The three systems are presented in the form of printed pads to flip through. What was the effect? The visualizations may not have provided effective new knowledge about individual indicators to our project partners but they delivered new insights into existing connections and clearly revealed problems of the MONET structure by bringing up contentrelated questions about the data and the construction of the indicator system. The visualizations thus enabled us – beyond the graphically conducted knowledge transfer – to trigger a critical thought process about the indicator system itself.

Contact: Barbara Hahn / Christine Zimmermann Hahn und Zimmermann mail@von-b-und-c.net www.von-b-und-c.net

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Fig. 1 The three visualization pads are supplemented by an indicator catalogue


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Fig. 2–4 View of the 12 MONET themes within the three different visualization systems rhomb (fig. 2), typography (fig. 3) and circle (fig. 4).

Credits: This research project was conducted by the Berne University of the Arts (BUA). Project lead: B. Hahn, C. Zimmermann; Project team: H. Klingemann, F. Meyer, M. Pfrunder; Project partners: Swiss Federal Statistical Office, Federal Office for Spatial Development; Project duration: 07/2009–04/2011; Funding: Swiss National Science Foundation, DORE.

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Research

Project:

brivel User Experience Library

What was the challenge? The everyday challenge of a successful design and software company is to develop innovative solutions for the output via various channels and at the same time guarantee feasibility and implementation efficiency right from the start.

What was the solution? The brivel User Experience Library uses information design methods to build a common language for an interdisciplinary team. This library consists of visual representations in diverse programming challenges through definitions of • Layouts • Components • GUI-Elements to be used through the definition phase and design process of a projects. While technical feasibility is guaranteed by a tested code representation of each component the User Interface and Interaction Design is field-tested in several projects.

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What was the effect? The brivel User Experience Library supports a coherent cross media information design strategy and assists in keeping a strong focus an a positive user experience for multiple channels while taking channel specific constraints and guidelines into account.

Contact: Michael Kieslinger Fluidtime Data Services GmbH michael.kieslinger@fluidtime.com http://fluidtime.com

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Stencil Library To improve efficiency in the design and minimise the amount of time spent on the production of visual mock-ups, the brivel User Experience Library exists also as a stencil library for the most common design tools.


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MORE THAN ADEQUATE Information Design Strategy for a coherent User Experience Through a coherent information design strategy the User Experience can be transported over multiple media channels.

Visual Design Each component is defined for each channel through its visual characteristics.

Interaction Design The behaviour is defined for each component per channel. Channel specific constraints and guidelines are taken into account.

Software Development The tested code representation of each channel guarantees technical feasibility.

Select one out of many This pattern is mainly used if it is possible to select only one item out of a list of items available to the user. CASE 1: first use, nothing preselected Label

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Research Information design process and methods

What was the challenge? In 1985 I published a paper in which I suggested that: The new information age will require many information designers. They will have to be capable of taking information users into account as part of their professional activity. This will require a redefinition of their job, an

& Sless 1990). In 1992 we published the proceedings of a conference in which we showcased our findings (Penman & Sless 1992). Many publications of research and case histories followed (eg. Penman et al 1995, Sless 1996). The findings can be summarised in a simple diagram:

acknowledgment of their own limitations and an informed and sensitive awareness of the needs of the information user. The last of these

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MORE THAN ADEQUATE the creation of highly successful guidelines and regulations that have encouraged many organisations to improve the quality of information designed for ordinary people (eg Sless & Wiseman 1994, TGO 69A). The process has also been applied to many commercial design projects (eg insurance documents, utilities bills, web sites), all with impressive results. We are now teaching this process in undergraduate and postgraduate training programs.

research that are not dependent on outside expertise, and acquiring an informed sense of

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these to create new conventions to meet new communication needs and technologies (Sless,

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1985, p 2).

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Since 1985, with support from over 200 organisations and over 400 projects, I and my colleagues at CRI (the Communication Research Institute, formerly CRIA, the Communication Research Institute of Australia) have collected data and experience for developing these methods; crucially, we have demonstrated that the methods are effective. In 1990 we published the first major case history to come out of this research (Fisher

Contact: David Sless Communication Research Institute d.sless@communication.org.au http://communication.org.au

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The solution was to develop a comprehensive set of design methods for information design problems, drawing on the history of information design and the fields of design research and methodology, then testing our methods using practical information design projects.

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The diagram shows each stage of the method and its sequence within the overall process. Our published research acknowledges the many precursors to this process. However, none has provided detailed descriptions of stages. More importantly, not one has published the supporting data in so many settings proving the effectiveness of their methods in solving information design problems. What was the effect? There have been many effects. The most important from my point of view has been

References Fisher, P. & Sless, D. (1990) Information design methods and productivity in the insurance industry. Information Design Journal 6(2), 103-129. Penman, R. & Sless, D. (eds) (1992) Designing information for people. Canberra: Communication Research Press. Penman, R., Sless, D. & Wiseman, R. (1996) Best practice in accessible documents in the private sector. Australian Language and Literacy Council, National Board of Employment and Training. Canberra: AGPS pp. 167–270. Sless, D. (1985). Informing information designers. Icographic, 2(6). Sless, D. (1996) Better information presentation: Satisfying consumers?, Visible Language 30(3), 246–267. Sless, D. & Wiseman, R. (1994). Writing about medicines for people: usability guidelines and glossary for consumer product information. Canberra: AGPS. TGO 69A http://www.comlaw.gov.au/Details/ F2007B00741, accessed 10 October 2011.


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Category:

Sustainability

Project:

Tourism-Broschure »WANDERZEIT«

What was the challenge? Our approach: Not only to design the commissioned tourism-brochure than to initiate an overarching sustainable concept for the whole village. How to conserve and increase the quality of life for guests and locals? Which way, the place could take a good development, a positive direction? And how tourism will receive a sustainable dimension? A basis to work in 20 years also successfully. At least: How should look like a brochure, express that all? What was the solution? The focussing on one topic – in workshops developed in collaboration with the locals. The concentration on something ecologically, sustainable and consistently developed: Hiking. And whole year round. This should be visualized authentic, credible, honest and in a very unusal way. Not colorful, in DIN A4, no clichee. Fotomodels just from the village, »real people« from there. Short texts, honest and a little bit self-critical. Tips and informations, all focussed on the topic hiking, helpful, interesting, surprising. A companion before, during and after the holiday … What was the effect? In the village itself, the concept was immediately accepted. Also the people on trade fairs were fascinated and interested. And even more by receiving the ordered brochure in the recycling-box with fragrant hay. The place now has a guideline of development, touristic offers also got a clear and sustained focus. And the guests very like the unconventional brochure.

Contact: Andreas Koop designgruppe koop info@designgruppe-koop.de www.designgruppe-koop.de

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Category:

Sustainability

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Bloomberg LP Sustainability Report

What was the challenge? When Bloomberg LP, the New York-based global business and financial news leader, was interested in publishing their first-ever report according to Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) guidelines, they came to Two Twelve’s sustainability communications team. GRI is a progressive framework for companies to report their performance not only in terms of the bottom line, but against standards for corporate governance, environmental and social responsibility. At the same time that they were releasing this report, Bloomberg LP was introducing a related product; an “on-terminal” tool to help investors evaluate and compare companies that report against GRI standards. Two Twelve was tasked with the design and production of four communications to support these activities: the Bloomberg GRI report, a demonstration of the new product, and promotion piece that introduced them, and a web page that allowed access to all of these. What was the solution? Recognizing Bloomberg’s leadership role in the finance community and their commitment to bringing transparency to capital markets, our team knew that precision, accuracy, and a data-driven design format would be critical to the success of the GRI report. Starting with a technical document that enumerated corporate performance according to Global Reporting Initiative (GRI)

Contact: name: Sarah Haun, Chief Marketing Officer company/organisation: Two Twelve e-mail: shaun@twotwelve.com website: www.twotwelve.com

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standards, our team organized the report data and information in a more accessible way, calling out important points and goals with creative use of imagery, graphics and type, and linking these metrics to the GRI standard index. In addition to developing the 230-page report, Two Twelve coordinated the development of the interactive version of the document as it would appear on Bloomberg’s “Terminal” interface. This interactive tool demonstrated the new on-terminal product, allowing Bloomberg subscribers to access and navigate information in a familiar way, and expose non-subscribers to the terminal experience. The dynamic promotion piece, produced in collaboration with Jaeger Sloan, puts the report and product in context, setting up the market opportunity and reasoning or these “triple bottom line” reports and tools. The Accessible online at http://www. bloomberg.com/bsustainable, the suite of related communications reveal the power and purpose of the data, and reinforce Bloomberg’s commitment to transparency. What was the effect? “This innovative online experience beautifully expresses our vision and re-establishes Bloomberg’s leadership position in the market for business news and information,” said our client Curtis Ravenel, who developed the ESG product and drives corporate sustainability initiatives at Bloomberg LP. Two Twelve’s work for the Bloomberg Sustainability Report was published by Communications Arts Web-picks, and recognized by Graphic Design USA as a 2011 American Graphic Design Award winner.

CREDITS: The project is the result of creative collaboration between communications design consultants at Two Twelve, corporate sustainability strategists and communicators at Context America, creative strategists JaegerSloan Inc., and application developers Rubenstein Technology Group.


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Bloomberg sustainability video accessible online at http://www.bloomberg.com/bsustainable

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Category:

Sustainability

Project:

The Green Machine

What was the challenge? Today, the world is aware of growing challenges to energy use and the need for conservation to avoid pollution, global warming, and other effects of energy use. Aaron Marcus had first analyzed global energy interdependence in a research and design project at the East-West Center, Honolulu, HI, in 1978, as the head of a special international team tasked with information design and visualization: communicating the subject through charts, maps, and diagrams for heads of state and the general public. A decade later Al Gore began his campaign to make people aware of energy issues. His efforts took 20 years to achieve success. Today, people are more aware, but not enough are making changes in behavior to have a global impact on energy use. In 2008, Aaron Marcus realized the mobile phone was ideal for informing people, as well as inducing them to change their behavior. There are some three to four billion phones in use throughout the world. Applications and content could be designed to have an effect on energy use. In 2009 he organized a team of AM+A Associates, in particular an international team of Designer/Analyst Interns, to help him research, design, and document a new approach to mobile applications that combined information design (and visualization) with the principles of behavior change. This team included these interns: • Arne Berger, Germany • Jan Brejcha, Czech Republic • Jérémie Jean, France • Eileen Lee, Phillipines • Hye-Min Kim, South Korea

Contact: Aaron Marcus, President Aaron Marcus and Associates, Inc. Aaron.Marcus@AMandA.com http://www.AMandA.com

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Many organizations that treat addictions use persuasion, such as Weight Watchers, Alcoholics Anonymous, and SmokeEnders. Several theorists and analysts have described the philosophy, principles, and techniques such as Robert Cialdini (e.g., in “The Science of Persuasion,” Scientific American, February 2001) and B. J. Fogg. (e.g., in Mobile Persuasion, 2009). AM+A distilled a five-step process for achieving behavior change: • Increase frequency of using application • Motivate change in some energy-use habits: e.g., use of lights and computers, etc. • Teach how to change energy-use habits • Persuade users to change energy-use habits (short-term change) • Persuade users to change lifestyle (long-term change) Today, Smart-Grid electricity meters are being used increasingly in homes and businesses throughout the USA and elsewhere to provide detailed, comprehensive, realtime data to utility companies. President Obama pledged $4.5 billion in 2010 to assist the roll-out of such systems. These same data can be provided by wireless communication to the owners of homes and commercial buildings, as well as to other energy “stakeholders.” In today’s communication media, such data can be provided, together with other statistics, charts, maps, news, images, in a social context that is familiar to users of mobile media. Tests have shown that with appropriate “incentives,” consumers can cut their energy use by about 10 per cent without requiring a radical change in lifestyle. Most applications that have appeared to assist consumers have been oriented to personal computers, not mobile applications. Google’s Power Meter is a good example of an application attempting to give people a “dashboard” view of energy use. AM+A investigated and compared

about 20 mobile applications to look at the marketplace and to consider how more could be done by not only providing information but combining that information with a program for behavior change. What was the solution? AM+A developed an information architecture for the Green Machine, a mobile application concept design incorporating the steps of behavior change identified above. The key ingredients of the design are expressed in the five buttons at the bottom of every screen: • Dashboard: How am I doing now, in this case, one’s current energy use • Model of the future: What will the world be like if I keep using energy as I am currently, including how many animal species will die, how much greater water scarcity, and how many more armed conflicts over scarce resources • Friends network: With whom am I connected? Who can provide support? • Tips and advice: How can I start with small steps? How can I increase my behavior changes? • Competitions and challenges: What available games, puzzles, or other incentives can make things fun? Following a user-centered design process, AM+A focused on user profiles or personas representing typical users (Mom, Dad, Daughter, Son) and use scenarios (checking the home energy use against planned or expected goals for the month). Keeping these two aspects in mind enabled AM+A to design a set of key functions and data for the application. AM+A organized these functions and data into the information architecture of the Green Machine, which is shown in the accompanying Figure 1. Based on the information architecture, AM+A designed preliminary screens for the key components of the application focused on reducing household energy reuse:


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MORE THAN ADEQUATE • My Use: Dashboard • 2200: Model of the future • Friends: Social networking among family, friends, and professionals • Tips: Advice about starting small, how to make progress, how to improve • Challenges: Games and competitions providing entertainment and incentives AM+A tested the initial designs with 20 people, aged 18-65, both men and women. In general the user reaction was favorable regarding motivation and behavior change. Although encouraging, this was merely a “snapshot” response. What was the effect? Based on feedback, AM+A revised the screens as shown in the accompanying Figures 2 through 7. AM+A published a case study in Information Design Journal, and article in User Experience Magazine, an article in Metering International, and an article in Korean Design News. Most importantly, in presenting lectures about the project, AM+A interested SAP, and international enterprise software company, in absorbing the principles into its products. During the latter part of 2010, AM+A worked for SAP to design four prototypes of mobile/Web products incorporating sustainability but oriented to employees within companies. AM+A tested the prototypes and derived guidelines for incorporating sustainability into enterprise software. Subsequently, AM+A worked with SAP to design one commercial product derived from the Green Machine. AM+A has been included as cosigners of three patent applications based on their work for SAP. The potential for incorporating sustainability and persuasion principles into enterprise software through SAP’s products has a potential worldwide impact, because SAP runs many of the world’s largest corporations.

Figure 1: Green Machine Information Architecture

Figures 2 through 7: Green Machine Revised Screens

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Category:

Student

Project:

Multitouch Lab Journal

What was the challenge? Their work is cutting-edge, their digital tools hopelessly outdated. Scientists in biochemical laboratories around the world take on all kinds of challenges from developing more efficient batteries to healing cancer. To ensure reproducible scientific results and keeping track of all experiments, proper documentation is absolutely crucial. However, while scientists are surrounded by high-tech laboratory equipment many of them still use pen and paper to document their work. In a so-called “lab journal” they record all information that is needed to reproduce an experiment, e.g. methods, material specifications or calculations. External (digital) content like photos, illustrations or charts are printed out and glued into the lab journal. This all makes for a very time-consuming and cumbersome process that keeps scientists from doing more important tasks.

and software concept as well as the user interface and interaction design for what we called the “Multitouch Lab Journal”.

What was the solution? The Multitouch Lab Journal (MLJ) is a computer-system based on a big multitouch screen. The system is protected by a solid glass surface and built right into a regular workbench. This way it enables easy access and operation, while saving valuable space in the lab. All data is saved on a central server and the MLJ is connected to other laboratory devices through the lab’s IT system. While the hardware of the MLJ is already cutting-edge, the user interface is really what sets it apart from other systems. One of the unique innovations is the new way of graphically managing experiments. All experiments are displayed as nodes within a tree-like diagram and can be organized into branches. Between experiments with similar results, keywords, methods etc. the system draws lines to show their connection. A Zoomable User Interface enables intuitive control, similar to the navigation on a digital map. This helps scientists to keep an overview over their work, easily

manage experiments and identify (hidden) connections and relationships. Another innovation is the actual documentation of experiments. No longer are experiments recorded in a journal but in a Chinese fan-like document, which can be easily manipulated through gestures. In addition to a digital pen, the application uses intelligent recognition algorithms to detect user input. For example the MLJ recognizes whether the user wants to write a text, insert a picture or create a table. Based on users input the system supports them with handwriting recognition, shape correction, auto-completion or a calculator. Furthermore the MLJ is able to optically identifying objects on the table’s surface and display metadata, e.g. the properties of a reagent. The system also contains a database with standardized templates for often-used methods and experiments. This enables scientists to quickly load a “recipe” and adapt it to their needs. Through the interconnectedness with other laboratory devices, the system can even execute parts of the documentation process by itself. This guarantees for an accurate record and saves valuable time. However, the MLJ offers even more. Since most scientists work within a team, certain

A typical hand-written lab journal In collaboration with the German Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Engineering and Automation (IPA) in Stuttgart, we set out to find a solution to this problem as part of our Bachelor’s thesis. Our goal was to create a system that will not only be a(nother) digital version of the lab journal, but one that holistically supports the workflow of scientists, from bibliographical research to conducting experiments and evaluating the results. After an in-depth user research, we came up with the hard-

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The MLJ is protected by solid glas and built right into a regular workbench


MASTER WINNER functionalities known from social networks enhance communication with coworkers and aid to keep track of the team’s activities. For example experiments and results can be shared, viewed and commented on. The system also allows for reserving laboratory devices, scheduling meetings and ordering new supplies.

What was the outcome? So far the MLJ is mostly a concept existing (only) on paper. However, engineers at Fraunhofer IPA have started working on implementing a prototype of the MLJ system within one of their experimental labs in Germany. Feedback from designers, scientists and engineers has been thoroughly positive and the question “When will this be available?” was placed more than once. Two of Germany’s most influential design magazines (PAGE and WEAVE) have published short articles about the MLJ. “GIT”, a professional journal for laboratories, has even dedicated a two-page article to the new system. Although the MLJ is not a fully functional system yet, we are sure that an exciting future lies ahead of it. The Multitouch Lab Journal could revolutionize the work in biochemical laboratories and allow scientists to spend less time at the desk and more in the lab – improving batteries and healing cancer.

The MLJ shows connections between experiments with similarities

All experiments are displayed in a tree-like diagramm and can be manipulated using touch

Contact: name: Jürgen Röhm, Vitali Fischbein university: Stuttgart Media University e-mail: juergen@jroehm.com, vitalifbein@googlemail.com website(s): www.info-design.net, www.jroehm.com, www.fischbein-design.de

Each experiments is documented in a Chines fan-like document

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Category:

Student Work

Project:

Category: Student Work Visual Information System for Curitiba’s Public Transportation Project:

Visual Information System for Curitiba’s Public Transportation

What was the challenge? What was the challenge?

What was the solution? What was the solution?

1. On Bus Stop: 1. On Bus Stop:

The challenge during our graduation project The design process began with a The challenge during our graduation project The design process began with a preliminarypreliminary analysisanalysis and problem definition. was to design a visual system and problem definition. (imagem ponto was information to design a visual information system (imagem ponto Bus passengers’ information needs to be displayed on bus andoninside Bus passengers’ information needs to bestops displayed bus stops and inside were identified a sequential vehicles of the public system transportationwere systemidentified throughthrough a sequential vehicles of the public transportation decomposition of the wayfinding task that of Curitiba, a main city in Brazil. The design decomposition of the wayfinding task that of Curitiba, a main city in Brazil. The design process was centered on users’ information they must perform when travelling with the mustsystem perform process was centered ontousers’ information (seewhen below).travelling with the needs attain their goals on usingthey the bus system (see below). needs to attain theirlines. goals on using the bus de parada) lines. The bus stops found in Curitiba (see below) de parada) (gráfico – decomposição da tarefa) can support a visual information system. The bus stops found in Curitiba (see below) 1.1. Backlight Display Their structure is composed of a backlight (gráfico – decomposição da tarefa) can support a visualdisplay, information a displaysystem. to attach the information The display now contains the stop We found out that the visual information 1.1. Backlight Display panel and aofside structure known as Their structure is composed a backlight system to be designed should meet these

- besides another side structure display, a display to“flag” attach the information user information demands, so that users do for advertising posters. Buses don’tWe havefound out that the visual information not need to consult other passengers and/ panel and a side structure known as specific structures in their interior tosystem to be designed should meet these or staff, go for trial and error or even give “flag” - besides another structure receiveside a visual information system,user but information demands, so that users do up the task. From this study we generated this could be arranged. for advertising posters. Buses don’t have 13 consult information requirements to be and/ fulfilled not need to other passengers specific structures in their interior to the information system re-design at or staff, goin for trial and error or even give the bus stops and in the design of the receive a visual information system, but up the task. From this study generated information system for we the vehicles. this could be arranged. 13 information requirements to be fulfilled Continuing the problem analysis, the in the information system re-design existing information system in theatstops the bus stops and in the design of the were was analyzed in detail and problems identified through the information systemandforsynthesized the vehicles. technique of Ergonomic Assesment.

Continuing the problem analysis, the

(imagem ponto de parada com painel atual) Problems related to information existing information in the stops e interior de um veículo (que não seja accessibility, system effectiveness of information expresso ou ligeirinho) and graphical were identified. was analyzed in detailpresentation and problems were these problems,through guidelinesthe were identified From and synthesized proposed for the graphic components of the techniquenew of Ergonomic Assesment. Even with the available structure, the information system. existing visual information system does (imagem ponto de parada com painel atual) Problems related Moving ontotoinformation generating alternatives, not provide essential information for information systems for transport e interior de um veículo (que não effectiveness ofpublic information passangers to useseja the service. Also,accessibility, current of 6 Brazilian cities and 10 foreign cities expresso ou ligeirinho) graphic solutions do not help users and to graphical presentation were identified. were analysed using the benchmarking understand and use information. Bearing From thesetechnique. problems, guidelines We also reviewedwere general these issues in mind, we started the design proposed for the on graphic theories graphiccomponents design, maps, of the process. diagrams,system. tables and other specific Even with the available structure, the new information elements necessary for the project. existing visual information system does

not provide essential information for passangers to use the service. Also, current graphic solutions do not help users to understand and use information. Bearing these issues in mind, we started the design process.

Moving onFinally, to generating alternatives, the design resulted in the following information systems for public visual information system:transport of 6 Brazilian cities and 10 foreign cities were analysed using the benchmarking technique. We also reviewed general theories on graphic design, maps, diagrams, tables and other specific elements necessary for the project. Finally, the design resulted in the following visual information system:

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identification - whether by name and street

number or landmark. To facilitatethe access The display now contains stop to such information, we suggest that the identification whether by name and street same display is placed on both sides of the number bus stop. or landmark. To facilitate access to information, we suggest that the 1.2.such The flag same display is placed on both sides of the The flag is only to be used in bus stops bus stop. lines, such as a tourism line, for special facilitating the identification of these services by users. Also, placing specific information schematic diagrams on the The flag isand only to be used in bus stops flags, leads to a more efficent access to for special lines, such as a tourism line, information.

1.2. The flag

facilitating the identification of these 1.3. The informative panel services by users. Also, placing specific The information panel is composed of information and schematic diagrams on the informative and referential graphic objects, flags, leads to a more efficent being the decorative function limited access to information. to the background color. These objects were arranged on the panel following

1.3. The informative panel an information hierarchy and are related by clustering. The upper space and the

The information panel is composed of center are used for key information and the informative referential graphic lower space isand intended for secondary and objects, educative being theinformation. decorative function limited to background At the the top of the panel color. there isThese a literalobjects symbolarranged that identifyonthethe buspanel stop, colored were following lines related to the bus lines categories, an information hierarchy and are related the name of the bus stop and the by clustering. Theitupper space and the neighborhood where is located, as well center are used for key information and the lower space is intended for secondary and educative information. At the top of the panel there is a literal symbol that identify the bus stop, colored lines related to the bus lines categories, the name of the bus stop and the neighborhood where it is located, as well


MASTER SHORTLISTED as an arbitrary symbol that locates the bus stop in the region and in the route map (see below).

Tables for bus lines frequency are divided into working days, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. They allow users to know the maximum waiting time between a bus and another.

When not finding a favorable destination on the connection diagram, user can consult the region map and identify other nearby bus stops. Another table shows the bus lines available on each of those bus stops. There are also literal images and symbols on the region map representing landmarks and public services nearby, such as schools and hospitals.

Highlighted on the panel, there is a connection diagram linked with a table and the symbols label. These elements allow users to view all bus lines available at that bus stop, their routes, bus stops along the path and possible connections. Also, are used literal figures of the main landmarks and labels identifying the neighborhoods of the city (the connection diagram is shown in detail below).

What was the effect? The visual information system developed through the presented process aimed to fulfill the users’ information needs. As well as graphically present the information in a way that it becomes acessible and understandable for everyone. The designed graphic elements for the information system share a visual identity, that makes the system more cohesive and attractive. The same elements can be adapted and applied to other situations, such as wayshowing system, printed or digital media. The efficiency of the new information system must pass through an userbased validation. This procedure is been developed in our master thesis. After the verification of its informational and graphical quality, the visual information system will be presented to the public transportation agency of Curitiba, for appraisal.

Contact:

2. Vehicle interior:

name: cristiele scariot & cristine lanzoni company/organisation: ufpr e-mail: cristielescariot@gmail.com cristinelanzoni@gmail.com

It was developed a connection diagram to be displayed inside the vehicle that allows the user to monitor the route of that particular bus line, bus stops through the path and their possible connections, in case terminals.

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Category: Student Work Project: Introducing the Deaf and Mute to the World of Road Signs

Introducing the Deaf & Mute to the World of Road Signs

S

What was the challenge?

What was the solution?

Considering the lack of an easy interface between the deaf & mute children and their parents/teachers, a learning aid was needed that could make the information transfer easy and effective. This project aims at designing information related to road signs for age group 6 - 8 years, when these challenged children are at an early stage of being road users. Creating a language to educate was another challenge as they cannot express easily and can hardly hear. Meaning of road signs, their location and usage is the first hand information essentially required to enhance their safety. A complete knowledge makes them independent and teaches them road ettiques which helps avoid accidents.

An informative aid containing 15 main road signs cards was designed. Each card contained all information that could be used as a single learning unit, or else, could be combined with other cards to be played like a game.

166

Users could fold and expand a card, hide a part of it, organize and arrange to play on their own or in a group. No assistance is needed. Different folding methods (inspired from origami) create multiple ways of playing cards, which creates enormous amount of interest due to its playful character. Cards can be played by a single user or a group by using multiple ways.

T

O

P

1. Each player has a card. The first player opens and sees the information on his own card. After thoroughly seeing it, the first player passes his card to the second player. The second player then asks the first player to identify the road sign on the card, which he had just seen and passed. This is because these children are slow learners and hence it is required to make sure that they remember the road sign information correctly. This activity proceeds turn by turn.


MASTER SHORTLISTED 2. In the scenario explained below, Priya and Rohit have seen and exchanged their cards. Rohit shows the exchanged road sign card and asks Priya to identify. With the advantage of folds, he hides information and shows just a partial part of the upper leaf as shown in the picture below. Each card contains information hidden in between the folds, which is used in displaying partial or semi partial information when the opposite player has to recognize the sign.

3. Priya recalls the answer and spells the word in their standard sign language. For example: Here, ‘SCHOOL’ is being explained using gestures for each alphabet.

S

Back of the card has letters of the word explained in sign language. This part is designed such that only the player asking the question can see and check the spelling. Rohit can read and match the letters explained by Priya in gestures. If correct, Priya gets the chance to question the next player. 4. If she spells incorrectly, Rohit can open up the next leaf to show her the correct spelling of the visual as shown in the picture below. Name of the road sign is displayed on a triangular shaped fold which metaphorically represents direction. Name of the road sign is also written in hindi to augment familiarity.

5. At the next level, Rohit unfolds the second level of information about the location - where is the road sign found, and what purpose does it serve. This unfolding reveals an illustration with the ‘SCHOOL’ road sign which explains where it is found and how it is positioned on the road. Pictures work as effective learning tools for these challenged ones. Visual clues help them to relate and remember quickly.

Probably, the kids might have seen the road sign board outside their school, but they might not be knowing what it meant. As a single unit, each card contains all road sign information folded into levels on a single paper sheet. What was the effect? This method of playful learning solves the project objective. It benefits the users in various ways: - Easy interface: Effective transfer of information - Complete first hand information on road signs - Enhances road safety and helps in emergency situations - While playing, users practice their standard language of alphabets and composing words - No dependency on teachers/parent to conduct the activity (more playfulness) - Group interaction improves confidence This informative aid has been distributed to a couple of NGOs working for the welfare of deaf and mute children. Also, it is being used in Jyoti Badhir Vidhalaya- special school for deaf and mute children in India. The project went through the understanding of basic needs of deaf and mute users through user studies, concept generation and testing mockups.

design submitted by: Manisha Gupta | +91 7350011745 | IDC IIT Bombay | manisha3057@gmail.com

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Category:

Student Work

Project:

Hyperreal Exhibition

What was the challenge? The challenge was to inform visitors of the Hyperreal exhibition at the Ludwig Forum in Aachen, Germany about different topics which had been relevant around 1970 when the hyperrealism took place. The topics were: 1. The Vietnam war 2. Elections in the USA from 1964 till 1980 3. Oil and energy market from 1960 till 2000 4. Consumption growth in the USA from 1970 till 2000 What was the solution? The data which was provided is very complex. To handle all the information a program with the programming language “processing” was written. Four unique programs created posters for the different topics in the format A0 (841x1189 mm).

1. The Vietnam war The goal was to show on the one hand how many soldiers were involved in the Vietnam war and on the other hand how many people protested against the war. One sign stands for 100 people. Green and lightgreen means drafted and stationed soldiers, red for dead or wounded US soldiers. Black for dead ARVN soldiers. Blue for people who participated in protests against the war.

2. Elections in the USA form 1964 till 1980 Every semicircle is about one election. From one line to the next there is a two years step. The horizontal position shows if the election was won by the Republican or the Democratic party. Out of each semicircle there is a line for every state. The three types of elections are connected beneath each other.

Contact: name: Sascha Wahlbrink company/organisation: e-mail: post@saschawahlbrink.de website www.saschawahlbrink.de

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Stationierte US Soldaten

Eingezogene US Soldaten

Verwundete / Gefallene US Soldaten

Getötete ARVN Soldaten

Protestteilnehmer gegen den Vietnamkrieg

Quellen: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_presidential_election, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Senate_elections, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_House_of_Representatives_elections, http://uselectionatlas.org, http://www.270towin.com/ US Wahlen zwischen 1964 und 1980 © Sascha Wahlbrink - www.saschawahlbrink.de

Verhältnis 1:100

© Sascha Wahlbrink - www.saschawahlbrink.de

Vietnamkrieg

Quellen: http://www.landscaper.net/draft.htm#Vietnam%20Troop%20Levels, http://www.landscaper.net/draft70-72.htm#Induction%20Statistics, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnam_War_casualties, http://thewall-usa.com/summary.asp, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opposition_to_the_U.S._involvement_in_the_Vietnam_War, http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnamkrieg

What was the effect? The area where the poster were issued, was the center of the exhibition. A special room which gave the visitor the feeling of the time around 1970. There were also newspaper articles, movies, music and film posters.


Japan

UDSSR / Russland

Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika

Saudi Arabien

Iran

UDSSR / Russland

Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika

Entwicklung der Rohölförderung (Top 4)

Quellen: http://www.bea.gov/national/nipaweb/TableView.asp?SelectedTable=58&ViewSeries=NO&Java=no&Request3Place=N&3Place=N&FromView=YES&Freq=Qtr&FirstYear=1968&LastYear=1975&3Place=N&Update=Update&JavaBox=no#Mid, http://www.bea.gov/national/nipaweb/TableView.asp?SelectedTable=65&ViewSeries=NO&Java=no&Request3Place=N&3Place=N&FromView=YES&Freq=Qtr&FirstYear=1968&LastYear=1975&3Place=N&Update=Update&JavaBox=no#Mid, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passenger_vehicles_in_the_United_States, http://www.bts.gov/publications/national_transportation_statistics/html/table_01_16.html

Kernenergie Wasser

Konsumentwicklung in den USA zwischen 1970 und 2000

3. Oil and energy market from 1960 till 2000 The small circles show four different fields of development: the oil price, curde oil production, oil consumption and energy consumption. The big circle sets all fields in relation to each other.

© Sascha Wahlbrink - www.saschawahlbrink.de

China

Quellen: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Top_Oil_Producing_Counties.png, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:World_Energy_consumption.png, http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/87/Oil_Prices_1861_2007.svg, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:EIA_petroleum_consumption_of_selected_nations_1960-2005.png

Entwicklung des Ölverbrauchs (Top 5) Indien

Gas

Energie- und Ölmarkt zwischen 1960 und 2010

Entwicklung Energieerzeugung Öl Kohle

© Sascha Wahlbrink - www.saschawahlbrink.de

MAStER

SHORTLISTED

A picture from the exhibition.

4. Consumption growth in the USA from 1970 till 2000 Every row of circles stands for one year. The fields of consumption are car market, personal income and charges and personal consumption, like clothing, food, etc. The development is shown in relation to all fields.

Real (Dollarkurs 2008)

Nominal

Ölpreis Entwicklung

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Category: INFORMATION DESIGN PROJECT FOR THE MUSEUM OF ANATOLIAN CIVILIZATIONS Project:

STUDENT WORK

What was the challenge?

What was the solution?

What was the effect?

The Museum of Anatolian Civilizations is one of the most important museum in Ankara/Turkey. The Museum occupies two Ottoman buildings which have been renovated and altered to suit their new role. The archaeology of Anatolia from the Paleolithic Age to the present day is displayed by periods in chronological order in the pleasant ambience of Ottoman surroundings. Some of the limitations should be considered while desinging the wayfinding and signages inspite the museum space is a historical building. Desing should less intervene its own historical arcitecture. Besides, the museum, which has a wide variety of collections, has a restiricted space for exhibition. Therefore, wayfinding and signages, information panels should not cause an extra crowd and for sure should not surpass the exhibited items visually as well.

In the desinging process, which was started after determining the

Information Design Project for The Museum of Anatolian Civilizations, made

requirements of the museum, a font, which will be used for information desing applications and a color code for each period of time, are identified initially.

as an application study of the PhD in Art thesis titled as “Principles, Elements and Practice Problems of Information Design”. This information desing project made

Pictogram system, wayfinding and signing

in the concept of thesis study, is a more

system, and information panels, are tried to desing by considering the objectives as, both, functionally and visually fit for

functional, modern and esthetical proposal to The Museum of Anatolian Civilizations. While meeting the requirements of the

the characteristics of the museum and spectacularity. Wayfinding and signing system considered to be applied on the floor, due to the fact that exhibition halls

Museum, this applications are reflexing the characteristics of the museum better. Besides being clear, elligible and modern, it is considered that this proposal, consisting

in The Museum of Anatolian Civilizations are packed of with pieces and also inapplicability of the walls, which are full of display windows. In the whole project

of wayfinding and signing system, and information panels, will very well fulfill the function of wayfinding and informing the visitors of the museum. Another effect of

simplicity, elligibility and functuality are taken account.

this application is, by integrating, to gain a different identification to the museum.

PICTOGRAMS

INFORMATION PANELS

Contact: Banu İnanç Uyan Dur / Hacettepe University / inancuyan@hotmail.com / www.inancuyan.com

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MAStER SHORTLISTED

INFORMATION PANELS

SIGNAGE SYSTEM

WAYFINDING SYSTEM

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Category:

Student Work

Project:

Relativity

What was the challenge? The Visual Communications program at Washington University culminates in a seminar project to be completed during your senior year. The only parameters for the project are that the final deliverable will be an informational book.

The twin paradox The most mind boggling part of Einstein’s theory is the idea that time is relative. Suppose two observers are inside two different vessels travelling at the same speed, which is 99% of the speed of light. When they each look at the other vessel’s clock, they will find that they do not record time at the same rate. If two

OBSERVER A’S EXPERIENCE OBSERVER A

TIME

people travelling at high velocities compare their respecitve clocks, each will find that his own

Observer a will find that his clock ticks faster than observer b’s clock.

clock will be faster than the other. This scenario OBSERVER B

TIME

is famously known as the twin paradox. Whenever two observers are associated with two distinct frames of reference in relative motion to each other, their determinations of time intervals and of distances will disagree systematically, without one being right and the other being

What was the solution? I was interested in the power of clear informational graphics to make complex ideas understandable, so I deliberately decided to focus on an obscure, esoteric topic: Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. After many long, excruciating nights in the library, I proclaimed myself an expert on Einstein’s theory of Relativity, and I wrote and designed this book. It uses clear language, appropriate pacing, and visual models to explain the scientific concepts.

wrong. As moving objects approach the speed of OBSERVER B’S EXPERIENCE

light, time moves increasingly slow as perceived OBSERVER A

TIME

from outside the moving system. The actual sensation of a space traveler would not be of

OBSERVER B

TIME

slower time, but of shortened distance– the stars would seem nearer than he had believed.

Observer b will find that his clock ticks faster than observer a’s clock.

31

Special Relativity

mass multiplied by energy

e=mc²

the speed of light squared

is equal to

What was the effect? This book calcified my belief that visual models are an extremely powerful way to clarify complex ideas. It was very well received by the faculty and it is now part of the Special Collections of the Library of Washington University.

PURE ENERGY

MASS This equation means that energy and mass are the same thing, expressed in different units. Mass can be converted into pure energy, and vice versa.

Even mass is subject to change in Einstein’s world. The notion that it is impossible to create or destroy mass has been discarded, and in its

According to Einstein’s theory, objects travelling at very high speeds increase in mass. The special theory of relativity leads to the conclusion of

place is the idea that mass can be transformed

relativistic mass, and as a velocity approaches c,

into energy and vice versa. The celebrated e=mc²

mass becomes infinately large.

means that mass and energy are the same thing, expressed in different units.

The conversion of mass into pure energy is a cornerstone of radioactive decay; as unstable

In order to understand this hypothesis,

elements decay, some of the mass is converted

understand that the mass of a material body

into pure kinetic energy while some of the mass is

is a measure of its resistance to change in

converted into other decay products. The nuclear

motion. The larger the mass, the more it resists

reaction that occurs on our Sun, nuclear fission,

acceleration. This is similar to Newton’s second

is another expression of this idea. Four atoms

law, F=MA. It is also important to remember

of Hydrogen are combined to make one atom of

that the greatest possible speed achievable

Helium, and the unequal mass is converted

is c, the speed of light. Therefore, masses

into pure energy.

approaching the speed of light must provide increased resistance so as to not cross the threshold of c.

35

Special Relativity

How can we tell if the other train is moving forward? Are we moving backwards?

If we are moving, how do we know how fast the other train is moving?

Relative motion

Contact: name: Annie Hill company / organization: company/organisation: Washington University in St. Louis e-mail: e-mail: asemhill@gmail.com website

172

Observed phenomena depend on point of view.

Most people easily accept this concept and dismiss it

This idea can easily be applied to our own daily

as obvious, but they fall short of following this logic

lives. Imagine we have boarded a train. While we

to its startling implications. We understand how

are sitting at the station, we notice there is another

motions can be perceived differently to different

train on the adjacent tracks. Suddenly, we will

observers, but most people fail to realize that it is

notice movement outside the window. Either the

not just motion that is relative, it is also time.

train we are inside has started to accelerate, or maybe the other train has started to accelerate. But for a time, it is impossible to tell which. Later, when inside a train car, we cannot tell how fast we are moving without looking out the window. These are all expressions of relativistic observations of motion and speed.

15

Special Relativity


MAStER SHORTLISTED

mass multiplied by energy

e=mc²

the speed of light squared

is equal to

MERCURY MERCURY

MERCURY

SUN

According to Newton’s theory of gravity, Mercury should have a perfectly elliptical orbit, like this.

SUN

SUN

But it is not perfect. It does not return to the same point from which it started.

As a result, its orbit looks like this. This seemingly erratic orbit is caused by the curvature of space.

SMALLER MASS Smaller objects move towards larger objects because of the curvature of space. This movement is interpreted as gravity.

LARGE MASS Large masses cause spacetime to curve and stretch around them.

Curved space Whereas the special theory of relativity reimagined

To help conceptualize this theory, picture a bowling

The general theory of relativity began with the

In Einstein’s world, masses move along lines known

the concept of time, the general theory of relativity

ball on a stretched rubber sheet. The large ball will

formulation of the fundamental equations by

as geodesic paths. A geodesic path is the shortest

reimagines the physical structure of spacetime.

cause the rubber sheet to sag under its weight.

Albert Einstein in 1916. It unifies Einstein’s earlier

distance between two points in a curved four-

When Einstein presented the general theory

If you dropped a baseball onto the sheet, it will roll

theory of special relativity and Newton’s law of

dimensional space. We can think of the baseball

of relativity, he introduced new mathematical

toward the bowling ball. Einstein theorized that

universal gravitation. The equations introduced

rolling towards the bowling ball as moving along

formulas that define space. These advanced partial

smaller masses travel toward larger masses not

by Einstein are used to derive an imaginary line

a geodesic path.

differential calculus equations are used to derive

because they are “attracted” by a mysterious force,

called a metric tensor. A tensor is like a vector

mathematical lines that describe the shape

but because the smaller objects travel through space

that describes the shape of space.

of space. Remarkably, these perfectly sound

that is warped by the larger object. This movement

of spacetime, which effects the motion of objects

mathematics produce results that most people

is interpreted as gravity.

in space, this motion being interpreted as gravity.

The presence of matter changes the geometry

find impossible and outrageous:

Phenomena that in classical mechanics are attributed

curved, four-dimensional space.

to gravity represent inertial motion within the curved geometry of spacetime.

39

General Relativity

173


Category:

Sustainability

Project:

Communicating Fire: Building Relationships and Creating Change

What was the challenge? The Fire Sticks Project aims to respectfully bring attention, recognition and understanding of Traditional Indigenous fire management practices to a wider audience. Aboriginal Australia’s pre-colonial landscape and culture has been shaped by fire to great success. The absence of Aboriginal fire management in contemporary land management contributes to an increase in the intensity and frequency of bush fires. In addition a strategy of hazard reduction and risk mitigation harm natural heritage and threaten the increasingly endangered flora and fauna species. The implementation of integrated Aboriginal fire management practices may help address these impacts by reducing the prevalence and severity of bush fires. The benefit of Traditional Indigenous fire practices is a potential reduction in carbon emissions, the enhancement of biodiversity in ecosystems, greater protection of cultural heritage sites and the revitalisation of Indigenous Ecological Knowledge as a cultural practice. The Aboriginal knowledge system represents an interconnected understanding of the relationship between people, country and spirit. The connection between animals, plants, trees and human action are understood in relation to each other. This sensitivity to the interrelatedness requires the development, not only of changed approaches to visual language elucidations but also the way that design is formed.

Contact: Jacqueline Gothe Visual Communication Design University of Technology Sydney Jacqueline.Gothe@uts.edu.au www.ccdp.uts.edu.au/www.tkrp.com.au

174

Working in this Indigenous-led context necessitated a rethinking of the relationships between participants, knowledge and representation. The A0 poster Communicating Fire: Building Relationships and Creating Change is one component of a participatory process that includes video, photography and sound recording for the documentation of Indigenous Ecological Knowledge with communities on country; in workshops, meetings, presentations; mentoring and skills exchange. The challenge is to create a context for the maintenance and recognition of First Nation’s perspective in western science and landscape management that is inclusive and respectful of the relations between nature and Aboriginal cultures. What was the response/solution? The design of an A0 poster for the Bushfire in the Landscape Conference organized by the Nature Conservation Council of NSW in June 2011 was an opportunity to present information from the Kuku-Thaypan Fire Management Project to a mainstream audience as a conference poster. The process of integrating a diagrammatic representation of the Indigenous knowledge system, with an information design approach, that used photographs and descriptions of the relational connections between people, country and spirit, provided a rich starting point. The diagram, an expression of the KukuThaypan knowledge system has a central triangle with three requirements for appropriate action – knowing what it is; knowing what it does; knowing how do it. Around this central element are the understandings of Kuku Thaypan Elders documented with Peta Standley through the co-generative action reseach project - The Importance of Campfires.

The participants and the development of networks in this project is given prominence through the documentation of the names of attendees at the fire workshops on country between 2004 and 2011. This poster becomes an historical record of the mentorship by Elders from Cape York with Aboriginal communities in NSW through the Traditional Knowledge Revival Pathways and the Fire Sticks Project. What was the effect? This poster affirms the depth of understanding and determination within Aboriginal communities to maintain custodianship of the land. All participating communities have received the poster, and there is discussion to create versions for individual communities to demonstrate the development of the revival of Indigenous Knowledge in specific situations. Attendees at the Bushfire in the Landscape conference were particularly interested in the descriptions of indicators such as dew and the canopy. This is the first step of the process. The visualisation of ecological indicators from an Aboriginal perspective in the Fire Sticks Project supports a practice of ‚reading country‘. Getting to know the country is an integral part of sharing knowledge across communities- Indigenous and non-Indigenous. The poster demonstrates a potential contribution of information design within an expanded field (this may include video, image, text, social situations and media), in Indigenous-led projects, to ensure the revitalisation of traditional burning practices and the recognition of Indigenous Ecological Knowledge in contemporary landscape management.


EDITOR´S CHOICE

Firesticks

COMMUNICATING FIRE BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS & CREATING CHANGE KuKu Thaypan Fire ManageMenT research projecT (KTFMrp) anD The iMporTance oF caMpFires Recognition Roles Responsibility Respect Reciprocity

PEOPLE - LORE - COUNTRY “Today fire is seen as a destructive force which most Australians fear. This fear disconnects society from the land and its people. Fire is a powerful natural element. Fire illuminates life and provides culture with ceremony, medicine, food, warmth and above all a lore that the land taught the people.

The Fire Sticks Pilot Project holds a vision to support the use of Aboriginal knowledge in natural resource management by focusing on Traditional Aboriginal Fire Management Practices.

Initiating Traditional Fire Practices through the Traditional Knowledge Revival Pathways (TKRP) methodology.

Info o ati rm na p nd

peopLe

g to ho

This Indigenous-led project is working with Traditional Knowledge Revival Pathways (TKRP), KTFMRP - The Importance of Campfires, University of Technology Sydney, Jumbunna and NSW NPWS Aboriginal Co-Management Unit through an Indigenous-led mentorship methodology that is respectful to the communities involved.

ra ph s©

20

11

KT FM R

PT

he I mpor tance of Campfires

Lore

We must respect this as an inherited responsibility to be passed on in our changing world. The challenge today is to keep this respect alive, not only in terms of looking after the land but to heal the differences between people and their relationship to country.”

Stage 1 Negotiations and Planning with all stakeholders.

counTry

Stage 2 Getting to know Country – Recording the process and knowledge to establish first step for monitoring. Stage 3 First burn –recording, monitoring, observing.

Knowing how to do it

Knowing what it does

PLANTS

MONITOR

Kwern (Awu-Laya – Kuku Thaypan Language name) Heteropogon contortus Black spear grass

Placing the tools of western science in Indigenous hands to bring together Traditional Environmental Knowledge and contemporary environmental management practices.

FIRE

A tropical perennial tussock grass that is an important indicator species for a healthy understory in many ecosystems where it is present.

pLanTs

Traditional owners learn GPS skills to assist in managing country during a western science fire monitoring workshop on Cape York.

MoniTor

LaW

peopLe

LAW

PEOPLE

Knowing what it is

aniMaLs

Dew is an important Traditional Ecological Knowledge indicator for early dry season burning. The moisture supplied by heavy winter dew provides conditions necessary for regeneration of species post fire and ensures that cool fires burn out over night.

BioDiVersiTy

Digitally recording and supporting the transfer of Traditional Knowledge from the Elders to their young people based on the traditional methods as determined by the Elders ensures the survival of this Traditional Knowledge before it is lost forever.

ANIMALS

BIODIVERSITY

Coming to know and understand fire requires guidance by Elders and fire knowledge holders through various stages of cultural learning on country. Learning the knowledge through a written or even a visual medium without that learning process on country means that components of the embedded nature of that knowledge in place and people can be misunderstood.

Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Important food resource. This species is considered in fire management law by ensuring that the animal is not trapped by fire, that areas remain unburnt and that it has access to new shoots post burns in order to assist the animal with successful breeding.

KuKu Thaypan Fire ManageMenT research projecT (KTFMrp) & iMporTance oF caMpFires – phD projecT 2004 - 2011

Cecil Woodley Peter Henry Tegan Koster Ben Jones Bruce Rigsby Noeleen Cole Joel Ngallametta Sharon Ngallametta Daniel Bracegirdle Stanley Kalkeeyorta Language groups Kuku Thaypan Olkolo Lama Lama Kuku Yalanji Western Yalanji Kuku Ngunkul Wik-Mungkan organisations James Cook University CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences The Cairns Institute Australian Tropical Forest Research Institute Northern Australian Environment Alliance Northern Australia Grantmakers Network Mullum Trust Bush Heritage Caring for Country Envirofund Caring for Country Open Grants Caring for Country Biodiversity Open Call Working on Country Perpetual Department of Environment and Resource Management Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service Cape York Peninsula Development Association Fire Project Monash University University of California Davis NOAA – National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Charles Darwin University Savannah Cooperative Research Centre Peter McConchie OZ Tours Wik Media Pty Ltd

BiZanT WorKshop May 2010 people Dr. Tommy George Margaret Bassini and family Alwyn Lyall Den Barber David King Sharyn Halls Chris Tobin Lex Dadd Tony Williams Terry Hill Jason Brown Tom Brown Hilton Naden Ashley Moran Robert Evitt Dion Creek Jenny Creek Joyce Henderson Clive Henderson Roderick Doughboy Jack Lowdown Jimmy(JR)Richards Gerraldine Mammoose Craig Wheeler Brendan Wheeler Matt Gillis Penelope Ivey Cindy Togo John Surha Larry Leedie Evelyn Ivey Dynzie Smallwood Bruce Reese Albert Reese Chris Muriata Haydn Togo Riki Archer Isher Segboer Ben Jones Luke Burnett Scott Burnett Oliver Costello Ben Jobson Sandhya Sharma

Sam Alex Ryan Clement Girault Paul Stephen McCann Ursula Stroh Tony Burt Liane Kluger Victor Steffensen Peta Standley Djerami Callope Danny Fischer Joel Nullametta Don DeBusch Gail Fischer Rod Bennett organisations Lama Lama Land Trust Kuku Thaypan Traditional Knowledge Revival Pathways Mulong KTFMRP The Importance of Campfires James Cook University Yuin Nation University of Wollongong Yirandali Nation Lockhart River Rangers Yuku-Baja-Muliku Landowner & Reserves Ltd Mapoon Rangers Kaanju Kulan Enterprises Thaypan Rangers Kuku Yalanji Ewamin Wild River Rangers Girringun Aboriginal Corporation Rangers NGISG – Northern Gulf Indigenous Savanna Group Cape York Sustainable Futures Sunshine Coast University NSW Department of Environment Climate Change & Water (DECCW) • National Parks and Wildlife Service Aboriginal Co Management Unit • National Parks and Wildlife Service • Culture and Heritage Division Climate Change Office University of Technology Sydney

• Design • UTS Media Lab OZ Tours Gudjuk Consultant Working on Country Program chuuLangun WorKshop juLy 2010 people David Claudie Dundee (Robert) Nelson James Adams Farren Port Gordon Peter Erica Liddy (Sadly deceased) Robert Nelson. Trevor Shane Gibson Ivan Gibson Oswald Gibson Cyril McGreen Veronica O’Sullivan. Alison Liddy Kevin Liddy Karen Liddy Hazel Peter Robert Trugar Jonathan Upton Peter Liddy Davinia Lakefield Elaine Liddy Seppi Bassani Richard King Dr. Tommy George Tony O’Keefe Charlie Hankin David Amber Emma Ignjic Don DeBusch Leslie Schultz Amanda Hogbin Ronald Harrigan Nevelle Hutton Rosie Harrigan Preston Cope Iris White Shaun Stephens Lana Polglase

Terry Hill Rob Evitt Leasie Felderholf Oliver Costello Layla Tan Jali Rose Tan Costello Ben Jones Isher Segboer Trish Butler Mick Blackman Alison Liddy Alex Ryan Eric Vanerduys Stephen McCann Don Hankin Victor Steffensen Peta-Marie Standley Djerami Callope Gail Fischer Terry Steffensen Kathy Gibson Simon Kennedy Peter Drahos Luigi Palombi Andrew Picone organisations Kannju Ngaachi Chuulangun Aboriginal Corporation Chuulangun Rangers Lama Lama Rangers Mulong TKRP Kuku Thaypan Fire Management Research Project Working on Country Program Australian Conservation Foundation TSRA Torres Strait Island Regional Council Yuin Nation Bush Heritage Australia/North Australian Indigenous Land and Sea Management Alliance Nyacha Kumopinta Aboriginal Corporation James Cook University University of Wollongong California State University Chico NSW Department of Environment Climate Change & Water (DECCW)

• National Parks and Wildlife Service Aboriginal Co Management Unit • National Parks and Wildlife Service Yirandali Nation Red Cross / Ngadju Kuku Yalanji Guugu Yimithirr NSW Rural Fire Service The Australian National University Parks Victoria Gudjuk Consulting Firescape Science CSIRO Biodiversity Project Cape York Sustainable Futures The E Robert Hayles & Alison L Hayles Charitable Trust, managed by Perpetual IBM Secondee FiresTicKs inauguraL nsW MeeTing aT uTs 7 FeBruary 2010 people Mark Simon Dennis Barber Chris Tobin Lenore Fraser Russell Hill Gillian Dunkerley Terry Hill Preston Cope Daniel Chalker Christine Eriksen Lynn Baker Greg Watts David Harrington Eric Claussen Robert Evitt Phil Butt Sharyn Halls Owen John Smith Iris White Deanna Davison Lana Andrews Waminda Parker Rob McKinnon Wayne Simms Andrew Boleyn

Ron Riley Jacinta Tobin Sharon Riley Michael Clancy Tim Wilkins Victor Steffensen Oliver Costello Peta Standley Jacqueline Gothe Daniel Bracegirdle Miguel Valenzuela Justin Harvey Brendan Lloyd organisations NSW Department of Environment Climate Change & Water (DECCW) • National Parks and Wildlife Service Aboriginal Co Management Unit • Country Culture and Heritage Division • Environment Protection and Regulation University of Technology Sydney • Jumbunna • Design • UTS Media Lab Mulong TKRP Kuku Thaypan Fire Management Research Project Macquarie University Yuin Dharug Gundungurra Dharrawal Wirradjuri Yirandali Bundjalung EPA NSW Rural Fire Service University of Wollongong Hotspots Fire Project Lachlan CMA Land and Property Management Authority The E Robert Hayles & Alison L Hayles Charitable Trust, managed by Perpetual

ent - Awu m

ya - Tr La a

people Dr. George Musgrave (Sadly deceased) Dr. Tommy George Snr. Victor Steffensen Peta-Marie Standley Christine Musgrave Carole Musgrave Elenor Musgrave Dale Musgrave Lewis Musgrave Thomas George Jnr. Lexie George (Sadly deceased) Eileen George Coralyn George Michelle Wilson Robert Ross Bronwyn Ross Alwyn Lyall Charlie Leecheu Francis Leecheu Robert Leecheu Elizabeth Lakefield Nikita Lakefield Jakita Lakefield Les Harrigan Ashley Lyall William Lyall Blade Omeenyo Greg Omeenyo Peter Accoome Leroy Platt Denise Claudie Peter Fischer (Sadly deceased) Polly Fischer (Sadly deceased) Gail Fischer Danny Fischer Ruby Winkle Marilyn Wallace Peter Wallace Errol Wallace Brian Barry Nickolas Woodley

The canopy is sacred in Kuku Thaypan lore. Culturally it is against management law to burn the canopy. A healthy canopy provides essential food, habitat resources and climate regulation that ultimately all biota rely on. TEK helps to ensure fire management is applied in the right place, at the right time for the right reasons to support resilient functioning ecosystems and maintain biodiversity.

Manage nd

Female Agile Wallaby Macropus agilis.

ional La dit

Nyemyra (Awu-Laya – Kuku Thaypan Language name)

The E Robert Hayles & Alison L Hayles Charitable Trust, managed by Perpetual

Designed by Jacqueline Gothe with Lyndal Harris, Peta Standley and Victor Steffensen © 2011

175


Driven by:

Alena Morrison Office / IIID Vienna

Alena

Silvia Mihokovic Office / hi-pe.at

Vit Kocourek Web / hi-pe.at

Catharina Ballan Graphics / hi-pe.at

Martin Foessleitner Editor / hi-pe.at, IIID

hi-pe.at Lindengasse 56/18-19 1070 Vienna welcome@hi-pe.at 2012

Š

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Book at ion De sign

The

COMPILATION OF SELECTED SUBMISSIONS

m for Int erna r In o f tional Institute

2011

IIIDaward Book  

Awarded and selected internationals submissions of the IIIDaward 2011

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