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IGNITE MAGAZINE

AUTUMN ISSUE

M AY 2 0 1 8 I G N I T E Y O U R C R E AT I V E F L A M E

I G N I T E


EDITORS

Welcome to Ignite Magazine, coming to you from Brisbane, Australia. This is a collaborative photography magazine with a focus on portraits, created by two almost graduated *young adults. We may not be pro photographers but nevertheless, we wanted to create something for the community, not only to enjoy but to get involved in. This magazine encompasses both and more. We’ve been passionate about photography for a long time now, especially portraits, which is why we chose to concentrate on them. Huge shout out to a previous lecturer (Paul Morris) for reintroducing us and teaching us what we needed to know on our way to this final project. Also, a big thanks to our current lecturer (Ben Cook) for being almost as stressed out as we were in the process. From your editors in chief, Natalie Edwards and Clara Jacobsen


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EVOCATIVE LIGHT INTERVIEW


CONTENTS INTERVIEWS 28 Lindsay E Morrison 48 Super Candids 60 Evocative Light

PHOTO SHOOTS 01 IWTFA 40 Autumn Ablaze

ARTICLES 14 Location Scouting 20 Harsh Light 32 Night Photography 36 Autumn Ablaze BTS 54 Lens Testing 66 Light It Up

More photos inside!


I WON’T TECHNO FOR AN ANSWER

IWTFA

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AUTUMN ISSUE


PHOTOGRAPHY CLARA JACOBSEN NATALIE EDWARDS MODELS IWTFA MEMBERS

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IWTFA

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IWTFA

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IWTFA

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PHOTOGRAPHY CLARA JACOBSEN & NATALIE EDWARDS


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LOCATION SCOUTING Location, location, location.

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LOCATION SCOUTING WRITTEN BY CLARA JACOBSEN When I began learning the ins and outs of photography all of my photos were being taken within my university studio. I loved the lighting equipment they provided but eventually this turned into a bit of a problem for me. I started to lose my inspiration, which took a toll on my creative portfolio. I was relying on the studio and equipment rather than my own creativity and seeing others photos online only made it harder.

local photographers feeds for encouragement. If you haven’t had enough motivation by now to get out there and scout for yourself there are online challenges for you to test your skills. For example there’s the ‘ugly location challenge’. Go somewhere that may lack a clear aesthetic look then push yourself to use think outside the lines.

If you’re like me and you dedicate time to updating and searching through Instagram, you’ll know what I mean by that. I wanted to put myself out there and take amazing photos but I had no idea where to start, that’s where this article comes in. Now let’s get into how you can better scout locations for your photography. The Internet is obviously very helpful for you in this instance. You can discover new places you may want to test out and there are many websites dedicated to helping you do just that. (These include a lot of sites like: ShotHotspot, Locationscout, etc.) Shot Hotspot will assist you in finding great places to take pictures anywhere in the world. You can search for hotspots or even add your own!

PHOTOGRAPHY CLARA JACOBSEN MODEL NATALIE EDWARDS

Flickr is another really useful media platform in which you can draw inspiration from other photographers and find locations in your area. Some photos will actually have details of the exact location/GPS data. If they’re geotagged you’ll get the location of where it was shot on your map. Moving on to Instagram. It’s a great place to share your selfies, but it’s also very helpful in finding new and fresh locations that you may not have known about. Don’t be afraid to get into the community and ask others questions about their work. Look up relevant hashtags near you and see if there’s anything useful. Location really can be a huge part of a make or break photo so don’t be nervous to seek advice from others or look through

Prior organisation can be very key. If your shoot has a theme or a certain direction, knowing your location is vital. Getting props ready and equipment sorted takes a lot of pressure off you. Also, if you’re planning on collaborating with other creatives like models, stylists, makeup artists, etc. them being clear on what your vision is for the


PHOTOGRAPHY CLARA JACOBSEN MODEL NATALIE EDWARDS


LOCATION SCOUTING end product is beneficial for everybody involved. When you’re looking for a location don’t close yourself off because it isn’t instantly a perfect backdrop. Look for the subtle details and focus on that. Things like leading lines and textures are a great starting point to look for. If you really take in all of the possibilities you’ll be able to use any location in no time. Don’t be worried to ask your model if they have ideas they’d like to try either, chances are another set of eyes may have picked up something you didn’t. Additionally, lenses with a wide aperture can really help you here. They can blur the background enough that the aesthetic of where you are can be completely new.

left me with almost too many places I want to shoot which may seem overwhelming but it’s also very exciting. Warning: Once you switch your location goggles on there’s no turning back. PHOTOGRAPHY NATALIE EDWARDS MODEL CLARA JACOBSEN

Now, editing is your secret weapon, Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop are now your partners in crime. Learning how to properly modify your photos is such a big must within the photography world. People will pay for editing and retouching because editing really is half the job. Some of the things you can be achieving just through photo editing are: removal of unwanted background elements, enhancing/changing colour, retouching, cropping, etc. There is no limit to the effects that can be brought about in a simple photograph. You can make yourself look like a movie star. You can make a simple landscape stand out with all the colours of the rainbow. You can make anything more vibrant and more fun. AKA make your life seem more interesting than it really is. Because let’s be honest, everyone else is doing it. Also, please make sure you check the weather forecast for where you’re going to shoot. The last thing you want is to be caught by a storm and completely unprepared for those conditions. My last tip is to just look around. When I’m on trains, buses or even if I see something while I’m driving, I’ll look for a keyword around the area and keep that in my mind. You can then look on Google maps or search around and easily find the address or area it’s located in. This has

If you keep practicing and searching for that new exciting backdrop it’ll not only improve your shoots but also spur you on in the future. Try and shoot as much as you can – it doesn’t matter what or who your subject is as long as you’re getting out there. Don’t be afraid of taking a bad photo. Since I’ve gone more out into the community and researched more and more new techniques I can now say happily that I really am currently creating some of my best work. Work that I’d be proud to post online or use in my portfolio. 12


MODEL EMILY PHAM | ig @emspham

IWTFA

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PHOTOGRAPHY ADAM TAHA | www.adamtaha.com MODEL NELLY RODRIGUEZ | ig @nellynelz23

IWTFA

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NIGHT PHOTOS Stay calm, shoot in raw and keep reading.

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NIGHT PHOTOS WRITTEN BY NATALIE EDWARDS Shooting portraits at night can be intimidating, I’ve had some success myself and I want to share what I’ve learnt here. First off, one of the hardest parts is keeping the camera steady. When taking portraits I don’t like to use a tripod because I find it restricting, as well as lugging it around can be a pain. Always focus on your subjects eyes and make sure that you keep the camera steady, try and lean on something, if you’re shooting from a low angle use your knee as your easiest on-the-go tripod. Whenever I do night photography I only use the light provided at the location. This had gone from neon signs to the lights at the bottom of a ferris wheel. Great locations to practice shooting with a low light source can be arcades, carnivals/festivals, bowling alleys, you can even try light painting or your own car headlights. Shoot wide open with a higher ISO and a slow shutter. This will allow you to let so much more light into your photo. I try to stay very aware of any shadows being created on the models face or how colours are casting with their skin tone. My tip here would be to always angle your models face in the direction of the light even if they’re looking in a different direction to it. Shooting in RAW is essential for your editing process, remember that underexposed images can usually be recovered if you shoot in the RAW format. If there’s not enough light to expose properly on the shoot, that’s still okay. Editing is one half of your job. Another great tool you can use is prisms. This is a big favourite for me in regards to photography in general, you can get some amazing effects with whatever light source you’re using. I own a small triangular prism which I incorporate into my photography when I’m doing a more creative shoot. As well as these prisms I recommend clear

frame glasses, the style is up to you but they’re a great reflector and they can really bump up your picture. Aviators are popular which you can find on places like eBay or Amazon for a good price. Lastly, understand the exposure triangle. This consists of aperture, shutter speed and ISO. A wide aperture will let more light in, the longer your shutter is opened up the more light that’s letting in, ISO allows you to work with less light. Test your settings as much as possible and you’ll see how you can manipulate your images in the camera. Being able to adjust and adapt to different settings is very important if you’re looking to add something like night photography to your skillset. It can also be a really fun experience because it’ll open your shoot options so much.

TIPS FROM PHOTOGRAPHER ELLIOTT ENG Instagram: @elliottjeng Well first off, always shoot in RAW. Not shooting in RAW will not allow you full control of your image as far as editing goes. Shooting in manual mode and understanding the exposure triangle would be another. tip Without the knowledge of these three areas, producing high quality images will be rough. For night photography the one tip I always give is understanding your light source, especially with portrait night photography. Extra tip: Don’t be afraid to increase your ISO. A lot of photographers are discouraged to increase their ISO thinking it will make the image grainy, which is not always the case.

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PHOTOGRAPHY NATALIE EDWARDS MODEL ALEXANDRA SARIOLA

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LindsayE Morrison ig @ lmorrison59 Model: Lorian Gish | ig @loriangish


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INTERVIEW LINDSAY E MORRISON PHOTOGRAPHY Based in Tucson, Arizona and Los Angeles, California. “I am a college student at California State University Northridge majoring in Cinema and Television Arts with an emphasis in Electronic Media Management. I have been a photographer since around the age of 12. My favorite subject matter is people.”

HOW DID YOU GET STARTED IN PHOTOGRAPHY?

WHAT KEEPS YOU INSPIRED TO TAKE PHOTOS?

I got started in photography in middle school. I have always had a passion for creating. When I was very young, I would invite friends over to make homemade movies and “talk shows.” That concept of using media to connect to others drew me to photography. Photography allowed me to go out and spend time with friends, talking and taking photographs while allowing me to give them a confidence boost. The personal connection aspect of photography is the best part of it. Portraits are so intimate, it really requires your subject and clients to trust you.

My need to create pushes me to continue photography. I find so much joy in photographing people and having them tell me how much they love the photos and how beautiful or handsome they feel. That is all I need to continue loving photography. Being able to help people love themselves is so amazing.

“Photograph anything and everything you can. It’s the only way to learn.”

lindsayellen59.myportfolio.com

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INTERVIEW LINDSAY E MORRISON PHOTOGRAPHY

GO-TO PORTRAIT LENS? My It’s me the

go-to lens is my Nikkor 85mm 1.8F. my most flattering lens and allows to keep my subject tack sharp and background really beautifully soft.

LOOKING TO PURSUE A CAREER IN PHOTOGRAPHY? Just keep shooting. When you do first start out, your photos won’t be award winners. It takes practice and time to understand not only the technical side of photography, but the artistic side. Photograph anything and everything you can; it’s the only way to learn. My first photography professor in college told me that if I walked away with two or three good photographs from the class, that I had succeeded. Never stop learning!


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PHOTOGRAPHY ADITI GUPTA MODEL TAMANNA SIWACH MAKEUP & HAIR ADITI GUPTA


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PHOTOGRAPHY NATALIE EDWARDS MODEL CLARA JACOBSEN

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AUTUMN ISSUE


HARSH LIGHT?

Don’t let the sun be your frenemy, flip over to find out what we learned about shooting midday, in Australia.

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HARSH LIGHT WRITTEN BY CLARA JACOBSEN Shooting in harsh light can be tricky even for the most experienced photographers. You can recognize it by the strong shadows, excessive contrast, blown highlights, and most prominently, squinting eyes. Harsh light is a very, very bright directional light, typically found during the middle of the day when the sun is shining its brightest. Therefore, casting strong dark shadows creating very defined lines onto or near the people you are photographing, you might even find your subjects squinting against the sun instead of having the relaxed natural expressions you wanted for the image. Sometimes we find ourselves shooting in unideal places where avoiding the sun can seem impossible, this article is going to help share a few tricks for making that harsh light work! The opposite of light is dark so perhaps the simplest way to avoid harsh light would be thide from it under shade, however, not all shade is created equal. There’s man-made and natural shade and by paying attention to the shadows of your subjects you could understand and determine the position of the sun and from which the light is hitting, often being more than one. This is a key part in photographing in harsh light as knowing how and where to position your clients is very important so that the sun is not casting strong shadows across their face. The background becomes especially important when looking at contrasts. Check how certain surroundings will work with you and your client. Not only can shade be used as a diffuser but reflectors are a great way to reduce that harsh light and contrast between your subject and the surrounding area. The important part of a reflectors job is to provide more light to an appointed area where you are wanting to fill a bit more. Reflectors can be used almost anywhere such as open sun, a combination or shaded

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areas, as well as come in many different sizes and colours. A natural reflector can be any neutral coloured object that can serve to bounce light back onto your subject whereas white reflectors will bounce back the same colour light that’s around you, silver will bounce back stronger and higher contrast light, gold will warm the light being sent back and black will actually absorb it. Using a strong backlight! Another helpful tip for shooting during the harsh hours of the day is to utilize a backlight. Keeping it simple by having your subject between you and the sun to minimize any direct sunlight entering the lens. When working with backlighting, there will always be some parts of your subject that will have some direct light from the sun. But to make sure you’re not overexposing any details, enable the highlight warning on your camera (generally found in the setup menu), this warning will then flash on highlights that are blown out. Another issue which frequently occurs in harsh lighting is overexposure. When too much light enters the camera, it causes the photo to be washed out thus creating the overexposure. Cameras have the ability to change the settings to control the lighting coming in and out. Such as the shutter speed can control the amount of the time the shutter is open, and the ISO controls the sensitivity of the internal senor. By increasing the shutter speed, you decrease the amount of time light has to enter the lens and lowering the ISO you lower the sensors sensitivity. Both of these camera techniques will help you to avoid overexposure. If you need to, underexpose your images and fix them in editing. Always shoot in RAW of course and this will help you so much.


PHOTOGRAPHY NATALIE EDWARDS MODEL CLARA JACOBSEN

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Behind The

Shoot PHOTOGRAPHY NATALIE EDWARDS CLARA JACOBSEN MODEL TANAZ AYRA IG @TANI.DEAR MAKEUP ARTIST JEMIMA MCCORMICK IG @MIMEMYMAKEUP

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WRITTEN BY NATALIE EDWARDS This shoot was a complete whirlwind from beginning to end, from planning to execution, from Gumtree to the SAE studio. When we decided that this magazine was going to be as collaborative as possible it was really important that we had a full shoot with other creatives. We looked through a lot of models, eventually narrowing it down to our final model, Tanaz Ayra. Luckily she was able to make it on the same day as our makeup artist, Jemima Mccormick.

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You can check out the final images after this but first, let’s take a trip into the behind the scenes of our Autumn Ablaze shoot and our thought process in creating that final product. Since this is the Autumn issue we saw it only fitting to coordinate our shoot with this theme. The colour orange was all I could see in regards to makeup inspiration so I then got a moodboard together and sent it off to our makeup artist.


BTS Jemima gave us her creative take on what we provided and it was even better than how we’d pictured it. Having never worked with a makeup artist prior to this photoshoot we were both excited and nervous. Now, I want to work with a makeup artist on every shoot, which may be a blessing and a curse in itself. We decided very early on that we wanted a slightly more unique take on the Autumn theme. So, we went for a more refined style in regars to the clothing and the studio. The orange really became the hero of these photos.

For the biggest curveball we faced, the studio lights did not want to work with us. After a lot of frustration and testing we gave in and used only the lighting in the room, thankfully we had a very patient and very talented model who struggled through it with us. Regardless of the trouble we faced with the equipment, we did end up getting some really great photos and this shoot was very much a success. It really was a great experience and getting the chance to work with other local creatives is never an opportunity to pass up.

When we set out to have this collaboration happen it was very new territory for us. Having a set theme and then having multiple people work together towards that final product was so great and so satisfying when it was all finished. Overall, every shoot can have its ups and downs but when you pick the right people to work with you can still have that vision come through. Thanks to Tanaz and Jemima for making the time to be a part of this. Lastly, we hope you enjoy the final product as much as we all have.

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PHOTOGRAPHY NATALIE EDWARDS CLARA JACOBSEN MODEL TANAZ AYRA MAKEUP JEMIMA MCCORMICK (MIMEMYMAKEUP)


Autumn

Ablaze 36


PHOTOGRAPHY NATALIE EDWARDS & CLARA JACOBSEN MODEL TANAZ AYRA MAKEUP JEMIMA MCCORMICK


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PHOTOGRAPHY ADAM TAHA | www.adamtaha.com MODEL NELLY RODRIGUEZ | ig @nellynelz23

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Super Candids P H O T O G R A P H Y IG @ ThatMatiasKid Model: Erica Muncy

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INTERVIEW SUPER CANDIDS PHOTOGRAPHY Based in Missouri, United States

HOW DID YOU GET STARTED IN PHOTOGRAPHY? I started taking photos back in middle school on my iPhone 4s actually. I loved to go out on my little adventures with my iPhone, capturing photos would give me such a beautiful and creative feeling.

WHAT KEEPS YOU INSPIRED TO TAKE PHOTOS? I find inspiration in the small things. I live in an area of Missouri where it’s hard to get cool or extravagant locations so I have to spark my creativity with what I have around me. I find my inspiration in just that challenge every single day.

“Just love to create so others will love your creations” GO-TO PORTRAIT LENS? My go-to lens for portraits is usually the 50mm F1.8.

ANY ADVICE FOR PEOPLE LOOKING TO PURSUE A CAREER IN PHOTOGRAPHY? I always tell my following this: Always create because you love to create and not because you want to be like everybody else. Be yourself and just love what you do and everything else will solve itself with time. Just love to create so others will love your creations.

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PHOTOGRAPHY LINDSAY E MORRISON MODEL LORIAN GISH


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PHOTOGRAPHY ADITI GUPTA | ig @ms_selfportrait MODEL PRACHI KANTIWAL


LENS TESTING Deciding between these two popular lenses? Let’s compare them to help you choose.

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LENS TESTING WRITTEN BY NATALIE EDWARDS Let’s start with the 24-70mm lens by Canon. This is a great and very versatile option, I’ve seen this lens recommended by photographers who shoot portrait and fashion pictures to weddings and landscapes. It’s great to start with if this is your first upgrade and it’s definitely one of the most popular lenses in the community. This lens has a great depth of field at focal length range, great quality and it’s not too heavy to carry for long periods of time. When taking outdoor portrait shots, using a wide angle lens like this can give you so much creative freedom. You can try out new perspectives and angles so easily, if you go in closer to your subject you can also achieve an interesting distortion. In saying all this, the 24-70mm can be tricky being used for portraits. The distortion you can get from the lens is great for creative shoots but maybe not so much for everyday work as it could be unflattering. Both of these lenses are quite pricey so they’re definitely an investment in your career. Generally the 24-70mm can be found slightly cheaper than the 70-200mm but I wouldn’t say it’s nearly enough difference to decide solely based on that. Now, the 70-200mm is an amazing lens but it does have its drawbacks. The compression is a really positive aspect of this lens. Lens compression is when the background elements appear larger than they actually are. Even though this is identified as a type of distortion, it’s more than that. Lenses with good compression can create a lot of new possibilities for your compositions. The main drawback of this lens and what puts off a lot of buyers is the weight. I can vouch from personal experience that this lens is exceptionally heavy compared to most. Yes, it’s clear that the size would mean this is going to happen but is it worth it? When holding this lens

in your hands or around your neck for extended periods of time it can really be difficult and could end up taking your focus from your subjects. In my opinion, yes it’s worth the trouble. Just be prepared for how heavy it can get and take short breaks from holding it. The quality is incredible and it really does live up to the price tag. You can crop so close into your pictures and lose no detail, this gives you so much more opportunity to get the shot. If you’re doing family photography or a lot of group shots go for the 24-70. Fitting everyone in is a breeze and that leaves more room for you to be creative. The 70-200 has a minimum focusing distance so you need to be a certain distance away and fitting a group in is very difficult. Obviously a wide angle would win in this category but it’s still so important to remember. Now if you’re planning on shooting at a time where the light is low keep reading. When you don’t have much light to work with you need slower shutter speed to let as much of it in as possible. Longer lenses like the 70-200mm need that fast shutter speed to keep their sharpness. This would be something to consider if you like to shoot in lower light situations. Take your style of photography into account and tailor your lenses to your needs and your clients needs. Use sites like Flickr to see photos people have taken with the lenses, this can be really helpful in seeing if a lens will suit you. I know when you’re investing in something as pricey as these that research is key so don’t make a decision until you’re sure. Seeking professional advice can be a huge help, online or in stores. Lastly, don’t shy away from online photography communities to get peoples personal opinions on these lenses. This is especially good for you if you’d rather hear people’s personal experiences. 50


70-200mm lens PHOTOGRAPHY CLARA JACOBSEN MODEL NATALIE EDWARDS


24-70mm lens PHOTOGRAPHY NATALIE EDWARDS MODEL CLARA JACOBSEN

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PHOTOGRAPHY EVOCATIVE LIGHT BY BJ

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Evocative Light 56


INTERVIEW EVO CAT I VE L I G H T BY B J Based in Brisbane, Australia

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN A PHOTOGRAPHER? I’ve been a photographer for about one year.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVOURITE PLACE YOU’VE TRAVELLED FOR PHOTOGRAPHY AND WHY? Hong Kong would be my favourite due to the incredible diversity and also Melbourne for the cool lanes and alleyways.


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INTERVIEW NATURAL OR ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING? I use both as they allow me to be creative and there are always going to be situations where you cannot shoot with just natural lighting.

ANY ADVICE FOR PEOPLE LOOKING TO PURSUE A CAREER IN PHOTOGRAPHY? Most importantly, photography is a passion and an art form which you have to love and enjoy before you start considering it to be your business.

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LIGHT IT UP Natural or artificial lighting? You decide.

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AUTUMN ISSUE


LIGHT IT UP WRITTEN BY CLARA JACOBSEN Throughout a photographer’s long career, many are faced with the question; is it better to use natural or artificial light when taking photos? Although there is no right or wrong answer for which is best, let’s go through some pros and cons of each. There are many key differences you can take into account regarding the use of both which will be explained and discussed here. The definition of natural light is a self-generated source which can come in a spectrum of dynamic visible colours, meaning that the intensity and mix of colours changes with the time of day. Which can also be thought of as available light, such as that produced by the sun or moon.

out your photography journey as it’s much easier to learn and get out there without all the pain of the skills you need with studio equipment. Cons of Natural Light While there are many positive reasons why to choose natural lighting, there are also a few cons that come with it. One of the main challenging aspects of natural lighting has been with the weather. It can be very unpredictable at times.

Whereas artificial lighting is man-made and the light will be generated from another energy source such as a streetlight, lamp, or even an LED light. Emitting a static spectrum means their mix of colours cannot change with the time of day. As a result of this, an artificial light source will try and replicate the natural light. Benefits of Natural Light The number one benefit of using natural lighting is that it is free and it’s always around, natural light is always readily available. All you need is a camera and some sun or moonlight which will be everywhere you go. There are no expensive investments in lighting equipments to be made or the hassle it takes to set up and adjust the correct light settings as you would within a studio. Natural light doesn’t have to be adjusted, you will just need to find a location with the best lighting for the look you are going for which could be much easier. Going with natural light is also going to give off a more unprocessed look to your images as it can create an airy, romantic feeling to the picture the photographer takes. Natural light is also great to begin with if you’re just starting

PHOTOGRAPHY CLARA JACOBSEN MODEL NATALIE EDWARDS

Depending on the location, the season, and the time of day, lighting can produce many different colours and contrasts that you just probably aren’t looking for in your photographs. 62


LIGHT IT UP For example, there might not be any shade, creating an uncomfortable atmosphere and over exposure, or light may be creating unwanted dark shadows in areas you are photographing. Lack of privacy is also a main issue while doing outdoor photoshoots, I myself have witnessed this first hand from others staring at what’s going on or simply getting in the way of the shot. When you’re in a public place there is very little you can do as photographer to keep people away. Having a confident model with experience in these situations is always a plus. Otherwise you could be spending more time worrying about those around you rather than focusing on your pictures. Benefits of Artificial Light The most first and foremost benefit of using artificial lighting is that you can control the environment. You are able to control every aspect of the photo shoot at your own will. You can monitor the quality and intensity of light to suit each of your needs in every photograph. You can create the effects yourself with studio lighting and depending on which artificial source you use, natural lighting could even be replicated to further enhance a more ‘natural’ look and in your photographs without even going outside, Adobe editing programs could also help you achieve these looks. Artificial lighting can mean the access of power and amenities! Being within a studio can be much more comfortable to work in then the hot unpredictable outdoors. This is not only a benefit for you but a benefit to anyone you’re working with. It could mean that people may be more open to working with you or that you can continue to work no matter the weather conditions you may be faced with. Cons of Artificial Light Even though artificial light offers much greater control over your photo shoots, it most definitely requires a lot more equipment and takes longer 63

setting everything up. You’ve also got to leave time to pack everything afterawards. Unlike the free natural lighting, artificial lighting however can cost quite a lot of money if you’re willing to spend (such as light stands, lighting kits, reflective umbrellas). These lighting kits also require a lot of practice and experience to get the right shot you’re looking for. Additionally, paying for a studio can be so pricey. If this isn’t a hit your budget can take, natural lighting may be for you. At least until you have that opportunity. Not only does shooting in a studio require more gear and more knowledge but there also might be some tight time constraints. Whether it’s an owned or rented venue, you’ll need to dedicate some time to setting up and taking down equipment as many may come with fixed times of use, restricting what you can and can’t do. Ultimately it will all come down to your personal choice and experience as a photographer, as well as the certain look and style you are trying to obtain within your images. Natural lighting is generally more widely used and liked for street, atheistic vibes, contemporary style, etc. Whereas artificial lighting is typically used for commercial, products, and fashion photography which could also add a very catalogue feel to your images. All of these are points to consider when you’re deciding how you’re wanting your next photoshoot to go. Often the type of shoot will control the location as sometimes certain shoots will require indoor or outdoor lighting. Remember, you can use both. Mixing natural and artificial lighting of course can come with it’s own budget problems, techniques and time or location constraints but it’s all about finding out which one works best for you. It’s going to be different for all of us and don’t be discouraged if it takes you a while to figure that out. You’ll find what goes best with your style eventually.


PHOTOGRAPHY CLARA JACOBSEN MODEL NATALIE EDWARDS

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creative contributors

AUTUMN ISSUE

Model: Emily Pham IG @emspham

M AY 2 0 1 8

FRONT COVER Photography: Adam Taha www.adamtaha.com

I G N I T E Y O U R C R E AT I V E F L A M E

Here we’d like to thank every creator who was a part of Ignite Magazine. We set out to make this magazine as collaborative as we possibly could and that was a success thanks to all of you. Big shout out to Adam Taha whose photo made our front cover and brought the magazine to life! To every person who answered our questions and trusted us with their amazing pictures, thank you so much for creating with us.

IGNITE MAGAZINE

OUR CREATIVE CONTRIBUTORS

I G N I T E

Adam Taha IG@ photahagraphy

Jemima McCormick IG@ mimemymakeup

Aditi Gupta IG@ ms_selfportrait

Lindsay E Morrison IG@ lmorrison59

Elliott Eng IG@ elliottjeng

Matias Ruiz (Super Candids) IG@ thatmatiaskid

Evocative Light IG@ evocativelight

Tanaz Ayra IG@tani.dear


s r o t a e r C NATALIE EDWARDS

@ignataliedwards natalie.jane@y7mail.com

CLARA JACOBSEN

@igclarajacobsen clarajacobsen48@gmail.com


Ignite Magazine  

A collaborative photography magazine focusing on portraits. Free download: goo.gl/sedAX8

Ignite Magazine  

A collaborative photography magazine focusing on portraits. Free download: goo.gl/sedAX8

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