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Vol .261•June-Jul y2019

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TOP STORIES

08 14

President's Message

?RULE OF THREE? WCTA RETURNS TO THE RIVER ROCK CASINO RESORT FEB 11- 13, 2020

20

NTA Donates $50k Toward Turf Research

22

Teens on Turf

30

Japanese Beetle Update ? June 2019

46

First, First Green Event of 2019

48

4th Installment of the Patrick Dooley Memorial Golf Tournament


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news

CONNECT WITH THE WCTA ON SOCIAL MEDIA Connect with the Western Canada Turfgrass Association on social media. We?re active, engaged, and excited to provide our members valuable information and updates through social media! Connect with us for up-to-date news and information relating to the professional golf and sportsturf management industry.

Follow @W CTA_social on Twitter and Like our Facebook Page

PG 05 | JUL 2019


26

On t h e cover : Scotiabank Field at Nat Bailey Stadium gets an infield skin make-over prior to the 2019 season home opener. Image credit: Jerry Rousseau

Feat u r e St or y 26 Nat Bailey Infield Skin Reno 44 Ministry of Environment Report

Indicates Majority of BC Golf Courses Non-Compliant With New IPM Rules Regu lar Colu m n s 05 Connect With The WCTA

On Social Media 08 President's Message 10 The Top Image 18 WCTA Membership Value Proposition 34 Look Who's Joined the WCTA 42 Coming Events Summary

38 Health Canada PMRA Re-Evaluates Itself 40 Estimated $15-20m Hit To BC Golf

Industry 47 July Is Smart Irrigation Month! 56 NGCOA BC Chapter and BC PGA Resign

From BC Allied Golf Association Con f er en ce New s 14 "Rule of Three"

Resear ch New s 36 Why Is 4N Tetraploid Perennial Ryegrass

So Special? 50 2019 Turfgrass Research Contributors

WCTA New s

52 Board of Directors

12 WCTA Executive Director Report

In du st r y New s

46 First, First Green Event of 2019

16 Health Canada Proposes Ban On

Common Insecticide

20 NTA Donates $50k Toward Turf

Research 24 British Columbia Golf Partners with

USGA to Rollout Resource Management Tool

30 Japanese Beetle Update

KPU Tu r f Clu b New s 22 Teens on Turf 48 4th Installment of the Patrick Dooley

Memorial Golf Tournament Associat ion New s

51 BCGSA Re-Brands Exchange

Tournament


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news BY TRAV IS O LSO N

LOREMIPSUMDOLOR

President's Message Have you ever tried to just enjoy something simple, even as simple as cutting the carrots? As we head into the dog days of summer, we should try to take some time to enjoy the ride. It?s too easy to get caught up in the hustle and bustle of getting things done. Stressing about playing conditions, weather, staff, bosses; the list goes on and on. Summer is a busy time for anyone growing grass, and sometimes we let it take us away from the things that really matter. It?s important to take a moment every now and then to pause and take it all in, and to pay attention to the little things; the colours of a PG 08 | JUL 2019

morning sunrise, the sound of the birds chirping TRAVISO LSON and wind PRESIDENT Kamloops G& CC rushing trav_olson@hotmail.com through the trees. We should stop to appreciate the things we miss when we have the pedal to the metal, working to stay ahead of golfers, or finish before the next user group takes the field. These moments should be pretty easy for us to find, as working outdoors affords us this great luxury that many other professions do not have. It only takes a few seconds to stop and just enjoy the simple things. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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With the constant pressure and stress, the dog days of summer can really take their toll on our mental health. Working in the natural environment provides the added stress of being at the mercy of mother nature. Thunderstorms, summer heat, and drought all affect our daily life. And of course, expectations that great playing conditions are maintained through all of these challenges just adds to our dilemma. By the time we reach the end of the season, we are usually burned out, exhausted, irritable, and maybe feeling a little bit nutty.

profession. It?s important to remember that as we spend more time at work, we spend less time with our family and friends both physically and mentally. Sometimes, even though we are present physically, our brain is still at work. We go through the motions, and sometimes we are not totally present for those people who matter to us.

This summer, let?s try to focus on taking those moments to just enjoy the little things and appreciate this great lifestyle we have and the benefits of having a career in turf. Instead of staying late at work, go Having a strong work ethic is a home and re-visit the task the great quality. Working hard, next day. Spend more time working late, getting the job with loved ones, and try to live done; it feels good... at least a little more in the moment. until the next problem pops up Life is a ride we only get to and we start all over again. For take once, so why don't we try some people it can become an to just enjoy cutting the addiction. Workaholics are carrots? or in our case, easy to come by in our cutting the grass! PG JUL2019 2019 PG 44 09 || JUL


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Teens on

TURF They had to bring their own work boots but KPU Turf Management instructors Stan Kazymerhcyk and Rob Welsh provided step-by-step instruction to 8 Langley teens who spent a week in May learning the necessary skills to become productive golf course groundsmen. See article page 22 for the whole story. PG 10 | JUL 2019


THE

WCTA

NEWS BY JERRY RO USSEAU

Summer 2019

WCTA Executive Director Report

JERRYROUSSEAU WCTA Executive Director

(604) 869-WCTA (9282) Exec.director@wctaturf.com

The 2019 season is well underway and to prove it, the days are about as long and nice as they?re going to be all year. Hopefully you?ve hit your stride and at this point, everything is on track. You might even get a chance to catch your breath after a busy spring and enjoy the few remaining pre-mosquito days! 57t h Annual Conference and Trade Show Announcement ? Feb 11-13, 2020 - On April 15th, we announced the 57th Annual Conference and Trade Show PG 12 | JUL 2019

will take place at the River Rock Casino Resort in Richmond, BC, for the third straight year. - ?If you made it to the last couple conferences, you know the River Rock is a fantastic venue for our conference and trade show,?stated WCTA President Travis Olson. ?If you haven?t, it?s definitely an event you won?t want to miss.? - Event planning is underway and further information will be released when available. WCTA Executive Director CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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Jerry Rousseau confessed, ?It will be tough to top the last two years at the River Rock but we still have a couple aces up our sleeve!?

roll-bars and seatbelts. Proposed changes apply to work carts and beverage carts, marshal carts and even carts driven by a golf professional Est imat ed $15-20m Hit To BC during a lesson. All employees operating a golf cart at any Golf Indust ry If WorkSafe time during work are Implement s Proposed New protected by the proposed Golf Cart Rules new rules and there may be - Hopefully, you?re aware of other scenarios where new WorkSafeBC proposed rules would apply, ie. a golf amendments to Part 16 of the pro or other staff employed at worker safety regulation, Golf Course A playing golf at 'Mobile Equipment' that Course B. would make roll-over - A far greater concern protection and seat belts however, is Worksafe?s mandatory on golf carts. determination that non-golf - Based on preliminary course workers are captured estimates of $1,500 to $2,000 under this provision. for upgrades to each cart and Specifically, employees an average of 60-75 golf carts playing in a corporate or per 18-hole golf course, cost could easily range from $90,000 to $150,000 per course with the total expense D O UBLE CLICK H ERE TO to the BC Golf Industry estimated between $15m and $20m! - Previously, golf carts were exempt from needing PG 13 | JUL 2019

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THE

CONFERENCE

NEWS BY W CTA BOA RD

?Rule of Three? WCTA Returns to the River Rock Casino Resort Feb 11-13, 2020

Cat ering t o t he professional golf and sport st urf management indust ry, t he West ern Canada Turfgrass Associat ion Board of Direct ors is pleased t o announce our 57t h Annual Conference and Trade Show will t ake place for t he t hird st raight year at t he River Rock Casino Resort in Richmond, Brit ish Columbia, February 11-13, 2020. The rule of three suggests every set of three is complete. We couldn?t agree more and are excited to let it ride for one more year to complete the River Rock conference trifecta! For 2020, you can bet on a wide-ranging turf management PG 14 | JUL 2019

supplier and service provider trade show, hit the jackpot with specialized pre-conference seminars and go all in with a first-class education program covering all sectors of turf management! Get in on the action with social and CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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networking events including the Dave Creamer Memorial Hockey Game and annual President?s Reception. ?If you made it to the last couple conferences, you know the River Rock is a fantastic venue for our conference and trade show,?stated WCTA President Travis Olson. ?If you haven?t, it?s definitely an event

you won?t want to miss.? Event planning is just getting started and further information will be released when available. WCTA Executive Director Jerry Rousseau confessed, ?It will be tough to top the last two years at the River Rock but we still have a couple aces up our sleeve!?

About t he WCTA Cateringto the professional golf and sportsturf management industry, the WCTA isa nearly 700 member, inter-provincial, not-for-profit industry organization whose purpose isto promote the interchange of scientific and practical knowledge through education, discussion, research and to undertake advocacy relating to the care and management of turfgrass. The WCTA isproud to serve and support an inclusive range of professional turf management interestssuch asgolf courses, school boards, municipalities, sod farms, nurseries, landscapers, lawn bowling greens, mechanics, horticulturistsand industry suppliers. For further information, contact: Jerry Rousseau, Executive Director Western Canada Turfgrass Association (604) 896-9282 Exec.director@wctaturf.com PG 15 | JUL 2019


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Health Canada Proposes Ban On Common Insecticide

Chlorpyrifos is a broad spectrum organophosphate insecticide used to control insects in various settings. It is one of the most widely sold pesticides in Canada and is one of the few insecticides registered to manage certain important pests, including invasive alien species, and mosquitoes. Chlorpyrifos is applied by growers and other certified users using ground equipment as a foliar, soil granular or drench application, and for some uses by aerial application. It kills insects by inhibiting the action of acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme that normally degrades acetylcholine, a ?neurotransmitter?that is critical to the functioning of PG 16 | JUL 2019

the nervous system. The Pest Management Regulatory Agency of Health Canada released its proposed re-evaluation decision for Chlorpyrifos and its associated end-use products May 31, 2019 stating: ?Under the authority of the Pest Control Products Act and based on the evaluation of currently available scientific information, Health Canada is proposing cancellation of all

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NTA Donates $

50,000

Toward Turf Research

The Nort hwest Turfgrass Associat ion will be donating $50,327 to worthy turfgrass research and education programs in 2019 as it continues to be a leading benefactor for the golf industry in the Northwest. Over the past five years, the NTA has donated almost a PG 20 | JUL 2019

quarter of a million dollars to various programs.

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WESTERN CANADA TURFGRASS ASSOCIATION 21


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IMAGES COURTESY: KPU

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Teens on

TURF

This May, eight Langley high school students went to university for a week. For five days they attended a Langley KPU mini course at the KPU Turf Lab taught by Turf Management Department Instructors Stan Kazymerchyk and Rob Welsh. The KPU Turf Lab is hidden away beside the Horticulture PG 22 | JUL 2019

buildings and is actually a three-hole golf course. This became students?classroom for the week. The curriculum included a tour of the campus, workplace expectations, workplace safety and how to act and work on fairways and greens. What excited the students the most was the opportunity to get hands on training operating trimmers, backpack blowers, push mowers, triplex ride on mowers, golf carts and a Gator. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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The tuition free Teens on Turf course was unique in many ways as students selected had to enjoy working outdoors and be interested in operating equipment. They also had diverse learning challenges. However, on the Turf Lab these challenged students looked like regular university students as they listened intently to Stan and Rob?s step by step instructions and practiced operating each piece of trying to start a weedie (string equipment. trimmer) and they were talking ?The thing that really struck about the ?primer button?, the me,?noted Langley School ?throttle?, the ?choke?and District work experience whether it was ?flooded?or not. teacher Marvin Moedt, ?was No one was on their phone and that every day these 8 guys they were all focused on that were on time, had their boots piece of equipment.? and gloves and were ready to learn. Something happens to even the most challenged learners when you introduce them to hands-on activities D O UBLE CLICK H ERE TO and when you give them real life problems. I was so impressed with the learning and teamwork one day as I was watching three students

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PG 23 | JUL 2019


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British Columbia Golf Partners with USGA to Rollout Resource Management Tool

Brit ishColumbiaGolf ispleasedto be workingwiththeUSGAasoneof the first jurisdictionsto moveforward withtheirnewgolf courseResource ManagementTool.

This product was first unveiled at the 2017 USGA Innovation Symposium in Vancouver. Since that time the USGA has been refining the tool and introducing more capabilities. The tool allows golf course operators: - ability to customize the course map and resources. - perform ?what-if?scenarios based on changes in design or maintenance profiles. - detailed reporting of resource consumption. PG 24 | JUL 2019

- advanced weather information, including growing degree days. - track hole location and generate sophisticated hole location sheets. According to the USGA brochure, ?Golfer heatmaps on the USGA Facility tool can tell you where your players are going ? and more importantly - where they are not going. You can prioritize the areas that most impact golfer experience and save money on the areas that get less play.? Throughout the 2019 season, British Columbia Golf will be working with facilities and the USGA to complete the tracking and uploading of the data into the Resource Management Tool. BC Golf has also applied to the National Sport Trust Fund so that tax receipts can be issued for funding from foundations or individuals who wish to support land use and/or environmental projects.


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IMAGE COURTESY: ROSS BARON

COVER

STORY BY JERRY RO USSEAU

Nat Bailey Infield Skin Reno

If you didn't know it, the infield skin of a baseball or softball infield is the area where dirt is used, such as the areas around the bases, base paths, home plate, pitcher's mound and any other part of the infield not covered with grass. So what is this ?dirt?they speak of and how is it maintained? Not too long ago and just before the 2019 season got going, I travelled to Scotiabank Field at Nat Bailey St adium, home of the Vancouver Canadians, to observe a critical step in the process.

League with field of the year awards in both 2017 and 2018, most likely due to the major projects and resulting field improvements his grounds crew pulled off in a very short timeframe.

Making the decision to renovate the infield skin is Nat Bailey?s head groundskeeper, Ross Baron. Now in his third season in Vancouver, Baron was quickly recognized by the Northwest

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Baron is all business. Commenting on the endearing ?5th inning drag?, ?I know the groundskeepers dance is a staple of this organization and the fans absolutely love it but I told management my focus was the field. The days are already 16+ hours long with plenty of other things to worry about.? I?m trying to imagine the golf superintendent at Augusta or Pebble Beach breaking it down on the 18th green between the final groups of a major and it?s just not happening. After the tournament was over and the greens were still alive perhaps but personally, I?d prefer a turf manager good at growing grass.

surface and in the big leagues, superior mixtures with the proper sand/silt/clay ratio, or SCR, have been used since at least 2005. There?s a lot to know about how mixes relate to infield skin performance parameters that we?re not going to mention here but a really good article can be found at ?What?s in the Infield Skin??by St ephanie Springer. Last year, the grounds crew tried to rotovate their infield skin by hand in hopes of creating a more consistent profile. Baron was noticing some layering and found they couldn?t keep the moisture level consistent, especially during frequent weather

Getting back to the story, infield skins were traditionally 100% clay at one time but straight clay gets too hard when baked by the sun. Finding the proper blend of components is crucial in creating a high performance playing

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IMAGES COURTESY: JERRY ROUSSEAU

Great results. RossBaron checksthe tiller depth along the first base line.

changes. With inconsistent moisture came variable drying rates resulting in wide variations of the surface that negatively affected playability. It was a noble attempt but unfortunately and somewhat expectedly, the effort didn?t get the infield where he wanted. The solution wasn?t a big a mystery for Baron. Known as a blecavator after the BLEC company tradename, golf greenkeepers, sportsfield groundsmen, municipalities, sod growers and landscape maintenance contractors have been using this particular type of tiller/grader for many years. His only challenge was finding PG 28 | JUL 2019

one nearby but a few calls lead to success and there we were, a few weeks before the 2019 season home opener, ready to tear up Nat Bailey?s infield. I sensed a bit of apprehension before the tiller went to work, kind of like the first pitch of the game or for me, first tee jitters. Professional ball fields are hallowed ground and the scrutiny for any minor mistake is substantial. If the field didn?t turn out just right, things would not be fun for Baron and his crew. Starting at first base, the compact 35hp tractor proceeded along the outer edge of the infield arc. A CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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couple minor adjustments were needed to tweak the desired till depth to about 4?. Being longer, the first several passes seemed to take forever but things got quicker as passes became shorter. Highly compacted areas around the bases revealed themselves by the obvious machine stresses but impressively, the rotovator didn?t have much trouble breaking through the hard, layered clay. The job took just under 4 hours to complete. Following a constant curve wasn?t ideal for

the tiller but the shallow arc minimized any significant equipment stress. Although straight, baselines were extremely compacted and required a little slower going however the finish was as nice as the rest of the infield. ?I?m very happy with the results and would recommend this procedure for any field,?Baron stated. While in a good mood, I was able to confirm Ross Baron as a 2020 WCTA Conference speaker on the subject of infield skin maintenance.

Nat Bailey grounds crew from left to right, Chuck Kaisla, RossBaron, Steven Maisey PG 29 | JUL 2019


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IMAGES COURTESY: W CTA

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br ief BY JIM RO SS

Japanese Beetle Update June 2019 Female adults lay eggs soon after they emerge from the pupae stage (expected to be June 15 this year). Eggs hatch within two weeks and begin to feed on roots of turf throughout the summer. Larva will overwinter as the final instar stage by burrowing further into soil to avoid cold temperatures. According to research information temperatures below -10C would kill the larva. PG 30 | JUL 2019

Japanese beetle isan invasive plant pest that was detected in the lower mainland of British Columbia in 2017. This voraciouseater can significantly damage plants in the landscape including small fruit, vegetables, orchards, nursery plantsand agricultural crops. Although, it lays itseggs in turf, it is not thought to be a significant feeder on above ground turfgrassplant parts. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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Much of the lower mainland and Vancouver Island never see temperatures this low. The larvae feed on the roots of grasses, which can result in wilting and yellowing of turf. However, most of the damage that occurs on turf during the larva stage is mainly as a result of birds and animals foraging for the larva. In very high infestations, dead patches of turf can develop which can create safety issues for athletes using impacted sports fields. Surveying for the beetle began in 2010 and has been conducted annually since that time. In 2017, 958 beetles were detected, most of which were found in the False Creek area of Vancouver. In 2018, the population increased to over 8,000 beetles, which was expected. For more information go to: 2018 Brit ish Columbia Japanese beet le survey report A plan was put in place to control the further development of the population which included pesticide spraying and containment of PG 31 | JUL 2019

potentially infested turfed areas in the regulated area. Pesticide spraying of the insecticide, Acelepryn, began in 2018 prior to the emergence of the adult beetle. This pesticide application was applied to all turfed areas within the regulated area with the thought that populations would decrease in 2019. This year, as of June 10, all public lands in the high risk areas had been sprayed and treatment on private lands was continuing. The eradication program, which is managed by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, is intended to go on for at least three years. Portland, Oregon has also had a recent infestation of Japanese beetle albeit one year earlier than BC. The first year of treatment was 2017, which served to reduce the adult populations to just over 17,000 collected adults, a reduction of 34%. This year will be an important measuring stick for BC as the first year of pesticide application was 2018. Trapping


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of adults will take place throughout the summer and the reduction will be assessed in the fall. For the first time, a biocontrol, bacillus thuringiensis galleriae, (or Btg) is available as a foliar spray for adult control. Unfortunately, it is available only in commercial sizes and is not available as ?Home & Garden? packs. For more information on Japanese beetle, sign up for the weekly newsletter from the BC Landscape and Nursery Association at Here

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JOIN CANADA’S ONLY ASSOCIATION DEDICATED TO SPORTS TURF MANAGEMENT In 1987, a group of sports turf professionals met at the University of Guelph to discuss the need to minimize and avoid turf-related injuries on athletic fields across the nation. With considerable assistance at that time from the Ontario Ministries of Tourism & Recreation and Agriculture & Food, an Association structure was established and the Association began. From that day forward, Sports Turf Canada’s mission continues to ensure better, safer sports turf. Sports Turf Canada works collaboratively with other organizations in an effort to improve athletic field safety. In 2012 Sports Turf Canada and the Western Canada Turfgrass Association created a strategic partnership to offer a joint membership opportunity for those in British Columbia and Alberta. As a result, members in those provinces have a unique opportunity to become members of both Associations with a discounted STC membership fee.

For only $99 you can join Sports Turf Canada, with a WCTA membership! Access the WCTA membership application form @ www.wcta-online.com/Membership on the bottom right of the form, indicate $99.00 plus 5% GST and return to WCTA. Questions? Give Sports Turf Canada a call 519-763-9431 | email info@sportsturfcanada.com | fax to 519-766-1704


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news BY W CTA STA FF

Look Who's Joined the WCTA As a unified voice for the professional golf and sportsturf management industry in western Canada, the WCTA is currently 680 members strong! Since the start of our fiscal year (Oct 1), we've welcomed 90 new and ret urned members, wow! Welcome and thank you for your support and confidence in our association. We also appreciate the 1500+ non-WCTA members on our mailing list for your interest in WCTA activities. PG 34 | JUL 2019

HERE'S OUR LATEST NEW AND RETURNED MEMBERS: Jeff Flemming City of Nanaimo Parks Nat han Hagel Vancouver ParksBoard, Queen Elizabeth Pitch & Putt Geoff Pearmain Vancouver School Board Curt Spaven SD#62 Sooke Whether you're from the golf, sportsfield, supply chain or any other turf industry sector, we would like to see your name on this list! CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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Why? Because far more can be accomplished together than by each sector working on their own. One voice, pulling the same direction, avoiding duplication, whatever the cliche, it's the most effective and sensible approach, especially when our industry needs to face tough issues. CLICK HERE t o join t he W CTA right now! Sometimes we lose members too, please help us congrat ulat e t he following ret ired W CTA members: Glen Caughlan Surrey Parks& Rec

Shon O'Hanley City of Victoria Parks Colin Pawson SD#37 Delta Ken Poure City of Regina Golf Paul Richards District of North Cowichan Clay Ronaghan NorthlandsGolf Course PLEASE NOTE By November 30, 2018, all 2019 dues invoices were emailed. At March 25th, 72% have paid - thanks for taking care of business! For the other 28%, payment can be made several ways:

Gerry Dionne City of Richmond Parks Dave Got t selig Whistler Golf Course Bill Greenhough SD#62 Sooke Charles Hogg Sunshine Coast Regional District PG 35 | JUL 2019

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TURF

IMAGES COURTESY: DLF SEEDS AND SCIENCE

r ESEARCH

NEWS BY N IK W A LL, PREM IER PACIFIC SEED S

Why Is 4N Tetraploid Perennial Ryegrass So Special?

Figure 1. Germination trial comparing tetraploid perennial ryegrassand diploid perennial ryegrass

Modern day turf grasses have drastically improved over the last 40+ years. Some turf managers may remember when varieties such as Linn perennial ryegrass was the newest and latest new variety. Oregon State University's Tom Cook notes that "Linn...has poor mowing quality, forms a relatively thin turf, and PG 36 | JUL 2019

basically has all of the bad qualities we associate with perennial ryegrass". Since that time there has been multiple generations of improvement to get to the point we are at today with 4N Tetraploid perennial ryegrasses. 4N Tetraploid perennial ryegrass is being used at the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup in France, CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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and has been used at huge sporting events like the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia and 2016 Summer Olympics in Brazil among others. So how does a turf type tetraploid perennial ryegrass come to be? According to DLF International Seeds, "polyploidy- the term to describe plants with more than two sets of chomosomes is common in the plant world [however] in its natural state, perennial ryegrass is diploid: it has two sets of chromosomes. By using a natural substance, [DLF I.S.] R&D teams have developed tetraploid varieties (four sets of chromosomes)". This is no small task according to DLF I.S. as "the route to tetraploidy is long because first-generation plants produce a mixture of diploid and tetraploid shoots within the same plant.[DLF R&D] teams have to count the number of chromosomes on each shoot so [they] can pick PG 37 | JUL 2019

out the tetraploid ones... [Then they] need several [plants] to make a population that avoids inbreeding depression". Lastly, based on information from DLF I.S., new varieties must be tested "to prove that ...selected tetraploid shoots perform better than their corresponding diploid shoots". The benefits of 4N Tetraploid Perennial Ryegrass are many. According to DLF I.S., "The strength of [Tetraploid perennial ryegrass] plants is obvious right from the start. Seeds kick off faster, even at lower temperatures. They grow into stronger seedlings that cover the ground faster without suffocating the other

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bRIEF BY W CTA STA FF

Health Canada PMRA Re-Evaluates Itself

Pesticides are regulated under the Pest Control Products Act, which is administered by Healt h Canada's Pest Management Regulat ory Agency (PMRA). As part of the PMRA?s ongoing efforts to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of its programs, in 2016 it introduced a number of improvements to post-market processes* to streamline its work and eliminate duplication. *post-market processesrefersto PMRA?smandate that all pesticidesregistered in Canada are re-evaluated every 15 years. Expecting a significant increase in workload in the coming years, PMRA determined that a fulsome evaluation was required to seek broader efficiencies and improve its overall sustainability, including PG 38 | JUL 2019

soliciting stakeholder input. As such, the PMRA set out to meet with stakeholders across the country to seek feedback on the current and future state of the re-evaluation program. These consultations were designed to elicit comments and feedback on the current post-market pesticide re-evaluation program, including what is working well and areas for improvement. Feedback was received under the following four key themes:

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IMAGES COURTESY: W CTA

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br ief BY JERRY RO USSEAU

Estimated $15-20m Hit To BC Golf Industry If WorkSafe Implements Proposed New Golf Cart Rules

Last October, WorkSafeBC (somewhat silently) proposed amendments to Part 16 of the worker safety regulation, 'Mobile Equipment' that would make roll-over protection and seat belts PG 40 | JUL 2019

mandatory on golf carts. Based on preliminary estimates of $1,500 t o $2,000 for upgrades to each cart and an average of 60-75 golf carts per 18-hole golf course, cost could easily range from CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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$90,000 to $150,000 per course with the total expense to the BC Golf Industry estimated between $15m and $20m! Previously, golf carts were exempt from needing roll-bars and seatbelts. Proposed changes apply to work carts and beverage carts, marshal carts and even carts driven by a golf professional during a lesson. All employees operating a golf cart at any time during work are protected by the proposed new rules and there may be other scenarios where new rules would apply, ie. a golf pro or other staff employed at Golf Course A playing golf at Course B. A far greater concern however, is Worksafe?s determination that non-golf course workers are captured under this provision. Specifically, employees playing in a corporate or charity event are considered PG 41 | JUL 2019

workers under this policy and the rules would apply. This bears repeating / restating. If your golf course?s business model includes corporate and/or charity events, patrons playing in the event are considered to be working. If operating golf carts, those carts will require seatbelts and roll-bars (if the new rules pass). The amendment process is in the final stages of public hearings. I attended a hearing in Kamloops on April 30th, finding myself surrounded by loggers, construction contractors and road builders, all potentially negatively affected by proposed

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THE

EDUCATION

NEWS BY W CTA STA FF

Coming Events Summary With so much happening in the worlds of golf and sport turf management, it's tough to keep track but we'll do our best to provide a current list of events, meetings and field days. More information will be added as it's received including times, dates, locations and CEC point availability. 2019 Aug 18-19 BCGSA Exchange, Crown Isle G&CC Sep 18

BCGSA Kootenay Chapter ? Shadow Mountain GC

Sep 25

BCGSA Northern Chapter ? Williams Lake GC

Sep 26

BCGSA Lower Mainland Windup ? Whistler GC

Sep 25-26 CanWest Hort Show, Abbotsford Tradex Oct 27-29 NTA Conference, Bandon Dunes GR Nov 14-15 Green Industry Show & Conference, Calgary Nov 17-19 BCGSA Prof. Development Days, Victoria Nov 17-19 Golf Business Canada (NGCOA), Niagara Falls Nov 24-26 Alberta Property Managers, Canmore PG 42 | JUL 2019

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2020 Jan 14-16 OGSA Conference, Collingwood Jan 14-17 STMA Conference, West Palm Beach, FL Jan 25-30 GIS, Orlando Feb 11-13 WCTA 57th Conference and Trade Show, River Rock Casino Resort, Richmond Feb 12

WCTA AGM

*Thisdefinitely isnot a complete list. We will make updatesand add detailsasfurther information becomesavailable. If you have an event to add, please contact Jerry Rousseau at exec.director@wctaturf.com

PG 43 | JUL 2019


THE

IMAGES COURTESY: MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT

f eat ur e

st or y V IA BC M IN ISTRY O F EN V IRO N M EN T & CLIM ATE CH A N GE STRATEGY

The Ministry of Environment & Climate Change Strategy amended the Integrated Pest Management Regulation in December 2015, with the amendments not coming into force until July 1, 2016 in order to give those affected time to come into compliance.

Ministry of Environment Report Indicates Majority of BC Golf Courses Non-Compliant With New IPM Rules These amendments included changes to the requirements for the use of pesticides on landscaped areas of private land, including most golf PG 44 | JUL 2019

courses. The requirements include: - Having a pesticide use license and certified applicators on staff for CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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application of non-excluded pesticides, - Keeping a record of each pesticide application and submitting an annual summary of pesticide use to the ministry, - Notifying the public of pesticide applications, and - Following the principles of IPM. In an effort to ensure golf courses could come into compliance with the amended regulation, the Ministry of Environment & Climate Change Strategy developed guidance material that was published on the ministry website and also presented at golf course industry conferences in 2015, 2016, and 2017. Beginning in June 2017, the BC Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy conducted a compliance audit of BC golf courses to ensure that the industry is following PG 45 | JUL 2019

the environmental and human health protection requirements outlined in the Integrated Pest Management Act and Regulation. Amendments made to the IPM Regulation in 2016 increased requirements for golf courses using pesticides by requiring licensing, training & certification for pesticide applicators, record keeping, posting of notification of pesticide use, and using the principles of integrated pest management (IPM).

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THE

IMAGES COURTESY: W CTA

wct a

NEWS BY W CTA STA FF

First, First Green Event of 2019

Jason Hooper (far right) presents a putting lesson to a group of studentsand their teacher as one of five stationson the program. The others were water conservation, water quality, math and soils. The first, WCTA sponsored First Green event of 2019 was hosted by WCTA President, Travis Olson and the Kamloops Golf and Country Club on May 13th. About forty local grade 8 and 9 students were bussed to the golf course to participate, along with their teachers. First Green, founded in 1997 in the Seattle area by a small PG 46 | JUL 2019

group of dedicated golf superintendents, is an innovative environmental and STEM (Science, Technology,

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THE

indust r y

br ief BY IIA BC

In 2016, British Columbia became the first province in Canada to officially proclaim July as 'Smart Irrigation Month'. With continued advocacy work lead by Terry Ormrod, current member and Past President of IIABC, current CPCIA Director and a current member of the WCTA, Manitoba and Alberta subsequently recognized the importance of the irrigation PG 47 | JUL 2019

industry and improving water use efficiency and management.

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KPU

IMAGES COURTESY: JERRY ROUSSEAU

TURFCLUB

NEWS BY STA N K A ZYM ERCH YK

4th Installment of the Patrick Dooley Memorial Golf Tournament

WCTA President Jason Hooper (farTravis right)Olson presents a putting lesson up for long putt tolines a group ofthe students and their teacher as one of contest. Tooon bad, the putt wasThe others were five stations the program. already drained by WCTA water conservation, water quality, math and soils. Exec. Director just a few momentsearlier! Image credit Jerry Rousseau.

Pat rick Dooley was a promising young golfer, ready to graduate from high school and planning to enroll in the Kwantlen Turf Management diploma program. Sadly, Patrick passed away from a sudden illness before getting a chance to pursue his PG 48 | JUL 2019

dreams. In hopes of creating a legacy to help others with similar aspirations, his family and KPU Turf Club began the Pat rick Dooley Memorial Scholarship Fund to annually support two worthy KPU Turf Management students. On April 26, 2019, the KPU CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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Turf Club hosted the 4th Annual Patrick Dooley Memorial Golf Tournament at Mayfair Lakes Golf Course in Richmond to raise funds for the scholarship and celebrate Patrick?s memory. Weather was ideal for the one o?clock shotgun start with 92

golfers enjoying Steve May and crew?s excellent preparation of the course. As per tradition, KP?s, Long Drives, Putting and Chipping contests were part of the action along with the popular, and competitive, marshmallow smash/long drive!

Ron Marchuck, retired KPU Horticulture Program Instructor, stopsby the ever-popular Tiki Bar located conveniently at the corners of hole #8 and 18.

Just some good ?ole boys, never meaning no harm? Rob Yates, Steve Haggard, Sean Healy and Spencer Grundy (all KPU Turf Grads!). PG 49 | JUL 2019

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Tur f

r esear ch

news BY W CTA STA FF

The turgrass research funding year begins with our annual conference and trade show. At that time, about a third of our annual average is raised through the Silent Auction, 50/50 draw and by the efforts of the Kwantlen Turf Club. Also, any contributions from allied organizations are typically presented at the show. Every WCTA member contributes too! Unique to our association, 10% of member dues and 30% of any annual net revenue is directed toward turf research project funding. Money raised this year will be directed toward turf research projects next year. Where dollars go is decided by the research committee based on a carefully developed list of turf management industry priorities (see below) and $4000 is earmarked annually for collaborative funding with the PG 50 | JUL 2019

2019 Turfgrass Research Contributors Canadian Turf Research Foundation. Sincere thanks must go to the organizations, companies and individuals who have made generous contributions to turf research through both donations and supporting events and functions. 2019 Silent Auction - $7,986 KPU Turf Club contest proceeds - $3,204 Give Me 5 Buckscampaign - $120 Kwantlen polytechnic university - $250

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IMAGES COURTESY: BCGSA

associat ion

news BY BCGSA

BCGSA Re-Brands Exchange Tournament 2019 will be the first year of the newly branded ?BCGSA Exchange?. The Exchange has been condensed to be a two-day event, still containing all the components that make the Exchange a great educational and networking opportunity for all members.

BCGSA Exchange August 18-19, 2019 Crown Isle Resort & Golf Community Courtenay, BC Thisarea of Vancouver Island is a great outdoor adventure mecca so plan early and bring the entire family to enjoy all that the Courtenay area hasto offer. PG 51 | JUL 2019

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YOUR2019 BOARDOF DIRECTORS Just click on their email addressto contact any board member directly

TRAVIS OLSON PRESIDENT KAM LOOPS G&CC

(250) 319-4669 - t rav_olson@hot mail.com

CAM WATT VICE PRESIDENT UBC ATHLETICS

(778) 840-8161 - camfwat t @gmail.com

ANDREDIONNE FINANCE DIRECTOR CITY OF COQUITLAM

(604) 927-6246 - adionne@coquit lam.ca PG 52 | JUL 2019


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YOUR2019 BOARDOF DIRECTORS Just click on their email addressto contact any board member directly

PETERSOROKOVSKY PAST PRESIDENT CITY OF BURNABY, PARKS, REC, CULTURAL SERVICES

(604) 297-4494 - pet er.sorokovsky@burnaby.ca

DAVINMARR TW O YEAR DIRECTOR HILLVIEW GC

(250) 549-4653 - davint marr@hot mail.com

STUCARMICHAEL TW O YEAR DIRECTOR CITY OF COURTENAY

(250) 338-1766 - scarmichael@court enay.ca PG 53 | JUL 2019

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YOUR2019 BOARDOF DIRECTORS Just click on their email addressto contact any board member directly

GARYBARTLEY ONE YEAR DIRECTOR UBC ATHLETICS

(604) 970-1417 - gary.bart ley@ubc.ca

JEDMCGEACHIE ONE YEAR DIRECTOR OVERTON ENVIRONM ENTAL

(604) 807-6768 - jed@overt onee.ca

NIKWALL ONE YEAR DIRECTOR PREM IER PACIFIC SEEDS

(604) 881-1323 - nik@premierpacificseeds.com PG 54 | MAY 2019


Gol f

INDUSTRY

BRIEF

BY W CTA STA FF

NGCOA BC Chapter and BC PGA Resign From BC Allied Golf Association

On March 8, BC chapters of both the National Golf Course Owners Association and Professional Golfers Association, submitted resignation letters to the Allied Golf Association of BC Board of Directors. In a post to its members, NGCOA expressed concerns that AGA?s governance structure unfairly hinders proper decision making, that member organizations should equally fund lobby initiatives as required and that AGA-BC removed itself from the National Allied Golf Association. Prior to the departure, AGA-BC had represented all the BC golf industry sectors PG 56 | JUL 2019

including NGCOA, BC PGA, BC Golf Association, Canadian Society of Club Managers, Western Canada Turfgrass Association, BC Golf Marketing Alliance and the BC Golf Superintendents Association. The group?s track record included several successful provincial government lobby days, development of an ?industry scorecard?and advocating for the golf industry on major issues like pesticides,

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ENDOFTHE MAGAZINE Remaining Pages Are Cont inuat ions Of Art icles St art ed Previously In The Magazine.

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PROUDLY POW ERED BY


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?Stan and Rob deserve all the credit for the success of this project,?explained Moedt. "They created a work-oriented and safety-oriented atmosphere that the students understood. They treated the students like competent workers and the students rose to meet those expectations. It doesn?t get any better than this.? Amadeus Landrath, a grade 11 student from Walnut Grove Secondary, thought the best thing about the week was driving the triplex mower. ?I learned how to mow fairways and greens the proper way. Even if I don?t end up working on a golf course, I learned a lot of good skills.?Ben Gunn, a Langley Secondary student, enthused that he learned? how to work with equipment safely and effectively. ?I really want to work at a golf course because I love the job and I know I can get up early.? The ?final exam?took place on | JUL 2019

Friday as students circulated through eight stations while being observed by Superintendents from local golf courses. Supes gave out words of encouragement, descriptions for entry level jobs and invited students to turn in resumes. Several students hope to start work on a golf course soon. "Teens on Turf 2019 was a pilot project that we hope we can do again", says Moedt. "This type of project is an excellent example of the kind of partnerships the School District and Kwantlen Polytechnic University could do more of. It makes the transition out of high school easier as students become aware of post secondary programs. It is especially valuable for our more challenged learners and those with barriers to employment. The confidence and skills our eight students gained was amazing.?


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charity event are considered workers under this policy and the rules would apply (that?s why 60-75 or more golf carts would need to be fitted with roll bars and seat belts).

WorkSafe officers.

- The WCTA is also working on this issue through the BC Allied Golf Association and met with WorkSafeBC officials on June 18 to clarify - The amendment process is in requirements of the new the final stages of public regulations, express concerns hearings. I attended a hearing of their effect on the in Kamloops on April 30th, sportsturf and golf finding myself surrounded by management industry and loggers, construction offer possible alternative contractors and road builders, solutions to any perceived all potentially negatively safety issues. A final decision affected by proposed from WorkSafeBC is expected amendments to the regulation. this fall. A common theme ? Member Programming and engineering and Event s manufacturing heavy - The first, WCTA sponsored equipment to the standards First Green event of 2019 was proposed by Worksafe isn?t hosted by WCTA President, possible due to material Travis Olson and the Kamloops physics limitations. In other Golf and Country Club on May words, equipment made to 13th. About forty local grade 8 meet the new standards would and 9 students were bussed to be too heavy to operate. Also, the golf course to participate, concern was expressed over along with their teachers. ambiguity of the proposed amendments that would leave On the organization and interpretation up to individual execution of the Kamloops | JUL 2019

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Golf Club event, host superintendent Travis Olson admitted, ?I was a little stressed in the initial planning stages but it wasn?t hard to put together. The learning lessons themselves are easy to present because you?re really just talking about something you know very well. The key is to remember that a lot of kids may never have been on a golf course before so keeping the presentation simple is important. They were very enthusiastic and loved the hands on component of the lessons.?

project titled, ?Comparing Iron Sulfate Versus Chelated Iron for the Suppression of Microdochium Patch on Annual Bluegrass Putting Greens in the Presence and Absence of Phosphorous Acid.?

Turf Research and Educat ion

many different levels. Subscribe to our newsletter and follow along at www.wct a-online.com for more news, information and updates.

- The WCTA?s three-year management contract with the Canadian Turf Research Foundation ends July 31st. Both Boards have agreed to a one-year extension option. The current CTRF focus is a full review of the organization?s purpose and rewrite of antiquated bylaws. Pretty dry stuff but necessary to ensure - Information coming soon on a we are able to advance turf sportsfield field day planned research priorities into the for early September and future. hosted by the City of Surrey. There a lot more happening at - 2019 project funding has been announced with $4,000 earmarked for our annual Canadian Turf Research Foundation contribution and $10,000 USD approved for the Oregon State University | JUL 2019


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uses of chlorpyrifos except those listed below, due to risks to the environment (aquatic biota, beneficial arthropods, birds and mammals) that were not found to be acceptable. These uses that are proposed for cancellation include almost all agricultural uses of chlorpyrifos." Only a small number of uses are acceptable for continued registration with required label changes: - Standing water - temporary pools for larval mosquito control - Outdoor adult mosquito control - Structural indoor and outdoor (non-residential) - Outdoor ornamentals

| JUL 2019

(container stock only) for control of Japanese beetle larvae - Greenhouse ornamentals All products containing chlorpyrifos registered in Canada are subject to this proposed re-evaluation decision. This document is subject to a 90-day public consultation period, during which the public including the pesticide manufacturers and stakeholders may submit written comments and additional information to the PMRA. The final re-evaluation decision will be published taking into consideration the comments and information received.


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-CLICK HERE to use PayPal quickly and securely using a credit card or your PayPal account (a Paypal account is not required). You will need your invoice number.

Call us with a credit card number at (604) 888-7759

Scan/email with credit card payment to exec.direct or@wct at urf.com

Fax invoice with credit card payment to 1-866-366-5097 or the old fashioned way,

installments, please send a request by email to account ing@wct at urf.com CLICK HERE to make contact information changes We look forward to serving you for another year. You can help us do that by taking care of your dues promptly. If you know someone who would benefit from a WCTA membership, ie Turf Line News, annual conference, membership roster, job postings, CEC program, etc, have them visit our member value proposit ion.

Are you interested in knowing mail a cheque to: WCTA, Box more about the societal 698, Hope, BC V0X 1L0 benefits of turf? CLICK HERE If you need to make changes to for a great poster from the CTRF. your invoice, or would like to pay in three equal

| JUL 2019


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Figure 2.Tetraploid perennial ryegrassisreferred to as 4turf in the graphic above.

seedlings in your mixture". It has been observed that this aggressive characteristic is great for the natural competition against weed establishment. Based on testing done by DLF I.S. shown below, "[tetraploid perennial ryegrass] has better germination at 4 C compared to a diploid [plant]". Based on evidence from trials | JUL 2019

completed by DLF International Seeds "during autumn and winter seasons [Tetraploid perennial ryegrass] shows improved tolerance to diseases". OSU Horticulture Department's Tom Cook noted that "in climates west of the Cascade Mountains throughout the PNW ryegrass has been widely used since it CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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Figure 3. Tetraploid Perennial Ryegrass (left) and Diploid Perennial Ryegrass (right) root depth study by DLF International Seeds(DLF Seedsand Science)

was first introduced" although "in areas east of the mountains ...potential loss from cold winters is still a concern". However, 4N tetraploid perennial ryegrass has been been observed to overwinter well without winterkill east of the Cascade

Mountains in Kamloops, and Kelowna. DLF I.S. is confident that "[Tetraploid perennial ryegrasses] are comparable to some of the best diploids" and it is exciting think about what the future holds for new, improved tetraploid perennial ryegrasses.

Works Cit ed Dept., T. C.-O. (n.d.). Perennial Ryegrass Lolium perenne L. Retrieved June 04, 2019, from Oregon State Agricultural Science: https://agsci.oregonstate.edu/sites/agscid7/files/horticulture/beaverturf/PerennialRyegrass.pdf\ DLF Seeds and Science. (n.d.). 4turf Stronger Plants. Retrieved 05 27, 2019, from DLF Seeds and Science: https://www.dlf.com/professional-turf/4turf-stronger-plants

| JUL 2019


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amendments to the regulation. A common theme ? engineering and manufacturing heavy equipment to the standards proposed by Worksafe isn?t possible due to material physics limitations. In other

words, equipment made to meet the new standards would be too heavy to operate. Also, concern was expressed over ambiguity of the proposed amendments that would leave interpretation up to individual WorkSafe officers.

Any questions? I thought proposed WorksafeBC regulations for golf carts apply just to golf course workers, right? Wrong. Anyone who can accessthe compensation system is protected by the regulation. Thiscapturesanyone being paid that is on your site and even volunteers. They can also be from out-of-province. Are there any exceptions? Yes. If a Qualified Person (QP) performsa site assessment and determinesthere isno significant risk of roll-over, then ROPSwill not be required. No significant hazard of rollover means?an area in which there are no gradesexceeding 10%, no operating areaswith open edges, no open ramps, loading docks, ditchesor other similar hazardswhich might cause a rollover.? | JUL 2019

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What isa Qualified Person? Defined in Part 1 of regulation: "qualified" meansbeing knowledgeable of the work, the hazards involved and the meansto control the hazards, by reason of education, training, experience or a combination thereof; Tim McCarthy, Senior Policy Analyst for WorksafeBC saysthiscan be a local expert meaning a golf professional, superintendent or perhaps the course architect. Food for thought - If roll barsare required on golf cartsto protect workers, including non-golf course employeesplaying in a corporate golf event, this could mean fire extinguishers, hard hatsand adequate training and supervision would also be required but it doesn?t appear WCB will go that far, at least not yet. - Certainly, beverage cartswill be required to have ROPSunder the new regulations. - If a person playing golf at a corporate event isbeing paid to do so and therefore considered by WorksafeBC to be a worker, how does that affect consumption of alcohol supplied by the golf course?

| JUL 2019


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There will be three separate research studies at Oregon State University that the NTA will continue to fund, totaling $31,160. All three studies pertain to Microdochium Patch, a consistent disease problem for turfgrass managers in the Northwest.

the NTA Board of Directors after recommendations from the Research Committee.

The NTA also will be supporting a $10,000 study by Dr. Paul Koch at the University of Wisconsin on snow mold control in higher elevations in the Northwest.

For 2019, after extensive consideration and recommendations from the NTA Research Committee, the Board of Directors awarded the following research and education grants:

Included in the financial support being distributed by the NTA is $1,700 to both the Inland Empire GCSA and the Western Washington GCSA to help finance the development of a Best Management Practices guidelines for superintendents in the Northwest. In all for 2019, six different entities in the Northwest will be supported through the grants, which were decided by PG 45 | JUL 2019

The grants from the NTA are made possible through the numerous and generous contributions from clubs and individuals throughout the Northwest.

Comparing iron sulfate versus chelated iron for the suppression of Microdochium Patch on annual bluegrass putting greens in the absence and presence of phosphorous acid -- Oregon State University, $11,141.00 Effects of winter nitrogen, phosphate and potassium rates on Microdochium Patch ? Oregon State University, $10,020.00


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Quantifying the long-term effects of alternative Microdochium Patch management techniques on sand-based annual bluegrass putting green performance over multiple seasons ? Oregon State University, $9,999.00 Snow mold control in higher elevations in the Northwest ? University of Wisconsin, $10,000.00 Turfgrass field lab construction ? Walla Walla Community College, $3,267.00 Northwest BMP funding ? Inland Empire GCSA, $1,700.00 Northwest BMP funding ? Western Washington GCSA,

| JUL 2019

$1,700.00 Bill Griffith Turfgrass Management Scholarship, Walla Walla Community College, $2,500.00 For more information on how to apply for grants for 2020, or to contribute directly to the NTA, contact Paul Ramsdell, executive director of the NTA, at mpsparks90@aol.com or 253-219-8360. Also, registration is open for the 2019 annual conference of the NTA, to be held Oct. 27-29 at the Bandon Dunes Golf Resort on the southern Oregon coast. More information on the conference is available by visiting the NTA web site at www.nwt urfgrass.net .


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Theme 1: Stakeholder Engagement and Transparency in Re-evaluationsincluding the timing and frequency of stakeholder engagement pointsthroughout the pesticide re-evaluation process, the predictability of requirements, and transparency. Theme 2: Initiation and Prioritization of Re-evaluations- particularly the timing and triggersto initiate a pesticide re-evaluation, including discussionson the 15 year cycle, risk-based approachesand prioritization of pesticidesto be reviewed. Theme 3: Scientific Assessment and Risk Management in Re-evaluationsincreasing the predictability of data requirementsand how data isbeing used to refine the risk assessment, aswell astoolsand opportunitiesto share available data and studies, and encouraging better understanding of the differences in use-patternsacrossthe country. PG 54 | JUL 2019

Theme 4: Alternative Modelsfor Re-evaluation - including increased stakeholder engagement, flexible risk-based approaches, enhanced post-market monitoring and surveillance of pesticides, socio-economic impactsof decisionsin the risk management process, improved accountability of the registrant and better international alignment. On June 4, a final ?What Was Heard Report ?was release by the PMRA. According to the organization, ?This report aims to reflect the summary of the ideas, comments and feedback that were raised during the stakeholder consultations. It does not attempt to include every comment received, nor does it imply consensus on the part of all participants. It presents a summary of what was heard from input that was wide-ranging, broad-based and not always consistent.?


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Approximately 318 BC golf courses were identified however only 126 of these courses held valid pesticide use licenses. Not all golf courses in BC were aware of the changes to the Regulation and therefore some had likely not yet obtained a licence. Therefore, ministry inspectors planned inspections of both golf courses that held valid licenses and golf courses that did not hold valid licenses but were likely to be using pesticides as part of their turf management programs. IPM Officers completed 37 inspections between June 6 and November 1, 2017 representing approximately 12% of golf courses in BC with inspections occurring in almost all regions of the province. Twenty inspections were of licensed golf courses and 17 inspections were of unlicensed golf courses. Some bad news: - 68% of golf courses were | JUL 2019

out of compliance with at least one aspect of the Regulation and were issued an advisory of non-compliance. - Of the 17 unlicensed golf courses inspected, 35% were fully in compliance with the Regulation and 65% were out of compliance with at least one aspect of the Regulation - Of the 20 licensed golf courses inspected, 30% were fully in compliance with the Regulation and 70% were out of compliance with at least one aspect of the Regulation The good news: - the required submission of an annual summary of pesticide use was completed by 93% of golf courses licensed in BC in 2017. These summaries generally confirmed the information provided by the superintendents interviewed regarding pesticide use targets. - Licensed golf courses had CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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relat ively high (>70%) compliance rat es for record-keeping and notification requirements. - Remarkably, a 100% compliance rat e was found at licensed golf courses for the IPM requirements, demonstrating strong and ingrained IPM practices across this sector. All non-compliant golf courses received an advisory of non-compliance, which is the lowest level of enforcement response. This in part reflects the fact that non-compliances were relatively minor in nature and that this industry is still adjusting to the new requirements. St at ement by t he Minist ry: ?The BC golf course industry is committed to continual improvement in IPM techniques, including industry association funding for turfgrass research. In 2002, ?IPM for Turfgrass Manager: A | JUL 2019

guide to disease, insect and weed management in BC?was produced by the BC Ministry of Agriculture in partnership with the Western Canada Turfgrass Association (WCTA), and this is a valuable resource tailored to conditions in BC. A major revision of this manual by a BC Allied Golf Association steering committee is currently underway to ensure it contains current and relevant information.? The Ministry of Environment & Climate Change Strategy will continue to conduct compliance inspections of golf courses, with a focus on golf courses found to be out of compliance during this audit as well as those that have never been inspected. All inspections and enforcement actions conducted will be conducted as per the Ministry?s Compliance & Enforcement Policy and Procedures. The inspections conducted in 2017 revealed that while many golf courses CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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were aware of the changes and had taken the appropriate steps to ensure compliance, a number of golf courses were not aware of the changes to the regulation, indicating the need for ongoing outreach and compliance activities. The BC golf course associations have been instrumental in helping to communicate the new rules to their members and the ministry

| JUL 2019

wishes to thank these associations for their ongoing promotional efforts to ensure compliance. CLICK HERE for full report LIST OF GOLF COURSES AND COMPLIANCE DETERMINATION RESULTS


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Engineering and Math) education outreach program using golf courses as environmental learning labs. Golf Course Superintendents and/or local golf course representatives host students on field trips where they test water quality, collect soil samples, identify plants, design plantings, assist in stream bed restoration and are involved in the ecology and environmental aspects of the golf course. Starting in 2015 at the Vancouver Golf Club with a pilot event, the WCTA currently remains the first and only international First Green sponsor and since, have produced events using both golf courses and sportsfields. Last year, the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America became an integral First Green partner with a vision to expand and support the program across the US, Canada and beyond. | JUL 2019

On the organization and execution of the Kamloops Golf Club event, host superintendent Travis Olson admitted, ?I was a little stressed in the initial planning stages but it wasn?t hard to put together. The learning lessons themselves are easy to present because you?re really just talking about something you know very well. The key is to remember that a lot of kids may never have been on a golf course before so keeping the presentation simple is important. They were very enthusiastic and loved the hands on component of the lessons.? Jerry Rousseau, WCTA Executive Director observed, ?It was interesting to not see a single cell phone in the hands of a group of 14 and 15 year olds for an hour and a half. Maybe that?s a new record!? He added, ?Any Superintendent can host a First Green event and CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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Okay, maybe one cell phone came out at the end but that was actually a teacher! (white shirt, red tie on right side of image).

engaging the kids is extremely gratifying. It?s a fantastic community outreach program. Some may take up the game, some could end up working on a golf course but all will leave with a little more knowledge and understanding of some of the science taking place on a golf course.?

Our First Green presentersfrom left to right, Jason Hooper, Cam Watt, Patrick Kerr, TravisOlson, Dylan Kerr, Jared White, Jesse Cowan and Nathan Hagel (missing). Thanks for your help guys! | JUL 2019


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IMAGES COURTESY: KWANTLEN TURF CLUB

Host Supe Steve May, John Taylor, Nik Wall, Jake Dueck. Thisyear?sPatrickDooleyAward winnerwasannouncedat the banquet,congratulations to Corey Hewletfor a job welldone!

Farm Tek, Keso Turf, RF Binnie, Terra Equipment, Terralink, Target Specialty Products, Prairie Coast Equipment, English Lawns, Evergro, Target, Brett Young, Thankyouto theturf industry West Coast Golf Group, Western guyswhobroughtteamsto this Turf Farms, EZ-Go/Cushman, event:JasonHooper,DanFast, SpencerGrundy,GlenAtamanik, Overton Environmental and StevePeardon,DuncanLongridge, Cedar Crest Lands! JoshCarlsenandJohnTaylor/Nik And of course the KPU Turf Wall. Club members who worked hard to make this day a huge Special t hanks t o t he t urf success: Josh Carlsen, Duncan indust ry Tee Sponsors: Longridge, Jason Morgan Kaleb TaylorsTurf Care, Fisher and Ksenia Thurston. Westerra/Vermeer BC, WCTA, BCGSA, NCGOA, BCGA, STC, JCL St an Kazymerchyk KPU Turf Management Ag Services, Premier Pacific Instructor Seeds, BC Plant Health Care, | JUL 2019

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The WCTA Executive, Peter Sorokovsky, TravisOlson and Cam Watt.

At the end of the day, the winning team was Westerra/Vermeer BC captained by Dan Fast! However the most impressive accomplishment was raising $8,000 for the Patrick Dooley Memorial Scholarship Fund and Turf Research!

The Champs! Sam Brevis, Phil Holmberg, Stuart George and Dan Fast with Tiki Bar Host Paul Berry.

2019 Pat Dooley Award Winner Corey Hewlet (centre) with Steve & Preet Dooley. | JUL 2019


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water management and taxation, among other initiatives. As an incorporated not-for-profit society, AGA-BC is the conduit for BC government tourism marketing funding and has grown the annual subsidy from around $50k prior to 2013, to $250k currently. The group also received $35k from the BC Ministry of Environment in 2015, about the annual cost for its hired lobbyist, to produce a new IPM resource for turf managers. According to WCTA Executive Director and one of WCTA?s AGA-BC representatives, Jerry Rousseau, ?The rationale to quit [AGA-BC] was weak in my opinion. Each member organization is required to put forward two representatives as Directors with each group having an equal vote at the table. There are sufficient bylaws, regular meetings take | JUL 2019

place with Roberts Rules used as a guide, minutes are taken and there is an annual general meeting where the Executive is nominated and voted in.? He continued, ?In terms of governance, there was never anything unfair at the AGA Board table in my experience and if anything, it was the lack of governance knowledge by some Directors that was a problem. I think their major issue was the proposal to send voluntary invoices to BC golf courses in hopes of soliciting funds to continue lobby efforts. NGCOA voted against it but the Board voted in favour. Shortly after, both groups decided to resign.? On the subject of voluntary golf course invoicing, President Trevor Smith stated, ?The NGCOA calls it a levy but it?s not. Alberta has been doing something similar since the 90?s. The idea was to ask each BC golf course for a voluntary contribution to help support CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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golf industry lobby efforts, nothing more.? He added, ?Unfortunately, It looks like the NGCOA has misinterpreted some of AGA-BC?s actions, for example, the group never removed itself from NAGA national. BC is the only province incorporated as a not-for-profit society; we needed to incorporate for funding and the name change [from NAGA-BC] was made to reflect the provincial nature of the group. It?s very unfortunate that we have not been able to have a discussion to clear up these simple

| JUL 2019

misunderstandings.? The five remaining organizations have indicated a strong desire to preserve the coalition in support of the BC golf industry. Both the NGCOA and BC PGA have indicated they would reconsider their decision, ?when circumstances improve.? Rousseau stated, ?Hopefully we can resolve this soon. Government has said time and time again that they don?t want to speak to splinter groups, they want to speak with one group representing an entire industry.?


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So far in 2019, over $22,000 has been raised and we're well on our way to hitting the magic $25,000 number! There's more work to be done so please remember to support the turf research that supports your career. We would like t o t ake t his opport unit y t o t hank t hose who serve t irelessly on our Research Commit t ee: Peter Sorokovsky City of Burnaby (Chair) David Davidson Kwantlen Polytechnic University David Duncan THP Co. (WCTA Past President) David Woodske BC Ministry of Agriculture Dr. Brian Holl Lamorna Enterprises Ladd Legeyt Agrium Advanced Technologies (Industry Representative) Jim Ross Prairie TurfgrassResearch Centre (retired)

| JUL 2019

Current Turfgrass Research Priorit ies: Nutrient and fertility management, best management practices Soil and root-zone management, best management practices Evaluation of alternatives to pesticides Irrigation and water use issues (water quality and reducing water usage) Investigations into the biology, ecology and management of current and emerging pests Alternative cultivar and species for new turf construction, integration and conversion into existing turf areas Species/cultivar evaluation and improved management practices for areas of heavy traffic and wear tolerance


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It inerary: Sunday, August 18 2:00 pm Meet & Greet 4:00 pm Industry Equipment Demo 6:00 pm Barbeque 7:00 pm Horse Race 9:00 pm No Host Bar @Timber Room Pub Monday, August 19 9:00 am BCGSA Information Meeting 9:30 am Educational Speaker 12:00 pm Lunch 1:00 pm 18 Hole Shotgun Tournament 6:00 pm Banquet & Prizes Educat ion Session Dr. Bill Kreuser University of Nebraska Asst. Professor, Extension Turfgrass Specialist Bill Kreuser will present a three hour session that will include the following: 1) (CEC?s: 3.0 IPM) 2) Perils of PGR Over-regulation 3) Drive your Growth Rate 4) Interpreting your Soil Test Results BCGSA Exchange Regist rat ion Form PG 45 | JUL 2019


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Focused on July, this campaign provides a unified marketing platform and is designed to: - Educate businesses, homeowners, growers/producers and other users about efficient water use. - Encourage industry firms and professionals to promote smart irrigation practices and technologies. - Position your organization as a leader in smart water stewardship. Take part by educating yourself in ways you can help participate in Smart Irrigation Month this July and all through the year with a few of these simple tips!

How to Hire a Reliable, Certified Irrigation Professional How to Water Smart & Save Money This Summer Complement Your Smart Irrigation System with Sustainable Solutions Plant Right - Simple Changes to Save You Money BC's 'Smart Irrigation Month' proclamation for 2017

PG 45 | JUL 2019


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Profile for Inside Golf Inc.

Turf Line News - June/July Issue  

Turf Line News - June/July Issue