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the business of international events

Everyone’s Invited – Get Hip to the Lingo Event Expansion: Embracing the Growth May I Help You? Turnstiles: When Sponsors Go Rogue


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The Pointsmap app was a match made in heaven for Riverbend Festival. With 5 stages over 8 days and 100 artists, the interactive map made planning a breeze for Riverbend Festival music lovers. Our patrons praised the ease of plotting their experience and having it all in the palm of their hands. The Pointsmap app had a it all covered…from when their favorite band was on stage, how to get there, and where to find concessions along the way. - Amy Morrow, Riverbend Festival

PointsMap puts your entire festival in the palm of your visitors hands. Add as many points to your map as you want including photos, descriptions, links to videos, websites and PDF’s. Your PointsMap Customized App helps users find out what’s happening, who’s performing, find the stages, tokens, restrooms and concessions and navigate to them. You easily update the information using your desktop PointsMap and the changes are instantly updated in your App!

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the business of international events

F E ATU R E S

Everyone’s Invited – Get Hip to the Lingo Event Expansion: Embracing the Growth May I Help You? Turnstiles: When Sponsors Go Rogue

On the Cover: Red Bull Crashed Ice will make its Ottawa debut when the Ice Cross Downhill World Championship crashes and glides its way into the capital March 3 – 4, 2017 on the iconic locks of the Rideau Canal, overlooking Parliament Hill and the famous Chateau Laurier.

DEPARTMENTS 6 President’s Letter

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The Festival Organizers Guide to Corporate Social Responsibility by Dan Rose

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9 Surefire Steps to Lockdown Your Cyber Security by Clinton Henry

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Event Expansion: Embracing the Growth by Nick Scala

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Hacking People: Why Your Biggest Vulnerability Isn't In Your IT Department by Clinton Henry

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Integrating Strategies and Services for Guests with Cognitive Disabilities by Lisa Potvin

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Put an End to Procrastination! by Steve McClatchy

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Should I Copyright My Website? by Andrew A. Gonzales, Esq.

8 IFEA World Board 10 IFEA Foundation Board 12 The Un-comfort Zone 14 Leadership at All Levels 16 The Digital Life 18 Everyone’s Invited Including People with Disabilities 20 What Keeps You Up at Night 22 English 101 24 Turnstiles: Marketing for Event Managers 26 May I Help You? 28 So You Want to Work in Events? 30 Safely Does It 32 People Profiles 33 Sponsor Doc 38 Leadership Legacy 57 2017 IFEA Webinar Series 64 2017 IFEA Awards Programs 99 Marketplace Spring 2017, Volume 28, Issue 1 “ie” is published quarterly by the International Festivals & Events Association, 2603 W. Eastover Terrace, Boise, ID 83706, USA. Permission to quote from material herein is granted provided proper credit is given to IFEA.


PRESIDENT’S LETTER

Steven Wood Schmader, CFEE

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One of the IFEA’s primary directives is to provide high quality educational and networking opportunities. High on that list is our IFEA Annual Convention & Expo, which gathers together many of the top professionals and event organizations in our field to meet, share and discuss the most current insights into the issues, trends and programs affecting our global industry. As we choose the locations for these important gatherings, we must consider many components (external and internal) to ensure the highest quality experience possible. These range across many operational areas and include (among others): • Choosing the highest quality properties, with professional staff and support services to work with us in achieving our goals; •`Providing the highest quality experience at the most reasonable cost to our attendees; 6

• Ensuring that the IFEA, organizationally, remains fiscally sound and successful; • Tracking attendance trends and history; Developing close partnerships with local members, tourism marketing agencies, media, city officials, corporate leaders and support service providers; • Ensuring that the properties we choose can meet our space, technical, access, food & beverage, and risk minimalization needs, while maintaining the cost-effective, high quality goals that under-pin everything we do. Like any event or festival, achieving this visually short list of objectives, involves many long hours of research, negotiations, creative solution-building, and on-site visits. It is not as straight-forward as choosing a destination and knowing that all your needs can be met. We typically aim to confirm and announce our location selection immediately after the first of each year, as that closer proximity negotiation window provides substantial financial and other benefits that we/our attendees would not normally get if we locked in much earlier. Historically, those who have been attending for many years will recognize that the IFEA has moved convention locations each year, adding further to the list above with the need to build/ develop new partnerships, learn new venue footprints and capabilities (from a distance) and completely recreate the wheel on an annual basis. As we look to the future, we have debated the need to revisit and reconsider this and other models (following the examples of many of our professional peer organizations such as IEG, IAFE, OABA, etc.) of repeating a convention location for a multi-year period.

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In 2017, given an unexpected, eleventh hour concern with a new property that we were ready to announce, that test opportunity presented itself as a necessity. In response, calling upon the strong partnership that we are pleased to have developed, we made the decision to return to the JW Marriott Starr Pass Resort in Tucson, Arizona for a third year. Based upon the past two years, the response to the beautiful 5-Star, 4-Diamond Starr Pass Resort & Spa has been a very positive one, as have been the benefits provided to our organization and attendees by Marriott and we are very pleased to continue that partnership for one more year. In the future, we plan to move again, but may again repeat other locations for more than one year, giving us a stronger negotiating and planning position. If we can identify a group of high quality properties that meet our goals effectively, we may, looking head, consider a fixed rotation of those properties. While we understand the anticipation that a continually changing location creates, our primary focus must be on delivering the education and networking components that are the core of our programming. We hope that content continues to be the driving force for attendance at our conventions as well (as you and your peers have identified in surveys) and we look forward to having you, your staffs, boards, city representatives, volunteers, vendors, et al. join us each year for the top professional gathering of global industry leaders in our field.


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IFEA WORLD BOARD

New Year. New Beginning. I'm not much into new year's resolutions. But, 2016 was a rough year for most. So many influential people left this earth, the election was traumatic and divisive, and traditional weather patterns were skewed. A new year brings hope for new beginnings. A fresh start. An opportunity to push the reset button. And like a new year, I wish for each of you to embrace the horizon. To tackle what is difficult. I’m especially looking forward to 2017 because there will be a lot of celebrating the things in life that bring meaning. Des Moines Arts Festival celebrates its 20th year. My parents celebrate 60 years together. My wife and I celebrate 25 years together. And in 2017, Canada celebrates 150 years as a nation. People from around the world will be joining our friend, and Ottawa 2017's Executive Director, Guy Laflamme for months of immersive experiences. I am so grateful for Guy's leadership this past year as IFEA’s Chairman of the Board. His enthusiasm, thirst for life and festivals, humor, and style made for a dynamic year with the IFEA. I am thrilled for this opportunity to serve as Chairman for 2017 with a group of individuals who are building community around the world – and they LOVE their job! The board meets three times a year and at each meeting, we take the time to go around the table and share trends and 8

news. Never has there been a time I was not humbled by the contributions each is making in their community. They are living breathing examples of what is good in our country and I’m proud to call them friends. IFEA is an important part of my life and my hope is you will find the same. I’ve been involved with IFEA for over 20 years and I’m constantly amazed and enlightened by the gifts it provides. I look forward to the annual Convention like young children look forward to Christmas morning. The people I’ve met have made me a better professional and person. Each is committed to building community and sharing what they’ve learned. I’m especially pleased that I can bring those gifts back to my city of Des Moines. Des Moines, Iowa is my home. It’s a beautiful city with kind and friendly people. It’s true what they say about being Iowa Nice – you could spend all day at an intersection because each of the drivers

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wants the other to go first. Ours is a place where ingenuity and riskful thinking are celebrated. I'm not the only one talking about Des Moines. Kiplinger named Des Moines America's Best City for Families. The Today Show ranked us the Wealthiest City in America.  Gallup named us the Metro with the Most Community Pride. Forbes tagged us as the Best City for Young Professionals. And the list goes on and on. I invite you to come see it for yourself during the award-winning Des Moines Arts Festival on June 23-25, 2017. In the meantime, whatever you do, go where it takes you…

STEPHEN KING, CFEE 2017 IFEA World Board Chair Executive Director, DES MOINES ARTS FESTIVAL® Des Moines, IA


IFEA FOUNDATION BOARD We may have met. If you have attended an IFEA Convention in the last 15 years, there is a very good chance that we have crossed paths. Perhaps I have served you an adult beverage in the IFEA Hospitality Suite or chatted you up from inside a tradeshow booth at the Expo. Hopefully, I might have even encouraged you to support IFEA scholarships by purchasing a 50/50 raffle ticket at the Foundation Night and Auction. If we haven’t formally met, maybe you know my father, Pete Van de Putte. He’s been hanging around International Festival and Event professionals since 1988, the year he joined the IFEA. He is a founding member and past Chair of the IFEA Foundation, and is a past Chair of the IFEA World Board. Though his resume is impressive, it’s not what comes to mind when you think of Pete Van de Putte. Anyone who really knows my father, knows at least these three things: 1) He likes to tell jokes, 2) He loves to tell stories, and 3) He is incredibly passionate and devoted to the festival and event industry, or as he likes to call it “those who are in the business of celebration.” I write today to share with you a little about my experience with the International Festival and Events Association. I attended my first IFEA Convention in New Orleans in 2000, but my experience with the network began long before that. One could say I grew up in the festival and event industry. My family owns a flag business in San Antonio, TX. Our company was founded almost 60 years ago by my grandfather. Our first order was hanging flag lines and custom decorations at the 1958 Poteet Strawberry Festival in Poteet, TX. Now, I cannot continue without at least mentioning that the Poteet Strawberry Festival is an active member of the IFEA and almost sixty years later, they are still a very good customer of ours. I have decorated the Strawberry Festival, as has my father, and my father’s father – and that’s pretty special. But, what is amazing to me is that this very special relationship is just one of probably tens of thousands of special relationships in the IFEA network. My first memory of IFEA has nothing to do with flags or work. I was just a child and I did what any child would do with a “VIP connection” to the festivals and 10

events world – I rode carnival rides, and as many as I could! Unlimited carnival wristbands were probably my first exposure to the IFEA network, and was thanks to the IFEA Foundation. Every year at the IFEA Convention, my father would bid on auction packages and festival experiences, and our family vacations would be planned before he even packed up the trade show booth and made it home. Some of these auction packages took us just across the city to the Texas Folklife Festival courtesy of a package donated by JoAnn Andera. Some were a bit more of an adventure. Thanks to a package donated by Pat Corda, my parents rented an RV and took all six Van de Putte kids over a thousand miles to the Gatorbowl in Jacksonville, Florida. I remember meeting both JoAnn Andera and Pat Corda when I went to their events and I specifically remember my dad introducing them both as “dear friends.” They were not colleagues or acquaintances to him, but real friends. As a businessperson, I attend plenty of meetings, conferences, and tradeshows. Very rarely do the people that I meet have much of an impact on my life. However, that is not the case with the IFEA. For some reason, it seems like every single person who I meet through the IFEA has a purpose in my life. I can and will learn something from every story and each personality. Kelven Tan from Singapore is my dear friend. Ed Bautista from San Jose, Stephen King from Des Moines, and Kay Wolf from McAllen are all dear friends who have already taught me so much. The list goes on and on, and I wonder, why is this group so special to me? Why does the IFEA have more of an impact than my other business associations? Well, other than the fact that IFEA folks are truly exceptional and by far the absolute

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best people in the entire world, if I had to choose a second reason for this phenomenon, I think I would have to say the key is involvement. When my father received a letter from the IFEA back in 1989 asking for him to get more involved through an exciting sponsorship opportunity, he answered the call and became the sponsor for the IFEA Hospitality Suite. Exciting? Yes, it has been. Twenty seven years (and at least eighty to ninety hospitality nights) later, dfest® is still encouraging conversations within the IFEA network. I know Kelven, Ed, Stephen, and Kay, because they are each highly involved in this network. Like my dad, they are incredibly passionate and devoted to the festival and event industry. They have volunteered at Conventions, presented as speakers, been published in this magazine, served on committees, hosted IFEA events in their home cities, and taken the time to have those meaningful conversations that develop into real relationships with others within our association. They are each important to me because they have shared their talents and time with our network. So, I leave you with this. If you want to get the most out of your membership, get more involved so that you can take advantage of the IFEA network. Find a mentor or become a mentee. Donate to the IFEA Foundation, bid on an auction package, take your family to a festival, or come to a Convention and hear a joke, share a story, and make “dear friends” of your own.

VANESSA VAN DE PUTTE 2017 IFEA Foundation Board Chair Vice President of Sales & Marketing dfest® (Dixie Flag Event Services Team) San Antonio, TX


THE UN-COMFORT ZONE

With Robert Wilson

Time Given to Innovation is an Investment in Your Future Ideas Seldom Occur Without This Critical Commitment When I was studying Abnormal Psychology in college, I read a case study of an unusual mental illness. It was so fascinating, that I thought it would be the perfect vehicle for a novel. Thus my idea for a story was born, but it would be eight years before I felt that I had acquired the writing skill to turn it into a book. During those eight years, I thought of it many times, and allowed the idea to grow in my head. Then once I started writing, it took over two years to complete. My point is that an innovation, whether it is a song, electronic gadget, or a new way of doing business takes time. It’s rare that an idea drops fully formed into someone’s head. Even when it seems that way there are countless hours of experience that paved the way for that idea to form. Most ideas begin with a problem that needs to be solved. Some problems are obvious and demand your immediate attention. You are forced to make the time to come up with a solution. Other times you have to seek out the problem. Say, for example, that you need your company to make more money. Perhaps you require more money to expand, or maybe you simply must have more money to stay in business. These are certainly problems that demand a solution. However, they are not specific enough. Here’s where you begin spending some time in creative thought. Start by asking why you are not making enough money. Don’t bother blaming it on the economy, that isn’t going to solve your problem. Focus your attention on areas where you have control. Ask questions such as “Do we have enough customers?” If the answer is, “Yes,” then your next question may be, “How can we get 12

our customers to buy more?” That might lead to a product improvement, a new product development, or even a customer service idea. If the answer is, “No,” then your next question may be, “How can we get more customers?” That might lead you to a marketing or public relations solution. Either way, you need to spend time thinking about all the factors involved. The more specifically you identify the problem, the more likely you are to solve it and come up with a winning idea. Many people feel that time spent in creative contemplation is not time spent working. American journalist, Burton Rascoe, understood that when he said, “What no wife of a writer can ever understand is that a writer is working when he's staring out of the window.” This is not just true for writers, it is true for anyone who is working on developing a new idea. Busy people are seldom innovators for the simple reason that they don’t have time to think of new ideas. Do you want everyone in your company working on the problem? Of course you do! Many great ideas emerge from the bottom of companies where the employees are working closer to the

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problem. If you want your employees to come up with great ideas for your business, then you need to create a Culture of Creativity. The first step in doing that is to give your staff time to innovate. They need time for research and the collection of data. They need time for thinking, dreaming and planning. The way to motivate innovation is to give it time. Some companies like Google give their employees 20% of their work week for creativity; 3M gives theirs 15%. Even 10% is better than none, because the time you give your employees to innovate, is time you are investing in your company’s future success.

Robert Evans Wilson, Jr. is an author, humorist and innovation consultant. He works with companies that want to be more competitive and with people who want to think like innovators. Robert is also the author of the humorous children’s book: The Annoying Ghost Kid. For more information on Robert, please visit www.jumpstartyourmeeting.com


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LEADE RSH I P AT ALL LEVE LS

With Gail Lowney Alofsin

"The difference between a successful person and others is not a lack of strength, not a lack of knowledge, but rather in a lack of will." Vincent Lombardi This past January 2017, I had the privilege of teaching my third New York J-term course for the Harrington School of Communication and Media at the University of Rhode Island. This one week, three credit course, offers the students an opportunity to network and learn from over 40 business professionals from corporations and agencies. We had the privilege of visiting the corporate offices of CitiBank, HBO, Momentum, Pepsi, Thomson Reuters, CBS Local Digital, Focus Financial Partners, Genesco, Allison + Partners, Carat Global, Access Intelligence, Twitter and ESPN to name a few. The main leadership trait discussed by the majority of the speakers was the importance of Trust. While authenticity, integrity and communication are all important, trust is the main indicator of successful relationships, both personal and professional. Your word, your work, your brand – are you trusted? Are you trusted to complete projects on time? Are you trusted to meet or exceed your budget? Do you show up on time? When you show up, are you present or is your mind elsewhere? A trusted employee at all levels of one’s career is a most coveted and valuable asset. You will not always agree with changes, policies or decisions in your organization. There may be opportunities to voice your opinion, however, when a decision is set in stone, move forward and choose your battles wisely. Bring YOUR best self to work. Subscribe to the 14

fortune cookie wisdom of “Good work brings good fortune.” No company wants to lose an employee who is valuable – showcase your value every day. There is a neon sign when you walk through the door of Twitter’s Manhattan offices aglow with #LoveWhereYouWork. This serves as a reminder that when we start each day focused on the positive aspects of where we work, our mindset will be that of productivity, contribution and trust. As you build your brand, make trust a cornerstone. Additionally, define your digital brand on line professionally as you can - people “meet” you before they meet you. There are no “little” things – every touchpoint counts. As you pay attention to detail and work on self-improvement every day, this will lead to a trusted brand called YOU! Gail Lowney Alofsin is a keynote speaker, author, adjunct professor and business executive. Her book, Your Someday is NOW – What are you Waiting For, focuses on becoming your best you. A lifelong student and humanitarian, Gail believes that we all have the capability to be a leader in our own lives, influencing the lives of others for positive peak performance and success. She can be reached at 401-640-4418 and gail@gailspeaks.com. Follow her on twitter: @gailalofsin and visit her website: gailspeaks.com.

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Whether you are new to the workforce or have been working for decades, the sage advice below from the Jterm guest speakers offers great insight: “Be the first one to raise your hand, always.” Adam Wiener CBS Local Digital “Don’t be afraid to scare yourself. Whether you fail or succeed, it will lead to other things.” Mark Dupont Focus Financial Partners “Adhere to the Adjunct Model, try something – fail fast and forward.” Michael Moore Thomson Reuters “Can you hear the smile in my voice and hear my enthusiasm in talking with you?” Kathy O’Donnell Citizens Bank (during a phone call with the students)

“There will be mini fire drills throughout your day. Nothing surprises us. A Type A personality is an asset!” Sammi Vogel HBO


THE DIGITAL LIFE

By Kendra Wright

Stay Productive in 2017! “New Year, New Me” and new apps to simplify your 2017! Every year, it feels like there is just not enough time in the day to get everything done. But with the help of a few digital tools, you can work faster and smarter to free up some extra time in your busy schedule. Although I have shared productivity apps before, here are a few new ones to kick off a productive and successful 2017!

Keeping up with Facebook during your event can fill up your entire day as attendees commonly Facebook message your page 24/7. There is now a way to answer all your attendee’s questions without having to sit at the computer to respond by using Chatfuel! Chatfuel is an Artificial Intelligence (AI) bot platform for creating chatbots on Facebook Messenger. Al bots are a computer program designed to have a conversation with your attendees in Facebook Messenger. This program makes interacting with your attendees quick and easy by automatically answering their questions. This app would help insure that your attendee’s questions are being answered and in a timely matter while freeing up time that you would otherwise spend manually responding. I would however take a quick glance through the messages to ensure that your attendee’s questions were properly answered by the bot! Another bonus to this program is that it is FREE to use up to 100,000 conversations.

A key to staying productive is to eliminate redundant tasks. Have you found yourself spending way too much time trying to schedule appointments with vendors, sponsors, coworkers and everyone else? If so, you need to try Acuity Scheduling! Acuity Scheduling is an online appointment scheduling software that helps organize meetings and phone calls. Vendors can schedule 16

appointments and complete forms online. The major benefit to this program is that you will not have to spend time emailing back and forth to schedule a meeting or phone call, as this platform allows someone to see your availability and schedule a time that will work best for both of you. Acuity even offers automated email reminders to insure you don’t miss an appointment. This program has had great reviews with starting prices at just ten dollars a month.

Do you hate keeping all your receipts and then spending hours entering in the data? Expensify is here to help. You will never have to fill out another tedious expense report again. Expensify allows users to track purchases through a mobile app or on your desktop. The process is simple, open the app and take a picture of your receipt and then Expensify will record all the necessary information. You can even forward any email receipts and it will scan the receipt and update your record with the receipt total and business name! Expensify can create reports, generate e-receipts for any expense bought on your account linked card, and it even provides simple analytics so you can track your spending habits. This app is FREE for individual owners and under $10 per person for their team plans. You can save hours of your day by integrating this program into your daily activities.

Have you found yourself getting distracted and losing hours of productivity

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due to cat videos and social media? Rescue Time is here to help you stay focused online. Rescue Time is a personal analytics service that tracks time spent on applications and websites and gives a detailed report on your day to day activities. Rescue Time is easy to use as it will run quietly and securely in the background, collecting your online habits. You can then see exactly how much time you spent on each app or website and compare each day’s activities. Rescue Time offers a free version of its software so there is nothing stopping you from trying it out. Time management is key to having a productive day/year and Rescue Time is the perfect solution for managing your time. There is not one definitive strategy to being productive, but if you resolved to make 2017 the year you accomplish more then try incorporating these programs above into your daily routine. Do you have any productivity apps or programs that you enjoy using? If so, let us know at marketing@saffire.com! Kendra Wright started her career managing non-profit fundraising events. Then in an “about face,” she took a job managing global Internet strategies at a Fortune 1000 company in 1995, just as the Internet came to being. She left that company in 1998 to found Wright Strategies, working with clients like KEEN Footwear, Nike, Jeep, Chrysler, Intel and Panasonic. Then in 2009, Kendra launched Saffire to do integrated online marketing and ticketing for hundreds of events, venues and destinations. It’s been a wild ride! Kendra can be reached at kendra@saffire.com, and more information about Saffire can be found at www.saffire.com.


Is Your Online Marketing

PLUGGED IN? Let the IFEA Take a Look with our New Online Marketing Audit Program

If you are like most events/organizations, your on-line marketing presence and visibility is really just a summation of non-related, often outdated, components and links and access to miscellaneous tools/ toys that someone in a seminar somewhere said that you should be using, with no real ‘plan’ to it at all. You may not even be sure anymore just what you have or what it should do, let alone having a plan for strengthening / upgrading it. If this sounds like you, it’s probably time for an online tune-up. We’ll make sure your Online Marketing is Plugged In! Working with some of the most experienced professionals in the field, IFEA is pleased to offer our new “IFEA Online Marketing Audit.” The Audit includes a formal evaluation of a festival/ event’s online visibility by an expert team from Edgeworks Group that includes web developers, social media consultants and online marketers. This broad assessment – a starting point for defining both a short-and-long term roadmap for creating a powerful online presence covers your event/ organization’s: • Online reputation • Social and mobile integrations • Search optimization • Website usability • Social media efforts. • Installation of tracking tools • Updates and customizations to existing tracking programs • Verification of Webmaster tools for both Bing and Google

To learn more about the IFEA’s Online Marketing Audit, please contact: Kaye Campbell, CFEE Director of Partnerships & Programs at kaye@ifea.com or +1-208-433-0950 ext: 815 or Click Here


Including People with Disabilities by Laura Grunfeld

Get Hip to the Lingo! People often say to me “Is it okay to say ‘handicapped’? I’ve heard that I shouldn’t but I don’t know what else to say when I want to reference ‘handicapped’ people.” Language is ever changing and we all want to be respectful so let’s talk about the current thinking on the topic. Keep in mind that particular individuals may prefer different lingo and conventions may differ in various regions and countries. Follow the lead of the person with the disability and ask if you are not sure. Most importantly it is best to simply use a person’s name and only mention a person’s disability if it is pertinent to the conversation. When the disability is being discussed it is most often best to use what is known as People-First Language. However, some individuals and advocacy groups prefer Identity-First Language. Let me explain. People-First Language (PFL): The basic idea of PFL is to get away from identifying people as their disability and to put the person first rather than the condition. For example, rather than saying, “Judy is a disabled person,” or “Judy is disabled,” as if that was the most important thing to know about her, say “Judy is a person with a disability,” or “Judy has a disability.” The person comes first and she has the condition, rather than she IS the condition. Unless an individual tells you otherwise, PFL is considered the default lingo with the following few exceptions. 18

Identity-First Language (IFL): Those who prefer IFL feel that PFL implies that there is something negative or shameful about the condition or disability. They believe that the disability is simply a part of who the person is and there is no reason to de-emphasize it. Members of Deaf culture are outspoken advocates for using IFL and refer to each other and themselves as Deaf with a capital D. “Craig is Deaf. I am Deaf.” It gets a little tricky with people who are blind or people who have autism. One person might favor PFL while another chooses IFL. For instance, the parents of a child with autism may prefer PFL as they don’t want their child identified as their disability, but the child may refer to themselves using IFL, “I am autistic,” as they feel it is a part of themselves they cannot change. About “handicapped,” no, that’s not a term we want to use any more. There are quite a few terms that have become

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outdated, offensive or even hurtful. Read through this handy chart. Be sensitive to what individuals care about. For some, the words don’t matter. Others are very particular. Open your mind and heart. Laura Grunfeld writes a regular column helping producers make their events accessible to people with disabilities. Suggest topics to her by writing to Laura@EveryonesInvited. com. She has worked many festivals across the nation and readers can learn more about her event accessibility consulting, training, and production company at www.EveryonesInvited. com. www.linkedin.com/in/lauragrunfeld, www.youtube.com/lauragrunfeld. www.facebook.com/everyones.festival, www.instagram.com/everyonesfestival.


FIRST CHOICE: PEOPLE-FIRST LANGUAGE Avoid

Recommended

Handicapped, challenged, disabled, crippled, handicapable, differently-abled, paralyzed. These words invoke pity, imply the person is broken.

People with disabilities. Henry uses crutches to get around. Walter is living with a mobility disability. Anna has paralysis.

Handicapped parking, toilet, etc.

Accessible parking, accessible toilet, etc.

Wheelchair bound. A wheelchair gives freedom and mobility; it is not constraining.

Jacob uses a wheelchair. People who use wheelchairs.

Electric chair.

Powered or motorized chair.

Spells, fits.

Fiona has epilepsy. Tad has a seizure disorder.

Speech impairment, speech impediment.

Shawn has a speech disability.

Is mentally ill, insane, emotionally disturbed, demented, crazy. The person is not these things. The person has a disability.

Person with an emotional or behavioral disability. Person diagnosed with a mental health or psychiatric disability. Jen has an anxiety disorder.

Retarded. Referred to as “the R word,” this is a very offensive word and there is never a time to use it. The R word may be applied to various types of disabilities.

Percy has an intellectual disability. The truck driver has a learning disability. The bartender has a cognitive disability. Carol has a developmental disability. Ella has Down syndrome.

Midget. Very offensive. From the days of side shows.

People with dwarfism. Brenda has dwarfism. Alex is a person of short stature. Little person.

Hidden or invisible disability. Implies concealing something.

People may have apparent or non-apparent disabilities. Ben has a non-apparent disability.

Is special, has special needs, is differently abled. Condescending and discriminatory. Being special often means being treated differently.

Don’t point out differences. Kids (and adults), don’t want to be special or different. Be inclusive.

Is a victim of, suffers from, struggles with, stricken with, has a problem with. Invokes pity, stresses the negative.

Talk about the solution, not the problem. Pat uses a walker. Leave out the negative descriptors. The professor is diagnosed with bipolar disorder.

Is inspirational, brave, courageous. Many people with disabilities find it offensive to be considered inspirational just because of their disability.

A person may be inspirational because of their skills, abilities, or accomplishments. I am inspired by Cora’s ski-jumping skills.

Normal, typical, healthy. Implies that a person with disabilities is abnormal, atypical, unhealthy.

Person without disabilities.

FIRST CHOICE: IDENTITIY-FIRST LANGUAGE Avoid

Recommended

Hearing impaired, suffers a hearing loss, deaf and dumb, mute. Culturally Deaf persons are staunch advocates for IFL.

IFL: “Deaf” and “hard of hearing” are accepted terms. The word Deaf is capitalized when referring to people who identify as being part of the Deaf culture. Stan is Deaf. Paula is hard of hearing. Deaf is spelled with a lowercase d when referencing a person’s audiological condition. Bret is deaf but does not identify with Deaf culture.

LET THE PERSON LEAD Avoid

Recommended

Visually challenged, visually impaired. Many, but not all, blind persons prefer IFL.

IFL: Blind person. The blind. Zoe is blind. PFL: Person who is blind. Jack has low vision.

Many autism advocates endorse the use of IFL but some prefer PFL.

IFL: Autistic person. Dave is autistic. PFL: Person with autism. Sally is diagnosed with autism. Toby has an autism spectrum disorder. Spring 2017

IFEA’s ie: the business of international events

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WHAT KEEPS YOU UP AT NIGHT ™ By Peter Ashwin

Securing our Events: New Security Challenges in an Uncertain World In today’s uncertain world of evolving risks from transnational terrorism, home grown violent extremism, natural hazards and financial challenges, it’s never been as important for host cities and event organizers to adopt a holistic, risk based approach to event and festival planning. The recent terrorist attacks conducted by radicalized individuals directed or inspired by ISIL during Bastille Day in Nice, France and the Breitscheidplatz Christmas Market in Berlin, Germany highlight the increasing risk of hostile vehicle attacks directed at crowds and places of mass gatherings during our festivals and events. This recent evolution in security threats has placed additional pressure on event organizers and their respective Law Enforcement and Public Safety partners to safeguard event participants and spectators from spontaneous attacks not previously anticipated. The challenge we now collectively face is how do we balance the requirement for enhanced security measures to mitigate current and future risks against the escalating cost of these measures versus the impact on attendee experience? From my experience, the most effective approach to this challenge is to adopt an integrated approach to event risk management through early engagement with your safety and security stakeholders including City planners, Federal agencies, local law enforcement, Fire and EMS. Developing your all hazards risk management framework in cooperation with your stakeholders ensures that event risks are identified, appropriately mitigated (control measures appropriate to the risk) and owned by the right stakeholders. This approach also provides early warning to the event organizing committee regarding what risk based security measures will be implemented to safely secure the event. This allows you to make informed decisions earlier in the event planning cycle and to designate contingency funds for security measures which are costed for budget proposes but not implemented unless there is a change in the event security risk profile. Given the recent focus on the protecting crowded places (events) from terrorist hostile vehicle attacks, I would like to share with you some of the strategies we 20

implemented during previous Olympic Games to address this risk. The following strategies are cost effective solutions to reduce the vulnerability of crowded places to hostile vehicle attacks as opposed to more permanent and expensive vehicle barrier solutions. • Designating a Controlled Access Zone – implementing “soft measures” to restrict traffic flows close to the event location through road closures and restricted parking during specific event hours. Vehicle access is controlled by vehicle check points (VCPs) jointly staffed by security and event transport staff to ensure only authorized vehicle and drivers (identity checks) are allowed access into the zone. • Designated Event Security Zone – implementing “hard measures” to prevent high speed vehicle approaches to crowded places through chicanes (traffic calming measures to reduce speed) and positioning of vehicle barriers (concrete or water filled) and large vehicles to block/stop vehicles. • Implementing an Event Master Delivery Schedule - an operational process to ensure only verified suppliers, drivers, vehicles and deliveries can access the Controlled Area Zone through designated vehicle check points. • Training of security staff to identify and report suspicious behavior and hostile reconnaissance activities prior to the event. • Joint tabletop exercises (risk based scenarios) with all primary stakeholders to validate the event security plan including the protocols for command, control and communications during an incident. The other key benefit from tabletop exercise is that they are a great team building activity. The strategies that I have highlighted also mitigate the known risk from vehicles driving into crowds (drivers without hostile intent) e.g. the 2014 South by Southwest (SXSX) festival where a drunk driver while trying to evade a traffic stop, drove his car into a crowd of festival attendees resulting in four deaths and 21 injured attendees. Finally, I would like to address the importance of the pre-event safety and

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security communications strategy. This communications strategy should be jointly developed by the event communications / marketing team with respective Police and City public information officers to advise attendees and the general public about any enhanced security measures for the event and provide reassurance that the event will be safe, secure and enjoyable. While securing crowded places at events and festivals will continue to be a challenge for event organizing committees for the foreseeable future, implementing an effective risk management strategy will minimize the likelihood and consequences of identified risks, leading to safer events which are more resilient and more likely to rapidly recover from a crisis or emergency. Peter Ashwin is the Principal at Event Risk Management Solutions in Boise, Idaho / Gold Coast, Australia. Peter Ashwin is an accomplished security and risk management consultant within the international major events environment. He is an innovative leader and project manager who successfully navigates complex, multi-agency environments to deliver effective integration strategies to align and integrate Event Organizing Committees with Government Security Authorities, Police and the private security sector. Peter’s diverse range of skills have been developed through 15 plus years of security planning & operational management for mega events, including the Baku 2015 European Games, ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 (Australia/NZ), six Olympic Games from 2000 - 2012, the 2010 G8 & G20 Summit (Toronto), supplemented by his experience as an Australian Army Special Forces officer. Peter is a regular lecturer and author on Major Event Security and Event Risk Management. In 2015, Peter was invited to join the International Festivals and Events Association (IFEA) World Board of Directors. Peter is based in Boise, Idaho but still calls Australia "home".


IFEA VISION A globally united industry that touches lives in a positive way through

Publisher & Editor Steven Wood Schmader, CFEE, President & CEO Assistant Editor Nia Hovde, CFEE, Director of Marketing & Communications Advertising Kaye Campbell, CFEE, Director of Partnerships & Programs

celebration.

Art Director Craig Sarton, Creative Director Contributing Writers Peter Ashwin, Mark Breen, Jeff English, CFEE, Bruce Erley, CFEE, APR, Andrew A. Gonzales, Esq., Laura Grunfeld, Clinton Henry, Sean King, Gail Lowney Alofsin, Florence May, Steve McClatchy, Britnee Packwood, Lisa Potvin, Dan Rose, Nick Scala, Kendra Wright, Robert Wilson Photography Andrew Rafkind

With respect to interactions with members/customers or those applying to be members/customers, the IFEA will not cause or allow conditions, procedures, or decisions which are unsafe, undignified, unnecessarily intrusive, or which fail to provide appropriate confidentiality or privacy. If you believe that you have not been accorded a reasonable interpretation of your rights under this policy, please contact the IFEA office at +1-208-433-0950 ext. 18.

For association or publication information: IFEA World Headquarters 2603 W. Eastover Terrace Boise, ID 83706, U.S.A. +1.208.433.0950 Fax +1.208.433.9812

http://www.ifea.com Spring 2017

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ENGLISH 101

By Jeff English, CFEE

Do What You Do Best to Give Back It’s good to be back! Not that I ever really left my duties writing for i.e. Magazine, but I took a year-long sabbatical from this column to serve as the Chair of the IFEA Foundation. Part of my duties in that position were to write a quarterly column about what’s going on with the Foundation, while at the same time begging folks to donate items to benefit our Silent Auction at the Annual IFEA Convention. Now that those duties have been passed to Vanessa Van de Putte, I get to resume my writing about legal issues and whatever else comes to mind. So here goes….. Part of my responsibilities at the Kentucky Derby Festival include serving as the President of the KDF Foundation. It’s the 501(c)3 charitable arm of KDF. Its mission, in a nutshell, is to provide grants to deserving local charities and to support educational and academic programming on KDF’s schedule of events. I’ve written in past columns about the challenge of raising money for a Foundation that doesn’t directly support babies in incubators or is dedicated to curing cancer. Often times, people believe that the Foundation uses the money it raises to buy fireworks and build parade floats. Over the last eight years, I’ve worked with the Foundation’s board to narrow its focus and mission into something that is relatable and understandable and tangible. What I found is that at the core of the Foundation and Festival’s mission is the production of events. By focusing on educational and academic competitions, that mission has been brought into focus in a way that allows those considering sponsorships or gifts to focus those dollars in a productive and positive way. Educational outreach not only provides us with a way to extend our reach to different demographics and segments of our community; it also provides very positive PR about the Festival giving back. The KDF Foundation supports and produces four educational events on KDF’s schedule. They are the Academic Challenge, Spelling Bee, Student Art Contest, and the recently added RoboRumble STEM Robotics competition. These four events cover a cross section of educational areas such as problem solving, language, arts, science, 22

technology, engineering, and math. The Academic Challenge is a fast paced question-answer style competition for elementary school students. Teams from each school compete in an elimination tournament with the first through third place team receiving a donation to their school’s quiz bowl program. To say the competition is fierce is an understatement. The students involved in this event are as competitive as anything you’d see on a basketball court! If you ever want to be humbled, attend the KDF Spelling Bee. Champion spellers from nearly every county in Kentucky (63 in 2016) gather to see who spells B-E-S-T. Last year’s championship word was “Eponym” – (of a person) giving their name to something. The Foundation provides $21,500 in scholarship bonds to the top five finishers of the Bee. First place receives a $10,000 scholarship. The Student Art Contest is one of the most inspiring events of the Festival’s schedule. Students from across the region paint, draw or use computer graphics to depict their favorite Festival event. It is fascinating to see these young artist’s interpretations of what you work to produce each year. To see the Festival through their eyes is simply awesome! Finally, the newest and hottest event on the Festival’s schedule is the RoboRumble STEM Robotics Competition. Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) has become a focus for schools and their students. Building robots and having those machines perform certain tasks is a perfect way for those students to engage in this curriculum while having fun doing it. Added to that, local companies and educational

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institutions are eager to sponsor this type of competition! We engaged with Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS) and made their RoboRumble one of our official events. Nearly 900 students will compete on March 4, 2017 to see who has the best robot building team. It should be fascinating! The point of all of this is that these types of events can really help to build the brand and positive name recognition of your festival. They engage a younger demographic and their parents, while providing fun and competitive programming. Added to that, folks will see your festival as giving back and using sponsor resources for something other than buying fireworks. It buys your festival credibility city leaders and with those who want to see what your festival is doing to give back. Plus, there’s nothing better than seeing a group of elementary schoolkids race up to the podium to get their medals. Each of them prouder than they’ve ever been because they won your competition! Jeff English, CFEE is the Sr. Vice President of Administration/General Counsel of the Kentucky Derby Festival.  After graduating from Washburn University School of Law (Topeka, KS) in 2004, Jeff worked in politics and practiced law before joining the KDF staff.  He is charged with overseeing all of Festival’s legal issues and serving as its risk management officer.  He also manages the Merchandise Department and the 501(c)3 not-for-profit Kentucky Derby Festival Foundation.


Your Event Has

IMPACT…

SHOW IT!

Commission Your IFEA Economic Impact Study Today

In uncertain times, we must often remind those whose support we depend upon, of the important economic and social value that our festivals and events bring to the communities we serve. Having a credible and current economic impact study can do just this, in addition to increasing credibility with stakeholders, providing quantified data to sponsors, presenting reliable data to base future marketing and programming decisions upon and much, much more. Unfortunately, this critical resource, especially with credible credentials, is often financially out of reach for most events even in a good economic environment. Recognizing this, the IFEA has created a cost effective, industry credible program to provide Economic Impact Studies at a budget-accessible investment. Call us today to learn more.

GETTING STARTED For more information about this valuable IFEA program, please contact: Kaye Campbell, CFEE, Director of Partnerships & Programs • +1-208-433-0950 Ext 815 • kaye@ifea.com


Turnstiles: Marketing for Event Managers By Sean King

WHEN SPONSORS GO

Rogue

While hosting presentations on marketing and sponsorship over the past few years, one phrase that usually elicits a chuckle is “when sponsors go rogue.” I’m not certain whether this response is due to the outlandish consideration that sponsors could actually go rogue, or that it strikes a chord with what the audience may have read in the daily headlines. Either way, it is clear people always enjoy hearing more of the stories of when things haven’t necessarily gone according to plan. There are many circumstances that lead up to a crisis situation at the hands of your partners. Perhaps it is business practices and leadership, or is a situation in which your partner has said or done something awkward or less than elegant? Yet both circumstances have the potential to negatively affect your organization or event. 24

How you approach these situations is fraught with anxiety on everyone’s behalf, and can destine the partnership for success or failure based on the steps you take to navigate through the pitfalls and steer through the headwinds. No one begins with a goal to create a negative situation. However, for those of us on the front lines, we are left to deal not only with our partner but also our board, leadership, staff and volunteers and ultimately our customers and guests. At some point, all of our stakeholders will be – or feel they will be – impacted, but it is the shining moments of doing right by both our partner and stakeholders that will be remembered. To this end, we’ve been talking about

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theoretical challenges to our partnerships, but what are some of the issues that do come up and what are some possible resolutions to those situations? National News The type of crisis that arises because of a national partner doing something that enters the zeitgeist is more common than you think. However, this is the time when you may be able to shine the brightest on behalf of your partners and stakeholders. For national entities, any topic from your partner’s business dealings to mergers to the loss of jobs can make its way onto the front pages and newsfeeds of your followers and potentially impact you in a negative way.


The first step when addressing this type of concern is to the commitment that your organization is still intact. While big stories tend to get a lot of buzz in the media and especially social media, internally most large organizations already have a well thought out plan to deal with the negative publicity surrounding the news. It is important for you to work with their official messaging, understand it and ask if there is a way you can assist. More times than not, large organizations prefer to not have third parties speak on their behalf, but your support and engagement can speak volumes to your partner given the details of the particular situation you are dealing with. Now is the time for you to be playing the role of supporter and friend. Ask your team, what short-term benefits can your organization leverage to get through the first days and weeks of the crisis in order to calm the waters? In the few cases where we’ve experienced this sort of dilemma first hand, it was clear that we were working with true professionals who were as committed to us as we were to them. Every step of the way, we took on the role as extended employees and family members to get through the situation at hand. We could not have been treated better by our partners, and realizing they were in a position not of their own doing, we felt a sense of pride and dedication in assisting them through what certainly was less than ideal circumstances. Local News While dealing with a national partner that could show up on the evening news and splashed across all of the morning shows, and worse yet on the late night comedy shows, what might be even more impactful is when a local business makes the news in a negative way. These are your personal friends and neighbors. Their kids go to school with your kids and when they make the front page of the hometown news, or have posts spread on Facebook, it is right-down-the-street real. How you approach this situation will have real consequences in the short and long term, and how deftly you manage the crisis will determine your standing for a long time to come, so it is best to not be too glib. Of course, the severity of the news that breaks on your partner is the first item to address. If it is illegal, unforgiveable or immoral, you have no option but to cut ties and hope your organization is not connected too deeply in any way to the crisis.

However, the line gets blurred quickly if there are two sides to the story and only the most negative side is gaining attention. Public relations 101 tells us to be cautious and not to react too quickly to a situation, but in these days of immediate connection directly to members of your community through social media, it will take a little time to determine the public voice for your organization and how it reacts to your partner. If you have the time and resources, it might be best to think through how you would deal with such a situation in advance so that you can react quickly once the details of the situation are established. How would you address the news? Who would be the spokesperson? Where would you post? Answers to these questions in advance would make the job easier should the unfortunate occur. Transparency is the key and being up front and as forthcoming as soon as possible is usually the best course of action. Messaging Imagine if your closest partner came out with an advertising or publicity campaign that went directly against your organization’s mission or views. What would you do? Again, as there are almost always two sides to the story, it is imperative to get to the bottom of their strategy immediately. Who made the decision? Did they know what impact it might cause? Is there any way to change the course of the messaging? Once you are able to determine the basic facts of the situation, it is much easier to decide on what direction to take moving forward. In one case we had to work through, it was clear that the action was awkward at best and that our partners would retract and correct immediately after an avalanche of negative comments on social media. Step two to our plan was to make sure that our stakeholders were kept aware of each step of the process and over-communication was the policy until the news cycle ebbed and we were able to go back to the real business at hand. Keeping everyone in the loop and allowing for your partner to understand which boundaries were crossed is critical. Providing context to the issue and discussing the resulting negative impact, were clear objectives of our crisis management policy. In the end, both the relationships with the stakeholders and partner were strengthened because of the connections and communication made due to an unfortunate choice of words.

Spring 2017

Volunteers Sometimes our wounds are self-inflicted. Given the negative issues that come up from time to time, its possible that a volunteer can do damage to our partnerships without even knowing it. Case in point, we had a partner struggling with negative press and for some reason a volunteer felt it important to reference this news at an event. Needless to say, the sponsor was already hyper-sensitive to the situation and the last thing they expected to hear at an event they were sponsoring was negative comments from an event volunteer. The takeaway from this experience is to always be in communication with all levels of the organization and to take nothing for granted. If a partner is struggling with a negative situation, make sure everyone on your team is aware and is knowledgeable as to the organization’s policy on the situation. As one of the partner’s representatives said, “We are happy to sit and talk for hours about the situation and to answer any questions they might have, but to be approached in such a way that it was impossible to address, we were starting from a defensive posture from the get go.” Cringe-worthy is the only word that comes to mind. In Summary The long-term commitment you show to your partners will help to define their role within your community. We cannot say it enough: there are only so many ways for brands and companies to connect in meaningful ways throughout the communities that define America. Whether it is part of the brand’s strategy to use your festival, event or fair to connect to the community or if it is just good business, in times of crisis or when a company is flying high, the event space is a place to connect in meaningful, authentic and relevant ways to sell more widgets, improve employee morale or just be a good neighbor. Keep up the good work and hopefully you’ll be able to avoid any rogue situations, and serve folks to the best of Sean King a Principle at conditions. Aspire your ability in is the most ideal Consulting Group in Allentown, PA and has been consulting with small businesses and non-profit organizations for over 20 years. He also blogs regularly at www.artsmarketingblog. org. You can follow Sean on Twitter @ skingaspire or contact him at: sking. aspire@gmail.com

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MAY I HELP YOU?

By Florence May

May I Help You? The desire to serve is at the heart of the volunteer experience. It is with pleasure that I’ve signed on to write about the driving factors related to recruiting, managing and retaining the right people. The people who want to serve. The right people? Yes, the right people. The people who choose to spend their free time working long hours for your event. The people who volunteer to do hard and often thankless jobs. The people who feel so committed to your festival or event that they come back year after year. I love this topic. Maybe it is the 15 years I spent managing events with Visit Indy, Simply Hospitality and the United States Grand Prix. Or maybe it is the 16 years delivering online volunteer management systems for many of the largest and most complex events in North America. Over the past year my company provided volunteer management systems for the 500 Festival, the Kentucky Derby Festival, the Republican National Convention, the Democratic National Convention, the Gilroy Garlic Festival, the US Mayors Conference, the Azalea Festival, multiple Olympic Trials and hundreds of smaller events. Over and over I study the trends that make certain events successful while others struggle. My point? Size doesn’t matter in the volunteer management world. All events share common challenges, the difference is simply scale. What does matter irrespective of size? Good leadership, teamwork and well thought out processes. From Soup to (are you) Nuts? I plan to cover a very wide variety of trending topics. Warning, whiplash is likely. But I will consistently provide management tools and tips gathered from working with the best volunteer managers in the event world. So which volunteer management topics are trending? 26

• Festivals getting sued over volunteer management issues. Yes, you’ve heard about this. We will explore the risks. • Events getting “beat up” in the media for using volunteers when they should have used paid staff. The Super Bowl was challenged on this topic last year. Should you be concerned? • Leadership working with corporate outreach programs and struggling to secure a strong partnership. What are the factors that make a strong partnership? Why do these efforts often fail? • Growing trend in events recruiting charitable organizations to manage and staff key operations … for a donation. Are they volunteers? Yes, but with different needs and expectations. • Email is still the most comprehensive way to reach all volunteers. Not all volunteers are using text and social media yet. But email deliverability is becoming a bigger challenge. How do you guarantee quality communications with all your volunteers? • Event staff communicating with volunteers using text and social media are a growing trend but sometimes with unexpected outcomes. Are you developing standard operating procedures for popular communications tools for younger volunteers? • Many events and festivals make it difficult to volunteer. Event mangers are challenged to provide efficient communications and registration options for multiple generations. How do you evaluate and compare technology to ensure it is right for your event and volunteers? • The competition for the right people is substantial. Appealing to younger

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Spring 2017

volunteers, corporate outreach programs and partner organizations requires event managers to provide a quality and well-organized experience. Do you have the right organization structure and processes in place to engage your volunteers? • Are your volunteers coming back year after year? In many parts of the country, our long-time volunteers are retiring from community service. Younger volunteers aren’t as inclined to volunteer with the same patterns as their predecessors. Do you have the right incentives in place? We have a lot to cover. So much that occasionally there will be a column focused on the issue and a supporting article to explore hot topics in greater depth. Yes, I am passionate about volunteers and all related topics. And I’m excited to share this passion. May I Help You? Florence May is the President of TRS – The Registration System. Leveraging world-class event management and large scale operations background, Flory is a popular speaker and writer on forward-thinking volunteer management strategies. She has served in leadership positions with Visit Indy, United States Grand Prix LOC, Simply Hospitality and as an US Army Officer during the Gulf War. She is married to a rocket scientist (seriously) with two daughters in college (donations are welcome) and a crazy labradoodle (my exercise plan).


Remember All Those Who Helped You Get Where You Are Today? The IFEA “Fund for the Future” provides critical funding to ensure that the IFEA has reserves in place to protect against future economic shifts and realities in a constantly changing world; to allow the organization to

keep pace with new and changing technologies necessary to communicate with and serve our global industry; and to support a continued expansion of our services, resources, programming and outreach around the world.

Pay it Forward With a Gift to IFEA’s

‘Fund for the Future.’ Your donation will ensure that our world always has something to celebrate!

Contact any IFEA Foundation Board, IFEA World Board, or IFEA Staff Member for more information. Individual and Organizational Contributions are welcomed and encouraged. All contributions are tax-deductible in the United States.

For more information go to www.ifea.com.


SO, YOU WANT TO WORK IN EVENTS? By Britnee Packwood

Let’s Start the Conversation Sometimes it’s hard to know where to begin. So often am I asked, “How did you know you wanted to be in the events industry?” I normally launch into this semi-elaborate recount of working for the Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival during my time in college. It was an experience unlike any other: immersive, intense, challenging, but most of all invigorating. It was during that time I knew working in the events industry was where I wanted to be, and I didn’t care what it took to make that happen. Fortunately for me, that passion and desire has propelled me into a place in my career where I am very happy. I’ve met some amazing people in the industry, some of whom have become dear friends and mentors. However, this isn’t the case for everyone. I’ll be honest, I’m still a youngster and fresh on the scene (I just turned 26 this January). I started my career in 2011, and I still have a lot to learn. I was lucky enough to have some guiding hands help me traverse the industry landscape, and I want to give back. We have a new generation making their way to the industry gates. I’ll level with you, sometimes I don’t even know what they are saying, but I want to use my experiences to help these “newbies.” We all know experience is what puts us ahead, but practical and honest advice can also make the difference. Hence the purpose and theme of this column: “So, you want to work in events?” That was a question I heard countless times over the course of interviewing for positions. It’s a question I am now finding myself asking college students nearing graduation. I listen to people’s responses, their reasons and ultimate goals. It’s often followed up with my own question, “How are you going to get there?” Many younger people have no clue, or have a semi-developed guideline 28

they are clinging too for dear life. My first piece of advice is to not cling to those plans. Keep your dreams and goals, but throw the turn-by-turn road map out the window. I learned quickly the events industry is a fast-paced and ever changing landscape. By all means, have a contingency plan, but remember… that will probably change too. My second piece of advice, write down your dreams and goals. Use those to keep yourself accountable. You would be surprised how much further you’ll be willing to push yourself. Remember, no goal is too small and no dream is too big. I’ve recently only discovered the importance of this within the last two years; it really has made a difference and I feel more driven and connected to my work. My third piece of advice, keep a running record of everything you do. We’re not perfect, and we all make mistakes—whether we want to admit it or not. If you keep a record of the tasks you’ve completed for an event and something went wrong, use that record as your tool to improve. This is something I’ll discuss further, but keep this in mind as you begin taking on new projects (extra points if you start now regardless of where you are on current project). As we move through the topics in this column, I am excited to explore and offer

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advice based on my industry experiences and those of others. I certainly hope this column will be a catalyst for the younger people in the industry, and offer itself as a conversation starter. We’re all moving into uncharted territory as our industry changes, some more than others; I am happy to lend my voice and I am happy to hear from you! If you find there is a topic you wish discussed, please don’t hesitate to contact me. I can easily be reached via email, britnee.packwood@gmail. com. I also welcome your thoughts on the topics and look forward to starting new conversations. Britnee Packwood is currently Director of the National Lentil Festival in Pullman, WA. She started her career in events during her undergrad at the University of Idaho where she received a B.S. in Public Relations and a B.S. in Conservation Social Science. She is currently working on obtaining an MBA focusing on Music Business. When she isn’t coordinating events one can find her listening to vinyl, knitting or enjoying the great outdoors. She can be reached at britnee.packwood@ gmail.com.


ONLINE

Entertainment Showcase Entertainment is one of the most searched on categories in the IFEA online marketplace today. We want to focus that interest on you through our new Online Entertainment Showcase!

With listings that include a logo or photo, video, audio, website and email connection, this one-stop resource is the ideal place to provide a sampling of your entertainment agency and/or individual acts(s) to IFEA audiences, 24 / 7. Discounts are also available for multiple listings. Featured Entertainment space on the site creates an even better stand-out opportunity with video of select acts rotating weekly. Turnkey, cost effective, and the opportunity to be part of a helpful new tool – let us shine the spotlight on you! SHOWCASE LISTING INCLUDES: • Description up to 25 words. • 1 high res photo or logo (vector, jpg or png file) • 1 audio file (5 min. max; mp3 or other format) • 1 video link (5 min. max; YouTube ID preferred) • 1 website listing • 1 email contact

N EW FEATURED SHOWCASE LISTING INCLUDES: • All items within Showcase, plus 1 ‘Featured Entertainment’ space video. Videos play directly in-page and rotate weekly. Caption space features the act name, agency name (if applicable) and a link to your website.

To make a reservation or for more information contact:

Kaye Campbell, CFEE, Director of Partnerships & Programs • kaye@ifea.com • +1-208-433-0950 ext 815 • www.ifea.com


SAFELY DOES IT

By Mark Breen

ASSESSING & EMBRACING RISK I’m going to be taking a different tack with this column for the next while. I want to focus on more strategic tools and techniques that should be helpful when planning your events. Planning for the safety of large crowds at events has, in recent years, become a true topic of study and learning in its own right. Not before time, either. I’m going to be taking a different tack with this column for the next while. I want to focus on more strategic tools and techniques that should be helpful when planning your events. Planning for the safety of large crowds at events has, in recent years, become a true topic of study and learning in its own right. Not before time, either. I’m currently in the 2nd year of a 3-year MSc in Crowd Safety & Risk Analysis in Manchester Metropolitan University in the United Kingdom. It’s the first of its type in the world and I’m thoroughly enjoying it. One of the major benefits we’re finding with the course is the introduction to, and development of, a number of tools & techniques that are proven to work in the real world. Some of us, having training with Professor G. Keith Still previously, have been using these tools for some time. Others have begun to use them more recently and are seeing immense benefit. Over the next few columns, I plan to introduce a number of them here and hopefully they’ll be of use to you in your own event planning life. Key 30

among those will be the following: • Risk Mapping • The application of the DIM-ICE matrix when planning events • RAMP Analysis • Real-time Decision Support Tools They are all fancy-sounding names for simple things that can make our lives as event organisers that much easier and, as a result, can help ensure our audience / attendees are that much safer. For this column I want to look at Risk Assessments for events as a general concept and begin to do two things: 1. Demystify them and make them less scary 2. Explore their limitations and look to how we can do them better.

‘death-defying’ tricks, being upside-down, letting go of the bike, etc. They often fall and are often hurt. The risk is clear and obvious. It still gets insured and still happens. Cliff-Diving involves people jumping / diving from great heights into water below. It’s quite obviously dangerous and risky. It still gets insured and still happens. The Red Bull events are a good example of events going ahead despite clear and obvious risks. Risk assessments are performed, risks are mitigated against and reduced and the events get the green light from insurance companies, local authorities, etc. Accept there is risk involved in events and focus on how to address them rather than avoid them.

Embracing Risk We need to embrace risk. Risk isn’t necessarily bad and it doesn’t necessarily mean we can’t do things. The only event with no risk is the event that doesn’t happen. Consider the Red Bull stable of events. X-Fighters is people on motorcycles doing

The Importance of Honesty I’ve written articles in the past outlining how the one key to risk assessment is honesty and I stand by it. A tick-the-box risk assessment worksheet won’t do us much good when we’re in court and are found out to have ignored what was a reasonably foreseeable risk.

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It’s important we acknowledge the risks and then work to mitigate them until the risk is ‘reasonable’. Only by going through this process can we actually establish whether the risk CAN be mitigated against. Ignoring it because it’ll make life difficult is a recipe for disaster. We need to be honest with our clients, all our stakeholders and ourselves. Identify the risks and work to see what can be done to reduce them to ensure the event can go ahead. If they can’t be reduced sufficiently to allow the event go ahead, then so be it. Be honest again. If it can’t be done, then it can’t be done. It isn’t often a good event idea can’t be made to work in my experience. We’ve run large bonfire events in the woods, ‘audience interaction aerial shows’, air shows for hundreds of thousands of people and aerial performances over moving traffic on Dublin’s main street. Be honest about the risks. The Traditional Approach The traditional occupational health & safety approach is inappropriate for the event industry. It does form an element of a comprehensive risk assessment exercise for an event, but it alone is not sufficient. The risk assessment matrix we’re probably all used to seeing (similar to the picture) is a useful tool to illustrate this part of the process but, from

an event perspective, it completely ignores a key element – time. Risks at an event change significantly over time. We need to account for this during our risk assessment process otherwise we are a.) remiss, b.) not being honest with our clients, stakeholders & ourselves and c.) potentially negligent. Consider the risk of ‘slips, trips and falls’ that we’re probably all used to including in our risk assessments as standard. Now consider the main entrance to your event and the area immediately outside it (queuing, search, etc.) and inside it. During main ingress, when you may have thousands coming through, the risk of slips, trips and falls is likely high. At this same time, the risk of same inside your venue is probably quite low, as the audience are only coming in. Jump to a half hour later when the show is starting and the vast majority of the audience are in; now your risk level at the entrance for slips, trips and falls is very low, while inside it is a much higher risk. Risk changes over time and this is especially true for events. The Bottom Line In the next few columns we’ll look at how to account for the unique nature of events from a risk assessment perspective and will hopefully help you improve how you do risk assessments for your own events. Spring 2017

Mark Breen is Director of Safe Events as well as Cuckoo Events based in Dublin, Ireland. He is an award-winning event Safety Officer and one of the most experienced and qualified event & crowd safety practitioners in Ireland. He is a Specialist Member of IIRSM, as well as being a member of IOSH, EPS and ESA.  He writes and speaks regularly on all things event-related, particularly event & crowd safety. He is a Graduate Member of the Marketing Institute of Ireland and holds a Postgraduate Diploma in PR & Event Management  He is currently among a small class pursuing the world's first MSc in Crowd Safety and Risk Analysis, and already has specialist qualifications in Spectator Safety Management and Crowd Science.  Mark and the Team at Safe Events and Cuckoo Events are passionate about helping people run safer events and devote a lot of time to doing so. Mark is very active on Twitter @mark_breen, @SafeEventsIE and @CuckooEvents. The multiple award-winning Cuckoo Events website can be found at cuckoo.ie and the new Safe Events website is at safeevents.ie (launching 9th February 2017)

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PEOPLE Cassie Roberts Dispenza Saffire empowers hundreds of clients with beautiful, unique and engaging websites, and integrated SaffireTix ticketing. The platform includes online, advance and gate sales, all with amazing real-time reporting. Saffire’s Spark content management system makes it easy to control yourself and get unlimited help when you need it. Our clients freakin' love us and you will too!

IN CONVERSATION How did you get into the events industry? I worked with the Austin Convention & Visitors Bureau Sports Commission during college. Their mission is to bring sports-related events to the City of Austin, so I ended up working and volunteering at several events that led to my first jobs in the industry. What has been your biggest professional challenge? My biggest professional challenge was learning how to sell something that people had never heard of! Saffire has hundreds of clients now and we’re fairly well-known in the industry, but when I started this position, Saffire was brand new. I had a lot of event & marketing experience, but I had never even sold a doughnut, much less a website or ticketing platform. Luckily with the help of a great team, I found the path to success! It wasn’t without a few bumps along the way, but the challenge of the process has put me in a place where I feel like I can strategically market & sell almost anything! I will always empathize with people trying to market or sell a new product too, because I know how tough it can be. What do you do to relax? I love going to our local hike & bike trail, either to walk or run. We have great weather almost all year in Austin, and the trail is right along the river. It’s very picturesque and a great place to relax and think! Other background experience: In the past, I worked with The Star of Texas Fair & Rodeo (Rodeo Austin). Currently I’m a part of the USA Taekwondo Tournament Committee staff that puts on several events a year around the country for athletes aged 5-95. What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? I really can’t think of any advice I’ve received that’s better than the Golden Rule-Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. If we would all live by this simple principle it would go a long way! What is Your Personal Philosophy? Focus on the things you can change, and don’t sweat things outside of your control. It’s something I have to remind myself of almost daily, but I really try to be “at peace” about things that I can’t change. I think it’s easy to get stressed about little things you can’t fix, but if you can take a step back and focus on the bigger picture, ways you can make a difference, it can change your daily outlook! I even have a piece of jewelry to help me remember to do this! 32

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FACTS ON FILE Years in the Business: 5 years Degree: Bachelor’s in Public Relations & Masters in Sport Management Family: Husband – Adam. Last book read: The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins Last business book read: Traction by Gino Wickman Cassie Roberts Dispenza Senior Director of Marketing & Partnerships Saffire 248 Addie Roy Rd. Suite B-106 Austin, TX 78746 512-430-1123 cassie@saffire.com www.saffire.com IFEA Foundation Board Member Since January, 2017.


THE SPONSOR DOC

With Bruce L. Erley, APR, CFEE

The Future of Festivals in a Virtual World Dear Sponsor Doc: I was recently reading about industry trends for sponsorship spending in 2017 and was a bit alarmed to see the ongoing lackluster growth for the dollars spent on festival and event sponsorship. While the dollars going to music venues and concerts, sports and other properties seem to be growing rapidly, our sector seems to be bumping along the bottom. What’s your take on this? L.L. New Orleans, LA Dear L.L.

Yes, I have been tracking those trends in spending as well and definitely think there are some things we can do better as producers and organizers of festivals and special events to make our properties more attractive to potential sponsors. We have to recognize that festivals can be considered “old school,” in this fast moving, tech-savvy society in which we live. As producers it is on us to keep our events fresh, creative and relevant to our audiences. I call it “re-eventing.” If you continue to provide the same programming and the same experience year after year, your event will become predictable and tired. Your audiences will sense that and begin to find other leisure activities. Further your sponsors will be looking for the “what’s new” elements that keep your event current and compelling. From the perspective of keeping your event attractive to sponsors, they are looking for events that embrace

current technologies as measurement and promotional tools that they can utilize to accomplish their goals. Needless to say that includes recognition on your website, but there are other things you should be doing as well. Here are a few ideas… • Grow your social media followings. Don’t just post during your event…post year-round. I manage social media for a bike ride, but throughout the year, I am posting stories on interesting cycling routes, latest gear, news about changes in city policies regarding cycling, etc. We have grown our followers to twice as many who actually ride with us. • Then we invite our sponsors to submit interesting posts that involve their products and services. We try to keep the content more informative that promotional. • Create interactive experiences that will engage your audience with Spring 2017

your sponsors. Your audiences want to move beyond being spectators to being participants. Have them text vote for their favorite band or menu item at your food court. Give them sponsor branded glow sticks for nighttime events. • Utilize new technologies such as Live Gauge, that can count the number of mobile phones that pass through your event thus providing you with accurate attendance, and the mobile app GuideBook to replace your paper program. Audiences and sponsors continue to look for authentic experiences that can be shared, have a local flavor and are important to the community. Tap into that energy and you will get your share of the sponsorship dollars being invested in festivals and events. The Sponsor Doc

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PEOPLE Bob Bryant Founded in 1957 to connect the community to the iconic Indy 500 race, the 500 Festival is a not-for-profit organization that produces more than 50 life-enriching events and programs that celebrate the spirit and legacy of the Indianapolis 500 and foster positive impact on the city of Indianapolis and state of Indiana. One of the largest festivals in the nation, each year more than half a million people attend an event or program produced by the 500 Festival. Since its founding, the 500 Festival has contributed more than $400 million in economic value to central Indiana.

IN CONVERSATION

FACTS ON FILE

How did you get into the events industry? Immediately after college graduation I embarked on a unique expedition initiated by HRH Prince Charles to the Australian Outback. After several months working with Aborigines, counting crocodiles, building roads in a new national park and documenting images of 1,000 year-old artwork in the cliffs along the Gregory River…. the idea of doing something exciting and adventurous with the rest of my life came into focus. Upon returning to the US, I happened upon an opportunity to be a regional marketing director for Feld Entertainment, promoting Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus and Walt Disney’s World On Ice touring shows. Since then, all my days have been circus days!

Bob Bryant President & CEO 500 Festival 21 Virginia Ave, Ste., 500 Indianapolis, IN 46204 317-614-6141 bbryant@500festival.com www.500festival.com

What has been your biggest professional challenge? On the personal front, I’d say keeping fresh and interested in the work at hand and keeping any sense of boredom at bay has been a consistent challenge. Not every day is aborigines and elephants, but you need to stay excited about what you are doing and your role in the mission. Developing a team environment where everyone keeps the creative fires burning is a great way to stay personally motivated. In a similar way on the organization front, I think any line of business

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needs to stay focused on being forever interesting, relevant and motivated to make a difference daily. I have been a part of organizations that shift from dynamic and entrepreneurial in spirit to a focus on managing a mature business. I think that is a slippery slope and a danger for any company. The moment you start thinking you’ve arrived and it’s time to sit back and coast is all too often the start of a decline in production, revenues, relevance or worse. What do you do to relax? In the short term, I try to read at least 15 minutes of scripture daily and find time for little moments of reflection, prayer and fun times with family. For the long haul as a family we like to make sure we plan trips or vacation times that include complete unplugging of all devices! Sports, golf, hiking, playing ball with kids… anything you do without knowing where your phone is. What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? A good friend and former pastor at the Naval Academy and Chaplain of the Marine Corps told me that as a believer with full knowledge of what awaits in Heaven, the end of life should be a race to the finish. Since we don’t know the timing of the end, we need to live each day with that spirit. I also have

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IFEA World Board Member Since January, 2017. cemented in my memory a quote from Ken Burns’ documentary of WWII by a former Army ranger who was dug into a shallow fox hole in the frozen woods during the Battle of the Bulge. After days of indiscriminate shelling and moving fox holes he awoke to find a young teenage soldier who had just been sent to the front trying to commit suicide, the seasoned veteran knocked the weapon out of his hands and simply said, “Hell man, think positive.” The genuine and heartfelt sentiment of that veteran telling that story and still in his late years being diligent in his simplistic and profound belief in staying positive is etched in my mind. In the event world, we often get a bit dramatic and deal with unforeseen circumstances… but we can sure think positive if that guy could! What is your personal philosophy? Heck man, think positive.


Good

Great

CFEE

An Important Step in the Career Track of Industry Leaders As a professional in the Festivals & Events Industry, you know the difference between Good and Great. You’ve dedicated yourself to the “whatever it takes” approach that has become your hallmark. You understand the importance and value of continuing to hone your skills, growing your knowledge base, expanding your professional network, and surrounding yourself with others who have reached the top levels of their careers as well.

CFEE (Certified Festival & Event Executive), the IFEA’s professional certification program, provides the essential difference between good and great among professionals in our industry. It signifies the highest level of achievement. Attainment of your CFEE certification provides recognition of your commitment to excellence, experience, and to your career, placing you in an elite group of the top festival and event professionals in your field. It’s a statement of quality that you bring to the table.

For more information about the IFEA’s professional certification program, and our 2016 CFEE FastTrack® Program, contact Cindy Lerick at clerick@culturalfestivals.com or call +1-314-614-7152.

The CFEE Professional Certification Program is Sponsored by


PEOPLE Alison Baringer Founded in 1948, the North Carolina Azalea Festival has emerged as Wilmington’s premier event and the largest of its kind in the state. Each April, a week of natural beauty, big-name entertainment, festive galas, fun family events and Southern hospitality come together to showcase the charms of the area. The Azalea Festival is a great source of local pride, with the entire community involved in displaying Wilmington to the world in its finest colors. More than 1,000 volunteers are required to stage over 50 events. An independent economic impact study completed in 2011 estimates the Festival drives an economic impact of well over $50 million annually.

IN CONVERSATION

Years in the Business: 12 years

How did you get into the events industry? I am fortunate enough to have had my entire professional career in the events industry. I worked at a dance studio part-time in college, and a mother of two of our students was the upcoming President of the Festival. Their current Office Manager was leaving, so she encouraged me to apply. I landed the job of Office Manager as the only year-round employee of the Festival. Since then my position has grown to encompass so much more than office management; creating new Festival positions to include Festival Coordinator and now Executive Director. We have grown to now have four additional full-time team members in our office! What has been your biggest professional challenge? My biggest challenge has also been my biggest blessing, and that is working with such a large corps of volunteers. Our organization was built on the backs of these dedicated individuals, some whom have been serving for twenty, thirty, forty, even fifty years! Many of them have served in a time before there were any full-time staff, even before the Festival had an office. It is a delicate balance to keep that spirit of volunteerism, the pride and the love for the Festival alive, while also incorporating staff and a more business professional environment. As we’ve grown and with the changing times it has become imperative to do so – but it has always been my goal to face these changes with grace, with honor for our volunteers, and to work together so our growth is a by-product of everyone’s dedication and commitment. What do you do to relax? I love spending quality time with friends, which usually means good food, good music, and good drinks. I also love to play beach volleyball, and am a regular in summer leagues. I can also get behind a good Netflix binge when I find a good show – most recently Westworld and Game of Thrones. Living at the beach, summers spent on the sand or in a boat are my absolute favorite! Other background experience: I served as the President of the Junior League of Wilmington in 2014-2015, where I led over 250 women in our mission to empower women to enrich Continued on page 99

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FACTS ON FILE

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Degree: Double Major in Communication Studies and English, with a Certification in Professional Writing Family: Fiancé, Micah English (Wedding in September, 2017!), in addition to the blessing of so many friends and extended family – including my #festivalfamily! Last book read: Never Split the Difference by Chris Voss and Tahl Raz Last business book read: Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance by Angela Duckworth Alison Baringer Executive Director North Carolina Azalea Festival at Wilmington, Inc. 5725 Oleander Drive, Suite B-7 Wilmington, NC 28403 910-216-9400 alison@ncazaleafestival.org www.ncazaleafestival.org IFEA Foundation Board Member Since January, 2017.


ASSOCIATION ENDORSED PARTNER

ASSOCIATION ENDORSED PARTNER

ASSOCIATION ENDORSED PARTNER

The IFEA would like to thank the following partners for their dedicated support of the association. Association Endorsed Partners have made a commitment to the continued success of our association, our members, and our industry through their umbrella support of all IFEA programs and services. Show your support for these dedicated providers to our industry by getting to know them, and the high quality products and services that they supply, better.


2017 International Festivals & Events Association

IFEA World

LEADERSHIP LEGACY

RECOGNITION PROGRAM The IFEA Leadership Legacy Recognition Program recognizes individuals who have made a significant impact through their work and accomplishments in the festivals and events industry within their local community. Throughout the year, four Leadership Legacy recipients will be selected by their peers, each being recognized in an issue of IFEA’s “ie” magazine. For more information on the Leadership Legacy Recognition Program, Click Here. 38

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Marie Atwell, CFEE General Overview of Marie's Career Born a Dancer. Loves the Theater. IS an Event Producer. Born a Dancer: Marie was raised in Lewiston, Idaho, a small town which couldn’t contain her, nor keep her off the stage. In the early 1960’s, Marie attended theatrical school at the famed Pasadena Playhouse in California. She went onto participate in community theater and live television performances after she moved to Portland, Oregon in 1965. She again continued her pursuit of media, modeling and acting when she landed in Boise, Idaho in 1966. Loves the Theater: It was Marie’s love of the theater however, that lead to her first, Community Outreach job. In 1975, Marie started working at the Bazaar, a family run department store in Boise, Idaho. It was here that she started to get the idea that she could benefit the community she loved and provide high quality entertainment at the same time. If New York could do it, so could Boise! She was given full rein (within budget of course) to create “events” for the store throughout the region, partnering with national sponsors like Seventeen Magazine and working with both live and taped media. Area businesses began to understand and appreciate the importance of their sponsoring Festivals & Events as part of their advertising plans. That was it! Marie was hooked! Is an Event Producer: In 1989, the newly formed Idaho Centennial Commission lured Marie away from the Bazaar to be the Statewide Event Producer for the Idaho Centennial Celebrations to be held the following year in 1990. With 1,500 special occasions during the year, the biggest being a 43-hour celebration for the 43rd state in Boise over the Fourth of July holiday, the celebration was a great success and the beginning of the next 21 years for Marie! Following the Centennial’s success, in 1991, along with her daughter Heather, Marie formed SHOWS ETC., an event design and production company excelling in helping clients take their projects to the


next level. Labeling themselves a ‘full service event agency,’ SHOWS ETC. specialized in all aspects of the event industry from Event Design, Logistics, Management and Sponsorship to Original Theatricals, Theme Décor, Melodramas, three day Murder Mysteries, Fables & Fantasies Come to Life©, Promotion and Festival Consulting. Although usually a 2 person team, this small town event production company has made a big impact on many events within Boise and the surrounding area. Over the past 21 years, Marie has worked and consulted with clients and productions in the Boise area such as: Saint Alphonsus Festival of Trees* (21 years); Burgers for Bikes, Bikes for Kids* (20 years); St. Luke’s Hospital’s Kid for a Night* (10 Years); The Winter Games of Idaho* (8 years); the Boise Holiday Parade (still on the executive committee after 8 years); Downtown Boise Association First Thursday (5 years); Boise River Festival River Giants Parade (5 years); The Humantarian Bowl Football Game (4 years); Idaho Capital Rededication (2 years). (*IFEA/Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Award Winning Events.) Marie and her SHOWS ETC. team have also worked and consulted for many corporate events such as Albertsons; Ore-Ida; Hewlett Packard; University of Idaho; Boise State University; J.R. Simplot Corporation; City of Boise; Meridian Chamber of Commerce and Idaho Public Television. Impact through work and accomplishments Marie has made in the festival and event industry within the local community. Marie Atwell, CFEE. BIG dreams, small communities. The term “Event Planner” hadn’t been established when Marie Atwell first began her career. She was “Community Outreach Director” or “Creative Services”. Fashion shows, fundraisers, special events, galas, tradeshows all fell under her leadership during the 1970’s and 1980’s in Boise, Idaho. She found these events necessary for the benefit of the town, but boy, they could be fun too! Marie saw events as theatrical productions and wrote the show for the audience. She has always scripted everything down to within a second of its life. Professionaly, she could have done just as well in a large city, but she truly enjoyed working with the people and resources of Boise, Idaho. They are our neighbors and friends. Marie often said about events, “It’s like Mickey and Judy putting on a show to save the town, farm, library or whatever!” (In case you’re wondering about the name SHOWS ETC., remember Mickey and Judy saying “Let’s put on a show!”) Being from a smaller community, often times Marie has had to make an idea hap-

pen that everyone else said was impossible. But Marie has indeed made big things happen! Marie has always had the belief that all events, large or small, could be better, follow best practices, improve their communities and let those in attendance, for just one minute, forget their everyday worries. Following the IFEA philosophy of idea and resource sharing, Marie has learned and ‘borrowed’ many ideas and strategies from larger, international events over the years and brought them back to her local community and other producers to help them achieve those big things. Focusing on the local community events throughout her career, Marie may not have had major ‘international’ impact in the events she has produced, but she has however had an impact of international proportions within her local community! And it is those local event producers, producing the smaller community events, that are the bread and butter of the Festival & Events Industry. For every one large major event there are many more local event producers just like Marie, who want to make their communities a better place to be. There is one thing that makes Marie stand out above all the rest however, and that’s the fact that she was aware so early on in her career, and continues to do so today, of the value of the IFEA, the impact it could have on events and how beneficial it was for her to be involved. Through her many years as an Event Producer and the knowledge gained from IFEA Conventions on elements such as safety, contracts, transportation, media and more, Marie has learned how to do things right. Events in Boise and throughout Idaho have always had that small town “Let’s Put on a Show” can-do spirit but had little history of emergency planning and communication. Marie has always insisted on the best practices for all events to ensure the well-being of each attendee and volunteer, and has brought these points to the forefront for all events she has consulted on since. Marie has helped small town committees like the Boise Holiday Parade, that with smart sponsorships, they too could have the same quality entertainment as the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade®! You can now see small, medium and large inflatable balloons all over the state of Idaho in parades and at events, because Marie showed them how. Marie also insisted event producers adhere to the proper training and safety strategies the “big cities” use. When Boise Music Week, est. 1919, was losing steam and sponsors in 2008, Marie advised them to act like they had something to sell, package it and go out and get it! 2018 will be the event’s 100th anniversary! Marie is probably best known in the local community however, for ‘bringing the fun’ to the event! There have been parades since the dark ages, but did those leaders wear Spring 2017

roller skates and a propeller beanie to access the parade from start to finish? Marie did! Every community has a Marie Atwell, CFEE. But Boise, Idaho has the original. Although over the past few years, her health has slowed Marie down a little, the impact Marie has on local events and the local community she serves, has not slowed down one bit. Not retired at all, but maybe with a “more relaxed schedule,” Marie will keep being involved with not-for-profit groups/local festivals and events community and will be the biggest cheerleader for the IFEA, for as long as they’ll ‘let’ her! If you know Marie . . you have most likely have often heard her share her personal motto . . . “This is not a dress rehearsal!” Level of involvement Marie has had with the IFEA during her career. While in the midst of planning the Idaho Centennial Celebrations, Marie knew she had a short timeframe to accomplish everything, so she joined the IF(E)A to learn how to maximize her time, budget and goals. Attending her first IF(E) A Convention in San Antonio in 1993, Marie jumped right in to being part of the IFEA family. Never one to sit on the sidelines and let someone else do the work, as an attendee at the Convention Marie has always been ready, willing and able to help in any way she can, ranging from acquiring silent auction items, setting up, decorating and tearing down the Foundation Auction event to setting up Pinnacle Awards, displays, flags, banners and whatever else was needed. The last several Conventions Marie has been asked to be part of the IFEA team in an official capacity. Her background in visual merchandising and theater has certainly come in handy for displaying those one of a kind items so often donated for the Silent Auction. Alongside working with the IFEA, Marie was one of the first Presidents of the Rocky Mountain Festivals and Events Association, a regional chapter of IFEA. Marie believed whole-heartedly in giving back and nurturing new Event Professionals, and did so enthusiastically through the RMFEA. Perhaps Marie’s biggest contribution to the IFEA though, is as a supportive and informative active member who seeks out the new, unsure, quiet attendees and makes them feel at home. She goes out of her way to encourage them to utilize the IFEA network and resources to their fullest. Marie is without a doubt one of IFEA’s biggest cheerleaders! Marie Atwell, CFEE. At five foot something, small Marie has had HUGE success!

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The Festival Organiser’s Guide To Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Part 3 of 3 By Dan Rose DETAILING CORPORATESOCIAL SOCIALRESPONSIBILITY RESPONSIBILITYIS, IS, DETAILING WHAT WHAT CORPORATE HOWFESTIVALS FESTIVALS ARE ARE USING USING IT IT AND HOW HOW HOWYOU YOUCAN CANIMPLEMENT IMPLEMENT A SUCCESSFUL SUCCESSFULCSR CSRSTRATEGY STRATEGYWHEN WHEN PLANNING PLANNING A FESTIVAL A FESTIVAL

By Dan Rose

TOP TIPS FOR CREATING A SUCCESSFUL CSR STRATEGY

WHAT IS CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY?

THE BENEFITS OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND YOUR BOTTOM LINE

HOW FESTIVALS AND SHOWS USE CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

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In Part 1 of this article, we discussed what is corporate social responsibility, highlighting the ISO 26000 CSR Guidelines, CSR and the Community, the Environment, the Economy and more. In Part 2 of this article, we talked about how festivals and shows use corporate social responsibility to their advantage and highlighted a case study on how Glastonbury, a leading UK festival implements CSR. In Part 3 you will learn about corporate social responsibility and your bottom line, the benefits of corporate social responsibility and top tips for creating a successful corporate social responsibility strategy. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND YOUR BOTTOM LINE The purpose of implementing corporate social responsibility within your festival’s activities is not specifically for increasing profit, however the results of your activities can lead to improved efficiency and an increased audience, therefore improving your revenue stream. Here are just a few advantages CSR offers which can have positive results to your bottom line.discover how CSR is being used and perceived within this industry.

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Bestival has an onsite shop which sources all of its produce from local traders, essentially acting as a wholesaler for them. This keeps local people happy as the festival is contributing to the local economy. This also increases the festival’s bottom line… Enhanced Reputation One of the main benefits to any festival or show participating in socially responsible activities is that it enhances their reputation. This is especially true when the festival makes a contribution to the local community which leaves the local people singing the festival’s praises. For example, Bestival has an onsite shop which sources all of its produce from local traders, essentially acting as a wholesaler for them. This keeps local people happy as the festival is contributing to the local economy. This also increases the festival’s bottom line as socially conscious attendees are happier to purchase products from the on-site shop knowing that it results in a positive contribution to the local community. Each type of activity, from the environmentally friendly to the socially responsible, enhances the festival’s reputation in the eyes of potential attendees and may be the tipping point to convince people to buy a ticket. These actions can also result in specific awards, such as the internationally renowned ‘A Greener Festival Award’, which Shambala Festival has won four times, successfully cementing its reputation as a ‘green’ festival. Differentiating From Competitors Each festival attracts a certain audience demographic, from lovers of folk music or cheese and wine enthusiasts. There are still many options for festival go-ers to choose from and any factor which differentiates your festival from the competition is going to put you at an advantage. If your audience is environmentally conscious and wants to attend the most environmentally friendly festival, they may be more willing to attend Wood 42

Festival over the competitors, as Wood Festival is 100% powered by renewable energy and has been described as “a beacon of environmental sustainability” by Julie’s Bicycle, a leading global charity bridging the gap between environmental sustainability and the creative industry. Promoting Socially Responsible Actions It’s important for each festival to promote their socially responsible activities in order to let their audience make a fully informed decision when choosing which festival to attend. Any awards won for environmentally or socially friendly behaviour might just be the differentiator that encourages your audience to attend your festival over the competitors. Attract Highly Qualified Staff & Popular Acts Improving your bottom line doesn’t just come from the financial contributions of attendees; it also comes from the efficiency of your team and the attractiveness of the acts performing at your festival. Festivals that treat their staff well, pay a fair wage and offer something extra are more likely to attract experienced, hardworking team members whose efficiency will ensure that tickets sell out, the event runs smoothly and the post-event clean up is performed efficiently. This contributes to the overall bottom line of the festival as money is not wasted through unsold tickets, mishaps during the festival and inefficient processes. It is also key to the success of each festival to attract the right entertainment and a good CSR strategy can make this happen. Glastonbury is a great example of attracting talent with the right CSR

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strategy, as Paul McCartney reportedly accepted a fee of just £200,000 instead of his usual asking price of £4 million. This is because Paul McCartney knew that Glastonbury wasn’t trying to profit from him as all proceeds generated go to charity. Charge a Premium Festival go-ers realise that it costs more for a festival to adhere to environmentally friendly practices and for the most part they will be willing to pay a little extra for their ticket in order to support renewable energy, reduced waste and a cleaner festival. A 2015 survey by Nielson revealed that 72% of respondents aged between 15 and 20 are willing to pay more for products and services from companies who are committed to positive social and environmental activities. An increase in awareness and education of these topics has resulted in a generation of people who want to make a conscious effort to preserve the planet. The Benefits of Corporate Social Responsibility Besides the aforementioned benefits to your bottom line, corporate social responsibility can have a positive effect on various other aspects of your business. A well thought out corporate social responsibility strategy can springboard your festival into the mainstream and engage your audience in a truly meaningful way. Happier Workforce When you implement CSR strategies that ensure your staff are treated fairly and offered a working environment that suits their personal needs, you end up with a happier workforce which offers a real benefit to your festival. A study by the University of Warwick found that happy employees were 12% more productive, while unhappy workers were 10% less productive. Encouraging positive working relationships, a healthy work-life balance and offering added incentives to your staff will make them advocates of your festival, which will increase your audience and improve your reputation. Building Relationships CSR is a great tool to help your festival build relationships with other organisations and communities. Supporting charities gives you access to their audience and marketing channels whilst portraying your festival in an empathetic and socially responsible light. You may also want to connect with other businesses in order to implement a joint CSR strategy and any involvement with the local community builds stronger


relationships with local businesses which can result in discounted goods and a more tolerant community. Public Relations CSR activities are something to shout about, therefore they make fantastic PR. Consumers are tired of companies and festivals shoving sales messages under their noses all the time. Taking part in CSR activities gives your festival a positive message to send out to the world that isn’t sales-focused, but simply promotes the good work you have been doing, which people will be much more interested in. Positive Impact Despite all the benefits CSR has in a business sense, it shouldn’t be forgotten that the purpose of these activities is to have a positive impact on the environment and the community as a whole. Reducing emissions, increasing recycling efforts and using renewable energy sources all have a positive impact on the health of our planet, which is something all businesses should be working towards in the modern world. Supporting local communities ensures that the social wellbeing of those most impacted by the festival is looked after.

TOP TIPS FOR CREATING A SUCCESSFUL CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY While corporate social responsibility is not a new concept, many businesses, shows and festivals alike struggle to get a CSR strategy off the ground. This is sometimes due to a lack of direction or information available regarding CSR strategies. Here are five top tips for implementing CSR within your festival or business and how you can make it a success.

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Assign a Budget for CSR Activities You will struggle to have a successful CSR campaign without spending any money, so when planning your budgets you should always set something aside specifically for CSR activities. Try to have an idea of what it is you want to achieve through

your CSR activities and this will help you decide how much of a budget you need to assign. Remember that CSR can be investment if implemented correctly and while it is not used to generate profit, it has many benefits that can improve your bottom line.

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Align Your Csr Strategy With Your Company Values Most businesses have a clear set of values which they live by. These values help to define the personality of the brand and give everyone involved an idea of the way the business likes to operate. When creating a CSR strategy, it’s important to take these values into consideration and ensure that your approach to CSR aligns well with your values. For example, if one of your core values is to be respectful, your CSR strategy may include a clean-up of the local community after your festival in order to show respect to the community.

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Choose A Key Area To Focus On Depending on the nature of your festival, be it a music festival, beer festival, food festival or any other, there may be a specific area of CSR you feel it would be most appropriate to concentrate on. For example, if your music festival directly impacts the local community through noise pollution and traffic congestion, you may want to consider concentrating your CSR efforts on improving relationships with the local community. If you run a beer festival which uses a large amount of plastic cups, you may want to concentrate your efforts on an environmentally friendly recycling campaign. Decide what is most important to you and your audience and concentrate on that instead of trying to cover every angle.

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Encourage Involvement From All Staff The only way to ensure your CSR strategy is a true success is to educate all staff members, from the top to the bottom, and to encourage their involvement with CSR activities. Your staff members represent the festival’s brand and if they are not on board with your CSR activities, your chances of success are much lower. Training staff on the reasons why you are using CSR and getting them to partake in activities will help to get them on board and will encourage positive growth of your CSR strategy.

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Promote Your Csr Activities Although CSR is not implemented purely for public approval, it is certainly something to shout about. Let your audience and critics know what you are doing to improve your impact on the planet and use those activities to draw attention to your festival. Festival go-ers are traditionally eco-friendly and community minded, therefore releasing details of your CSR activities will ensure your brand resonates with the audience well. Your festival’s website is the ideal place to promote these activities, as well as on partner sites.

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Your Next Step Taking influence from the most successful festivals will help take your festival to the next level. Appealing to all stakeholders and their needs, wants and values ensures that their interest in your festival continues to grow, which in turn encourages growth and development of the festival itself. If your festival isn’t already participating in social responsible behaviour, it might be time to start considering it. A great starting point is to do in-depth research, particularly when it comes to your audience. There is no point in blindly attempting to take action in order to impress your audience; you need to know what matters to them and where the most negative impacts of your festival are perceived, and rectify them. You also need to know what your objectives are. Setting KPIs will keep your strategy on track. Perhaps you want to recycle 50% of all waste at your festival, or you aim to get a local building rebuilt or renovated in a certain time period. These objectives will give your strategy direction. Whatever you decide, your festival does have a responsibility to rectify any negative impact and maximise the positive impacts it has on the world. Corporate social responsibility is something all festivals should concentrate on going forward in order for us to continue enjoying these fantastic events in beautiful locations across the world. Dan Rose is Managing Director of Hampshire based Event Insurance Services, one of the leading providers of all types of event insurance in the United Kingdom. The company prides itself on a reputation built on outstanding personal service and is celebrating its 20th Anniversary this year. Dan has been with the company for nine years and has long been a festival goer himself. https://www. events-insurance.co.uk

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9 By Clinton Henry

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9

Surefire Steps to Lockdown Your Cyber Security “Dear Client”. That’s how the letter usually begins. The next few sentences are a little trickier; there is really no good way for someone to hear that their data has been stolen. Unfortunately, getting this letter is becoming an all too common occurrence in business. Businesses lose more than $100 billion a year to cyber-attacks and fraud globally. While a security breach might be one of the last things on your mind, the most recent Travelers Risk Index report shows that it’s a top concern for your clients, customers and contractors – “Personal Privacy Loss and Identity Theft” went from barely ranking on their survey a few years ago to being #2, right behind “Financial Security”. The expectation of cyber security has to be met with the same fervor and drive that you strive to meet all your other clients’ expectations. 1. Engage and Educate Your Employees It’s important that you create a culture of security within your organization because security is everyone’s responsibility. If you don’t have buy-in from all your team members, you’re exposing your business to unnecessary risk. The majority of attackers gain access to networks via social engineering and the manipulation of a user within an organization, not via command line “hacking” from a dark, Cheetos-filled basement somewhere, as the movies often portray. Why would someone spend days trying to crack your accountant’s password when they can simply call your IT desk pretending to be your accountant and ask him to reset it to something new? 2. Anti-Virus Having an up to date anti-virus deployed on all of your desktops and servers is vital. An unprotected computer is an easy target for a motivated attacker. Don’t make it easy on them – pay for anti-virus and make sure it’s regularly updated by your IT staff. 3. Password Management It’s important that you and your employees leverage strong, complicated passwords that aren’t easy to guess. There are now hacking applications you can plug

into a computer that will run through the most common 10,000 passwords used in about four minutes, trying each of them. You’d be surprised how many folks with access to critical data have the password of “password,” or if they are feeling clever, “password1” (Did this just guess your password? Go change it!). 4. Secure Your Networks Without getting too technical, just know that having a firewall between your corporate network and the Internet is very important. If you don’t, there is very little stopping someone from freely accessing your data. 5. Secure Your Cloud No matter what cloud provider or service you use, make sure you do your due diligence on their security practices. If they can’t easily and quickly tell you how your data is secured, odds are it isn’t. Also, for any accounts used to access your firm’s data, make sure you have strong passwords and only access it via a computer you own or trust. If you access your cloud on an infected machine, a hacker could potentially learn your password and use it later on without your knowledge. 6. Protect Your Banking Information Make sure that all financial data, accounts, and records are kept secure and segregated from the rest of your business’ general shared drives. If financial transactions are conducted electronically, ensure they are done over an encrypted connection and that your employees never email account numbers, credit card information, or sensitive financial documents. 7. Backups One of the most common types of breaches now being seeing are called “ransomware” attacks. Instead of “stealing” data from your organization, these attackers find your critical data and then encrypt it (digitally locking you out of it), making it so only the person with the digital “key” can unlock and access that data. The hackers then offer the victim access to the “key” for a very large fee. If you’re hit with one of these attacks you have two options: Pay the fee or restore the locked data from Spring 2017

a recent backup. This is why backups are so important. Recently a very large hospital, a police department, and a public school (along with literally thousands of other victims) have been forced to pay tens of thousands of dollars to get their data back. Making sure your data is backed and stored separately from your main repository can help protect you from attacks such as these. 8. Physical Security This one is self-explanatory but you’d be surprised how much client data is left lying around the office. Ensure your partners, trusted employees, and finance team lock away any sensitive documents when they aren’t working with them. 9. Mobile Devices While they are a convenience and increase productivity of the staff, mobile devices mean that your clients’ sensitive data can potentially walk out your firm’s door without you ever knowing it. Make sure that all mobile devices used to access corporate data have passwords (your email server can force this requirement), and if you have employees that use laptops you should look at having the hard drives for those machines encrypted. Most modern operating systems have encryption built in (you just have to enable the feature), and it’s foolish not to leverage it. If an employee accidently leaves a laptop on a plane or in the back of a taxi, you’ll be guaranteed that all data on it is secure and protected. Your business, your brand, and your bottom line depend on the trust you develop with your clients. Handling the items listed above will go a long way in protecting all three. Clinton Henry is one of the world’s leading cyber security and identify theft experts. Known for his engaging keynotes and insightful perspective on business and personal cyber security, Clinton has amassed a loyal following of business and IT executives who look to him for guidance on how to protect their corporate profits and reputation from attack or compromise. For more information on hiring Clinton for your next event, please visit www.ClintonHenry.com.

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By Nick Scala

Event Expansion: EMBRACING THE GROWTH The old idiom ‘if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it’ may be applicable in many different scenarios but unfortunately, it isn’t always true in the world of festivals and events. Of course, it would be simple to keep your event identical year after year, especially if you have the perfect blueprint for the event. But communities change and evolve and as event planners we must adapt as our community adapts. Wait a second, what am I talking about? I’m pretty certain a prerequisite to being an event planner is possessing the ability to predict the future. We must always be one step ahead. Predict the trends and have plentiful amounts of that trend at each event. We all saw Pokémon Go coming and planned accordingly, right? News flash, this is not reality, however there is one trend that most of us can be certain of: population growth. I work in a town that has seen a 360% population growth over the last 25 years. We went from 9,000 residents to 42,000 residents in a quarter of a century. And as national trends go, we don’t anticipate a downward turn in this growth anytime soon. What does this mean for events and festivals in our community? As population grows this means our events will grow and may even burst 46

at the seams if adequate changes and modifications are not made. In this article, I will explain the process of making that transition from small-scale events to larger festivals, while still maintaining the integrity of your event and fulfilling the needs of your community. In 2000, our community held our holiday tree lighting celebration in a courtyard at town hall. This event lasted 3 hours and about 800 people attended throughout the event. There were arts and crafts, holiday songs and even a visit from Santa. The size and programming suited the community perfectly. In 2015, this event was held at a shopping center parking lot, attracted +/- 3,000 people over a 2-day period and partnered with an art festival with 150 vendors. And yes, Santa made a visit but this time he came roaring through on top of a fire engine. So how can this transition be made? There are many moving parts that are spurred into action when an event sees growth like this. A fundamental feature is ensuring that you have the correct facility to host your event. Small events call for a small event space. Plain and simple, if you have an event that attracts 100 people, you don’t want that shopping center parking lot

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because your event will seem empty and poorly attended. However, there’s nothing worse than outgrowing a facility and experiencing complete mayhem as people struggle to move from one activity to another. So when is it time to turn the dial on your facility size? When making this decision we must first consider the safety of our attendees. You may want to stay at that small facility because it makes your event seem like a rocking good time, but it’s very likely that you’re ready for a bigger and better space. We work very closely with our fire department in our community to ensure that we are not exceeding the total capacity of each facility. Keep an open communication with the Fire Marshall in your area. It’s much better to have a running dialogue than finding out you’re not up to code a day before the event. You may love a certain space for your event but safety and the flow of your event should be of high priority when making this decision. I’ve learned that there are many tricks and loopholes when making the jump to a larger facility. That first year it can seem empty, if you don’t use your space efficiently. Arrange and organize your event in such a way that maintains the tight knit feel to your event while designating areas for spillover in the


chance that attendance exceeds your expectations. These spillover areas can be as simple as green space for playing horseshoes, ladder golf, corn hole, giant Jenga sets or other self-engaging activities the public can migrate to if need be. Also, consider rerouting your lines towards these spillover areas. Choose a facility that allows for growth. Each year the event should expand and occupy more of the space. In year one you may have the food court, kid’s zone, art show and stage all in the same area (all in compliance with the inspector’s code, of course) because it suits the needs of your anticipated attendance and synergy of the event. Year five may require all four of those attractions in four separate corners of your event space. But make sure you pick a facility that allow you to be flexible with the layout. Of course, not all facilities allow for this sort of flexibility. You may be changing sites every 2-3 years, but if possible it’s best to keep the event in the same space to allow it to have a true home. What kind of parking does your facility have? I’ve found that a lot of facilities are built to host thousands of people, but overall parking spaces may not reflect that. For example, our best facility for hosting events in our community has roughly 500 parking spots. Now this would translate to +/1,500-2,000 people (depending on how carpool friendly your community is). The only problem is that our Fourth of July Celebration typically draws +/- 5,000 people. But what makes this facility so special is located right next to a local high school. This means about 1,000 more parking spots that can be obtained through a lease agreement with the school district. Take a long look at your surroundings when deciding on an event space. Parking may seem insignificant in the grand scheme of your event but not having enough parking could be the deciding factor on whether or not the public returns the following year. So once you have the proper facility locked in, what else needs to be done to guarantee that this transition goes smoothly? During those transitional years it’s essential to seek out support and involvement from your community through engagement. As our Holiday Tree Lighting was making the transition the event coordinator sought out participation from the local elementary and middle school choir departments to perform. So how does this help with overall attendance? Each choir had about 20-30 students, which means 20-30 families tagged along to watch the performance.

With 4 to 5 school’s participating you now have created a 100 family guarantee and given these young performers a place to test out their chops. Win-win situation for all parties involved. Other examples of this active participation can be through public art shows, inviting local bands to perform, t-shirt designing competition and one that I’ve become very fond of is engaging the community through volunteerism. When boosting attendance and gaining community buy in it’s essential that the public take a certain amount of ownership of the event. What better way to become an integral piece than volunteering at the event? Approach local schools, sport organizations, youth advisory councils, National Junior Honor Society and other local organizations. Not only do volunteers offer a helping hand at the event but they also can be a great resource for advertising your event through word of mouth. Understand that volunteers are not staff and should not be tasked with jobs that are intended for staff. But a duty such as taking an entrance fee or greeting the public is ideal because nothing says “community event” like a member of the community greeting you as you enter. Community involvement spans beyond active participation and volunteerism. An essential step in this leap of expansion is obtaining an appropriate and suitable sponsor for your event. I would like to stress the “suitable” and “appropriate” part because this plays a large role in maintaining the integrity of your event. You wouldn’t ask a fast food restaurant to cater your organization’s health and wellness fair just like you wouldn’t ask a large national corporation to sponsor your grass roots heritage festival. An appropriate sponsor can not only boost attendance through the brand of their organization but also through advertisement. Monetary support is always a good thing but it is essential to secure sponsors that are willing to promote the event like it’s their own. You may be doing the majority of the planning but if the event is not successful then it reflects negatively on both parties involved. It’s important to remind yourself that it is not necessary nor is it beneficial to do all the heaving lifting on your own (literally, but more importantly figuratively). The public will have a much more positive response if they are being made aware of an event from multiple outlets and approaches. Especially if your sponsor is a reputable source that they trust. So you’ve upgraded facilities, secured community involvement through active participation and volunteerism and Spring 2017

found that suitable sponsor, now what? Time to rework your marketing scheme. Banners on the side of the road and email notifications may have been adequate for that small 100-person event but won’t cut it as you begin expanding. I’m surprised I’ve made it this far without mentioning the all-important ‘s’ word: social media. As we’ve begun expanding our events I’ve found social media to be a great tool and resource. I know, big surprise. However, it can be a very effective marketing strategy when drumming up anticipation for your event. As the event gets closer begin giving out details of how it will be bigger and better than previous years. We can only say so much on an event flyer and banner but social media allows us to actively engage the community. Maybe you didn’t have your headlining musical act secured when you passed out flyers to the community? Social media can make that unfortunate misstep seem like an intentional marking strategy. If your event budget allows it, I would highly recommend investing in boosted social media posts. So far, I have not been disappointed by this investment and it’s a great way to reach a larger audience and increase attendance. In-kind sponsorship agreements with local media outlets are also a great way to get the word out especially when working with a small budget. This is a great solution when trying to grow your event when your budget hasn’t yet grown. It will allow you to advertise in local newspapers, radio stations and maybe even TV stations in a very cost effective manner. As you’re going through the process of expanding your event it is essential to remain patient and persistent. Just because your community is growing does not guarantee that attendance will grow. Increase in population is a great foundation for event expansion, but you must excite and engage your community. Remember this is their event, not yours. Nick Scala is the Assistant Recreation Manager for the Town of Oro Valley. He is the event coordinator for some of the town’s largest events, including the Fourth of July Celebration and MOVE Across 2 Ranges, a hiking event. He began his employment with the town in 2006, working his way up through the ranks while graduating from the University of Arizona in 2011 with a degree in Journalism.

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By Clinton Henry

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HACKING PEOPLE:

Why Your Biggest Vulnerability Isn't In Your IT Department Last week, Chris stopped off at his local coffee shop to have a chai before heading off to a trade show to deliver a keynote speech. As he sat at his usual spot near the counter a heated discussion ensued next to him regarding the 3rd Quarter of 2017. In the middle of the morning’s caffeinated hustle and bustle, a marketing meeting was in progress. He knew it was a marketing meeting because the three employees left the screens on their computers open to “Marketing Plans.” Much to his amazement, they “abandoned” the table and were apparently on line (as well as online). They left two smartphones and a couple of memory sticks out in the open, plain as a Pumpkin Spiced Latte. While reasonable predictions aren’t always correct, there’s a strong possibility that sooner or later the company will experience a breach. Moreover, it’s highly unlikely that anyone within the business or IT has taken a serious look at how its users operate to protect from this sort of vulnerability. The Biggest Risk The biggest risk for any organization getting hacked is neither the firewall nor the server. It is another problem altogether: Social Engineering. Social engineering is when employees inadvertently (or out of malice) give cyber thieves sensitive corporate or client information. The problem with most businesses and IT departments is while they may be eager to “invest” in cybersecurity measures for their organization, they often neglect investing in shielding the most common attack surface motivated hackers use to gain access: employees. Let’s review some of the socially engineered pitfalls that occur all too often: Public Wi-Fi – Public Wi-Fi is to your computer network as Kryptonite is to Superman or garlic is to a vampire. Unless you are sending out information that is encrypted via a secured site, never conduct any business from an unsecured Wi-Fi hotspot. Public Places – In the space of two seconds, it would have been possible for a thief to take screen shots of the

3rd Quarter plan with a smartphone, or to swipe the smartphones and stick drives or even one of the laptops. Any document, especially any document with links to your organization, is all a cyber thief needs to get going. Never leave documents unattended. Ever hear of “Visual Trespass?” It is the practice of someone in any public space “looking over your shoulder” viewing your computer screen. Here’s an apt example: Alison, the head of tax and audit for a publicly traded company was traveling and noticed a stranger was trying to observe her computer screen in an airport while she was working on her corporation’s soon- to-be-public 10-k filing! While the stranger may have been rude (and not a cyber thief), the person working on those financials was misguided and careless. Moreover, public conversations that should be held in private can undo a company quite easily. Recently, the same Chris from earlier was in O’Hare airport while a gentleman next to him was on the phone with a colleague who needed access to a file. The helpful companion, within earshot of Chris, decided it was a good idea to give his coworker his personal password so he could access the file. If Chris was an opportunist, he could have simply made conversation with the unsuspecting traveler later and traded business cards, giving Chris his username and company along with his password. The businessman would have been none the wiser. Phishing – Remember those emails we once received from Nigeria, Lithuania or Romania that named us as the heirs to great fortunes? All they needed to secure the millions owed to us was a credit card number. People fell for it in droves. Then there were fake job postings that asked us for background information. The postings looked legitimate and we gave them what they asked for – and we fell for that too. Phishing has not gone away. It has become so sophisticated that we believe it comes from our bosses or a supplier or a nonprofit we might support. The links in the email are typically malware that can infect the entire network and grab important files. Don’t fall for it. When in doubt, always verify. An interesting fact: Millennials are more prone to falling Spring 2017

for phishing than older employees! Over-familiarity with and blind trust of technology can be a dangerous thing. Vindictiveness – Remember the angry employee who was terminated? What precautions were taken to make sure that he or she was immediately shut out from the network? Terminated employees can sometimes be vindictive. Have a plan and protect your data so the recently fired sales executive can’t walk to your competitor with your latest leads or biggest accounts. Vendors – Your computer network is only as good as who has access to that network. Many cyber thieves have successfully snuck in through a back door by going through the networks of your vendors. This is a potentially huge problem for any organization having a continuous relationship with suppliers. If your network is “secure” but your vendors have cyber security that is more like Swiss cheese, it can potentially create a huge vulnerability in your network. Remember: While most internal IT organizations often seek funding for the latest network security equipment or software to beef up cybersecurity, they often neglect to engage their users to harden the organization from social engineering attacks that are commonly used to compromise a company. Neglecting to offer sufficient training for their users leaves the organization vulnerable to a hacker using a company’s own employees against it.

Clinton Henry is one of the world’s leading cyber security and identify theft experts. Known for his engaging keynotes and insightful perspective on business and personal cyber security, Clinton has amassed a loyal following of business and IT executives who look to him for guidance on how to protect their corporate profits and reputation from attack or compromise. For more information on hiring Clinton for your next event, please visit www.ClintonHenry.com.

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INTEGRATING STRATEGIES AND SERVICES FOR GUESTS WITH

COGNITIVE DISABILITIES By Lisa Potvin

Stevie Wonder once said, “Just because a man lacks the use of his eyes, doesn’t mean he lacks vision.” In this article, I will address the integration of strategies and services for guests with cognitive disabilities. I will start with my community and our Special Needs and Adaptive Program better known as SNAP Dance. This is a monthly community dance for adults with disabilities. Although far from a large scale event, it demonstrates the framework for how to host an accessible festival. This extraordinary group of individuals comes out to the dance every month to take pictures, make friends and bust a move. Over time we have found that our guests want to be more involved and take part in community events but there is either too much stress on the families or the large scale events are not accessible enough. It poses the question: How do we, as industry leaders, make inclusion and accessibility possible at our large scale festivals and events? It all started with a dance. After hearing from multiple families in the community we realized there was a major gap in our system that needed to be filled. There were limited programs available for adults with disabilities. Those that were available were costly. We came to a realization, after reading an article from the National Down Syndrome Society, which stated, “While in school, most, if not all of the resources that make up a student’s principal support system of special education and related services are mandated by law. Upon graduation, the student will no longer be eligible for many, if not all of the services. Leaving the responsibility of identifying, locating and coordinating appropriate resources mainly upon the individual and their families.” (1) Our small dance of less than 20 participants quickly grew to over 100 and has been a success within the community for over five years. Over the past year, we have put in an increased focus into talking to the caregivers about other events and activities they attend. At one of our dances, we asked the caregivers and parents of our guests how they enjoyed our local large scale events. They stated that although they meet the ADA requirements they were still too 50

difficult to navigate for our participants with severe Autism and Down syndrome. As a community which strives to be inclusive to all, this did not settle well with us and we realized steps needed to be taken. Step 1. Understand Your Audience As a Special Events Coordinator, I do not have a background in therapeutic recovery or caregiving, so my first step was to learn more about our participants and understand what they truly go through in different situations. The importance of dietary restrictions, sensory details and preparation became obvious. It was also clear that although there are many restrictions placed on this population, the benefits of community involvement outweigh the restrictions. One study drove this point home the best. Autism Speaks recently did a study that concluded: “Roughly 50,000 youth with autism will turn 18 years old this year. So many of these young people have the potential to work and participate

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in their communities. Supporting this potential will benefit everyonethe person with autism, the family, employer and society.” (2) It is also imperative to understand current laws in place, such as: “The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) which became law in 1990. The ADA is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all areas of public life, including jobs, schools, transportation, and all public and private places that are open to the general public. The purpose of the law is to make sure that people with disabilities have the same rights and opportunities as everyone else. The ADA gives civil rights protections to individuals with disabilities similar to those provided to individuals on the basis of race, color, sex, national origin, age, and religion. It guarantees equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities in public accommodations, employment, transportation, state


and local government services, and telecommunications.” (3) The Americans with Disabilities Act also provides us with a map on regulations, how to build proper ramps, and to make sure that our event grounds are accessible to all. This can be a helpful tool when designing your event grounds. Step 2. Identify Who Is Doing It Right Recently, at the 61st Annual International Festivals and Events Association Convention, Expo and Retreat it was stated, “We are in the business of making magic happen!” Well who makes magic happen better than the happiest place on earth, Disney World. They have put together a list of simple services and strategies to give guests with cognitive disabilities a magical experience. This list includes: • Advanced Ticket Purchase - to avoid the possibility of waiting in line in inclement weather. • Stroller and Wheel Chair Rental - having a rental option for either a stroller, wheel chair or ECV/ Motorized scooter for a day can turn a good experience into a great one. • Rider Switch - offering a rider switch for parties of two or more so that the third party can switch out without going back in line. • Accessing Attractions - being able to designate a specific return time for guests who are unable to tolerate extended waits at attractions due to a disability. • Break Areas - should the guests with a cognitive disability become over-stimulated, cool, calm areas should be offered on event grounds. • Companion restrooms • Attraction Guides - include pamphlets for carnivals where each ride offers different features and effects. • Dietary Recommendations - either offer multiple options or allow guests to bring food items into your event. • Transportation - Offer accessible parking as well as busing to and from your event grounds. • Have ear plugs available. Disney World included all of this stated above in a pamphlet which also provides a section with information on preparing your guests for the event. They also include suggestions for planning a visual schedule and links to videos to help prepare for the experience. Another organization making a difference is Accessible Festivals, a contract organization that will come to your event and handle all aspects of accessibility regarding legal compliance for mobility,

hearing and visual impairments. The organization goes above and beyond by utilizing volunteers to help participants move around the uneven and dusty roads at music festivals, as well as having raised platforms for attendees in wheelchairs to be able to see over the crowds to the stage. Through partnerships with Live Nation and Goldenvoice they are making huge strides in creating accessible festivals. The organization which strives to make the biggest impact on the community is the Special Olympics. At the Special Olympics, they are able to make sure all aspects from food and beverage to announcements are accessible to every participant. They also have partnered with the Department of Aging and Disability Services to provide year-round programs and support for this community. Through an almost entirely volunteer base they are able to make over 300 competitions accessible each year! These three organizations are doing it right and can provide us with valuable insight on how to make the festivals and events industry accessible to everyone. When we spoke with these organizations one employee stated, “The biggest issue we face going into a venue is the crowds. It is important for the correct measures to have been taken, ADA regulations to have been met and access to all the different areas not hindered or forgotten.” The key point made by all three organizations is that we cannot forget about this population. We must keep them in mind as we make key decisions regarding our events. Step 3: Adapt your Event Although the ADA lays out a guideline on the laws and regulations around your event grounds, there is so much more that you can adapt to truly be accessible to this community. Consider what Disney World has done best by providing break rooms for sensory overload. Offer something as simple as early ticketing and free passes to caregivers and companions. Have a sponsor hand out free ear plugs before loud concerts and fireworks. Look at what Accessible Festivals does by creating skyboxes with ramps so that guests can see the stage from their chairs. In regards to food and beverage, if you can’t supply it, make an exception for the family, by allowing them to bring in the specialized food. Almost all of these changes are low cost and easily adaptable to events both large and small. By offering a pamphlet with information and links to videos so that guests can prepare ahead of time you are making your event more accessible. Most importantly, make sure all of your staff is aware of the various services you are providing so that they can spread the word and answer questions correctly when asked about break areas, ear plugs, or other amenities. Spring 2017

Lastly, reach out to the various care homes in your community and the programs that are already in place. Let them know that your event is accessible or ask them if they have any recommendations. By adapting your event to not only meet ADA requirements but to go the extra mile so that each guests can fully experience your event, you are truly making magic happen. Step 4: Accept the Challenge The SNAP Dance has proven to us on a smaller scale the positive impact that we can have on this specific community. There is a huge gap after these individuals turn 18 when they are “aged out” of the system but they still have so much to give and want to be involved. Whether it be working, volunteering or going to programs to meet others they want to remain active in the community and in the event industry, we have the opportunity to make this happen. Our large event is far from perfect when it comes to being fully accessible to those with cognitive disabilities. We have a lot of opportunity to update in the upcoming year. Although we are only starting to make the move by taking small steps in the right direction, through early ticketing, involvement and reaching out to the community, we know these easy changes can make a difference in the long run. Just as we have challenged one another to make changes to our large scale events in our office, I challenge everyone who reads this to make a positive change to your event in order to become more accessible. By doing so, you are becoming an advocate for your guests with cognitive disabilities. Sources 1. Life after High School. Retrieved October 03, 2016, from http://www.ndss.org/ Resources/Transition-and-Beyond/ Life-After-High-School/ 2. New Studies Emphasize Lack of Services for Young Adults With Autism (2013, September 05). Retrieved October 03, 2016, from https://www.autismspeaks. org/news/news-item/new-studies-emphasize-lack-services-young-adults-autism 3. What is the Americans with Disabilities Act? (2009, January 01). Retrieved October 3, 2016, from https://adata.org/learn-about-ada Lisa Potvin is the Special Events Coordinator for the City of Allen’s Parks and Recreation Department in Allen, Texas. In this role she helps plan and produce many events throughout the year including Market Street Allen USA Celebration.

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PUT AN END TO

By Steve McClatchy

PROCRASTINATION!

Are you a procrastinator? Do you live by mantras like “I do my best work at the last minute” or “If you wait until the last minute, then it only takes a minute!” If you do then you’re not alone. But if you take a step back and look at the impact of living by these statements they just don’t deliver on what they promise. Let’s say you have a report due by the end of next week. You could carve out some time today. You decide to wait. It’s now Monday morning of the week the report is due. You check your email first thing and there is a lot that needs to get done today. No report will get done today. You make these same kinds of decisions on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday and now it’s the day the report is due. The adrenalin rush of missing the deadline comes over your body, you come to life with energy, complete the report and hand it in on time. “Whew, it’s over!” Sound familiar? Procrastination is something we can all relate to with varying degrees. Some people put things off until the last minute only to let a deadline help them bring the task to completion. Others let procrastination get completely out of hand to the point of losing relationships, jobs, homes or businesses. Procrastination is not a time management problem as much as it is a decision making problem. 52

When you procrastinate you’re making a decision to put something off that you have agreed to do or think you “should” do. We don’t procrastinate things we don’t have to do. For example you’re not reading this article procrastinating a hot air balloon ride. If you are it’s because you either made a commitment to someone to go on a ride or you believe that a hot air balloon ride is something you should be doing right now. We use the term procrastination to describe putting off tasks we have agreed to others we will do or agreed to ourselves that we will or should do. When you make a commitment to someone else that you will do something at a time other than now, the commitment is time flexible. Time flexible tasks, although flexible, still have deadlines. You have a choice as to when you are going to do the task up until you reach that deadline. Once you reach the deadline the choice is no longer yours. When the deadline arrives you now have to race against the clock to complete the task. Not only do you lose control of your time when the deadline arrives but I believe the quality of what you produce is diminished and in some circumstances, at the last minute, the task can actually take longer to complete than it would have if you had done it earlier.

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Quality or Quantity? Have you ever heard anyone say “I do my best work at the last minute.” If I were to ask the five people that work most closely with that person would those five people agree with that statement? I bet not. Why do we believe that we do such great work at the last minute? Well, we did a lot of work in a little bit of time, it must be good! We’re not really measuring quality, we’re measuring quantity. At the last minute, you certainly produce more quality than not doing the task at all but do you produce better quality than getting to the task ahead of time? Let’s say you have a performance appraisal due today and you are going to write it today. Contrast that with an appraisal for which you have been taking notes over the course of a year and you’re writing it in stages over the course of a month. Would there be a difference in the quality of these two reports? Even if you are the best writer in the world it would be hard to argue that the report written the day it’s due would be a better report. What’s missing the day the report is due is perspective, thought, reflection, research and other people’s input. Perhaps these things aren’t necessary for the appraisal you’re doing. If so, make that decision ahead of time and stop letting the deadline do it for you.


I have witnessed million dollar proposals, completed at the last minute, sent to clients with the wrong client name on them. I have been a part of meetings that wasted the time of everyone involved because they were put together at the last minute. I have witnessed legal action taken against companies because numbers were miscalculated in tax reports that were done at the 11th hour. When you wait until the last minute you can produce work but it’s not the same quality work you can produce when the task is completed in the appropriate amount of time. This does not mean that you should give tasks more time than they deserve. It just means that you should decide ahead of time the kind of quality you want to be associated with and not let the deadline decide for you. Waiting until the last minute is making a decision to let the quality of what you produce be left to chance. You may get away with this for some things in life but with other things it can spell disaster. Decide in advance the amount of time needed to produce the appropriate quality and set aside that amount of time before the deadline arrives. If you want to live by a mantra that will serve you well throughout your life, make it “I do my best work when I decide my best work is needed.” Shorter or Longer? Deadline or Best Time? Another mantra I hear a lot is “If you wait until the last minute, it only takes a minute.” When you wait until the last minute does a task actually take less time? Certainly tasks like taking a shower, doing the dishes or paying the bills can take less time when you add some urgency and put a hop in your step, but this does not work for everything. In most circumstances, at the last minute, the task will actually take a lot longer than it ordinarily would. Let me give you an example. Let’s say it’s Wednesday morning and you’re leaving on-time for work or an appointment you have scheduled. When you get in your car you notice that your gas light is on and your mileage indicator reads three miles until empty. You didn’t plan any extra time this morning to stop and get gas but you fear if you don’t stop you won’t make it. You know what, if you pop in really quickly, make a couple of green lights and avoid some school buses you might still be able to make it on time so you start to rush. You take a back road that dumps you out right near a gas station that is close to your home. You make two green lights you didn’t expect and it must be a holiday of some kind because the school zone sign that normally blinks “15 mph” is turned off. You see the sign for the gas station up ahead and you are two minutes ahead of where you expected. This might just happen! You get into the right lane and no one in the line of traffic ahead of you pulls into the station,

yes! You put on your blinker, you pull into the station and all your hopes come to a crashing halt. You now know why none of the cars in front of you pulled in. Not only is every pump busy, there are two cars staring you down waiting for the next available pump and three of the cars at the pumps are empty with no drivers in them. Now, because you’re late, you decide to only put five dollars worth of gas in your car so you can leave faster, which means what? You’ll be doing this all over again tomorrow. Did I mention that the gas price is $.18 higher than it was at a station you passed on your way home yesterday? Ouch! In most cases the deadline is not the best time for a task to get completed in the least amount of time. This principle applies to more than just getting gas. Have you ever tried to do a report at the last minute and found out you need information from someone who is on vacation today. Tried to grocery shop the day before a holiday or attempted to get a car wash the Friday before a three-day weekend or ventured to make reservations for Valentine’s or Mother’s Day the same day? If you have then you know that at the last minute these tasks take more time to complete, not less. When you wait until the last minute you relinquish your ability to choose the best and least amount of time for a task to take. How about this one? Have you ever run out on the day of a party to buy a gift for someone? This is certainly not a situation that will save you time. Making a separate trip to purchase any one item is a big waste of time. By adding that gift purchase into a trip you already had planned you would have saved a lot of time. If you wanted to save even more time you could make your purchase on the internet and with enough advance notice, the shipping would be minimal. If you wanted to take it one step further you could even make several gift purchases on the same website and depending on where you’re shopping you can often receive free shipping above a certain dollar amount. You would have saved a lot of time, kept your costs the same and had the gift arrive at your doorstep. Waiting until the deadline doesn’t save you time, it only creates an urgent environment that feels like things are being done more quickly. When you look at the total picture “the last minute” doesn’t save time, it wastes it. If you want a new mantra that will serve you well adopt this one… “Ahead of time saves time!” Benefits of Planning Mantras are serious business because they drive a lot of our decision making. Be careful of the mantras you live by and think them through before you commit to one. “I do my best work at the last minute” and “If you do it at the last minute it only takes a minute” are mantras that cause a lot of Spring 2017

people to make bad decisions. The key to moving away from procrastination and a reactive lifestyle is simply planning. When we are planning we are deciding the best time for tasks to get completed and not letting the deadlines decide for us. This not only improves quality and reduces the amount of time each task can take; it reduces urgency, fear, stress, pressure, anxiety and even costs. When you look at achieving results, selecting the best and most appropriate amount of time for a task to be completed beats procrastination hands down. If you have time to have things take longer than they should then procrastination is for you. If you don’t have the time or the desire to be associated with quality that is not up to your standards then planning can take you there. Take time each day, week and month for planning and put an end to the wasted time and poor quality associated with procrastination.

Steve McClatchy is a speaker, trainer, consultant, New York Times Bestselling author and entrepreneur. He founded Alleer Training and Consulting out of his passion for continual improvement and his belief that when we stop growing, learning, gaining experience, achieving goals and improving, we stop living. His firm focuses on helping companies and individuals improve performance and achieve outstanding results in the areas of Leadership, Performance, Personal Growth, and Work/ Life Engagement. His client list includes Pfizer, Microsoft, Disney, Comcast, Accenture, Super Bowl Champions Baltimore Ravens, DHL Europe, Tiffany and Co., Wells Fargo and many others. He is a frequent guest lecturer in many of America’s top business graduate schools including Harvard and Wharton. Steve’s book, Decide: Work Smarter, Reduce Your Stress and Lead by Example, debuted at #2 on the New York Times Bestsellers list and also was named a New York Times Bestselling Business Book for February 2014. Steve is the eleventh of twelve children and grew up outside of Philadelphia. He lives with his wife and four kids in Malvern, Pa. He has a BA in Finance and a BA in Economics and has been involved in the Big Brother/Big Sister program for over 25 years.

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Copyright is a form of protection given to authors of original works, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and other intellectual works. 54

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SHOULD I

COPYRIGHT MY WEBSITE? By Andrew A. Gonzales, Esq. The Internet makes it possible for businesses to reach millions of potential customers with a website. However, the Internet can be a source of liability for a company that is careless in publishing information. If you have a blog, write articles, or manage an online magazine, chances are you have experienced—or will have—content stolen. The stolen content can be reposted on other blogs, article websites, and personal websites without proper attribution. Sometimes website content is copied in its entirety from your site to another website. There are also situations where your content is reposted with proper attribution, but without your permission. The good news is that no matter how or why your content is used without your prior knowledge: there are measures you can take for such protection. There are even ways to prevent your content from being stolen in the first place. How Do I Find Out If Content Has Been Stolen? Set alerts which make it simple to keep an eye on your website content and potential piracy. Set alerts for both your domain name and business name so anytime they show up in the search engine, you receive notification. Who Owns or Hosts the Site? Contact the offending party directly to put them on notice to immediately remove infringing content. If this request falls on deaf ears, contact the online service provider [OSP]. OSPs are often more efficient when it comes to removing potentially infringing content than web owners. The Digital Millennium Copyright Act [DMCA] is landmark legislation that updated U.S. Copyright Law to meet the demands of the digital age. You can also send a DMCA Takedown Notice to the OSP requesting that they remove or block the offending pages from the suspect website.

What is a Copyright? Copyright is a form of protection given to authors of original works, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and other intellectual works. A copyright automatically comes into existence the moment an author fixes work in a tangible form. This protection gives the owner of a copyright several exclusive rights: • to reproduce the work; • to prepare derivative works (works that adapt the original work); • to perform or display the work publicly; • to distribute copies of the work to the public by sale, rent or lease.

protect the textual, graphic and audio content of a site. All of these components should be submitted to obtain the broadest scope of legal protection.

Why Should I consider Copyright Registration? You’ve probably noticed phrases like “All Rights Reserved” or “Copyright 2016”, or perhaps the copyright symbol and a date at the bottom of a website. What does this mean? Do I need to copyright my website? Registering a copyright with the United States Copyright Office is not mandatory. Copyright protection exists without registration; however, the “work” must be registered prior to filing an infringement case in court. In addition, the copyright owner will be eligible to receive statutory and actual damages as well as legal costs and attorneys' fees from a copyright infringer. Registration provides notice to the public that you own the work making it more difficult for someone to claim they unknowingly infringed upon your copyright. There is also added credibility registration brings to the work. Should I Register my Website? Copyright violation is illegal, but it can be difficult to prosecute offenders without copyright registration establishing a public record of ownership. If the content of your website is original (not a template), or if it includes an original work, it can be protected. Website registration will generally be made to Spring 2017

Putting the Public on Notice If a website contains copyrightable materials, a copyright notice should, at the very least, be placed on the site’s home page. Although not required by law, it is not a bad idea to place notice on every page of the website. The circle 2© puts the world on notice that you claim a copyright in the work. The proper way to use the 3© is in connection with the year of first publication and the copyright owner’s name (i.e.4© 2016 Jane Doe or Copyright 2016 Jane Doe). If you really want to make it clear that all aspects of your site are copyrighted, you may use a notice such as: All website design, text, graphics, selection and arrangement thereof, and software are the copyrighted works of Jane Doe 5© Copyright 2016. Content theft on the Internet will always be a problem. Bear in mind that U.S. Copyright laws, cease and desist letters, careful monitoring, and all other actions can only get you so far. There is no 100% foolproof way to stop such action, but legal intervention may be warranted.

Andrew A. Gonzalez, Esq. is an experienced attorney with over twenty-five years in practice. He focuses his attention on business and intellectual property matters. He provides sophisticated services to commercial and individual clients who need to effectively compete in a business environment. For more information, please call 914 220-5474 or visit www.golawny.com.

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ASSOCIATION ENDORSED PARTNERS

ASSOCIATION SPONSORS

ASSOCIATION SUPPORTERS

For IFEA sponsorship opportunities, contact Kaye Campbell, Director of Partnerships & Programs at (208) 433-0950 ext. 815 or kaye@ifea.com


2017 IFEA Webinar Series

IFEA is pleased to present our 2017 Webinar Series! Offering online educational sessions hosted by industry leaders and special guests, the IFEA Webinar series covers a wide variety of topics important to your organization’s success.

2017 IFEA WEBINAR SCHEDULE THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2017

Patrons with Disabilities and Your Security Team Laura Grunfeld, Owner & Founder, Everyone’s Invited, LLC Sheffield, MA

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2017

Valuation: Stop Guessing & Gambling on Your Sponsorship Fees Bruce Erley, CFEE, APR, President & CEO, Creative Strategies Group, Denver, CO

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2017

10 Tips to Creating a Responsible Alcohol Program That Gives Back Karen, Shostak, CFEE, Director of Sales, Friends of the Festival Owner, C.O.R.E. Training Services, Chattanooga, TN Friends of the Festival & C.O.R.E. Training Services

THURSDAY, MARCH 9, 2017

Preventing and Responding to Sexual Assault Incidents at Your Event Dr. Kari Sampsel, MD, FRCPC, DipForSci University of Ottawa, Department of Emergency Medicine Medical Director - Sexual Assault and Partner Abuse Care Program, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

THURSDAY, MARCH 23, 2017

Free Media: Big PR Ideas for Smaller Festivals Mark Demko, Sr. Director of Communications, ArtsQuest Bethlehem, PA

THURSDAY, APRIL 6, 2017

Millennials: Harnessing their Power as Workers, Volunteers & Attendees Penny McBride, CFEE, President/CEO Fredericksburg Chamber of Commerce, Fredericksburg, TX

THURSDAY, APRIL 20, 2017

Webinars are easy to attend . . . just view and listen to the presentation online from the comfort of your own computer - without even leaving your desk! No Travel Expense Required. Can’t make the live presentation of the Webinar? All Live webinars are recorded and are available for purchase to watch at your leisure. What better way to receive great educational information by great presenters while saving both time and travel expenses!

Event Marketing Lessons Learned from the 2016 Election Sean King, Principle, Aspire Consulting Group, Allentown, PA

Registering for a Webinar: Live Webinars are available for purchase via any of the following methods: • Online at the IFEA Store • Faxing or mailing in the Webinar Registration Form

your computer. Gather additional staff, volunteers, or board members around your computer so they too can join you for this learning experience at no additional charge!

THURSDAY, MAY 11, 2017

Buy More, Save More Webinar Special Offers: The more Webinars purchased, the more available for free. May combine Live Webinar Presentations and Webinars on Demand to take advantage of this special offer. (Call, Mail or Fax orders only, not available for online purchasing) • BUY 3 Webinars and Receive 1 FREE • BUY 5 Webinars and Receive 2 FREE • BUY 10 Webinars and Receive 5 FREE • CFEE Elective Credit: If working toward your CFEE Certification each indiviual webinar is eligible for one CFEE Elective Credit.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2017

• Questions? Contact: Nia Hovde, Director of Marketing & Communications at: nia@ ifea.com

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2017

Webinar Start Time in Your Time Zone: 7:00 a.m. Hawaii 9:00 a.m. Alaska 10:00 a.m. Pacific 11:00 a.m. Mountain 12:00 p.m. Central 1:00 p.m. Eastern 6:00 p.m. GMT Webinar Length: 60 Minutes Individual Webinar Cost: • $59 - IFEA Members • $59 - Association Alliance Members • $99 - Non-IFEA Members Registration cost is per computer site for as many people as you can sit around

THURSDAY, MAY 4, 2017

An Ethical Dilemma – The Estimation of Attendance Dr. Vern Biaett, CFEE, Assistant Professor of Event Management Nido R. Qubein School of Communication, High Point University High Point, NC A Proactive Approach to Claims, Incident Reporting and Cyber Liability Risks for Festivals Andrew Vandepopulier, Producer Mike Rea, Recreation Sales Manager Haas & Wilkerson Insurance, Fairway, KS 20 New Ideas for Online Marketing Cassie Roberts, Partnership & Marketing Director Jessica Bybee-Dziedzic, Director of Partnerships, Saffire, Austin, TX

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2017

We the People: The Effect of Constitutional Amendments and Other Laws on Events Jeff English, CFEE, Senior Vice President/General Council Kentucky Derby Festival, Louisville, KY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2017

Merchandise Strategies Built for Results Stephen King, CFEE, Executive Director, Des Moines Arts Festival Des Moines, IA

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2017

Keys to a Successful Volunteer Management Program Stephanie Donoho, CFEE, Owner Stephanie Donoho Consulting, Honoka’a, HI Sponsorship Jumpstart! 45 Sponsorship Ideas in 45 Minutes Gail Alofsin, Director of Corporate Partnerships Newport Harbor Corporation, Newport, RI

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2017

© Copyright 2017. The presentation, materials and content of these Webinars are the intellectual property of the International Festivals & Events Association (IFEA) and the specific presenter for each webinar. They are presented for the educational use of each paying customer to the IFEA. Any reproduction, rebroadcast or reselling of this webinar, or the content contained within, by an outside party, without the expressed written consent of the IFEA is strictly prohibited.

Spring 2017

17 Spectacular Special Event Trends and Ideas from 2017 Ted Baroody, President, Norfolk Festevents, Norfolk, VA

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Thursday, January 26, 2017

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Mountain Time Patrons with Disabilities and Your Security Team Laura Grunfeld Owner & Founder Everyone’s Invited, LLC Sheffield, MA You have security staff posted throughout your event: at the gates, the stages, the viewing platforms, parking, etc. They are conducting searches, checking for drugs, assisting in an emergency, screening service animals, answering questions, and so much more. All of your security team members need basic accessibility awareness training but certain teams will need additional specialized training. Take this seminar to learn what you can do to help your security team accommodate and serve your patrons with disabilities. Laura Grunfeld is the owner and founder of Everyone’s Invited, LLC a consulting, training, and production company specializing in helping producers make their events more accessible to people with disabilities. Laura has worked with festivals large and small, and was the main architect of the award winning Access Program at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival in the late 1990s. She has since consulted with, and designed and implemented Access Programs for, events across the nation including Bonnaroo, Outside Lands, Governors Ball, The Meadows, TomorrowWorld, Firefly, Life is Good, Rothbury, Electric Forest, Phish, and many more.

Thursday, February 9, 2017

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Mountain Time Valuation: Stop Guessing & Gambling on Your Sponsorship Fees Bruce Erley, CFEE, APR President & CEO Creative Strategies Group Denver, CO How do you determine your sponsorship fee? Most guess based upon what they need, not based upon the value of the package to the sponsor. You’d be surprised to learn 58

that most event producers are underpricing sponsorship. Join sponsorship expert Bruce Erley to learn what goes into calculating a fair market price that provides great ROI for both you and your partners. Learn the methods and metrics of calculating sponsor fees including the tangible valuation rights of benefits, the intangible value or “halo effect” of being associated with your event, plus some new innovative online tools to help you in the process. Bruce L. Erley, CFEE, APR, is the President and CEO of the Creative Strategies Group, a full-service sponsorship and event marketing agency based in Denver, Colorado which he founded in September, 1995. Creative Strategies Group (CSG) specializes in sponsorship and event marketing consultation as well as forging partnerships between corporations and events, festivals, nonprofit organizations and other properties. In 2012, Erley served as the World Board Chairman of the International Festivals & Events Association (IFEA). He is a 2015 inductee into the IFEA Hall of Fame. He is Accredited in Public Relations (APR) by the Public Relations Society of America and a Certified Festival & Events Executive (CFEE) by the International Festivals and Events Association.

large scale corporate events. She has spent the last 12 years working in various areas of Festival and Event Production such as Admission, Artist Hospitality, Sponsorship, IT, Customer Loyalty Programs, Concessions and Operations with a focus on event alcohol sales. Her alcohol sales programs serve nearly 700,000 guests annually. In 2010, Karen wrote, developed, and founded C.O.R.E Alcohol Sales Training for Retailers and Special Events (Compliance Orientation and Responsibility Education) which is being converted to an online platform for Special Events to use globally.

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Sexual assault at festivals and events is a common occurrence which has garnered international media attention in recent months. This session will outline the scope of and risk factors for these assaults. It will also give practical prevention mechanisms and interventions you can undertake to keep all your attendees safe. Dr. Kari Sampsel is a staff Emergency Physician and the Medical Director of the Sexual Assault and Partner Abuse Care Program at the Ottawa Hospital and an Assistant Professor at the University of Ottawa. She graduated with honours from University of Calgary Cellular Molecular and Microbial Biology program and completed her Masters of Science in Biochemistry in the area of cancer biology. She next completed medical school and her Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada specialty training in Emergency Medicine at Queen’s University. She undertook fellowship training in Clinical Forensic Medicine at the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine in Melbourne, Australia, and is currently the only Canadian physician to hold this designation. She has been active in the

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Mountain Time 10 Tips to Creating a Responsible Alcohol Program That Gives Back Karen, Shostak, CFEE Director of Sales, Friends of the Festival Owner, C.O.R.E. Training Services Chattanooga, TN Friends of the Festival & C.O.R.E. Training Services Creating or maintaining a solid alcohol program at your event can be a monumental task. Permits, staffing, training, ordering, stocking, selling, monitoring, balancing, analyzing... the punch list for an efficient program is endless. In this webinar we will break down 10 helpful tips for the alcohol supply chain that can be applied to events of all sizes. Karen Shostak, CFEE grew up in Miami Florida and moved to Chattanooga TN in 2000. Her career in special events began in 2001 in the hospitality industry as a Director of Sales which led to producing

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Thursday, March 9, 2017

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Mountain Time Preventing and Responding to Sexual Assault Incidents at Your Event Dr. Kari Sampsel, MD, FRCPC, DipForSci University of Ottawa, Department of Emergency Medicine Medical Director - Sexual Assault and Partner Abuse Care Program Ottawa, Ontario, Canada


fields of forensic medicine and medical education, with multiple international conference presentations, publications and committee work. Dr. Sampsel has been instrumental in working with community groups and launching a number of community initiatives, including bystander intervention training for preventing sexual assault. She has been honoured with a number of national awards in recognition of her commitment to education and awareness.

Thursday, March 23, 2017

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Mountain Time Free Media: Big PR Ideas for Smaller Festivals Mark Demko Sr. Director of Communications ArtsQuest Bethlehem, PA For smaller events with limited budgets, the marketing dollars only go so far. In this presentation, Mark Demko will share tips and tactics for working with the media to take advantage of free media and promotional opportunities that will help expand your audience and promote your programs and events. You’ll discover: • PR 101 - Media Outreach Basics • Importance of Developing Good Relationships with the Media • Beyond the Press Release • What to do if no one picks up your story • How your resources can enhance the media’s programming/coverage • Working with Bloggers • Turning negatives into positives The second half of this session is an interactive discussion where attendees share their PR successes and misses, so come prepared to divulge a few of your own. Great ideas come from anywhere and you’ll leave with a handful you can try at your next festival or event. As Sr. Director of Communications for ArtsQuest, Mark Demko oversees media and public relations for the nonprofit arts organization that presents Musikfest, the nation’s largest free music festival, and 11 other festivals. A graduate of Moravian College in Bethlehem, where he earned his bachelor’s degree in communications/ journalism, he has more than 15 years

of experience in marketing, public relations, communications and program development. He serves or has served on several boards, including as past president of the Lehigh Valley Chapter of the International Association of Business Communicators.

Thursday, April 6, 2017

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Mountain Time Millennials: Harnessing their Power as Workers, Volunteers & Attendees Penny McBride, CFEE President/CEO Fredericksburg Chamber of Commerce Fredericksburg, TX They number more than the Baby Boomers and their consumer potential is unparalleled. But what they think, how they work and what they value leaves the rest of us scratching our collective heads. This session will provide context for what shaped this generation, what they want and need and strategies for working with them as colleagues and volunteers. Penny C. McBride, CFEE is the President & CEO of the Fredericksburg Chamber of Commerce. For 14 years prior to starting with the Chamber she owned Indigo Resource Group, an outsource firm that specialized in providing marketing, consulting and management services to tourism-related businesses and organizations. She continues to work as a consultant, speaker, trainer and writer. Her speaking clients have included the International Tour & Travel Research Association, Argentina Economic Development Federation, Dubai Events and Promotions Establishment, Hawaii Tourism Authority, Illinois Special Events Network, and Festivals & Events Ontario. Since 2008, she has worked on a contract basis as the Director of Business Development for the International Festivals & Events Association (IFEA). In this capacity she developed IFEA’s Economic Impact Assessment and Sponsor Forum products, along with a variety of other services. Penny also teaches two of the six required core courses for IFEA’s Certified Festival & Event Executive (CFEE) program. She earned her CFEE designation in 2009, Spring 2017

becoming part of an elite group of industry event professionals to hold this global designation.

Thursday, April 20, 2017

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Mountain Time Event Marketing Lessons Learned from the 2016 Election Sean King Principle Aspire Consulting Group Allentown, PA The 2016 Presidential election is still relatively close in our rearview mirror, however the lessons learned will reverberate for years to come. During this webinar, we’re not talking about the politics, but rather the strategies, gamesmanship and tactics used within a bruising $1.5 billion campaign that can be takeaways for us all in our future marketing, advertising and communication plans. This wide-ranging session will provide insight from an election campaign in which we all participated and will provide takeaways to help you in marketing and promoting your next event. Topics include identifying and motivating your base, the new social media reality, managing online content in the post-election landscape, smart marketing ROI, challenging the status quo, dancing with data and ten top takeaways to put to use as soon as you sign off from the session. Sean King is a Principle at Aspire Consulting Group in Allentown, PA and has been consulting with small businesses and non-profit organizations for over 20 years. He also blogs regularly at www.artsmarketingblog.org. You can follow Sean on Twitter @skingaspire or contact him at: sking.aspire@gmail.com.

Thursday, May 4, 2017

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Mountain Time An Ethical Dilemma – The Estimation of Attendance Dr. Vern Biaett, CFEE Assistant Professor of Event Management Nido R. Qubein School of Communication High Point University High Point, NC The idea that overstated attendance is not problematic is a false assumption.

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Attendance figures are key variables for marketing studies, operational logistics, experience design, sponsorship, economic and community impact assessment, and viewed as the most significant quantifiers of achievement and symbolic rhetoric. This session will explain the ethical implications of using inaccurate figures and introduce an analytical method for better estimation. Following a career that included producing festivals and events for the cities of Phoenix and Glendale, Arizona for twenty years, in 2006, Dr. Vern Biaett became a faculty associate at Arizona State University where he taught event management courses in a certificate program he co-created for eight years. In 2013 he completed his PhD in Community Development and Resources at ASU and in the fall of 2014 accepted his current position as the Assistant Professor of Events Management at High Point University in North Carolina where he has created one of the first Event Management majors in the USA. Dr. Biaett is a lifetime CFEE, a member of the North Carolina Association of Festivals & Events, was a founding member of the Arizona Festivals & Events Association, serves on the IFEA President’s Council, and is a past board member of the IFEA Foundation.

providers and insurance programs built specifically for Cyber Risks. After graduating from the University of Central Missouri with a degree in Business and Education Andrew Vandepopulier began working in the disaster and catastrophe claims field for Farmers Insurance. He spent 3 years working around the Midwest handling all types of claims from hail to wildfires. In 2010, Andrew joined Haas & Wilkerson’s Fair and Festival division and has been serving the insurance and risk management needs of the event world ever since. With Clients all over the country ranging from the largest fairs in the nation to the smallest festivals, we have a product for all types of events.

Thursday, May 11, 2017

Become an online marketing super star! If you are looking for a session jam packed with practical, usable strategies, then this one is for you! You will learn 20 revolutionary ideas you can implement for your organization throughout the year, including social media, best mobile practices and more. We’ll also cover recent changes to online platforms so you can ensure that you are always using the latest best practices. Your “genius status” awaits! Cassie Roberts has extensive experience with online marketing and event planning. She started working with Saffire in 2011 and since then, the company has grown from supporting a few great organizations in Texas to partnering with over 200 unique events, venues and destinations across the country. Cassie lives in Austin, TX, and if you’re looking to visit, can rival any tour guide in the city! Jessica Buybee-Dziedzic has a comprehensive background in online marketing, social media and website strategy. In 2007, she joined Wright Strategies, managing online projects for clients including KEEN Footwear, Nike and Frito Lay. In 2009, the Wright Strategies

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Mountain Time A Proactive Approach to Claims, Incident Reporting and Cyber Liability Risks for Festivals Andrew Vandepopulier, Producer Mike Rea, Recreation Sales Manager Haas & Wilkerson Insurance, Fairway, KS When your festival has a claim, whether it be a trip and fall or a catastrophic weather incident, you should always have an action plan and incident reporting procedure in place. We will discuss the areas which we find the most important and how to help your team prepare for these difficult times at your event. Additionally, we will also touch on the new exposure, Cyber Liability, facing many of your events today, highlighting the risks and the best ways to manage this risk through contracts, reputable 60

Thursday, October 26, 2017

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Mountain Time 20 New Ideas for Online Marketing Cassie Roberts, Partnership & Marketing Director Jessica Bybee-Dziedzic, Director of Partnerships Saffire Austin, TX

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team created Saffire, providing events, venues and destinations with websites and ticketing in a simple integrated platform. Today, the Saffire team serves hundreds of clients nationwide. Jessica is a Partnership Director for the company and in her free time loves to travel.

Thursday, November 2, 2017

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Mountain Time We the People: The Effect of Constitutional Amendments and Other Laws on Events Jeff English, CFEE Senior Vice President/General Council Kentucky Derby Festival Louisville, KY The list of complex legal issues facing the festival and event industry continues to grow each year. Let’s spend an hour discussing your event’s legal standing on such hot topics as protestors, open carry, intern/volunteer labor, trademarks, and taking (and using) pictures of your patrons at events. We’ll reserve some time for Q&A so you can save your budget on those legal bills back home! Jeff English, CFEE, is the Senior Vice President and General Counsel for the Kentucky Derby Festival. After graduating from Washburn University School of Law in Topeka, Kansas in 2004, Jeff worked in politics and practiced law before joining the Derby Festival staff in 2007. He is charged with overseeing all of the Festival’s legal issues and serving as its risk management officer. He also manages the Merchandise Department and serves as the President of the Kentucky Derby Festival Foundation, the 501(c)3 charitable arm of KDF. He was named a member of the 2014 class of Business First’s Forty Under 40.


Thursday, November 9, 2017

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Merchandise Strategies Built for Results Stephen King, CFEE Executive Director Des Moines Arts Festival Des Moines, IA

Keys to a Successful Volunteer Management Program Stephanie Donoho, CFEE Owner Stephanie Donoho Consulting Honoka’a, HI

Sponsorship Jumpstart! 45 Sponsorship Ideas in 45 Minutes Gail Alofsin Director of Corporate Partnerships Newport Harbor Corporation Newport, RI

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Mountain Time

Winner of IFEA’s Best Overall Merchandise Program, the Des Moines Arts Festival’s merchandising program nets significant income as a result of a fresh and strategic approach. Stephen will present his strategy to key fundamentals of building a merchandise program that is built for results. Identifying a strategy, determining your market, tips on discovering what is fresh and current in the retail market, POS options, and managing an RFP process and budgeting will be just some of the topics covered. Stephen M. King, CFEE, is the executive director of the award-winning Des Moines Arts Festival® in Des Moines, Iowa. Projects throughout his career in events have garnered more than 200 awards from the International Festivals and Events Association, International Downtown Association and numerous publications. Before turning his full attention in July of 2011 to the Des Moines Arts Festival®, King led Des Moines’ Downtown Events Group from 2006-2011 producing the U.S. Cellular® World Food Festival, Holiday Lights Des Moines, Skywalk Golf, and GuideOne ImaginEve! He arrived in Des Moines after serving as president/CEO of Celebrate Fairfax, Inc. in northern Virginia. Prior he was the director of the festivals and events division of Downtown Fort Worth, Inc. in Fort Worth, Texas, where he produced the MAIN ST. Fort Worth Arts Festival. King is a 25-year veteran of the festival and events industry, a Certified Festival and Events Executive (CFEE), Chair-Elect of the International Festivals and Events Association World Board of Directors, member of the IFEA World President’s Council and IFEA’s Foundation Board and instructor for IFEA’s Event Management School at Oglebay. He serves on the board of directors of Bravo Greater Des Moines, is a past board member of the National Association of Independent Artists and is a founding member of arts festival’s industry universal online application system, ZAPPlication™.

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Mountain Time

This Webinar will first help event planners and organizers understand the reasons why people volunteer, and then help them design a successful Volunteer Management Program to meet those volunteers’ needs. During the webinar, we’ll review the steps of the Volunteer Management Cycle; review industry standards used to measure the Return on Investment (ROI) for a volunteer’s time; and explore how lessons learned throughout the year can be incorporated, to create an even stronger program moving forward. This webinar is a great overview for those new to volunteer management, as well as division heads, committee chairs, and management staff responsible for supervising volunteers in action. Stephanie Donoho, CFEE is the owner of Stephanie Donoho Consulting, which provides small business and non-profit management services to companies in the areas of: government relations, communications, fundraising and development, strategic and business planning, event sponsorship development and activation, and events management. Selected clients include: Kohala Coast Resort Association, Friends of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaiian Legacy Tours, Visitor Aloha Society of Hawaii, Kona Brewfest, Duke’s Ocean Fest, Tiffany’s Art Agency, and the County of Kauai. Prior to starting her consulting company, Stephanie served as the Tourism Specialist for the County of Hawaii for eight years, where she managed an annual budget of more than $1.5 million in transient accommodations taxes that were re-invested in tourism product development, community festivals, marketing and events. Stephanie has a Bachelor of Arts degree in communications and sociology, cum laude, from Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and her CFEE from the International Festivals and Events Association.

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11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Mountain Time

Get your roller skates on while Gail shares over 20 years of best practices and award-winning ideas in this fast paced, content rich Webinar. From KidStops to greyhounds in addition to creative activations and social savvy (both media and in person) – you will be ready to jumpstart your event with new programs and a renewed passion for what you do. Gail Alofsin is the Director of Corporate Partnerships, Newport Harbor Corporation and has had the privilege of being involved in all aspects of event production for over two decades. Her current position is focused on prospecting, procuring and retaining corporate sponsors for the concerts and events produced at the Newport Yachting Center. A graduate of Tufts University, Gail’s passion for education led her to the University of Rhode Island where she has been welcomed as an adjunct professor in the Communication, Journalism and Public Relations departments since 1999 – 30 consecutive semesters! Gail has been speaking for over two decades at national and international conferences inclusive of IEG (International Events Group) and IFEA (International Festivals & Events Association). Her new book, Your Someday is NOW, focuses on work/life integration and personal branding, and was released in January of 2014.

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Thursday, December 7, 2017

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Mountain Time 17 Spectacular Special Event Trends and Ideas from 2017 Ted Baroody President Norfolk Festevents Norfolk, VA What was spectacular in ’17? Tune in to this Webinar as it will present research and highlights from around the globe showing you some of the most spectacular trends and ideas from the world of events, sports and entertainment. Whether these timely trends and innovative ideas are from the big city or the small stage, they will all come to life for you to make your own. Let this be the catalyst to planning your 2018 of eventful experiences! Ted Baroody is a graduate of North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. After college he moved to Norfolk, Virginia to start his own small sports marketing company, Victory Promotions. After a couple of years of power boat racing production under Victory Promotions, he served as Marketing Director for a group of local radio stations in Virginia Beach, Virginia for 5 years. From 1996 to 2011 he was the Director of Development of the not-for-profit event marketing company, Norfolk Festevents, Ltd. known as “Festevents,” and is now the President of Festevents. Ted also works with many non-profit organizations as a volunteer, event coordinator and as a board member and serves on both the IFEA World and IFEA Foundation Boards of Directors.

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Webinars On Demand Looking for a different webinar topic – don’t forget to check out our Webinars OnDemand – previously recorded webinars that are now available for download. For a complete list of available Webinars On Demand, just go to the IFEA Store. How Webinars Work IFEA Webinars are Website-enabled seminars that function much like a teleconference. They use your computer’s Website browser to display presentation materials and other applications important to the Webinar topic, with the audio portion of the presentation provided either through your computer speakers or over the phone. Once your registration has been submitted, you will receive an email from the IFEA confirming that you have been registered for the Webinar. The day before the scheduled Webinar, you will receive an email with specific instructions on how to log in for the Webinar. You will receive this email again, the day of the Webinar. Once this information has been received, joining a Webinar is as easy as 1, 2, 3! 1. Log In To The Webinar: To start the Webinar, log in to the specific website address that you received for the Webinar and connect to the presentation. Webinars can be viewed on virtually any

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computer with a high-speed internet connection. 2. Listening To The Webinar: After you’ve logged in and gained access to the Website, you have two options to listen to the audio portion. You can either dial the telephone number provided to hear the webinar via a conference call, or if you have computer speakers, you may listen via your computer speakers. (The phone number provided will not be an 800 number, so all costs for the call will be incurred by the registrant.) 3. Sit Back and Learn: Once you are logged in, all you need to do is sit back and learn! It’s just like any other seminar, except you’re sitting comfortably at your own desk! Throughout the webinar, you are able to ask questions to the presenter using the online Question/ Answer messaging system that is part of the Webinar screen. The Webinar Organizer will view your question and present it to the speaker at the end of the presentation. Along with the Webinar itself, all registered attendees will receive a copy of the presentation used for the webinar prior to the webinar start time start time. All paid registrations will also receive the recorded version of the Webinar after the live Webinar presentation.


Upcoming Live Webinar Presentation Registration Form REGISTRATION CONTACT INFORMATION Webinar Participant: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Webinar Participant Email: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Organization: ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City, State/Province, Zip Code: ______________________________________________________________________ Phone: _________________________ PURCHASE INFORMATION

IFEA Member Association Alliance

Non-IFEA Member

Total

Individual Webinars:________Quantity X

$59 (USD)

$99 (USD)

___________

Purchasing Webinars in Bulk: BUY 3 Webinars and Receive 1 FREE

$177 (USD)

$297 (USD)

___________

BUY 5 Webinars and Receive 2 FREE

$295 (USD)

$495 (USD)

___________

BUY 10 Webinars and Receive 5 FREE

$590 (USD)

$990 (USD)

___________

TOTAL

___________

PAYMENT INFORMATION Select method of payment:

VISA

MasterCard

American Express

Discover

Check (make check payable to IFEA in U.S. funds)

Print Cardholder Name: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Signature: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Credit Card Number: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Expiration Date: _______________________________________________ CVN Code: _______________________(MC/Visa-3 digit code back) (AMX-4 digit code front)

2017 UPCOMING LIVE WEBINARS: To register please make your selection by checking (√) from the webinars below: ❍

Thursday, January 26, 2017 ❍ Patrons with Disabilities and Your Security Team Laura Grunfeld, Owner & Founder, Everyone’s Invited, LLC, Sheffield, MA

Thursday, February 9, 2017 ❍ Valuation: Stop Guessing & Gambling on Your Sponsorship Fees Bruce Erley, CFEE, APR, President & CEO, Creative Strategies Group, Denver, CO

❍ Thursday, February 23, 2017 10 Tips to Creating a Responsible Alcohol Program That Gives Back Karen, Shostak, CFEE, Director of Sales, Friends of the Festival, Owner, C.O.R.E. Training Services, Friends of the Festival & C.O.R.E. Training Services Chattanooga, TN ❍ Thursday, March 9, 2017 Preventing and Responding to Sexual Assault Incidents at Your Event Dr. Kari Sampsel, MD, FRCPC, DipForSci University of Ottawa, Department of Emergency Medicine Medical Director - Sexual Assault and Partner Abuse Care Program, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada ❍ Thursday, March 23, 2017 Free Media: Big PR Ideas for Smaller Festivals Mark Demko, Sr. Director of Communications, ArtsQuest, Bethlehem, PA

Thursday, April 6, 2017 Millennials: Harnessing their Power as Workers, Volunteers & Attendees Penny McBride, CFEE, President/CEO, Fredericksburg Chamber of Commerce, Fredericksburg, TX

Thursday, November 2, 2017 We the People: The Effect of Constitutional Amendments and Other Laws on Events Jeff English, CFEE, Senior Vice President/General Council, Kentucky Derby Festival, Louisville, KY

❍ Thursday, April 20, 2017 Event Marketing Lessons Learned from the 2016 Election Sean King, Principle, Aspire Consulting Group, Allentown, PA

Thursday, November 9, 2017 Merchandise Strategies Built for Results Stephen King, CFEE, Executive Director, Des Moines Arts Festival, Des Moines, IA

❍ Thursday, May 4, 2017 An Ethical Dilemma – The Estimation of Attendance Dr. Vern Biaett, CFEE, Assistant Professor of Event Management Nido R. Qubein School of Communication, High Point University, High Point, NC ❍ Thursday, May 11, 2017 A Proactive Approach to Claims, Incident Reporting and Cyber Liability Risks for Festivals Andrew Vandepopulier, Producer ❍ Mike Rea, Recreation Sales Manager Haas & Wilkerson Insurance, Fairway, KS

Thursday, November 16, 2017 Keys to a Successful Volunteer Management Program Stephanie Donoho, CFEE, Owner, Stephanie Donoho Consulting, Honoka’a, HI

Thursday, October 26, 2017 20 New Ideas for Online Marketing Cassie Roberts, Partnership & Marketing Director Jessica Bybee-Dziedzic, Director of Partnerships Saffire, Austin, TX

Thursday, November 30, 2017 Sponsorship Jumpstart! 45 Sponsorship Ideas in 45 Minutes Gail Alofsin, Director of Corporate Partnerships Newport Harbor Corporation, Newport, RI Thursday, December 7, 2017

17 Spectacular Special Event Trends and Ideas from 2017 Ted Baroody, President, Norfolk Festevents, Norfolk, VA

Registration cost is per computer site for as many people as you can sit around your computer. Once your registration has been submitted, you will receive an email from the IFEA confirming that you have been registered for the Webinar. The week before the scheduled Webinar, you will receive an email with specific instructions on how to log in for the Webinar. You will receive this email again, the day before the Webinar and the hour before the scheduled Webinar. Webinars in Bulk offer is applicable to both Upcoming Live Webinar Presentations and Pre-Recorded Webinars On Demand. Payment must be received in full at time of registration to participate in Webinars. No refunds on webinar registration unless notified 24 hours prior to start of webinar.

If working towards your CFEE Cerification, each individual webinar is eligible for one CFEE Elective Credit.

International Festivals & Events Association • 2603 W Eastover Terrace • Boise, ID 83706 - U.S.A. Questions: Contact Nia Hovde, Director of Marketing & Communication at nia@ifea.com or Phone: +1-208-433-0950 ext: 3, Fax: +1-208-433-9812 • www.ifea.com


2017Call for Inductees Please submit the following information for your nomination:

A. INDIVIDUAL SUBMITTING NOMINEE 1. Name • Organization • Address • City • State Zip • Phone • Fax • Email 2. If your nominee is selected, will you be willing to help ensure that they attend the luncheon? 3. If your nominee is selected, will you be willing to assist the IFEA and the inductee in gathering materials to prepare their induction video? B. NOMINEE INFORMATION 1. Name • Position • Address • City • State • Zip Phone • Fax • Email

Known as the associations most prestigious honor, the IFEA Hall of Fame recognizes those outstanding individuals who, through their exceptional work and achievements, have made a significant contribution to the Festivals and Events Industry. The International Festivals & Events Association is now accepting nominations from its members for those individuals who meet this standard for the 2017 Induction Ceremony. The Hall of Fame Committee will review all nominations and select one or more individuals to be honored in to the IFEA Hall of Fame. The Honoree (s) will be the guest (s) of the IFEA on an all-expense* paid trip to the 62nd Annual IFEA Convention & Expo, Date and Location TBD, where they will be inducted at a reception, in their honor. NOMINATION CRITERIA Nominations must represent a current or past IFEA member who has made substantial achievements and/or contributions to the festivals and events industry. Nominees can be retired and represent any facet of our industry (i.e. vendor, supporter, senior professional, etc.). (Current IFEA Board of Directors and Staff Members are not eligible to be nominated).

C. NOMINATION QUESTIONS • Please answer each of the following questions citing specific examples. Points will be awarded for each question. Points awarded are listed below. • Please provide up to a 1 (one) page response (single sided) for each of the below questions, for a maximum total of 4 (four) pages. 1. Explain how your nominee has made a difference to the festivals & events industry. (25 points) 2. Submit a general overview of your nominee’s career, including organizations they have worked for, positions held, titles, awards, etc. (25 points) 3. Describe the level of involvement your nominee has had with the IFEA during their career. (25 points) 4. What void would there be if he/she were not an event professional? (25 points) D. ENTRY FORMAT: Please EMAIL your nomination in a Word document. E. SUBMIT ENTRIES TO: Nia Hovde, Director of Marketing & Communications at nia@ifea.com F. QUESTIONS: Please contact: Nia Hovde – nia@ifea.com +1-208-433-0950 ext: 3 To view a complete list of past inductees and their stories go to the Industry Awards / Hall of Fame section on www.ifea.com.

Nominations should be submitted no later than 5:00 PM (MST) Monday, June 5th, 2017

Includes 2 nights hotel, airfare and Convention registration. 64

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IFEA WORLD FESTIVAL & EVENT CITY

©

AWARD PROGRAM “Recognizing the best in city-event leadership and partnerships around the world.”


ABOUT THE

IFEA WORLD FESTIVAL & EVENT CITY AWARD

©

The IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © was designed and created as a way for the global festivals and events industry to openly encourage, support, learn from and recognize positive local environments for festivals and events worldwide. If you are considering applying for this prestigious award, you already understand the important role that festivals and events play in your community by: • Adding to the quality of life for local residents; • Driving tourism; • Showcasing a positive community brand and image to the media, business community, and visitors; • Creating economic impact that translates into jobs, tax revenues and enhanced infrastructure improvements; • Providing enhanced exposure opportunities for the arts, not-for-profit causes and other community programs and venues; • Promoting volunteerism and bonding the many elements of the community together; • Encouraging community investment, participation, creativity and vision; and • Building irreplaceable ‘community capital’ for the future. To achieve and maximize these important returns for the markets that they serve, we must clearly understand their direct correlation to the partnerships with and support from the local community, at all levels, that is critical to the success and sustainability of existing festivals and events, as well as the ability to attract and encourage new events. Through this special award the IFEA is pleased to recognize those cities and markets who have worked, through concerted efforts, to provide an environment conducive to successful festivals and events. For each year’s selected cities, the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © provides: • A strong platform from which to recognize the success of current and on-going efforts by every component of your community; • A clear positioning statement to encourage continued infrastructure, policy and process enhancement and expansion; and • A powerful marketing statement for use in recruiting and encouraging new festivals, events and businesses. We look forward to working with you, your city and community partners to recognize the quality efforts and support that you have successfully developed over the years and should be rightfully proud of. Thank you for your continued support of, and partnership with, the festivals and events industry. Best of Luck with your entry!

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RECIPIENT CITIES INCLUDE:

IFEA World Festival & Event Award recipient cities come from all over the globe including such cities as: Sydney, Australia; Dubai, United Arab Emirates; SĂŁo Paulo, Brazil; Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Jinju City, Gyeonsangnam-do, South Korea; Krakow, Poland; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Greater Palm Springs - CA, USA; Ottawa - Ontario, Canada; Boston - Massachusetts, USA; Maribor, Slovenia; Taupo - New Zealand; Ballito-KwaDukuza, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa and much, much more. A complete list of winning cities and details about each can be found at www.ifea.com.

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ENTRY INFORMATION Quick Reference Guide DEADLINES

• Entry Deadline: 5:00 p.m. (Mountain Time Zone) – Monday, July 10, 2017 • Entry must include completed entry, additional requested details and application form with payment • Due to time constraints in judging, late entries cannot be accepted.

FEES

The total cost to enter the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© is $695 (U.S. Dollars) for IFEA Members and $895 (U.S. Dollars) for non-IFEA Members per entry. Payment may be made using a Visa, MasterCard or American Express credit card or by Check (made payable to the IFEA) or by Wire Transfer. For more information on Wire Transfers and transfer fees, please contact IFEA at +1-208-433-0950.

ELIGIBILITY

Applications for the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © may be submitted by the City itself or by an event(s) on behalf of their City. It is our hope that the application process itself will result in an even closer working partnership and dialogue between the Applicant City and the festivals and events who serve that market. Applicants may re-apply for the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © each year.

JUDGING

Judging of the IFEA World Festival & Event City entries is done by an international panel of respected event professionals, who have been pleased to discover that there are many amazing programs happening around the world that will help us all to raise the bar for our own communities, showing us what is possible – at every level – when vision and leadership combine. The IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © are presented on an individual basis to exemplary cities around the world that we hope others will emulate. The awards are not designed as a competition of one city against another, but rather to recognize those individual cities that have ‘raised the bar’ for everyone, taking into account the cultural, economic and geographic challenges that they have met, mastered and often changed along the way. For that reason, we may present multiple awards each year, while some will be encour68

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aged to strengthen or make adjustments to selected components of their entry criteria for reconsideration in future years.

SCORING SYSTEM

• A possible total of 100 points may be awarded to each entry based upon the individual components listed under Sections 1-6 of the overall entry. • Failure to meet all requirements or answer/ provide all necessary information may impact judging decisions and will result in a deduction of points. • If a section or element does not apply to your City, please state this within your entry (explaining why it does not apply) in order to avoid losing points.

SELECTION AND NOTIFICATION

• Award Recipients will be notified via email by Monday, August 14, 2017. Notification will go to the primary contact listed on the entry application. • The 2017 IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © will be presented during the IFEA’s 62nd Annual IFEA Convention & Expo, Date and Location TBD. Each recipient city will be highlighted in a brief video presentation at the award ceremony and on-site throughout the convention. • If you are unable to attend the IFEA’s 61st Annual Convention, Expo & Retreat to accept your award, please arrange for a representative to accept on your behalf. • IIf you are not present at the awards presentation to accept your award, it will be mailed to you 3-4 weeks after the convention concludes. Please provide a UPS or FedEx account number to charge shipping fees to, or a credit card number to charge for shipping fees.

MAXIMIZING YOUR AWARD

Being selected as an IFEA World Festival & Event City is only the beginning of the benefits to be gained from this special honor. The IFEA will help each recipient with ideas on how to maximize and leverage your award, with specific examples from previous recipients. • Each winning recipient of the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © will receive an engraved award suitable for indoor display and a personal letter of congratulations. • Duplicate IFEA World Festival & Event City awards, flags (for display or flying) and other recognition items are available for purchase by award recipients wishing to share their honor with the many partners who helped them to win. • Winning recipients will be provided with the rights to use the 2017 IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© Winner logo


on their websites, press releases and other appropriate City letterhead, brochures, marketing materials, etc. • The IFEA will announce all IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© recipients in an international press release to the world’s leading media sources, including all local market media contacts provided to the IFEA by selected applicants. • IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© recipients will be featured in a special on-line tribute section at www.ifea.com in perpetuity and in a special section of ie: the business of international events, the IFEA’s industry-leading magazine. • Each winning recipient will receive a oneyear complimentary IFEA membership.

RELEASE & USAGE

• By submitting your entry to the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award, you automatically grant the IFEA the right to use any materials from your entry for editorial, analytical, promotional or any other purpose without additional permission or compensation. All materials and photos submitted as part of the application will become the property of the IFEA. • Entries submitted are not able to be returned. Copies should be made prior to submitting your entry, as desired. Note: Proprietary or sensitive information will not be shared if identified clearly. • Winning applicants agree that the IFEA may use their City name and representative photos in all press releases and program marketing materials, both hard copy and electronic versions. • Your entry into the competition is acknowledgement of these terms.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Working in partnership with local community leadership, festivals, events, organizations and businesses, please provide a clear overview and understanding of the festival and event environment in your City/Market through your responses to each defined section. The application process in itself is a great opportunity to evaluate internally the areas where your City excels and other areas where you may be able to strengthen your efforts and further support local programs. Cities interested in being considered for the annual IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© must submit and include the following information: 1. A completed entry form providing contact and payment information.

2. A one (1) paragraph description of your city (to be used for promotional purposes by the IFEA). 3. An email list of your local media contacts in Excel format for IFEA for use in announcing the selected recipients. 4. An individual photograph representing your city - preferably of a festival setting within your city (at least 300 dpi in size). 5. A three (3) minute video presentation representing your City. (Refer to Important Details section below for video format.) 6. A one (1) page introductory letter stating why your City should be selected to receive the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award. 7. Your overall completed IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© Entry providing responses and supporting information for the following sections. Refer to pages 6-9 for detailed descriptions required for each section. This part of your entry must be submitted as one (1) singular entry piece/ document/PowerPoint/Pdf, etc.: ❍ Section 1: Community Overview ❍ Section 2: Community Festivals & Events ❍ Section 3: City/Government Support of Festivals & Events ❍ Section 4: Non-Governmental Community Support of Festivals & Events ❍ Section 5: Leveraging ‘Community Capital’ Created by Festivals & Events ❍ Section 6: Extra Credit To view examples of past IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© recipient entries, go to: www.ifea.com / Industry Awards / World Festival & Event City Award / Past Recipients.

IMPORTANT DETAILS

• Please submit your main entry (as listed in components 6-7 under Entry Requirements above), as one (1) singular entry piece/document/ PowerPoint/Pdf, etc. Components 1-5 listed under Entry Requirements may be submitted as separate pieces from the main entry, but must be submitted at the same time. • All entry information should be provided in English and typed using 10-point Arial font. • Please submit your overall entry via Email (preferred method of submitting entry.) Please create entry in a Word, PowerPoint, PDF document, tif, jpg or other standard format. If entry must be mailed, please submit your overall entry on a CD, or USB flash drive to the IFEA World Headquarters in the format listed above. • To submit Video portion of entry, please email video file as an MP4, WMF, MOV or provide a link to an online video location

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such as YouTube. If mailing video on a disk or USB Drive, please submit video as an MPF, WMF, MOV. (DVD’s should be encoded for Region 1 or Region 0 DVD capabilities.) • Entries over one Meg must be provided as a link to a fixed site with no expiration timeframe.

TIPS & POINTERS

• Not all components under a specific section will pertain to everyone. Don’t worry; there are no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ answers and our international judging panel will base their decisions on overall impressions after reviewing all of the submitted information. We are all learning from each other, with the goal of strengthening the partnerships, benefits and returns to our respective communities from the festivals and events that are such an important part of the community fabric and we hope to find additional new ideas being implemented from within all of the award entries that we can share in the future. • Responses to the requested information may require a straight-forward numerical answer, or a more descriptive definition. While we have placed no limits on length, we encourage you to provide the most succinct answers possible that clearly make your point. • If you have any questions or need clarification on any criteria, please do not hesitate to contact us. • Support materials, photos, videos, brochures, copies, etc. should be inserted following the responses to each section. • As needed, we may communicate with the primary contact on the application to clarify any questions that may arise.

SEND ENTRIES TO

Please email completed entries, application form and payment to: nia@ifea.com. Entry, payment and application form may be mailed if necessary. Be sure to provide entry on a disk or a USB Flash Drive in a word, PowerPoint, PDF or other standard format. Please mail to: IFEA World Festival & Event City Award 2603 W. Eastover Terrace Boise, ID 83706 U.S.A.

QUESTIONS?

Contact: • Steve Schmader at schmader@ifea.com • Nia Hovde at nia@ifea.com • Phone: +1-208-433-0950 ext:3

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IFEA World Festival & Event City Award

©

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Working in partnership with local community leadership, festivals, events, organizations and businesses, please provide a clear overview and understanding of the festival and event environment in your City/Market through responses to each of the following sections. The application process in itself is a great opportunity to evaluate internally the areas where your City excels and other areas where you may be able to strengthen your efforts and further support local programs. Please submit the following information: 1. A completed entry form providing contact and payment information. 2. A one (1) paragraph description of your city (to be used for promotional purposes by the IFEA) 3. An email list of your local media in Excel format for IFEA to use to announce the selected recipients. 4. An individual photograph representing your city - preferably of a festival setting within your city (at least 300 dpi in size). 5. A three (3) minute video presentation representing your city. (Refer to Important Details section for video format.) 6. A one (1) page introductory letter stating why your City should be selected to receive the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award. 7. Your overall completed IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© Entry providing responses and supporting information for Sections 1-6 below. This part of your entry must be submitted as one (1) singular entry piece/document/PowerPoint/Pdf, etc. Please refer to the Entry Requirements and Important Details sections for specific entry formats and details. To view examples of past IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© recipient entries, go to: www.ifea.com / Industry Awards / World Festival and Event City Award / Past Recipients

Section 1. Community Overview Goal: The information in this section should help provide us with a better understanding of your community and the infrastructure in place to host and/or support those producing and attending festivals and events. • Please provide an overview of your community that will provide us with as many elements as possible, such as: a. Current City Population b. Current SMSA or LUZ Population (Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area or Large Urban Zone) c. Population within a 50 Mile Radius of Applicant City d. Primary Festival and Event Venues Available (Indoor and Outdoor. For example: Theatres, Plazas, Bandshells, Parks, Stadiums, Fairgrounds, Sport Facilities, Convention Centers, etc., including those facilities planned for completion within the next two years. Include Estimated Capacities for each. For outdoor venues, use a formula of 1 person per 3 square feet if no other total capacity numbers are available.) e. Water and Power Accessibility in Outdoor Venues f. Hospital and Emergency Response Availability g. Total Number of Hotel Rooms Available h. Public Transportation Options i. Parking Availability (Paid lots, meters, and free) j. Walking Paths, Bicycle Lanes k. Estimated City Visitors Annually Attributed to Festivals and Events


Section 2. Community Festivals and Events Goal: The information in this section should provide us with an understanding of the diversity and success of current festivals and events that serve your city residents and visitors throughout the year. • Please provide us with a good overview of the leading festivals and events currently operating in your market. A full-year calendar of events is very helpful as we consider this area. Please provide the following for the ‘Top 10’ festivals or events in your market: a. Festival or Event Name b. Top Executive Contact Information c. Number of Years Festival or Event has been Produced d. Event Dates (Minimally the month held, with days if clearly defined – For example: the last weekend in June. If the event is a series, list the starting and ending dates – For example: Every Wednesday, June through August.) e. Primary Target Audience (For example: Families; Young Adults; Seniors; Children; Specific Cultural Heritage Groups; All Community Segments; Out-of-Market Visitors, etc.) f. Recurrence Cycle (Annually, Every 5 Years, etc.) g. Estimated Combined Aggregate Attendance

Section 3. City/Governmental Support of Festivals and Events Goal: The information in this section should help us to understand the strength and depth of support by the applicant City and other area governmental bodies (County, State, taxing districts, etc.) and demonstrate a clear awareness of event support needs by government agencies and officials. • Please define or describe each of the following elements (a-i) below, as completely and accurately as possible. • Where available and appropriate, please provide examples and copies. • If a section or element does not apply to your city, please state this within your entry and why it does not apply and/or what you may have/use instead. a. Defined and Accessible Public Objectives and Support Statements for Festivals and Events by the City and Other Local Government Agencies b. Direct Funding Support Provided to and/or Budgeted for Festivals and Events from the City or Other Government Agencies c. In-Kind Services Support Provided to and/or Budgeted for Festivals and Events from the City or Other Government Agencies d. Defined Role of the City in Festival and Event Approval e. City-Provided Festival and Event Process Coordination and Assistance Systems (For example: Existence of a City Events Department; ‘One-Stop Shopping’ for Permitting and Municipal Service Needs; Shared Resource Programs for Volunteer Recruitment/Management, Non-Proprietary Equipment Usage/Maintenance, Insurance/Music Licensing Provisions, etc.) f. Participation in Official Capacity by City Department Representatives on Boards and Planning Committees of Local Festivals and Events g. Local Laws, Ordinances, Regulations, Permits and Policies Impacting and Supportive of Festivals and Events (For example: noise ordinances, traffic regulations, curfews, parking fees, fireworks regulations, ambush marketing control, alcohol service requirements, taxes, food safety, insurance requirements, etc.) h. Green Initiatives: What assistance does the city offer to encourage and support green initiatives by festivals & events? i. City Provided Festival and Event Training Programs (For example: Marketing, Planning, Budgeting, Risk Management, Alcohol Service, City Department Introductions, Professional Certification, etc.) j. Direct Industry Involvement / Memberships by Any of the Above

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Section 4. Non-Governmental Community Support of Festivals and Events Goal: The information in this section should help us to understand the commitment to festivals and events and direct support provided by community individuals and non-governmental organizations. Without this type of support most festivals and events could not achieve the level of success that these important partnerships help to build. • Please define or describe how each of the following elements/organizations (a-l) below (if applicable) lends their support to ensure the success and outreach of local festivals and events completely and accurately as possible. • Answers should be provided as an overview reflective of the entire community versus an individual event/organization, with enough detail to provide a clear picture of support. • If a section or element does not apply to your city, please state this within your entry and why it does not apply and/or what you may have/use instead. a. Volunteer Involvement b. Sponsorship Support (include in your answer a list of the ten (10) most prominent corporate sponsors in your market) c. Media Support d. Chamber of Commerce / Convention & Visitors Bureau Support (Promotion and marketing activities, familiarization tours, travel writer access, material creation, information distribution, grant funding, visitor hosting, etc.) e. Downtown Associations (Support by Downtown merchants and businesses) f. Organizations to Assist Individuals with Disabilities g. Local Event Cooperatives h. Sports Commissions i. Educational Institution Support j. Special Incentives/Discounts Provided to Festivals and Events by Local Venues (For example: special discounted rates for use of a local performing arts venue; provision of ticketing services, etc.) k. Access to Industry Suppliers in the Local Market (For example: banners and decorations; generators; portable toilets; merchandise; generators; stage, lights & sound; golf carts; security; chairs; barricades; ATM’s; communication services; etc.) l. Direct Industry Involvement / Memberships by Any of the Above

Section 5. Leveraging ‘Community Capital’ Created by Festivals & Events Goal: The information in this section should help us to understand how the City and its non-governmental partners maximize the ‘community capital’ created by festivals and events in your market. • Please define or describe how your City uses the branding and marketing images/ opportunities provided by your local festivals and events to leverage return in other areas. • These may include, the items below, among others. • If a section or element does not apply to your city, please state this within your entry and why it does not apply and/or what you may have/use instead. a. Community Branding (How are local festivals and events used to promote and build upon the positive image of the city?) b. Promoting Tourism (How are local festivals and events used to promote tourism visits?) c. Convention Marketing (How are local festivals and events used to recruit conventions to the city during the times that festival or event activities may serve as an extra incentive for choosing a destination?) d. Corporate Recruiting Efforts (How are local festivals and events used by Economic Development efforts to recruit new businesses to consider choosing your market for their operations?) 72

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e. Relocation Packets and Information (How are local festivals and events used in information designed to entice individuals / organizations to relocate to your city?) f. Familiarization Tours (How are local festivals and events used by your City and Convention & Visitors Bureau as part of ‘Familiarization Tours’ for visiting meeting planners, VIP’s, etc.) g. Out-of-Market Media Coverage (How are local festivals and events used to secure interest in coverage from out-of-market media sources, travel writers, etc.?) h. Enhancing Exposure to the Arts and Other Causes (How are local festivals and events used to feature, highlight, expose new audiences to, or drive support for the arts and other causes?) i. Creating Highly Visible Public Relations Campaigns for City Facilities and Services (How are local festivals and events used to drive positive public relations campaigns for things like police image, parks usage, fire safety, EMT roles and support needs, use of local transportation options, marketing of/exposure to local venues, support of local bond issues, etc.?) j. Encouraging Community Bonding, Participation, and Celebration (How are local festivals and events used by the City to bond all of the diverse elements of the community together, encourage community involvement and support, and celebrate who we are when we are at our best?) k. Highlighting or Developing Underused Venues or Sections of the Community (How are local festivals and events used to encourage usage of or exposure to underused venues or city neighborhoods, underdeveloped sections of the City, etc.?) l. Creating Legacies and Images Beyond the Event (How are local festivals and events used to create lasting legacies (venues, programs, infrastructures and images of the City after and in-between events?)

Section 6. Extra Credit This section provides an opportunity to highlight any other programs, services, resources, activities, etc., that may not have been included or covered in the previous sections. Some examples may include the items below, among others, a. Skills Development - Availability of Certificate or Degree Programs in Festival & Event Management through a Local University or Private Provider b. Members of Your Event Community Who Currently Hold a Certified Festival & Event Executive (CFEE) Designation c. Secondary School System Graduation Requirements that Encourage Volunteerism and Community Service during Festivals and Events d. A Festival and Event Shared Resource Program in Your City (For example: shared warehousing, office space, equipment, staff, etc.) e. Efforts to Actively Recruit New Events to Your City (Please include reference to any applications made/secured if this area pertains) f. Other Creative Endeavors

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Past IFEA World Festival & Event Cities Each year, the International Festivals & Events Association announces the recipients of the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award, at the Annual IFEA Convention & Expo. The IFEA would like to congratulate each winning city. For more information about each winning city - go to: www.ifea.com / Industry Awards / IFEA World Festival & Event City Awards / Past Event Cities

2016 IFEA World Festival & Event City Award Recipients • • • • • • • •

Coffs Harbour, New South Wales, Australia Dubai, United Arab Emirates Greater Palm Springs, California, United States Krakow, Poland Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Taupo-, Waikato Region, New Zealand

2015 IFEA World Festival & Event City Award Recipients • • • • • • • •

Coffs Harbour, New South Wales, Australia Dubai, United Arab Emirates Jinju City, Gyeonsangnam-do, South Korea Louisville, Kentucky, United States Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Rotterdam, The Netherlands Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

2014 IFEA World Festival & Event City Award Recipients • • • • • •

Dubai, United Arab Emirates Dublin, Ohio, United States Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States São Paulo, Brazil Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

2013 IFEA World Festival & Event City Award Recipients • • • • • • •

Boston, Massachusetts, United States Hwacheon-Gun, Gangwon-do, South Korea Nice, Côte d’Azur, France Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Rotorua, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand Salvador, Bahia, Brazil Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

2012 IFEA World Festival & Event City Awards Recipients • • • •

Ballito-KwaDukuza, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa Campos do Jordão, São Paulo, Brazil Denver, Colorado, United States of America Dubai, United Arab Emirates

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• • • • • • • • •

Dublin, Ohio, United States of America Grapevine, Texas, United States of America Hampyeong-gun, Jeonlanam-do, Korea Lhasa, Tibet Autonomous Region, People’s Republic of China London, England Maribor, Slovenia Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, The Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

2011 IFEA World Festival & Event City Award Recipients • • • • • • • • • •

Dubai, United Arab Emirates Gimje-si, Jeollabuk-do, South Korea Indianapolis, Indiana, United States Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa Joinville, Santa Catarina, Brazil Meizhou Island of Putian City, Fujian Province, China Reykjavik, Iceland São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Shanghai, China Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

2010 IFEA World Festival & Event City Award Recipients • • • • • • • • • • • •

Boryeong-si, Chungcheongnam-do, Korea Edinburgh, Scotland Geumsan-gun, Chungcheongnam-do, Korea Hidalgo, Texas, United States Jinju-si, Gyeongsangnam-do, Korea Louisville, Kentucky, United States Norfolk, Virginia, United States Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Rotterdam, The Netherlands Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Salvador, Bahia, Brasil Taupo, New Zealand


IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© APPLICATION Entry Deadline: 5:00 p.m. (MST) Monday, July 10th, 2017 Submit Entries, Entry Form and Payment to: Email: nia@ifea.com (preferred method of receiving entry.) If shipping entry, send to: IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© • 2603 Eastover Terrace, Boise, ID 83706 USA Phone: +1-208-433-0950 ext: 3 – nia@ifea.com

CITY APPLICANT INFORMATION (Please print clearly) Applicant City Name (If including information from surrounding market or suburb communities, please note those in parenthesis):______________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ State / Province or Territory: __________________________________________________________________________________________________ Country: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Global Region: (Choose one)

❍ Africa

❍ Asia ❍ Australia / New Zealand ❍ Europe ❍ Latin America ❍ The Middle East (MENASA) Note: Politically connected islands and territories should choose the region of their most direct affiliation.

❍ North America

❍ Other (If you choose ‘Other’ please clearly specify location below.) __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Population Level (select one):

❍ Under 1 million ❍ Over 1 million

PRIMARY CONTACT INFORMATION (Please print clearly) The following information should pertain to the primary individual with whom the IFEA should communicate with, as necessary, throughout the award judging and selection process. Name: ___________________________________________________________ Title: __________________________________________________ Organization: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Mailing Address: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City, State, Country, Postal Code: _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone (Business): _________________________________________________ Phone (Mobile): _________________________________________ Fax: _____________________________________________________________ E-Mail: _________________________________________________ Note: The Recipient City will receive a complimentary membership for one year in IFEA through our appropriate global affiliate. If different from the Primary Contact please let us know who should receive this membership.

RELEASE & USAGE

• By submitting your entry to the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award©, you automatically grant the IFEA the right to use any materials from your entries for editorial, analytical, promotional or any other purpose without additional compensation. All materials and photos submitted as part of the application will become the property of the IFEA.

• Winning applicants agree that the IFEA may use their City name and representative photos in all press releases and program marketing materials, both hard copy and electronic versions. • Your entry into the competition is acknowledgement of these terms.

PAYMENT TOTAL

IFEA Member Non IFEA Member IFEA World Festival & Event City Award©: Number of Entries:_________x ❍ $695 USD Per Entry ❍ $895 USD Per Entry = $_____________

PAYMENT INFORMATION Please select your method of payment:

❍ VISA

❍ MasterCard

❍ American Express ❍ Check (Made payable to the IFEA) ❍ Wire Transfers: (Contact Leslie McFarlane at leslie@ifea.com for details)

Print Cardholder Name: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Signature: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Credit Card Number:________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Expiration Date: _____________________________________________ CVN Code: _________________ (VISA/MC-3 digit code back) (AMX-4 digit code front)

DID YOU REMEMBER TO: ❍ Complete the entry form providing contact and payment information? ❍ Submit a one (1) paragraph description of your city (to be used for promotional purposes by the IFEA)? ❍ Submit an email list of your local media in Excel format for IFEA to use to announce the selected recipients? ❍ Submit an individual photograph representing your city - preferably of a festival setting within your city (at least 300 dpi in size)?

❍ Submit a three (3) minute video presentation representing your city? ❍ Submit a one (1) page introductory letter stating why your City should be selected to receive the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award©? ❍ Submit your overall completed IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© Entry providing responses and supporting information for Sections 1-6? Is this entry submitted as one (1) singular entry piece/document/ PowerPoint/Pdf, etc.? Is this entry provided on a disk, USB Flash Drive or electronically in a Word, PowerPoint, PDF or other standard format?


The importance of volunteers to our industry cannot be overestimated. Whether the individual acts as a volunteer administrator of an event or contributes his or her time and resources in support of a larger, multi-event organization with a paid staff, the efforts that are put forth deserve our heartiest congratulations and recognition. It is for that reason that the IFEA/Zambelli Fireworks Volunteer of the Year Award was created. Nominations are currently being accepted for the 2017 IFEA/Zambelli Fireworks Volunteer of the Year Award. The award recognizes those outstanding event volunteers whose unselfish and dedicated service to a member festival or event has made a significant difference in their community and mirrors the commitment to success in our professional ranks. A panel of impartial judges from within the IFEA organization will select the Volunteer of the Year winner from all of the candidates submitted. That individual will be honored at the 62nd Annual IFEA Convention & Expo, Date and Location TBD. As the guest of the IFEA the winner will receive an all expense* paid trip to the convention to accept their award. All participants in the program will be promoted through local and national media releases, available on request. The finalist will be featured in a future issue of “ie� magazine, and each semi-finalist will receive a certificate of recognition. Volunteer nominations submitted for the 2016 Award may be carried over into the 2017 competition with the permission of the nominator. The nominator will have the option to re-write the nomination if desired. Please direct all nomination materials and questions to Nia Hovde, Director of Marketing & Communications at nia@ifea.com or +1-208-433-0950 ext. 3.

*Includes 2 nights hotel, airfare and Convention registration. To view a complete list of past winners and their nominations, go to the Industry Honors section on www.ifea.com


NOMINATION CRITERIA 2017 CALL FOR NOMINATIONS Please submit the following information for your nomination.

A. INDIVIDUAL SUBMITTING NOMINATION INFORMATION: Name • Organization • Address • City • State • Zip • Phone • Fax • Email B. NOMINATION INFORMATION: Name • Address • City • State • Zip • Phone • Fax • Email C. NOMINATION QUESTIONS: Please provide a 2 paragraph response for each of the questions below, indicating which question you are answering. Please include specific examples for each. Points will be awarded for each question. Points awarded are listed below. 1. Explain your volunteer’s significant depth of involvement. (20 points) 2. Show specific examples of your volunteers roles and responsibilities. (10 points) 3. Describe how your volunteer has provided significant enthusiasm, organizational assistance and specific expertise. (10 points) 4. Explain how your volunteer has shown initiative and leadership in his or her efforts. (20 points) 5. Tell how your volunteer has exemplified his or her dependability. (10 points) 6. Describe your volunteer’s positive attitude. (10 points) 7. Describe how your volunteer has made a difference to the festival or event. What impact has your volunteer had on your festival/event? What void would there be without him or her as a volunteer? (20 points) D. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: If your nominee is selected, we will need the following information for marketing the 2016 Volunteer of the Year. Please submit the following with your nomination. (Not required at time of nomination). 1. A photograph of the volunteer you are nominating. 2. A local media list (up to 15 contacts) in order for IFEA to send Press Releases to your media. • The preferred media list submission is in an Excel format. • Please include: Name; Organization; Address; City; State; Zip; Phone; Fax; Email E. ENTRY FORMAT: • Please email your nomination in a Word document. F. SUBMIT ENTRIES TO: Nia Hovde, Director of Marketing & Communications at nia@ifea.com G. QUESTIONS: Please contact Nia Hovde, nia@ifea.com, +1-208-433-0950 ext. 3

Nominations should be submitted no later than Monday 5:00 PM (MST) June 5, 2017 * Pixels Per Inch ** Pixels Per Centimeter

To be eligible for consideration for the IFEA/Zambelli Fireworks Volunteer of the Year Award, the nominee shall:

• Be a current volunteer of an IFEA member organization • Have provided significant enthusiasm, organizational assistance and specific expertise • Be a volunteer of the nominating festival or event for at least 3 years • Have shown initiative and leadership in his or her efforts • Have a positive attitude • Have exemplified his or her dependability • Have a significant depth of involvement • Have made a difference to the festival or event • Have received no remuneration for services directly associated with his or her volunteer duties


2017 International Festivals & Events Association

IFEA World

LEADERSHIP LEGACY

RECOGNITION PROGRAM The I FEA Leadership Legacy Recognition Program recognizes individuals who have made a significant impact through their work and accomplishments in the festivals and events industry within their local community. Th r o u g h o u t t h e y e a r, f o u r Leadership Legacy recipients will be selected by their peers. Each Leadership Legacy recipient will be recognized through a feature in an issue of IFEA’s “ie” magazine – specifically in January, April, August and October.

Leadership Legacy Nomination Criteria Leadership Legacy nominees must represent a current or past IFEA Member. Nominees can be retired and/or represent any facet of our industry (i.e.: vendor, supporter, event profession, senior professional, etc.) Please Submit the Following Information for a Leadership Legacy Nomination. Nominees may have someone else submit a nomination on their behalf, or are able to nominate themselves. Leadership Legacy Nominee Contact Information Name, Title Organization Address, City, State, Zip, Country Phone, Fax, Email Leadership Legacy Nominee Questions Please answer each of the following questions citing specific examples using no more than 500 words per answer. 1. Explain the impact through and accomplishments the has made in the festival industry within the local

their work candidate and event community.

2. Describe the level of involvement the candidate has had with the IFEA during their career. 3. Submit a general overview of the candidate’s career including organizations worked for, positions held, titles, awards etc. Entry Format: Please email the nomination in a word Document. Submit Entries to: Nia Hovde, CFEE, Vice President/Director of Marketing & Communications at nia@ifea.com. Questions: Please Cont act Nia Hovde, C F E E, Vice President/Director of Marketing &Communications at Email: nia@ifea.com or Phone: +1-208433-0950 ext: 3. Deadline: Nominations may be submitted at any time during the year. Leadership Legacy Recipients will be featured in the January, April, August and October issues of IFEA’s “ie” Magazine.


2017 IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson

Pinnacle Awards Competition Call for Entries Gain the recognition your event deserves…

E

ach year, the International Festivals & Events Association recognizes outstanding accomplishments and top quality creative, promotional, operational and community outreach programs and materials produced by festivals and events around the world, with the Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards Competition. This prestigious awards competition strives for the highest degree of excellence in festival and event promotions and operations, and in doing so, has raised the standards and quality of the festivals & events industry to new levels. From events large or small, cities, festivals, chambers, universities, parks & recreation departments, vendors & suppliers, and everything in between, events and promotions of nearly every type and size will have the opportunity to be recognized, as entries are categorized into organizations with similar sized budgets. From best Event Poster, T-Shirt, Hat, Promotional Brochure, Website, TV Promotion and Social Media site to best Volunteer Program, Green Program, Sponsor Follow-Up Report and Media Relations Campaign, there’s a place for almost every element of your event to be recognized. The IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards have provided many outstanding examples of how event producers can use innovation and creativity to achieve a higher level of success. One of the goals of the IFEA is to promote the professionalism of our members and the festivals and events industry as a whole. Therefore, to add further impact to the winning organizations, the IFEA will provide your organization with a press release template for you to distribute to your media list explaining the award and the competition. Your organization will be recognized for taking part in raising the level of professionalism throughout the industry, while at the same time improving your community. So what are you waiting for, gather your items, fill out the entry form, and send them off to be judged against the best of the best, in the festivals and events industry. Then get ready to hear your organization’s name announced at the 62nd Annual IFEA Convention & Expo, Spring 2017

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THE CONTEST DEADLINES • EARLY BIRD ENTRY DEADLINE: 5:00 p.m. (MST), MONDAY, JUNE 19, 2017 ❍ Entries received on or prior to June 19, 2017 will receive the Member early bird rate of $35 per entry or $100 per Grand Pinnacle Entry or the Non-Member earlybird rate of $70 per entry or $200 per Grand Pinnacle entry depending on IFEA Membership status.

A HOW TO GUIDE • All categories are listed on the left side of each page • Entry information required for each category is listed under the specific category on the left (if applicable). This information is unique to that specific category. • Any supporting questions and supporting material requirements needed for each category or group of categories, is listed on the right side of each page (if applicable.)

• FINAL ENTRY DEADLINE: 5:00 p.m. (MST), MONDAY, July 17, 2017 ❍ Entries received between Tuesday, June 20, 2017 and Monday, July 17, 2017will receive the Member final entry rate of $40 per entry or $125 per Grand Pinnacle Entry or the Non-Member earlybird rate of $90 per entry or $250 per Grand Pinnacle entry depending on IFEA Membership status.

THE JUDGES The judges are recognized professionals in the areas of graphic design, promotions and public relations; broadcast, print and online media; and special event planning and management.

ELIGIBILITY • Entries must have been produced and / or used for the first time between July 19, 2016 and July 17, 2017. • Entries must be submitted in their original format unless previously approved. For Questions Contact: Nia Hovde, nia@ifea.com. • Payment in full must be received with entries for entries to be deemed eligible. • Entries and entry forms must be submitted in English. • Font size for any written text must not be smaller than 11pt. • To receive the member rate for Pinnacle entries you must be an IFEA member in good standing. • Each entry form submitted must be completed in its entirety in order for items to be judged eligible. • Entry must be received at the IFEA Office by the above dates to be eligible. • Please consider the processing of your credit card or the cashing of your check for your Pinnacle entries, notice that your entries were received and processed. IMPORTANT NOTES • Items submitted are NOT able to be returned. • Judges will not refer to items in other categories, nor will they transfer items already judged in other categories (the number of entries must equal the number of categories entered). • A separate entry form must be submitted for each entry (copy as necessary). • Multiple entries or categories on a single form will not be accepted. • For all entries, please paper clip/bull clip entry form to item. Please do not glue or tape form to item. • Multiple entries within the same notebook/ bound format/ CD/ USB Drive, will not be accepted. Please separate entries. • Entries required to be submitted in a “notebook” (Categories 1, 40-71) means that the entry should be submitted in some sort of bound format in order to keep all the materials together. For example, a 3 ring binder; spiral bound; in a report cover or a bound publication with hard/soft covers. Please do not staple or paper clip your entries together. • UPDATED: If submitting categories 1 or 40-71, in addition to the printed entry being submitted, please also submit each entry as a single pdf document (including all supporting materials within that single document.) Please submit PDF on a USB ThumbDrive. If submitting one or more entries from categories 1 or 40-71, please include all entries on the same single USB Thumbdrive and attach to overall payment form. • After submitting your entries, please also submit a high resolution copy of your organization or event logo. Please email to nia@ifea.com – subject “Logo for 2017 Pinnacle Entry – and your event/organization name.”

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SCORING SYSTEM • Categories 1, 40-71 will be judged using a point system for each individual entry. Each entry is scored separately. Scores will not be combined. • A possible total of 100 points may be awarded to each entry. • Be sure to answer and include all necessary information for each entry. • If a required element within an entry is not applicable to your event, please state so within your entry to avoid being marked down on points or indicate what element you have instead. • The scoring system is not applicable to TV, Radio, Multimedia, Print & some Merchandising categories. • Scores will be available upon request. • Failure to meet all requirements or answer / provide all necessary information will result in a deduction of points. THE WINNERS • All finalists for the IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards will be notified by email by Monday, August 28th, 2017. Notification will go to the primary IFEA Member in addition to the contact listed on the Awards entry form. If you have not received a notification email, please contact nia@ifea.com. • The 2017 IFEA/Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Award winners will be announced at the 62nd Annual IFEA Convention & Expo. All winners will receive an email on the evening of the Awards Presentation which will include a complete list of winners, press release, logos, etc. This email will go to the primary IFEA Member and the contact person listed on the Pinnacle Awards Entry Form. A complete list of winners will also be posted on the IFEA Website the evening of the Awards Presentation. • If you are not able to be present at the IFEA Awards Presentation to accept your award(s), they will be mailed to you 3-4 weeks after the IFEA Annual Convention. • Awards will be shipped via USPS and make take up to 3-4 weeks to arrive at their destination (depending on location). If you would like us to ship your awards via UPS/FedEx, please provide your UPS/FedEx account number or a credit card for us to charge the shipping fees. • Organizations submitting entries for the Grand Pinnacle category must register at least one person for the 62nd Annual IFEA Convention & Expo, or arrange for a representative to accept any award won on your behalf. • Gold winning entries will be on display during the 62nd Annual IFEA Convention & Expo. • Winning entries will also be available to view at www.ifea.com shortly after the 62nd Annual IFEA Convention & Expo.


RELEASE & USAGE • By submitting your entry to the IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Award Competition, you automatically grant the IFEA the right to use any materials and / or photos from your entries for editorial, analytical, promotional or any other purpose without additional compensation or permission. In addition, you acknowledge your entry/ies are not returnable. Your entry into the competition is acknowledgment of these terms. SHIP ENTRIES TO: IFEA Pinnacle Awards Competition International Festivals & Events Association 2603 W Eastover Terrace, Boise, ID 83706, USA Phone: +1-208-433-0950 ext: 3 • Please try to avoid using packing peanuts/popcorn when shipping your entry. • For packing tips, go to www.ifea.com and then Industry Awards / Pinnacle Awards / 2017 Pinnacle Awards FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS As you prepare your entries, you will have many questions. To help answer many of your questions, we have posted our most frequently asked questions on the IFEA website at www.ifea.com / Awards / Pinnacle Awards / 2017 Pinnacle Awards, check back often as we’ll continue to post questions and answers as they come in. If you have any further questions about the IFEA/Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards, please contact Nia Hovde at +1-208-433-0950 Ext 3 or nia@ifea.com. Go to www.ifea.com to find answers to common questions such as: • When you ask for entries in the original format, what does that apply to? • What do you mean when you say, please provide entries in a ‘notebook’ or ‘bound format’? • For the more in depth entries (categories 1, 40-71) do I have to answer or provide information for all the criteria and requirements listed under the category? • Referring to the above question, what if something in a specific category that is required, either does not apply to our event, or we are unable to provide the information required. • Certain entries ask for budget information, however we aren’t able to reveal certain elements of that information as it is not public knowledge. How can I answer the required information if I’m not able to provide it? • On certain entries, it says we can only provide 5 examples of supporting materials . . . how can I possibly only provide 5 examples!? • Why do we need to provide certain entries on Thumbdrive? • Referring to the above question, am I able to save all of the entries I’m submitting on one disk/Thumbdrive, instead of saving each individually? • Are we able to enter the same event into multiple categories? • Are we able to enter multiple items (that are different) in the same category, for the same event? • I’m not a member of the IFEA, am I still able to enter? • Can I pay for my entries via a wire transfer? • How are the Pinnacle Award Entries Judged? • Why do you not publish the points awarded for each entry in the list of winning entries? • Who judges the Pinnacle Entries? • Why aren’t we able to know the names of the judges? • It looks like there’s even more requirements for some categories . . what specifically do I need to answer for categories 1, 40-71? • For the above listed categories . . . what order should I list my entry in, in response to the requirements?

TIPS AND POINTERS Never participated in the Pinnacle Awards Program before? Looking for some helpful tips and pointers on how to enter? Below are just a few tips to hopefully point you in the right direction. Be sure to also review the Pinnacle FAQ’s and the Pinnacle Packing Tips. • Start Early! • Don’t wait until the deadlines are almost here to get your entries submitted! If you have time to work on your entries early, do so and then get them in early! • We will start accepting entries as soon as you want to start sending them in! • Do not mount any of the merchandise on poster board/foam core/card board etc. It’s much easier for the judges to pick up, look at and perhaps try the items on, if they are standing alone. • Be sure to read and follow all the criteria and requirements for each entry. The criteria and requirements are always being updated, so be sure to review the changes before you start. • For categories 1, 40-71, that require written information and are also required to be put into a ‘notebook’ or ‘bound format’ be sure to submit the information in that category in the order that it is asked so it’s easier for the judges to compare one entry to another. • When saving your entry to a Thumbdrive to go along side your individual entry, be sure to save your entry as one document – instead of multiple documents. • When putting together categories 1, 40-71 that require a lot of work to create… if you have time, make 2 copies! What better way to keep a record of what you did each year not only at your event, but also for the next year’s Pinnacles! • Remember the eligibility period for the pinnacles. Entries must have been produced and/or used for the first time between July 19, 2016 and July 17, 2017. So if you produced an event during that time, or any materials for your event were produced during that time (even if the actual event was outside of that time frame) it’s eligible! • If you are required to write something for your entry, make sure it is well written and easy to read. • The more organized your entries are, the easier it is to understand your message. • With all entries, guide the judges to what you want them to see. Highlight the important parts. • Don’t overwhelm the judges with too much information. Summarize the statistics and only display your best footage/news clippings. Quantity is not always quality. • On categories 1, 40-71 (categories that have a lot of requirements), be sure to have someone that is not closely tied to your event read through your entry to see if everything makes sense. Sometimes you may be too close to your event and you may not include certain information, since it may be too obvious to you. But it may be a vital piece of information. If your entry makes sense to an outsider to your event, it should make sense to the judges. • Many of the judges may not know anything about your event, so make sure your explanations are clear enough so they feel like they have just attended/participated in your program. • Proof, Proof, Proof!! Yes, we do mark you down for typos! • When in doubt – ASK. If you’re not sure on something, please contact Nia Hovde +1-208-433-0950 ext: 3 or nia@ifea.com. QUESTIONS? • Contact: Nia Hovde, Director of Marketing & Communications at Phone: +1-208-433-0950 ext: 3 or Email: nia@ifea.com • For additional information and FAQ’s, go to www.ifea.com/ Industry Awards / Pinnacle Awards

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THE GRAND PINNACLE 1) GRAND PINNACLE The Grand Pinnacle is the highest award given by the IFEA in recognition of those Festivals and Events* who have a balance of all the elements necessary to ensure a successful event. (*Of those events who enter and judged within each of the four separate budget categories.) ENTRY INFORMATION: For entry, please provide a detailed description to each section requested within: 1. Introductory Information 2. Additional Requirements 3. Supporting Materials 4. Supporting Questions • Submit entire Grand Pinnacle Entry within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as 1 (one) document) on a Thumbdrive. Attach Thumbdrive to overall payment form. If submitting one or more entries from categories 1 (or 40-71), please include all entries on the same single USB Thumbdrive. • Please submit your entry in the order listed here. • Points will be awarded to the individual sections of your entry, in addition to the overall Judges Criteria points. 1. Introductory Information: (10 points) Within a maximum of 4 pages (total), provide an overview of your event, stating your event’s: a. Event Dates b. Purpose / Mission c. History/Description of Event d. Types of Activities Included Under the Festival / Event Umbrella e. Overall Revenue and Expense Budget f. Estimated Economic Impact g. Attendance Numbers & Demographics h. Volunteer Count & Demographics i. Staffing Numbers and Positions j. Founding / Incorporation Date and Management System (i.e.: 501(c)3 non-profit staff & volunteer board; city managed; profit-making partnership, etc.) 2. Additional Requirements: (40 Points) Include a detailed overview of each of the sections listed below (a-e*) for your festival / event, using no more than two (2) pages for each section. • Make each section a separate tab in entry in order for the judges to clearly identify them. • If your festival/event does not include one or more of the sections listed below, please provide an overview as to why your event does not include that element, or what you provide instead, so as not to lose points. a. Promotional/Marketing Campaign & Media Outreach (Includes but not limited to: What was your overall message/ slogan/image that you projected for your event this year? What was your target population, who received the message, what types of mediums did you utilize and who promoted your message. ) b. Website / Social Media / Multi-Media Program /Campaign c. Overall Sponsorship Program (Provide an overview of your overall sponsorship program – how many sponsors, who are they and what do they sponsor and total sponsorship funds.) d. Critical Component Programs *Provide up to a one (1) page description for each of the following programs (if not applicable, please state as such and/or what your festival/event has in its place.) • Volunteer Program • Green Program 82

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• • • •

Educational Program Children’s Program Food & Beverage Program Entertainment Program (music, artists, theatre, performers etc.) • Merchandise Program • Community Outreach Program • Emergency Preparedness Program e. Descriptions of any other Special Programs unique to your event. 3. Supporting Materials: (10 Points) • Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the festival/event - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area in the 2.) Additional Requirements section (if applicable) (a-e). • Supporting materials may be placed within a specific section of the entry, or at the end. 4. Supporting Questions: (10 points) Please answer the following questions. (Maximum of 1 page per question) a. What did you do to update / change the event from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? ❍ If the event is a new event, please answer the following question instead: • “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the event, and how did you handle them?” b. Please provide measurable results / examples for question (a). c. What makes the event stand out as an internationally recognized event? d. Why should the event win the IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Grand Pinnacle Award? Judging Criteria: (30 points) The Grand Pinnacle Entry will be judged based on the following criteria. Please refer to the Entry Information for further details. The following Judging Criteria is applicable to both the individual entry and the overall event. • Is the entry / event well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / event designed and laid out well? • Is the event creative and / or unique? • Does the entry relay the image of the event? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Does the entry match the purpose / mission for the event? • Have all requirements been met? Additional Notes: • Be sure to answer and provide information for every section and area listed in the entry requirements. Failure to provide information for each section / element will result in a deduction of points. If a required element is not applicable to your event, please state as such and/or what your festival/event has in its place. • Grand Pinnacle entry must score a minimum of 80 points or higher to be considered as a Gold, Silver or Bronze winner. • This entry is separate from all other categories and divisions. Judges will not refer to, or transfer items from other categories. • Organizations submitting entries for the Grand Pinnacle category must register at least one person for the 62nd Annual IFEA Convention & Expo. or arrange for a representative to accept any award your behalf.


CATEGORIES TELEVISION & RADIO ENTRIES 2)

BEST TV PROMOTION

3)

BEST FULL LENGTH TV PROMOTION

4)

BEST FULL LENGTH TV PROGRAM

5)

BEST EVENT VIDEO PROMOTION

6)

BEST RADIO PROMOTION

(Ad Spot or PSA)

(Local Programming)

(National Promotion / Syndication)

(Include video on a thumbdrive or submit online link. Clearly print or type link on entry form under section 3.) (Ad Spot or PSA)

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 2-7: • Submit categories 2-6 each on an individual Thumbdrive. Only one entry per Thumbdrive. • Each TV/Video entry should be viewable in Windows Media Player or QuickTime. • All Radio entries should be submitted on a Thumbdrive and should preferably be submitted as a wave file, MP3 file or WMA. • Please clearly label each Thumbdrive, with Organization Name and Category number, and attach entry form. • Only one video/radio spot per Thumbdrive. • Submit EACH entry SEPARATELY. • DO NOT combine multiple entries on Thumbdrive. • These are standalone items and no written information is required. Judging Criteria: • Does the entry relay the image of the event? • Is the item creative and / or unique? • Is the message clear? • Is the item organized? • What is the “Usability” factor? • What is the overall impression?

MULTIMEDIA ENTRIES 7)

BEST EVENT WEBSITE

13) BEST SINGLE DIGITAL/SOCIAL AD

8)

BEST ORGANIZATION WEBSITE

14) BEST DIGITAL/SOCIAL AD SERIES

9)

BEST EVENT / ORGANIZATION E-NEWSLETTER

(Submit web address only – clearly print or type website address on entry form under section 3.) (Submit web address only – clearly print or type website address on entry form under section 3.)

(Submit link to view ad online - clearly print or type link on entry form under section 3.) (Submit a maximum of 5 ads.) (Submit link to view ads online - clearly print or type link on entry form under section 3.)

(Clearly print or type a link to download materials on entry form under Section 3. Submit 3 consecutive issues.)

10) BEST MISCELLANEOUS MULTIMEDIA

(Includes, but is not limited to items such as: Screen Savers, Live Web-casts, Electronic Billboards, etc.) (Submit in format used. Preferable method for Videos is a YouTube link. Only one multimedia item per entry. Clearly print or type link on entry form under Section 3 or on separate sheet of paper if necessary.)

11) BEST SOCIAL MEDIA SITE

(Submit Social Media Site Address – clearly print address on entry form under section 3.)

12) BEST FESTIVAL / EVENT MOBILE APPLICATION

(Submit web address or instructions on how to obtain the App, clearly print address on entry form under Section 3.)

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 7-14: • For categories 7-14, entries will be reviewed online by judges. • Be sure to make the website link goes to exactly where you wish the judges to go first. • Refer to any additional entry information listed next to each category. • These are standalone items and no written information is required. Judging Criteria: • Does the entry / item relay the image of the event? • Is the item creative and / or unique? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / item organized? • What is the “Usability” factor? • What is the overall impression? Spring 2017

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CATEGORIES PROMOTIONAL PRINTED ENTRIES 15) BEST EVENT PROGRAM 16) BEST NEWSPAPER INSERT / SUPPLEMENT 17) BEST PROMOTIONAL BROCHURE 18) BEST MISCELLANEOUS PRINTED MATERIALS (MULTIPLE PAGE)

(Includes but not limited to: direct mail brochures, cookbooks, annual reports, etc.) Only one item per entry.

19) BEST MISCELLANEOUS PRINTED MATERIALS (SINGLE PAGE)

(Includes but not limited to direct mail pieces, rack cards, fliers, maps, etc.)

(Only one item per entry. Mounting on Poster board, optional for this entry.)

20) BEST COMPANY IMAGE PIECES

(Includes but is not limited to: Letterhead, envelopes, logo, business cards, notecards, etc.)

(One item per entry.)

21) BEST COVER DESIGN

(Includes covers from items such as Magazines, Newspapers, Brochures, Programs etc.)

(Submit cover only – mounted on poster board.)

22) BEST SINGLE NEWSPAPER DISPLAY AD (Submit entry mounted on poster board.)

23) BEST SINGLE MAGAZINE DISPLAY AD (Submit ad mounted on poster board.)

24) BEST AD SERIES

(Submit a maximum of 5 ads. If possible, mount all ads on same poster board.)

25) BEST PROMOTIONAL POSTER

(For posters not for sale at Festival or Event but used for promotional purposes to promote event) (Do not mount. Submit in poster tube.)

26) BEST COMMEMORATIVE POSTER

(For posters specifically for sale at festival or event.) (Do not mount. Submit in poster tube.)

27) BEST EVENT PROMOTIONAL PHOTOGRAPH

(Promotional photograph for your event) (Photo Dimensions: 8 inches x 10 inches. Submit photo mounted on Poster board - 2 inch margins.)

28) BEST OUTDOOR BILLBOARD

(Submit photo or print out of billboard, mounted on poster board.)

29) BEST EVENT INVITATION

(Single or Multiple Page. Do NOT mount this category on poster board.)

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ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 15-18: • These are stand alone items and no written information is required. • Submit each entry in original format if possible • Submit categories 15-18 with the entry form securely paper clipped/bull clipped to the back. • Do not mount on display board. Judging Criteria • Does the entry relay the image of the event? • Is the item creative and / or unique? • Is the item designed / laid out well? • Is the message clear? • Is the item organized? • Is the item usable / functional? • What is the overall impression? ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 19-29: • Submit categories 19-24, 27-29 each mounted on a single, black display board with a maximum of 2 inch margins. • Submit categories 25-26 each rolled up in a poster mailing tube. Do not fold the poster. Do not mount the poster on poster board. • Only one entry per board. • These are standalone items and no written information is required. Judging Criteria • Does the item / entry relay the image of the event? • Is the item creative and / or unique? • Is the item designed / laid out well? • Is the message clear? • Is the item organized? • Is the item usable / functional? • What is the overall impression?


EVENT DÉCOR & AMBIANCE ENTRIES 30) BEST STREET BANNER

(Submit photo or printouts of banner only, mounted on poster board. Do not send actual banner.)

31) BEST MISCELLANEOUS ON-SITE DECOR

(Includes but is not limited to: directional signage, stage backdrops, entryways, flags, inflatables, etc.) (Submit only one decor item per entry.) (Submit photo of decor, mounted on poster board.)

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 30-31: • Submit categories 30-31 each mounted on a single, black display board with a maximum of 2 inch margins. • Only one entry per board. • These are standalone items and no written information is required. Judging Criteria: • Does the item / entry relay the image of the event? • Is the item creative and / or unique? • Is the item designed / laid out well? • Is the message clear? • Is the item organized? • Is the item usable / functional? • What is the overall impression?

MERCHANDISE ENTRIES For merchandise sold at Festival / Event / Organization. 32) BEST T-SHIRT DESIGN

(Does not include Tank Tops, Long-Sleeve T-Shirts or Collared/Polo Shirts)

33) BEST PIN OR BUTTON

(Please mount pin on poster board with 2 inch margins maximum. For single pins only, no pin sets.)

34) BEST HAT 35) BEST OTHER MERCHANDISE

(For merchandise other than T-shirts, pins, hats etc. that you have for sale at your festival/event.)

36) BEST MISCELLANEOUS CLOTHING

(i.e. - jackets, sweatshirts, long-sleeve t-shirts, polo shirts, tank tops, socks, scarves, etc.)

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 32-39: • Submit actual merchandise items for categories 32- 39 as is. • These are standalone items and no written information is required. • Do not mount merchandise items on poster board – except Best Pin or Button. Judging Criteria: • Does the entry / item relay the image of the event? • Is the item creative and / or unique? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / item organized? • What is the “Usability” factor? • What is the overall impression?

37) BEST NEW MERCHANDISE

(New merchandise to your festival/event/ organization)

38) BEST SPONSOR GIFT

(A gift a festival/event gives to a sponsor of their festival/event.)

39) BEST GIVE-AWAY ITEM

(For merchandise items that are given out at festival/ event and are not for sale, i.e. - Race medals, T-Shirts, Beverage Mugs, etc.)

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CATEGORIES SPONSORSHIP ENTRIES 40) BEST TARGETED SPONSOR SOLICITATION PROPOSAL

(Actual Sponsorship Proposal that was used to target a specific sponsor for your festival/event.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following using no more than one (1) page per section: a. Introduction and description of main event. b. Name of Sponsor c. Introduction, effectiveness and success of Sponsor solicitation package 2. Supporting Materials: a. Please provide a sponsor solicitation package that was actually used to target a specific sponsor. • Provide in the format used to present to the sponsor and with any other additional materials that were sent with the proposal. (Okay to substitute name of sponsor for generic name for confidentiality, however please make it clear on your entry you are doing this.)

41) BEST INDIVIDUAL SPONSOR FOLLOW-UP REPORT

(Actual Follow-Up Report that was generated for a specific sponsor for your festival/event.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following using no more than one(1) page per section: a. Introduction and description of main event. b. Name of Sponsor c. Introduction and effectiveness of Sponsor follow-up report

2. Supporting Materials: a. Please provide a sponsor follow-up report that was actually sent to a specific sponsor. • Provide in the format used to present to the sponsor and with any other additional materials that were sent with the report. (Okay to substitute name of sponsor for generic name for confidentiality, however please make it clear on your entry you are doing this.)

42) BEST SPONSOR PARTNER

(Entry should highlight a specific sponsor that stands out above all others.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following using no more than one (1) page per section: a. Introduction & description of main event b. Name of Sponsor c. Description of sponsor; level of sponsorship (cash/in-kind); details of benefit package and length of sponsorship/ partnership d. Quantity and quality of support to event by sponsor e. Goals and success of relationships for both event and sponsor f. How the sponsor stands out over all other sponsors. g. Activation of Sponsorship by Sponsor ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORY 42: • Submit category 42 within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.)

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ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 40-41: • Submit category 40-41 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. If submitting one or more entries from categories 1 or 40-71, please include all entries on the same single USB Thumbdrive. For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (20 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Materials: (50 points) Please provide materials listed under the specific category to the left. Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. 3. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the item / entry well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met? • Would you recommend or support this opportunity if in a position to do so?

• Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. If submitting one or more entries from categories 1 or 40-71, please include all entries on the same single USB Thumbdrive. For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (70 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • What is the overall impression? • Have all requirements been met?


SPONSORSHIP ENTRIES 43) BEST SINGLE NEW SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITY

(New activity / program within an Event created specifically to recruit a new sponsor or created after a new sponsor came on board.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & description of main event b. Name of Opportunity and Sponsor c. Description and purpose of New Sponsorship Opportunity d. Description of the targeted sponsor for the opportunity and why the sponsor was targeted e. Explain the synergy between the event and sponsor f. Overall effectiveness / success of the sponsorship 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

44) BEST SPONSORSHIP PROGRAM FOR INDIVIDUAL SPONSOR

(Activity or program within a Festival or Event created for a specific sponsor.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & description of main event b. Name of Program and Sponsor c. Description and purpose of event/program being sponsored d. Description of sponsor; level of sponsorship (cash/in-kind); details of benefit package and length of sponsorship/ partnership e. Overall effectiveness / success of the program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

45) BEST OVERALL SPONSORSHIP PROGRAM (Entry should focus on the entire sponsorship program for all sponsors for the entire event.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & description of main event b. Description of overall Sponsorship Program c. List of all current sponsors for event; levels of support; longevity of each d. Available benefit packages and valuation formulas e. Description of sponsor research targeting and sales process f. Description of sponsor service team and steps taken when new agreement is signed. g. Describe current sponsor renewal process & retention rate h. Overall effectiveness / success of the program i. Supporting Materials: Please provide a copy of Sponsor Agreement Sales Packet / Proposal; a copy of Sponsorship Follow Up Report and a sample of Sponsor Agreement 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 43-45: • Submit category 43-45 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. If submitting one or more entries from categories 1 or 40-71, please include all entries on the same single USB Thumbdrive. For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this program from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the program is a new program, please answer the following question instead: “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the program, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program. Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. Please limit your supporting materials to those actually sent / used with sponsor: • Printed materials (brochures / programs etc.) • Promotion / marketing / media materials • Supporting photographs • Measurable results: tangible & intangible 4. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the program / entry well organized? • Is the content professional? Is the message clear? • Is the program / entry designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met? • Would you recommend or support this opportunity if in a position to do so?

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CATEGORIES FESTIVAL & EVENT CRITICAL COMPONENT ENTRIES 46) BEST VOLUNTEER PROGRAM

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 46-47:

(For overall Volunteer Programs at an Event/Festival/ Organization)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section, together with applicable examples: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Volunteer Program c. Target audience / attendance / number of participants d. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event e. Volunteer demographics (age, gender, individuals, charities, schools etc.) f. Volunteer job descriptions g. Recruitment methods / materials / applications h. Communication methods / materials i. Training guides / programs / handbooks / materials j. Organization & schedule information / materials k. Volunteer perks / benefits l. Appreciation / recognition methods/ materials m. Retention methods / materials n. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with program and benefits to each (if applicable) o. Overall revenue/expense budget of program p. Overall effectiveness / success of program q. Measurable results: ratio of volunteers to guests; # of volunteers; # of volunteer hours; # of volunteers in database; estimate of the financial value of your volunteers. 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

47) BEST GREEN PROGRAM

(For festivals/events with implemented green/recycling programs at their event.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Green Program c. Target audience / attendance / number of participants d. What “Green” initiatives were used at event (i.e. – recycling; alternative methods of transportation; renewable energy etc.) e. How were initiatives promoted to the public? Include marketing materials. f. Education programs pertaining to green program (for public, sponsors, volunteers etc.) g. How was green program enforced / encouraged, tracked, and staffed? h. Who assisted green program (vendors, volunteers etc.) i. Measurable results – how much was recycled; savings / cost of Green program; carbon footprint reduction j. Non-tangible results: education; awareness; involvement etc. k. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event l. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with program and benefits to each (if applicable) m. Tie-in of program to main event n. Overall revenue/expense budget of program o. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry. 88

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• Submit categories 46 & 47 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. If submitting one or more entries from categories 1 or 40-71, please include all entries on the same single USB Thumbdrive. For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this program from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the program is a new program, please answer the following question instead. • “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the program, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area listed below (if applicable). Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Printed materials (brochures, handbooks, Recruiting materials, evaluation forms, signage, etc.) • Promotional / marketing / media materials • Merchandise materials (photographs accepted) • Information provided to participants / volunteers / sponsors / students / charities etc. • Supporting photographs • Measurable results: tangible & intangible 4. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?


FESTIVAL & EVENT CRITICAL COMPONENT ENTRIES 48) BEST PARADE

For parades that are stand-alone parades or part of a larger festival /event.

1. Overview Information Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction, background, purpose and objective of Parade b. Introduction and background of overall festival/event, if Parade is part of a larger festival/event (if applicable) c. Tie-in of Parade to main festival/event (if applicable) d. Target audience / attendance of Parade e. Number and type of entries in Parade f. Overall revenue and expense budget of Parade g. Duration of Parade (start to finish) and years Parade has been in existence h. Activities planned before, during and after Parade i. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with Parade and benefits to each (if applicable) j. Community involvement and impact of Parade k. What makes the Parade unique and creative? l. Overall effectiveness / success of Parade 2. Supporting Question – Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials – Place at the end of the entry.

49) BEST EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

(For festivals/events who have a specific educational component built into their programming.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Educational Program c. Target audience / attendance / number of participants d. Provide a detailed description of the education program / curriculum e. Who provided the education and in what setting f. Involvement by local educational institutions and professional education (if any) g. What was the take-away for attendees / participants? h. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event i. Tie-in of program to main event j. Overall revenue/expense budget of program k. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with program and benefits to each (if applicable) l. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 48-49: • Submit categories 48-49 within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. (If submitting one or more entries from categories 1 or 40-71, please include all entries on the same single USB Thumbdrive.)

For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this program from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the program is a new program, please answer the following question instead. • “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creat-ing the program, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area listed below (if applicable). Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Printed materials (brochures, handbooks, Recruiting materials, evaluation forms, signage, etc.) • Promotional / marketing / media materials • Merchandise materials (photographs accepted) • Information provided to participants / volunteers / sponsors / students / charities etc. • Supporting photographs • Measurable results: tangible & intangible 4. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?

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CATEGORIES FESTIVAL & EVENT CRITICAL COMPONENT ENTRIES 50) BEST CHILDREN’S PROGRAMMING (For festivals/events who have specific programming for Children) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Children’s Program c. Target Audience / main target age group d. Attendance / number of participants e. Activities /entertainment provided f. Local School involvement g. Tie-in of program to main event h. Overall revenue and expense budget of specific program / event i. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with event / program and benefits to each (if applicable) j. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event k. What makes the program unique and creative? l. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

51) BEST COMMUNITY OUTREACH PROGRAM

(Programming done throughout the year to benefit and help include all parts of the community, while enhancing the image and brand of your event/organization throughout the year.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Outreach Program c. Target audience / attendance / number of participants d. Impact program had on the community e. Tie-in of program to main event f. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event g. Overall revenue/expense budget of specific program h. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with program and benefits to each (if applicable) i. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

52) BEST EVENT / PROGRAM WITHIN AN EVENT TO BENEFIT A CAUSE

(Entry may include fundraising programs as well as awareness programs.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Event/Program c. Description of selected cause and why/how it was selected d. Target audience / attendance / number of participants e. Tie-in of program to main event f. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event g. Overall revenue/expense budget of specific event/program h. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with event / program and benefits to each (if applicable) i. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

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ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 50-52: • Submit categories 50, 51, 52 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. If submitting one or more entries from categories 1 or 40-71, please include all entries on the same single USB Thumbdrive. For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this program from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the program is a new program, please answer the following question instead. • “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the program, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area listed below (if applicable). Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Printed materials (brochures, handbooks, Recruiting materials, evaluation forms, signage, etc.) • Promotional / marketing / media materials • Merchandise materials (photographs accepted) • Information provided to participants / volunteers / sponsors / students / charities etc. • Supporting photographs • Measurable results: tangible & intangible 4. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?


FESTIVAL & EVENT CRITICAL COMPONENT ENTRIES 53) BEST EVENT (WITHIN AN EXISTING FESTIVAL) (Entry to highlight a specific event that is held during the course of a larger festival/event.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Event within Festival c. Target audience and attendance / number of participants d. Overall revenue/expense budget of event e. Tie-in of program to main festival f. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event g. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with event and benefits to each (if applicable) h. What makes the event unique & creative? i. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

54) BEST EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS & RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR AN EVENT (Entry to focus on the overall risk management / emergency preparedness plan for a specific festival/event.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Risk Management Plan c. Target audience / attendance / number of participants d. Overall revenue and expense budget of specific program / event e. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event f. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with event / program and benefits to each (if applicable) g. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry. Please submit a detailed documentation of the security plan used at your event

55) BEST FOOD & BEVERAGE PROGRAM

(Entry to focus on the overall food and beverage opportunities available during the course of a specific festival/event.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) pages to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Food & Beverage Program c. Number and types of vendors d. Site Plan (i.e.: Food Courts, Crowd Flow etc.) e. Cash Management Process f. Fee Structures g. Alcohol Beverage Training/Control h. Vendor Application Process i. Festival/Event Controlled Products & Services (i.e.: Festival-only controlled product sales, Vendor required product use, etc.) j. Promotional activities to drive business k. Power/Water Access l. Waste Disposal 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

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ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 53-55: • Submit categories 53, 54, 55 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. If submitting one or more entries from categories 1 or 40-71, please include all entries on the same single USB Thumbdrive. For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this program from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the program is a new program, please answer the following question instead. ❍ “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the program, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area listed below (if applicable). Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. ❍ Printed materials (brochures, handbooks, Recruiting materials, evaluation forms, signage, etc.) ❍ Promotional / marketing / media materials ❍ Merchandise materials (photographs accepted) ❍ Information provided to participants / volunteers / sponsors / students / charities etc. ❍ Supporting photographs ❍ Measurable results: tangible & intangible 4. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?

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CATEGORIES FESTIVAL & EVENT CRITICAL COMPONENT ENTRIES 56)

BEST NEW EVENT

(For festival or event created from scratch within the past year.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of New Event c. Target audience and attendance / number of participants d. Overall revenue/ expense budget of event e. Duration of program (start to finish) f. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with event and benefits to each (if applicable) g. What makes the event unique & creative? h. Overall effectiveness / success of event 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

57)

BEST NEW PROMOTION ACTIVITY

(Entry should focus on a specific promotion done by festival/event/vendor/supplier to promote a product, service, event, company, entertainment etc.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event/organization b. Description and purpose / objective of Promotion c. Description of what was being promoted (merchandise, event, company, entertainment; etc.) d. What makes this promotion different from any other promotions? e. Target audience for promotion f. Attendance / number of participants (if applicable) g. Tie-in of promotion to main event/organization h. Overall revenue and expense budget of specific promotion i. Duration of promotion (start to finish) j. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with event/ organization and promotion and benefits to each (if applicable) k. Overall effectiveness / success of promotion 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

58)

BEST NEW ATTENDEE SERVICE

59)

BEST MONEY-MAKING IDEA

(Any product or service designed with the intent of enhancing the attendee experience at a festival or event.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) pages to explain each section: a. Description of new product or service b. Goals & objectives of product or service c. Application of product or service at an event d. Overall effectiveness of product or services e. Target market for product or service f. Measurable results: tangible & intangible 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

(Entry should focus on a specific idea implemented at a festival/event that generated revenue.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & description of main event b. Description of money-making idea c. Target audience (if applicable) d. Attendance / number of participants (if applicable) e. Mediums used to promote idea (if applicable) f. Tie-in of promotion to main event/organization g. Overall revenue and expense budget of specific idea h. Overall effectiveness / success of idea 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 56-59: • Submit categories 56-57-58, 59 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. If submitting one or more entries from categories 1 or 40-71, please include all entries on the same single USB Thumbdrive. For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question (10 points) • What challenges/obstacles did you foresee/encounter in creating the program/activity/idea, and how did you handle them? 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area listed below (if applicable). Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Printed materials (brochures, handbooks, signage, etc.) • Promotional / marketing / media materials • Merchandise materials (photographs accepted) • Information provided to participants • Supporting photographs • Measurable results: tangible & intangible 3. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?


FESTIVAL & EVENT CRITICAL COMPONENT ENTRIES 60) BEST OVERALL MERCHANDISING PROGRAM

(Entry should focus on the entire merchandising program for the entire festival/event/organization.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & background of event b. Description of merchandising program c. Overall revenue and expense budget for merchandise lines d. Target market for merchandise program (population / location) e. Marketing efforts tied to merchandise program f. Community support in selling / distributing merchandise g. Measurable results (Including number / variety of items; number of outlets selling items, etc.) h. Overall effectiveness of merchandise program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry. ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORY 60: • Submit category 60 within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. If submitting one or more entries from categories 1 or 40-71, please include all entries on the same single USB Thumbdrive.

61) BEST VENDOR / SUPPLIER

(Entry should highlight a specific vendor or supplier to the festival/event that stands out above all others.) (Festival or Event must submit this entry)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) pages to explain each section: a. Description of vendor / supplier b. How the vendor / supplier stands out over all other vendor / suppliers c. Quantity and quality of service and support to event by Vendor / Supplier d. Length of relationship between vendor and event e. Tangible benefits of relationship to both event and vendor.

For entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this program from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the program is a new program, please answer the following question instead: “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the program, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please include a sample selection of actual merchandise items available. • Also include photographs of all merchandise items available in your merchandise program. • Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. 4. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met? For entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (70 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • What is the overall impression? • Have all requirements been met?

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORY 61: • Submit category 61 within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. If submitting one or more entries from categories 1 or 40-71, please include all entries on the same single USB Thumbdrive. Spring 2017

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CATEGORIES MEDIA RELATIONS ENTRIES For effective media campaigns that generated news coverage, instead of paid or donated advertising time. 62) BEST PRESS / MEDIA KIT

(For festivals/events/organizations to demonstrate the effectiveness and use of their Press/Media Kit.)

• Provide information for questions listed below in addition to providing your actual press/media kit. 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & background of campaign / event b. Provide actual media kit used to send out for your event c. Target audience / demographics for the media d. Target location (communities / cities / states) for media e. Types of mediums used for media outreach f. Measurable results indicating: • Number of publications / cities / states targeted • Percent of distribution that covered news • Longevity of media coverage • Increase / decrease in media from previous years 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

63) MOST CREATIVE / EFFECTIVE NEWS STUNT

(For Festivals/Events/Organizations who generated publicity through a media stunt to promote their event/ cause etc.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & background of campaign / event b. A detailed description of the news stunt c. How did the news stunt fit in to the overall media campaign for your event? d. Sponsor / charity involvement (if any) and why e. Was there an increase in media coverage for your event as a result of the stunt? 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

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ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 62-63: • Submit categories 62, 63 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. If submitting one or more entries from categories 1 or 40-71, please include all entries on the same single USB Thumbdrive. For entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this promotion from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the promotion is a new promotion, please answer the following question instead. • “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the promotion, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area listed below (if applicable). Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Printed materials (press releases, news clippings, etc.) • Promotional materials • Video / audio documentation (Please limit to 1 example – provide written explanation of further examples) • Supporting photographs 4. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / campaign well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / campaign designed and laid out well? • Is the campaign creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?


MEDIA RELATIONS ENTRIES For effective media campaigns that generated news coverage, instead of paid or donated advertising time. 64) BEST MEDIA RELATIONS CAMPAIGN (Entry should focus on the entire media relations campaign for a specific festival or event.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & background of campaign / event b. Purpose / objective of the media relations campaign c. A detailed outline of your entire media relations campaign for your event. d. Target audience / demographics for the media e. Target location (communities / cities / states) for media f. Types of mediums used for media outreach g. Measurable results indicating: ❍ Number of publications / cities / states targeted ❍ Percent of distribution that covered news ❍ Attendance results based on media outreach / campaign ❍ Income results based on media outreach / campaign ❍ Longevity of media coverage ❍ Increase / decrease in media from previous years. h. Overall effectiveness of the campaign 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

65) BEST SOCIAL MEDIA CAMPAIGN

Overall social media campaign used to promote a festival, event, parade, etc.

1. Overview Information Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of Main Event b. Description, purpose and objective of Social Media Campaign c. Social Media Platforms used (please provide up to 5 screenshots of each platform used) d. Social Advertising used (please provide up to 5 screenshots of each social advertising used) e. Target Audience for Social Media Campaign f. Editorial Calendar and Timeline for Campaign g. Examples of Hashtags, Contests, Polls & Quizzes etc., used during Campaign h. Additional Media exposure received from Social Media Campaign i. Estimate of revenue and/or attendance increase as a result of Social Media Campaign j. Analytics Overview (Listing Demographics, Impressions, Shares, Mentions etc.) k. What makes the Social Media Campaign unique and creative? l. Overall effectiveness / success of Social Media Campaign 2. Supporting Question – Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials – Place at the end of the entry.

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 64-65: • Submit categories 64, 65 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. (If submitting one or more entries from categories 1 or 40-71, please include all entries on the same single USB Thumbdrive.) For entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this promotion from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the promotion is a new promotion, please answer the following question instead. • “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the promotion, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area listed below (if applicable). Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Printed materials (press releases, news clippings, etc.) • Promotional materials • Video / audio documentation (Please limit to 1 example – provide written explanation of further examples) • Supporting photographs 4. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / campaign well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / campaign designed and laid out well? • Is the campaign creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?

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CATEGORIES EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS OFFERING EVENT MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS 66) BEST EVENT MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATE DEGREE

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & History of School/University b. Purpose / objective of Event Management Associate Degree c. Date program was founded & time frame course is offered d. Number of staff members & student to staff ratio e. Number of students enrolled / number graduated f. Tuition costs / Financial assistance offered g. Overall revenue and expense budget of program h. Writing/Speaking/Testing/Research requirements for students i. Practical event experience required (internships/assigned event management etc.) j. Overall effectiveness of degree/program - Alumni success (what are alumni of program doing now?) 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

67) BEST EVENT MANAGEMENT BACHELOR DEGREE

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & History of School/University b. Purpose / objective of Event Management Bachelor Degree c. Date program was founded & time frame course is offered d. Number of staff members & student to staff ratio e. Number of students enrolled / number graduated f. Tuition costs / Financial assistance offered g. Overall revenue and expense budget of program h. Writing/Speaking/Testing/Research requirements for students i. Practical event experience required (internships/assigned event management etc.) j. Overall effectiveness of degree/program - Alumni success (what are alumni of program doing now?) 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

68) BEST EVENT MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATION PROGRAM

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & History of School/University b. Purpose / objective of Event Management Certification Program c. Date program was founded & time frame course is offered d. Number of staff members & student to staff ratio e. Number of students enrolled / number graduated f. Tuition costs / Financial assistance offered g. Overall revenue and expense budget of program h. Writing/Speaking/Testing/Research requirements for students i. Practical event experience required (internships/assigned event management etc.) j. Overall effectiveness of degree/program - Alumni success (what are alumni of program doing now?) 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry. 96

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ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 66-68: • Submit categories 66, 67, 68 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. If submitting one or more entries from categories 1 or 40-71, please include all entries on the same single USB Thumbdrive. For entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question (10 points) • What did you do to update/change the Degree from the year before? Were your updates/changes successful? Please provide measurable results/examples. • If the Degree is a new program, please answer the following questions instead: • What challenges/obstacles did you foresee/encounter in creating the program and how did you handle them? 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points)

Please also include any and all of the following Supporting Materials. Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Student recruiting materials • Student application materials • Marketing materials for program • Complete outline and syllabus of course(s) • Reading requirements list for students • Sample testing Materials 4. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?


EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS OFFERING EVENT MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS 69) BEST ONLINE EVENT MANAGEMENT TRAINING PROGRAM 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & History of School/University b. Purpose / objective of Online Event Management Training Program c. Date program was founded & time frame course is offered d. Number of staff members & student to staff ratio e. Number of students enrolled / number graduated f. Tuition costs / Financial assistance offered g. Overall revenue and expense budget of program h. Writing/Speaking/Testing/Research requirements for students i. Practical event experience required (internships/assigned event management etc.) j. Overall effectiveness of degree/program - Alumni success (what are alumni of program doing now?) 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

70) BEST FESTIVAL & EVENT MANAGEMENT MASTERS PROGRAM 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & History of School/University b. Purpose / objective of Festival & Event Management Masters Program c. Date program was founded & time frame course is offered d. Number of staff members & student to staff ratio e. Number of students enrolled / number graduated f. Tuition costs / Financial assistance offered g. Overall revenue and expense budget of program h. Writing/Speaking/Testing/Research requirements for students i. Practical event experience required (internships/assigned event management etc.) j. Overall effectiveness of degree/program - Alumni success (what are alumni of program doing now?) 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

71) BEST FESTIVAL & EVENT MANAGEMENT PHD PROGRAM

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & History of School/University b. Purpose / objective of Festival & Event Management PhD Program c. Date program was founded & time frame course is offered d. Number of staff members & student to staff ratio e. Number of students enrolled / number graduated f. Tuition costs / Financial assistance offered g. Overall revenue and expense budget of program h. Writing/Speaking/Testing/Research requirements for students i. Practical event experience required (internships/assigned event management etc.) j. Overall effectiveness of degree/program - Alumni success (what are alumni of program doing now?) 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 69-71: • Submit categories 69, 70, 71 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. If submitting one or more entries from categories 1 or 40-71, please include all entries on the same single USB Thumbdrive. For entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question (10 points) • What did you do to update/change the Degree from the year before? Were your updates/changes successful? Please provide measurable results/examples. • If the Degree is a new program, please answer the following questions instead: • What challenges/obstacles did you foresee/encounter in creating the program and how did you handle them? 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points)

Please also include any and all of the following Supporting Materials. • Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Student recruiting materials • Student application materials • Marketing materials for program • Complete outline and syllabus of course(s) • Reading requirements list for students • Sample testing Materials 4. Judging Criteria: (30 points) • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?


ENTRY FORM REQUIREMENTS

• PAYMENT: Submit one overall entry form with total payment - list all entries submitted on this form. (Be sure to complete sections 1 & 4.) • ENTRIES: Please also submit TWO copies of each individual

2017

AWARDS RELEASE AND USAGE

By submitting your entry to the IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards, you automatically grant the IFEA the right to use any materials from your entries for editorial, analytical, promotional or any other purpose without additional compensation. In addition, you acknowledge your entry / ies are not returnable. Your entry into the competition is acknowledgment of these terms.

• •

entry form – one to be attached to each individual entry – and one to be submitted with payment and overall entry form. (Complete sections 1, 2, 3 on each entry form.) Be sure payment information is NOT filled out on these copies. Please PRINT or TYPE all information as information from this form will be used for any awards if won. Please email a high resolution copy of either your organization or event logo (Only one logo will be used.) to nia@ifea.com subject “2017 Pinnacle Entry Logo” & Your Event / Logo Name.

Sections 1, 2 and 3 must be completed twice for each entry. One copy attached to each individual entry, and one copy attached to payment form. 1. ENTRANT INFORMATION (Required for each entry) (Tip: Complete Section 1. Then make copies to complete form for each entry.) How you list your organization / event name will be how it is listed on any award won. PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY. Organization: ________________________________________________________________________ Membership #: ____________________________ Address (Do not list P.O. Box): ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ City: ____________________________________ State: _____ Zip Code: _____________________ Country: __________________________________ Contact Person (This person will receive all email notifications regarding your Pinnacle entries.): ________________________________________________________________ Phone:______________________________________________ E-mail: ____________________________________________________________________ Website: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 2. BUDGET INFORMATION (Required for each entry) Organization’s Event Expense Budget: (USD, include all cash outflows). Each entry category is divided into the budget categories below. Gold, Silver and Bronze Awards will be given in each budget category unless the number of entries warrants budgets to be combined, or as determined by the judges. Under $100,000

$100,000 - $500,000

$500,000 - $1.5 Million

over $1.5 million

3. ENTRY INFORMATION (Required for each entry) Category Name (required): _____________________________________________________________ Category Number (required): ________________ Name of Event (if different from organization): ________________________________________________________________________________________ Name of Program / Program Sponsor / Vendor, etc. - if applicable:_______________________________________________________________________ Entry Link for Categories 7-14: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Entry Description: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Provide brief identifying description for each entry. This helps to identify your entry if you enter 2 or more entries for the same category. Complete section 4 ONCE (along with section 1). Attach payment for all entries combined.

4. PAYMENT INFORMATION

Entries received with payment by 5:00 p.m. June 19, 2017 (MST) will receive the Member early bird rate of $35 per entry or $100 per Grand Pinnacle Entry; or the Non-Member early bird rate of $70 per entry or $200 per Grand Pinnacle entry, depending on IFEA Membership Status. Entries received between June 20, 2017 and July 17, 2017 will receive the Member final entry rate of $40 per entry or $125 per Grand Pinnacle entry; or the Non-Member final entry rate of $80 per entry or $250 per Grand Pinnacle entry, depending on IFEA Membership Status. Questions: Contact nia@ifea.com. Early Bird Member Rates (Before June 19, 2017)

Final Entry Member Rates (June 20 - July 17, 2017)

Early Bird Non-Member Rates (June 19, 2017)

Final Entry Non-Member Rates (June 20 - July 17, 2017)

Grand Pinnacle:

$100 x _____= $_______

$125 x _____= $_______

$200 x _____= $_______

$250 x _____= $_______

Pinnacle Entries: (Categories 2-71)

$35 x _____= $_______

$40 x _____= $_______

$70 x ______= $_______

$90 x ______= $ _______

TOTAL CATEGORIES ENTERED: Please list which categories you are entering and how many of each so we are able to confirm all of your entries have arrived. (e.g. 1, 2, 2, 3, 5, 7…): ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ TOTAL NUMBER OF ENTRIES: ____________________________ TOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED: $ _____________________________________ Check (Make checks payable to IFEA)

Visa

MasterCard

American Express

Print Cardholder Name: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Signature: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Credit Card Number:_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Expiration Date: _____________________________________________ CVN Code: ______________________(MC / VISA-3 digit code back) (AMX-4 digit code front) DID YOU REMEMBER TO Include your payment for total entries along with 1 overall entry form listing each category number entered Include 2 individual entry forms for each item – one with item, one with payment, do not list payment details on these forms Include each entry (as requested) on one Thumbdrive attached to payment form. Email organization or event logo to nia@ifea.com Review all rules for entry submission – go to: Pinnacle Awards section at www.ifea.com for more info. International Festivals & Events Association • 2603 W Eastover Terrace • Boise, ID 83706 U.S.A. • phone: +1.208.433.0950 • fax: +1.208.433.9812 • web: www.ifea.com


MARKETPLACE BANNERS/FLAGS dfest® - The ONE source for creative design, custom decorations, street banners, mascots, video marketing & installation for events. All services tailored to fit your unique needs. Contact: Pete Van de Putte Jr., CFEE, President; Address: 1930 N. Pan Am Expressway, San Antonio, TX 78208; Phone: (800) 356-4085; Fax: 210-227-5920; Email: sales@dixieflag.com; Website: www.dixieflag.com. FIREWORKS LANTIS FIREWORKS AND LASERS - Provides display fireworks and laser specialists, computerized, choreographed fireworks, indoor/outdoor programs, special effects. Fully licensed and insured in Nevada, Arizona, Utah, Wyoming, Idaho, Colorado, Texas and Alaska. Contact: PO Box 491, Draper, UT 84020-0491; Phone: 800-443-3040; Email: lantispyro@yahoo.com; Website: www.lantisfireworks.com. INFLATABLES DYNAMIC DISPLAYS / FABULOUS INFLATABLES - Designs, manufacturers, for rent or purchase – costumes, props, floats, helium balloons, event entry ways and décor. Offers complete and flexible service packages for small towns and large international events. 50+ years of parade/event experience. Contact: Steve Thomson; Address: 6470 Wyoming St. Ste #2024, Dearborn MI 48126; Phone: 800-411-6200 Fax 519-258-0767; Email: steve@fabulousinflatables.com; Website: www.fabulousinflatables.com. INSURANCE HAAS & WILKERSON INSURANCE – Over 50 years experience in the entertainment industry, providing insurance programs designed to meet the specific needs of your event. Clients throughout the US include festivals, parades, carnivals and more. Contact: Carol Porter, CPCU, Broker; Address: 4300 Shawnee Mission Parkway, Fairway, KS 66205; Phone: 800-821-7703; Fax: 913-676-9293; Email: carol.porter@hwins.com; Website: www.hwins.com.

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and improve our community through leadership as trained volunteers. I am also a graduate of Leadership Wilmington 2013, and have attended many national trainings with both the Association of Junior Leagues International and the IFEA. What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? My father always tried to instill in me the importance of not worrying about things. Worrying won’t change anything, and all it does is drive you crazy. As an event planner, this has become so crucial to my sanity! Thoughtful consideration and planning for multiple scenarios is important – but once this is done – let it go. If you can’t control it, don’t worry about it. What is your personal philosophy? My personal philosophy is to find gratefulness in your current situation, be happy, and make the most out of everything. I think life is better with lots of loved ones around, taking time out to celebrate. I guess that is what draws me to the events industry – the chance and opportunity to create situations where people can gather and just be together, celebrating a common interest.

K & K INSURANCE – For 60 years, K & K insurance has been recognized as the leading provider of SPORTS-LEISURE & ENTERTAINMENT insurance products. Contact: Mark Herberger; Address: 1712 Magnavox Way, Fort Wayne, IN 46804; Call: 1-866-554-4636; Email: mark.herberger@kandkinsurance.com. Website: www.KandKinsurance.com. INTERNET POINTSMAP® - PointsMap® has proven to be an effective and useful software for Festivals and Events. Create custom points at their exact location on your PointsMap with photos, descriptions, website links, multi-media, PDF’s and even “inside maps”. Your visitors can “PLAN” before the festival using their desktop computer, and then “NAVIGATE” the festival using their Smartphone. Visit www. PointsMap.com/SLAF and http://www.PointsMap.com/WichitaRiverFest/ to see how PointsMap is being used. It’s easy to use and extremely affordable. Contact: Jerry Waddell Address: 1100 Riverfront Pkwy, Chattanooga, TN 37402-2171; Phone: 423-894-2677; Email: jerryw@videoideas.com; Website: www.pointsmap.com. SAFFIRE - Saffire is award-winning software providing events & venues with beautifully designed, online event destinations, including integrated content management, mobile, social, ecommerce, email and more. Contact: Kendra Wright; Address: 248 Addie Roy Rd, Ste B-106, Austin TX 78746-4133; Phone: 512-430-1123; Email: info@saffireevents.com; Website: www.saffireevents.com. PINS / EMBLEMS CUSTOM PIN & DESIGN - Supplying festivals and events with lapel pins and other novelty items since 1980. Highest Quality - Lowest Prices! Many well-known clients. Special Convention discounts - Free Pins! Contact: John Stevenson; Address: 245 Ivanhoe St., Denver, CO 80220; Phone: 877-307-7467; Email: custompin@aol.com; Website: www.custompin.com. SPONSORSHIP IEG - The leading provider of consulting, valuation, research, published information and training in the global sponsorship industry. Address: 640 N. LaSalle St. 450, Chicago, IL 60654-3186; Phone: 312-944-1727; Website: www.sponsorship.com or www.ieg2017.com. Spring 2017

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Ie volume 28 issue 1