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the business of international events

Creating a Successful Mascot Program Volunteers – To Screen or Not to Screen It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane… Wait, What in the Heck is That?


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the business of international events

Creating a Successful Mascot Program

F E ATU R E S

Volunteers – To Screen or Not to Screen It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane… Wait, What in the Heck is That?

On the Cover: Dawn balloon flight at Spirit of Boise Balloon Classic, Boise, ID. Photo courtesy Lighter Than Air America, Inc.

DEPARTMENTS 10 President’s Letter 12 The Board 14 Foundation 16 The Digital Life 18 English 101 20 “They Said What???” 22 The Un-comfort Zone 26 Leadership at All Levels 30 The Sponsor Doc 32 Turnstiles: Marketing for Event Managers 55 60th Anniversary IFEA Convention & Expo 77 2015 IFEA Expo

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The Power of Brand Presence at Festivals & Events by Marc Goulet

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From Volunteers to Super-Volunteers by Kathryn May

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Creating a Successful Mascot Program by Michael Baxter

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To Screen or Not to Screen? Provided by Verified Volunteers (A SterlingBackcheck Company)

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83 2015 IFEA Webinar Series 89 IFEA World Festival & Event City 101 Pinnacle Awards 120 Marketplace

Summer 2015, Volume 26, Issue 2 “ie” is published quarterly by the International Festivals & Events Association, 2603 W. Eastover Terrace, Boise, ID 83706, USA. Permission to quote from material herein is granted provided proper credit is given to IFEA.

Tokens Keep the Beer, Lines and Profits Flowing by Jim Wahl Economic Impact to the Local Economy Collaborating and Cooperating with Local Government as Social Entrepreneurs By Wes Tilghman

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Creative Insurance Is No Oxymoron by Melissa Matheson

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Top Ten Tips to Draw More Attention to Your Festival Booth by Amy Amdur


PRESIDENT’S LETTER

Steven Wood Schmader, CFEE

BRIGHTON, ENGLAND

BRING THE HAPPY I just returned from an IFEA Europe Board meeting in Brighton, England. Brighton is a beautiful seaside resort town located on the south coast of England, just a short 18 miles across the English Channel from France (a few meters closer if you journey out onto the Palace Pier, filled with carnival rides, restaurants and arcades). It is a picturesque area that takes your imagination back through multiple periods of history without ever having been there. While we were there, we met with Andrew Comben, Chief Executive for the Brighton Festival and Brighton Dome, who was in the middle of his event. Each May the city hosts the Brighton Festival, which stakes claim to being England’s largest annual festival and the second largest arts festival in the UK (after Edinburgh). The Festival draws some 500,000 people to a plethora of events that include processions such as the Children's Parade, outdoor spectaculars (often involving pyrotechnics), and theatre, music and visual arts in venues throughout the city, some brought into this use exclusively for the Festival. Simultaneously, the Brighton Fringe festival runs alongside the Brighton Festival, and has grown to be the second largest fringe festival in the world. Needless to say, the city of Brighton was a busy place during our visit. But with all the things going on, I was most drawn to a project from the 2014 Brighton Festival called ‘Bring the Happy,’ 10

by a group called ‘Invisible Flock’. Even without experiencing it first-hand, it is an idea that has lingered with me since I learned about it. For ten days, a city-center gallery was transformed into a giant 3D map of Brighton on which people were invited to stop by and plot their own happy memories. A first kiss, a longed-for baby, a chance encounter: where it happened and how happy it made them feel (on a scale of 1 to 10)? As the people of Brighton marked their own moments of happiness throughout their city, everyone was invited to explore what has made other people happy – and where. Similar to the ‘Story Corps’ Project by National Public Radio (NPR) in the United States, as people marked/plotted their memories, they were also asked to record and share their memories and the feelings that they had held onto from those special moments throughout their lives. From those memories, with the help of an outstanding six-piece band called Hope & Social, the happy memories collected from Brighton and other cities throughout the country were used to create a live show called ‘Bring the Happy Live’ (performed at the 2014 Brighton Festival), where they were shared (as they describe) “in all their beautiful, tragic, ridiculous and occasionally mundane glory, pitched somewhere between a wedding and a wake, and designed especially to celebrate

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happiness and where we find it.” It was a life-affirming project that attempted to create a portrait of people’s lives, taking happy memories from local residents and then weaving them into a spectacular live, musical event that celebrated the happiness of Brighton. Based upon comments from those who were fortunate enough to experience it first-hand, the results were both powerful and moving. As I continued to think about this concept (one that could be replicated in any city) of helping people to map their happiness, I wondered to myself, if we could accomplish a similar project from a worldwide perspective, how many lifelong memories would be plotted on the global map as the result of a festival or event? Memories of family and friends; of communities at their best; of irreplaceable moments that – were it not for a festival or event – may never have existed at all. And that made me reflect on the continuing and critical role that our industry plays in the world around us; creating results that we cannot possibly plan, except to provide the venues, the canvases, the gathering spots, the opportunities that make anything possible and everything memorable. With that in mind, I hope that we will all strive to provide the highest quality, most creative and inspirational settings that we can through our events; for you never know when and where those happy memories will be etched in someone’s mind for a lifetime. I hope that all of you are planning to join us in Tucson, Arizona for the IFEA’s 60th Anniversary Convention & Expo (September 21st-23rd), the largest gathering of industry professionals who have perfected the art of ‘Bringing the Happy’ to cities and communities around the world! Until then, have a wonderful and happy summer!


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THE BOARD Why We Enter the IFEA/Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards I love this time of the year. It seems like the world around us wakes up from a long nap. The grass becomes bright. The trees flower. Bright colors show up in every store window. Festivals and events start popping up in every city and municipality. In our office, Spring means new interns and preparations for our IFEA/ Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards entries. Our interns most likely haven’t ever been to the Saint Louis Art Fair before and have no idea what the IFEA Pinnacle Awards are or why we even enter. With the above being said…for the many organizations that do enter the IFEA/Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards, there are even more that don’t. I’ve always wondered the reasons why an organization chooses not to enter at least one entry. There are so many reasons TO enter the Pinnacles . . . and below I have shared the top 10 reasons why Cultural Festivals/Saint Louis Art Fair is excited to enter the Pinnacle awards each year and why we feel it is worth our time, energy and dollars. 1. Conversation Applying for anything gets people talking. If your event team is applying for an award, they start talking about the project. They engage in conversation. The entry helps clarify and reiterate the mission and the “why we are doing what we do.” For us at Cultural Festivals, the conversation is educating our new interns on our brand. The Grand Pinnacle category application walks everyone through all the basic information necessary to get everyone up to speed on the

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event. It asks for event dates, mission, history, activities or programs, budget, economic impact, attendance and demographics, staffing and the type of corporation your organization is. It truly gives an overview of your company. 2. Teamwork The event didn’t happen by one lonely staff person, your whole team labored in the efforts of producing your event/festival. Working on a Pinnacle submission is another project where all members work together on a common goal. The sponsorship team has to work with the designers, production team, volunteer team and public relations. The silos have to come down. Input from each department is necessary. 3. Marketing Expense The money you put out for an award submission is just a necessary part of doing business. If you do the math and you apply to enter the Grand Pinnacle category, the cost is $75 (for IFEA Members). That is about 21 cents a day. It is a marketing expense. It is another way to market your event or festival. You can utilize applying for the award as a way to create interest. For example, you can ask your social media audience which print ad would they enter into an award contest; or what merchandise piece did they think was hot and would buy? If you win the award, you can include the news in your email newsletter, press release, website, etc. 4. Client Relations You can include all your stakeholders by crediting their role as part of your event. This is a classy step in building stronger relationships. The Saint Louis Art Fair works with amateur photographers to capture our event beyond the traditional corporate photos. Letting our photographers know we are using their photos (with credits) in our submission for the Pinnacles, makes them smile. Winning the awards (with their photos) makes them giddy! 5. Street Cred There is no better endorsement than a third party entity that has no vested

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interest in your success. The award tells others that your event is something special – i.e. IFEA Pinnacle Award Winning Volunteer Program – Who doesn’t want to volunteer for that group! 6. Confidence The minute you enter your festival or event, you elevate the state of mind of your team members. You believe they can win, you believe they are worthy. Your team starts to believe they can win and the attitude and morale changes. Everybody believes! 7. Self Respect By entering, you are saying you believe in what your team does. People respect those who stand up to be counted. The other option is to not enter but obviously you can’t win if you don’t enter. If you don’t believe in your event, why should your sponsors, volunteers, and board believe? 8. Continuity The endless buzz and conversation doesn’t stop after you win an award at the awards ceremony. It is now part of your event’s story. You are an award-winning event and you will continue to be an award-winning event. The event will continue to grow and always strive for new standards of excellence. This continuity and confidence breeds more believers . . . more volunteers, more sponsors, more attendees. 9. Community Awards are a place to meet. They open doors for you to engage your civic and industry professionals in discussions. They are a great place to see the competion, see the new trends in the festival and event industry. They are a place to network, learn and enhance your professional development. Awards tend to involve leaders and experts. If you are an award winner, people start


IFEA VISION

A globally united industry that touches lives in a positive way through celebration.

Publisher & Editor Steven Wood Schmader, CFEE, President & CEO Assistant Editor Nia Hovde, Vice President/Director of Marketing Advertising Sylvia Allen, Director of Sponsorship Sales and Marketing Advertising Sales & Expo Booking Art Director Craig Sarton, Creative Director Contributing Writers Gail Lowney Alofsin, Amy Amdur, Michael Baxter, Jeff English, CFEE, Bruce L. Erley, APR, CFEE, Scott Fraser, Marc Goulet, Sean King, Kathryn May, Melissa Matheson, Wes Tilghman, Jim Wahl, Robert Wilson, Kendra Wright Photography Andrew Rafkind, Lighter than Air America, Inc.

For association or publication information: IFEA World Headquarters 2603 W. Eastover Terrace • Boise, ID 83706, U.S.A. +1.208.433.0950 Fax +1.208.433.9812

With respect to interactions with members/customers or those applying to be members/customers, the IFEA will not cause or allow conditions, procedures, or decisions which are unsafe, undignified, unnecessarily intrusive, or which fail to provide appropriate confidentiality or privacy. If you believe that you have not been accorded a reasonable interpretation of your rights under this policy, please contact the IFEA office at +1-208-433-0950 ext. 18.

http://www.ifea.com

to include you in those event specific topics and controversies. You become part of the award-winning event. 10. Everybody Loves a Winner and Everybody Loves Winning. Winning Just Feels Good! I am sure that every organization that enters the IFEA/Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards Competition has their own top 10 reasons why they enter. My hope is, that if you have considered entering the competition before, but have yet to do so, that I have convinced you to enter at least one submission to the Pinnacle Awards this year. This year, not only is the IFEA celebrating its 60th Anniversary in Tucson, Arizona with their Anniversary Convention & Expo this September 21-23, 2015, but the IFEA/Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards Competition is celebrating 20 years of industry recognition. What a year to be a part of the IFEA! I look forward to seeing you in Tucson this September and maybe, if

you enter, I’ll see you in the Pinnacle Awards winner’s circle! PINNACLE DEADLINES: Early Bird Deadline: June 15, 2015 Final Deadline: July 20, 2015 For more information on the IFEA/Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards, Click Here.

CINDY LERICK Chairman of the Board 2015 International Festival and Events Association Executive Director Cultural Festivals St. Louis, MO Email: clerick@culturalfestivals.com Summer 2015

IFEA’s ie: the business of international events 13


FOUNDATION Can We Count on You for Your Support? Little did I know when I began my adventures in the festival world, the education the International Festivals and Events Association provides would be the main reason for the success the organizations would experience. Looking back through the years, I am humbled by the impact. Let me share just a few changes we learned through the conferences, webinars, books, industry products, magazines, CFEE program and of course, the connections we would make. Through the knowledge obtained in IFEA we were able to create numerous new events to our festival, add accountability to the concessions, create measureable effective marketing pieces, send out efficient RFP’s, implement sponsorship levels with benefit consistent benefit packages, increase our in-kind sponsorship over 1600 percent and quadruple our cash sponsorship. We were able to double the number of stages, expand our event from three days ending at 6:00 p.m. to four days with the event closing at 10:00 p.m., giving us insurance if Mother Nature reared her ugly head. In working with IFEA member professionals, we were able to be proactive in getting our event grandfathered for city assistance for the future. The city helped us learn, obtain mobile units for the event, discover ways to partner with local colleges to execute effective surveys and helped provide service of our website and IT needs. IFEA plays an instrumental role in educating event professionals. The Annual Convention is packed with topics on how to be a better event manager and the online educational Webinars, hosted by industry leaders, offer topics that are important to the workings of your organization. The Expo at the Convention features event specific prod-

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ucts. And, the unconventional way of learning facilitated by the environment of the Convention is achieved by the exchange of ideas outside of the meeting rooms or in the hospitality suite. The connections you make are resources you can utilize throughout the year that can be an instrumental success to your own organization’s success along with your personal career. What can you do to be sure IFEA will continue to play a major role in educating event professionals in new ways for our industry? 1. Get involved with the IFEA Foundation The IFEA Foundation helps to support the mission and vision of the IFEA by providing financial support that allows the organization to fulfill its educational goals, goals which further ensure the quality of both the events and the professionals who make up our unique industry. Last year the Foundation granted 15 scholarships to the Annual Convention. 2. Save the Date Save the Date in your calendar to attend the IFEA Foundation Night Auction & Party. The IFEA Foundation Auction allows you to be a part of that support, with a unique opportunity to bid on one of a kind package, including travel, products, services, VIP event experiences and much more. The Foundation Night Auction & Party is the largest fundraiser for the organization. It will take place on Tuesday, September 22 in Tucson, Arizona. The monies raised will guarantee that IFEA will be in the forefront to help educate its members on the new ways to help promote and execute events into the future. Save the date in your calendar to

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attend the Auction Night Party, September 22, 2015 in Tucson, Arizona. 3. Donate Auction Items One of the many highlights of this event is the unique auction items that have people buzzing around the auction tables and discussing the rest of the Convention. What can you donate to the auction you ask?  Well, what would you buy? How about unique things to give as gifts for friends and family of ALL ages--yes, don’t forget the kids! Experience packages, jewelry, art, electronics, something unique from your community or state, collectibles, hobby related items and hard to get tickets and/or in demand items. The ideas are truly endless!  We encourage you and/or your organization to donate and we thank you for joining the effort to help keep IFEA in the spirit of its mission “to inspire and enable those in our industry to realize their dreams, build community and sustain success through celebration.” Can we count on you for your support? For more information about the IFEA Foundation Night Party & Auction and also donating an auction item, Click Here. http://www.ifea.com/p/about/ foundation/fundraising/annualauction

Mary Ann Dilling, CFEE 2015 IFEA Foundation Board Chair Director of Business Development Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) Oshkosh, WI Email: mdilling@eaa.org


The IFEA would like to thank the following partners for their dedicated support of the association. Association Endorsed Partners have made a commitment to the continued success of our association, our members, and our industry through their umbrella support of all IFEA programs and services. Show your support for these dedicated providers to our industry by getting to know them, and the high quality products and services that they supply, better.


THE DIGITAL LIFE

By Kendra Wright

Tools for Good Living Recently I heard that using the term “smart phones” is out. They are now actually just called “phones.” And even if you’ve already picked up on this change in nomenclature, isn’t it still kind of crazy to think just how quickly smart phones have infiltrated our lives? It’s also worth noting that making actual calls is one of the least used functions of our phones. They have taken the place of so many devices that we used to carry around separately (and some we never had, like texting). Why bother carrying a camera, a flashlight, a music player, a map, an address book, a planner/calendar, a watch and more. As they say, there’s an app for that, and they’re all right there on your phone. It should surprise no one that the Saffire team tends to be a little on the techie/nerdy side. When I asked for some favorites, I was deluged with responses from our team! I know you don’t have time to download a bunch of apps you may never use, so I hope this list helps you narrow down some top choices from the millions of apps available. Today, we’re going to focus on some favorite general “life apps” and mobile site resources. No matter what your interests are outside of work, they can be enhanced or streamlined by using a digital tool. Love to (Bargain) Shop? • Never buy online without searching “<shop name> promo code.” You will almost always find a discount on a site like RetailMeNot. • Even if you’re in a store, you can search “<store name> coupon” or go to the retailer’s app or website to find coupons. Or download RedLaser and Amazon PriceCheck and scan products to instantly check the price against other re-

tailers. Specifically at Target, if you find an item at Target.com, Amazon.com, Walmart.com, BestBuy.com, ToysRUs. com or BabiesRUs.com (all searchable from RedLaser) for a lower price, just show your device to the cashier, and they will match the price. • If you share shopping responsibilities with a spouse or partner, you’ll love Shopper. You each put the app on your phone and it automatically syncs your shopping lists. I even create “check” lists of standard items to use while making my list. Love to Cook? • Epicurious has amazing recipes from Gourmet, Bon Appetit and more. • Whether you’re looking for easy, healthy or fancy meals, AllRecipes has you covered. You can search by ingredient, utilize a menu planner and more. Love Movies? • Flixter helps you discover the best movies by using Rotten Tomatoes, the web’s leading aggregator of movie and TV reviews from professional critics. You can see show times and buy tickets at your local theater, or via Vudu, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video and Netflix. • We also love Google Play to rent/buy movies and music, and Spotify for listening to music by genre and mood. Love to Read? • Libraries have gone digital! As much of an Amazon fan as I am, I am also

a huge fan of FREE. Now from many library websites, you can check out books or magazines to read or listen to on your device (check out Overdrive to see if your library participates), learn languages, find your ancestry and more, all while never stepping foot in your library! Want to Get Fit? • Most of our team uses MyFitnessPal to track food, water, exercise, weight and more. You can even share info (only the good stuff) with friends to help stay motivated, and it syncs with FitBit, a pedometer we also love. • Dream of becoming a runner? C25k takes you from the couch to running a 5k or 30 minutes within 9 weeks. It starts gently, with intervals of 60 seconds of jogging with 90 seconds of running and advances slowly. It gives you voice cues and lets you play music from your playlists. Need Help With Money? • There are apps for most banks, credit card companies and more, and these can streamline your interactions with them. How about depositing a check from anywhere, by snapping a photo with your phone? Good bye, ATM lines! • Several of us also love Mint, a personal finance tracker that helps you set budgets and more. • Venmo is a great, free alternative to Paypal to send money from your bank account or debit card. Continued on page 121

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Remember All Those Who Helped You Get Where You Are Today?

The IFEA “Fund for the Future” provides critical funding to ensure that the IFEA has reserves in place to protect against future economic shifts and realities in a constantly changing world; to allow the organization to keep pace with new and changing technologies necessary to communicate with and serve our global industry; and to support a continued expansion of our services, resources, programming and outreach around the world.

Pay it Forward With a Gift to IFEA’s

‘Fund for the Future.’ Your donation will ensure that our world always has something to celebrate!

Contact any IFEA Foundation Board, IFEA World Board, or IFEA Staff Member for more information. Individual and Organizational Contributions are welcomed and encouraged. All contributions are tax-deductible in the United States.

For more information go to www.ifea.com.


ENGLISH 101

By Jeff English, CFEE

It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane….. Wait, What in the Heck is That? In the summer of 2014 a video was posted on YouTube showing a much different and fantastic view of a fireworks show than what most of us had ever seen before. It was such a unique video that so far it’s garnered over 11 million views! As an object lifts off and flies towards a river, a flash appears on the screen and it’s then you realize this flying object is directly in the middle of a fireworks explosion! The video is of a drone with a GoPro camera strapped to it flying through the middle of the fireworks show at SunFest. To say the least, it has become a certified social media sensation. So much so, that the video has become Exhibit A for the event industry as policies and procedures try to keep pace with our technologically changing times. What I’ve learned over the last year while researching the issue of Unmanned Ariel Systems (Drones) is that local, state and federal authorities are doing their very best to find a balance between the desires of recreational drone users, commercial demand for drone use, and the potential safety threats of drones at large public events. In preparation for Kentucky Derby Festival’s Thunder Over Louisville, an event that hosts 500,000 people on a venue that spans over two miles on both sides of the Ohio River, I did extensive research and attended several meetings trying to understand FAA policy and KDF’s limitations on regulating drones at Thunder. Thunder includes both an air show and fireworks, neither of which mix well with drones flying overhead! Because much of the rules regarding drones were as murky as the muddy Ohio river, we gathered together the top officials who assist with Thunder security. They included Metro Safe, Indiana and Jefferson County Sherriff’s Departments, Louisville Metro Police, FBI, and the FAA. We learned the following at the meeting: 1. Drone use is a federal issue regulated by the FAA because they fly. The rules regarding drones fall within those developed for model aircrafts. 2. Drones cannot be used within 5 miles of an airport. The Thunder venue is within that 5 mile barrier and also has an air box used for the air show, so any use of drones is strictly prohibited. 3. Any enforcement of drone regulations falls under FAA statutes. Those statutes 18

allow for fines and civil penalties. Any prosecution would have to be done by a federal prosecutor, which frankly, is unlikely absent someone being injured by a drone. 4. The FAA is limited in the number of people who can monitor drone use at events, so they have asked state and local law enforcement officials to deter, detect, immediately investigate and, as appropriate, take action to stop unauthorized drone use. 5. Our state and local law enforcements agencies were reticent to actually confiscate drones, but had no problem stopping unauthorized use. They also would collect information that could be passed along to federal prosecutors if an incident or injury happened. From a public relations standpoint, we knew it was going to be absolutely essential to get the word out that Thunder and all of the KDF events were going to be in a “No Drone Zone.” Our Vice President of Communications, Aimee Boyd, made the No Drone Zone message a part of her regular media interviews. During those interviews, she emphasized that if a drone was spotted near the venue, the air show would be suspended and the fireworks would not launch. On Thunder Day there were no drones in the skies above our venue. Neither during the air show or during the fireworks. Moving forward, we at least have an idea of how to monitor this situation, but there’s still a lot to be decided. The

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FAA is still grappling with the licensing of these aircraft for commercial use. Also, because drones are very commonplace, what fines or penalties can be put in place for unlicensed users? We have even considered the question of whether local ordinances should be enacted to prevent unregulated drone use at events, thereby providing local authorities with the jurisdiction to make arrests and confiscate the aircraft. To say the least, this issue is very fluid. If you’d like to learn more about this topic, I look forward to examining it in depth even further at a session I’ll be presenting at the IFEA 60th Anniversary Convention & Expo this September 2123, 2015 in Tucson, Arizona, in addition to an IFEA Online Webinar scheduled for Thursday, October 8, 2015. For more information on both of these educational opportunities, go to www.ifea.com. Jeff English is the Sr. Vice President of Administration/General Counsel of the Kentucky Derby Festival. After graduating from Washburn University School of Law (Topeka, KS) in 2004, Jeff worked in politics and practiced law before joining the KDF staff. He is charged with overseeing all of Festival’s legal issues and serving as its risk management officer. He also manages the Merchandise Department and the 501(c)3 not-for-profit Kentucky Derby Festival Foundation.


TWO PROGRAMS GUARANTEED TO INCREASE YOUR SPONSORSHIP REVENUE! International Festivals & Events Association

SPONSOR SUMMIT

Sponsorship is the fuel for the festival and events industry engine. Strengthen the partnerships you have built with your festival’s sponsors by hosting an IFEA Sponsor Summit. When sponsors have to make difficult resource allocation decisions, they will remember the sponsor properties that gave them the tools and ideas they need to gain even greater value from their sponsorship investment.

SPONSOR AUDIT

Are you getting the most out of your sponsorship program? Is your sponsorship program performing at its peak or could it be strengthened? Have you identified and valued all of your sponsorable benefits and assets; or is their valuable ‘real estate’ going untapped? Have you been so busy recruiting, servicing and retaining the sponsors you have that you haven’t had time to step back and evaluate your overall sponsorship program to see if there is room for improvement? If all of these questions have left you with even more questions, it may be time for an IFEA Sponsorship Audit! To set up a Sponsor Summit or Sponsor Audit or for more information about these valuable IFEA programs, please contact:

SYLVIA ALLEN, CFEE +1-732-241-1144 • sylvia@ifea.com International Festivals & Events Association 2603 W. Eastover Terrace • Boise, ID 83706 • USA Phone: +1-208-433-0950 • Fax: +1-208-433-9812 www.ifea.com


THEY SAID WHAT???

By Scott Fraser

How Can You Be Heard Above

“The Noise”? ‘Tis the season…or at least it will soon be the season….for festivals, events, concerts, outdoor activities and just plain fun! As you know, late Spring, Summer and early Fall are the best times to hold events. People want to get outside and take part in whatever fun, recreational or cultural activity you have to offer.

So the good news is, we are coming in to prime festival season. But that can also present a challenge as well. How can you be heard above “the noise”? How can you distinguish your event from all those being held around you? What story will resonate with the media and the public? Let me offer some suggestions. First, it is always best if you can get someone else to tell your story, endorse you, or just generally say good things about you. For instance, one of my clients just became the title sponsor of a long running and beloved outdoor art festival. A photo was taken of the check presentation and the festival will soon be sending out a news release. In this case, my client (a bank) will have good things said about them by someone else, the festival organizers, without having to send out a news release themselves. I realize this is a bit of a reverse example. However, if my client was the festival organizer I would tell them that while the story angle is about securing the sponsorship, take the opportunity to include all the facts about the upcoming festival—where, when, how long it has been taking place, highlights of this year’s event and any other tidbit you think is important. So, did you just secure a new sponsor, or title sponsor? Send out a release! That way you are crediting the donor, but you also can remind people of what will be coming up.

What else can you do? Well, is there a politician, local civic leader, Chamber of Commerce executive, sports or entertainment figure or someone else who might say good things about your event? Have them put out a release or be available for an interview about your organization or event. That way you will be the recipient of the good will coverage, without bragging about yourselves. Have you just secured a big name band, singer, entertainer or speaker? Send out a release! This will generate interest and possibly increase or at least jump start ticket sales. It reminds people that your event is taking place and hopefully gets them interested in what you will have to offer. And if you have several entertainers taking part in your event, it is OK to send out individual releases for each act signed. That way you get several bites at potential coverage rather than sending out just one release with the names of all acts listed. Another option is to partner with a non-profit group or charitable organization. No matter how good your event is or how well it is loved in the community, sharing some of your spotlight, not to mention profits, with a worthy organization is sure to make news. You will be looked at as caring and compassionate. Even if a story will profile your non-profit partner, news of why they are partnering and details of your event always make it in to the story.

And speaking of stories, the media loves to tell them. If your event has been around a long time, it sometimes is hard for the covering media to come up with a new angle. They don’t want to write/ record/film the same people and subjects that have been interviewed and covered the previous year and the years before that. So, find a new angle and suggest it to those on your media list. Profile an individual. Is there something unique about a performer, or someone on your organizing committee? Have they overcome some specific hardship to get where they are today? Focus on a small piece of what you do, or one specific individual and let the media build on that. All of the pertinent details of your event will be used in the story. Are animals involved? Even better! Who can resist the cute face of a puppy, kitten or even a Holstein? Find a way to get a photographer out to take pictures of the event set-up. Arrange to have an animal or two on the grounds (if they are part of your event that is) just to give a preview. For example, are you having a “bark in the park” type of event? Send out a media advisory saying a “spokes-Schnauzer” will be available for interviews prior to the event. Of course it is a gimmick, but it should make people smile. And you might just want to make some people available for interviews as well. Continued on page 121

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Good

Great

CFEE

An Important Step in the Career Track of Industry Leaders Join us September 18-20, 2015, in Tucson, Arizona, U.S.A. and be three steps closer to the recognition you deserve. CFEE SEMINAR DAY 1 SPONSORSHIP/SPONSORSHIP SERVICE

Over the past generation the sponsorship of festivals and special events has evolved from the quasi-donation of money by a local business to a sophisticated marketing relationship involving the exchange of mutual value. The development of a comprehensive sponsorship plan and successful fulfillment program involves the coordination of numerous details and the working knowledge of a variety of factors. This area of instruction is designed to provide information about the fundamentals of sponsorship. (Learn More)

CFEE SEMINAR DAY 2 MARKETING/MEDIA RELATIONS

A strong marketing vision, direction, and ultimately a plan is essential in successful promotion of any company’s

products or services. This area of instruction is designed to look at and provide an overview of marketing and media relations and specifically how these functions can be used to the unique needs of the festival and special events industry. (Learn More)

CFEE SEMINAR DAY 3 ADMINISTRATION/MANAGEMENT

Using the development of a model business plan as a guide, these sessions will explore and reveal the process by which successful administration and management programs are developed. Session attendees will explore the ins and outs of managing a board of directors, building an effective leadership and administration team, identifying budget targets and making them work, establishing marketing plans, identifying competition and establishing a business paradigm that will give more, “gravitas,” to an event-producing organization. (Learn More)

For more information about the IFEA’s professional certification program, and our 2015 CFEE FastTrack® Program, contact Cindy Lerick at clerick@culturalfestivals.com or call +1-314-614-7152. The CFEE Professional Certification Program is Sponsored by


THE UN-COMFORT ZONE

With Robert Wilson

This Story has a Happy Ending... I Promise! I was less than two minutes into my sales presentation when the business owner sitting behind his desk, gruffly said, “Get out of here.” I figured someone must have walked into his office and he didn’t want us to be interrupted. I turned around to see who it was; there was no one. He then said, “I’m talking to you salesman; get your @#%*&, and get out of here!” I suffered a moment of cognitive dissonance, this wasn’t making sense. He had given me the appointment over the phone, I had driven nearly an hour to get there, and even paid for parking. I said, “But, I haven’t even shown you the benefits of the program yet.” Then he screamed, “Get out of here now, or I’ll throw you out!” He was a big guy, who looked like a TV mobster; and with his heavy Brooklyn accent, I believed he’d break my legs. I scooped up my presentation notebook, and silently left. Welcome to New York City. I had accepted that job, selling barter club memberships, before I left Atlanta. It was a cool concept I was sure everyone would love: a member put a set dollar amount of his or her goods and services into the barter club bank, which could then be exchanged for the same dollar amount of any other member’s goods and services. Unfortunately, six weeks later, I hadn’t sold one. People slammed doors in my face, abruptly hung up on my phone calls, and spoke to me more rudely than ever before. Meanwhile, I received no salary, and was working on commission. The next week, I finally sold a membership, only to be told by my manager that the company had its quota of that type of business, so they wouldn’t be paying my commission. No one told me about the quota. Welcome to New York City. I quit that job and took one in telephone sales. For three weeks I sold personalized ballpoint pens to small businesses. I was paid an hourly wage, plus a small commission. Payday was every Friday. On the 22

third Friday, I showed up for work to an empty office. The company had moved in the middle of the night. I learned from the police that it was a Boiler Room, and they were conducting some sort of phone scam. I had naively worked in one of the straight jobs that made the company look legitimate. I would get no paycheck for that week’s work. Welcome to New York City. Before moving to New York, I made a down payment to purchase a co-op apartment that was under construction. It was supposed to be ready the day I arrived from Atlanta. When the moving truck pulled up, my unit was not finished. The builder assured me it would be ready in one week. I put my belongings into storage, moved in with a buddy and slept on his sofa. One week quickly became eight weeks, so I demanded an inspection of the building. Nothing had been done since the first time I saw it. I had to threaten a law suit to get my money back. Welcome to New York City. I then rented an apartment for four times what I had been paying in Atlanta. Plus, I had to pay the equivalent of three months rent to move in: the first month’s rent, a security deposit, and a real estate commission. Welcome to New York City. One night a hit-and-run driver wrecked my parked car. A neighbor got the license plate number when he heard the crash. I called the police. They asked if the neighbor could identify the driver. He could not; he only saw the car driving away. The police then said the car was reported stolen one hour after my car was hit, and unless we could identify the driver they could do nothing. Welcome to New York City. My girlfriend thought that my becoming a stockbroker would be glamorous, and I wanted to please her. I sent resumes to dozens of firms; I interviewed with several; but I couldn’t land a position. I looked for other high-end sales jobs, but couldn’t find one.

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I got depressed, which made things even harder. Then I ran out of money. That had never happened to me before. I was too embarrassed to tell my girlfriend, so I borrowed money from my mother. And, I started looking for the type of job I knew I could get: waiting tables. My girlfriend urged me not to do that, but I was in a panic. Two weeks later, I had a job in a restaurant, money in my pocket, and for the first time in four months New York City didn’t seem evil. I can’t help but think of these words from the song New York, New York: “If I can make it there, I’ll make it anywhere.” I wasn’t making it; New York chewed me up and spit me out. And, while I’ll always love visiting the Big Apple, I was clearly not meant to live there. I’m sharing this story because the adversity I experienced motivated me to focus on my most important goal. It made me realize I had been wasting my life. I wanted to be a writer, but I wasn’t pursuing it seriously. I did not write every day, and I was not trying to get my work published. When I got back to Atlanta, I cashed in a life insurance policy to buy a personal computer. I used it to write eight hours a day; and each week I mailed several query letters to book publishers, or at least one short story to a magazine. I was finally working in the career I had always dreamed of. If you are experiencing tough times... let them remind you of what is most important in your life. Then let them motivate you to get back to your primary goals. Robert Evans Wilson, Jr. is an author, speaker and humorist. He works with companies that want to be more competitive and with people who want to think like innovators. For more information on Robert, please visit www.jumpstartyourmeeting.com.


IFEA 60 Anniversary Convention & Expo th

JW Marriott Tucson Starr Pass Resort & Spa Tucson, Arizona, U.S.A.

Presenting Sponsor

CFE E

Mark Your Calendar Now! CFEE Certification Classes Offered September 18 - 20, 2015 For more information visit us at www.ifea.com

CFE E


Is Your Online Marketing

PLUGGED IN? Let the IFEA Take a Look with our New Online Marketing Audit Program

If you are like most events/organizations, your on-line marketing presence and visibility is really just a summation of non-related, often outdated, components and links and access to miscellaneous tools/ toys that someone in a seminar somewhere said that you should be using, with no real ‘plan’ to it at all. You may not even be sure anymore just what you have or what it should do, let alone having a plan for strengthening / upgrading it. If this sounds like you, it’s probably time for an online tune-up. We’ll make sure your Online Marketing is Plugged In! Working with some of the most experienced professionals in the field, IFEA is pleased to offer our new “IFEA Online Marketing Audit.” The Audit includes a formal evaluation of a festival/ event’s online visibility by an expert team from Edgeworks Group that includes web developers, social media consultants and online marketers. This broad assessment – a starting point for defining both a short-and-long term roadmap for creating a powerful online presence covers your event/ organization’s: • Online reputation • Social and mobile integrations • Search optimization • Website usability • Social media efforts. • Installation of tracking tools • Updates and customizations to existing tracking programs • Verification of Webmaster tools for both Bing and Google

To learn more about the IFEA’s Online Marketing Audit, please contact: Nia Hovde, Vice President & Director of Marketing & Communications at nia@ifea.com or +1-208-433-0950 ext: 3 or Click Here


EXHIBITOR SPOTLIGHT Sound Lighting FX, Inc., started in 1997 and has grown with its production & employee’s. We do all kinds of events from Festivals, Concerts, Weddings, Mitzvah’s, Corporate and more. How many years have you exhibited at the ifea’s expo? This is our first time exhibiting at the IFEA EXPO. Why did you decide to exhibit at the ifea’s 60th Anniversary Convention & Expo? We love festivals and want to do more of them. What better place to advertise and get your name out. What do you hope to get out of exhibiting at this year’s expo? We hope to get our name out there, get more business and be more involved in supporting Arizona’s festival industry.

How many employees does your company have? We have 7-20 employees depending on the season & events. How has your company grown over the years? We really started with developing great relations with people in the industry. Word of mouth grew over time, eventually allowing me to grow in building size, products and employees. With putting out a good product at a great price it has really grown over the years establishing deep roots in Arizona when it comes to production and events. What areas do you serve with your product/service? We serve all over the Valley of the Sun, Arizona as well as California and Mexico. We are not limited to just Arizona. Give us your ‘Eelevator Pitch’ about your product/service. SLFX, Inc., is a full service turnkey event production and management

company specializing in Staging, Power, Sound, Lighting and Effects! What is your newest product/ service that you have to offer that attendees need to know about? We are really excited about our APEX 3224 mobile Stage which is 32’ W X 24’ D. The structure is rated to withstand 60 to 80 MPH winds and bypasses all permits necessary. Plus, set up and strike down is a cinch. It’s perfect for festivals or any open area. We create complete packages with lights, sounds and banners to fit your budget. What is different about your product/service vs. your competitors? We have a great team at SLFX allowing us to put out great products at great pricing. Our top notch customer service makes everything we offer stand above the rest. We are one of the only companies to offer the APEX stage in Arizona. Summer 2015

What is the best sales advice you’ve ever received? Really listen and validate what your customer wants/needs are and your professional experience will guide them to exceed their expectations every time. What is your customer service philosophy? We are service professionals committed to providing efficient and excellent products and events by addressing each need with a caring attitude on a consistent basis that will exceed their expectations.

CONTACT INFORMATION Name Title Sound Lighting FX, Inc. 4639 E. Virginia Street Suite 101 Mesa, AZ 85215, USA +1-602-722-0783 www.soundlightingfx.com

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LEADE RSH I P AT ALL LEVE LS

With Gail Lowney Alofsin

Where are YOU in Your Race? “These are men of hulk and keel and deck and steel, we want them to communicate in heart and feel and share and tell.”

– Jim Morris, Schouten Global Sponsor of Team Brunel (Volvo Ocean Race)

In early May, Newport welcomed the North American stopover of the Volvo Ocean Race, an event touted as the world’s toughest ocean race. It was one of the most professionally produced events to grace our city by the sea, attracting more than 125,000 attendees to historic Fort Adams. The event included impressive sponsor displays inclusive of education for families, the Heineken Beer Garden and the Volvo compound complete with self-parking car. Schouten Global, an international leadership development company, was a premier sponsor of Team Brunel, one of six racing yachts competing in the event. Their sponsorship activation was unique, impactful and impressive. The organization invited area business leaders to attend a three hour leadership seminar followed by a networking lunch overlooking the Pro-Am Race taking place in the Newport Harbor. The leadership seminar opened with Schouten Global’s Jim Morris sharing insight regarding the Volvo Ocean Race. “Each racing yacht is built to the same exact specification, which means the deciding factor in who wins is the human factor.” Schouten Global describes the Volvo Ocean Race as the “Everest” of sailing, a race that you win as a team, versus on your own. Schouten Global co-founder, Anne Schouten-Van Hooft, as the host of the group and one of the speakers, discussed the importance of soft skill development. Her questions included “What is your business reality? Where are you in your race?” She asked the attendees if it was time to put on a different pair of running shoes. Schouten Global sponsors the Dutch team, Team Brunel, whose crew is led by Bouwe Bekking. I had the privilege of a once in a life time opportunity, racing in the Volvo Ocean Race Pro-Am, where I experienced Bouwe’s leadership and focus. During the seminar he stated that the 26

team had one goal – “Winning the race.” The team certainly lives that goal. On board, one of the crew members, Pablo Arrarte, would repeatedly say “thank you” every time he gave instructions to me and the other amateur crew members (comprised of press and corporate sponsors). I found it very interesting that during a Pro-Am race, in which the safety briefing offered advice on “how not to lose a finger,” that a crew member would take time for gratitude. I asked Pablo if the crew thanked each other during the “real race” versus the Pro-Am. Pablo assured me that they did, especially after a crew member did something exceptional. In my short experience on the racing yacht, I was starting to wonder if they did anything that was not exceptional! Schouten Global’s energetic and endearing trainer, Anje-Marijcke van Boxtel, has had the privilege of being the leadership coach for Team Brunel, contributing to their high performance. During the seminar she discussed that part of her work with the team was aligning the personal values of the individual team members with the team values as a whole. Corporate sponsorship is comprised of many elements – branding, marketing, advertising, social media, community relations and hospitality, to name a few. The Volvo Ocean Race, led by CEO Knut Frostad, illustrated that this event is among the “best of the best” in achieving the above. What makes Schouten Global’s sponsorship unique is the focus on leadership – for both the crew and the corporate leaders that they meet during their seminars at each of the stopover cities. The networking lunch that follows the seminars offers an opportunity for camaraderie and discussion. Gonnie Swanenberg, Global Client Manager for Schouten Global, is an integral member of the team that organizes the sponsor-

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ship activation for the Volvo Ocean Race. Her passion and drive is reflected in her personal mission and goal to keep learning every day. She is an organic networker, believing in making “connections” versus “quick wins.” While this may take longer, her belief is that in the long run these relationships will be more valuable. We grow as leaders every day, through both success and challenges. As we “check in” with both our teams and ourselves, we have the opportunity to reflect on the questions posed by Schouten Global: “What drives you? Where does your passion come from? Where are you in YOUR race?” This is not your practice life. Be aware of how you live your life, as you live your life. What impact do you have on the people that you work with, live with and meet along the way? Find ways to challenge YOUR comfort zone. Here’s to smooth sailing and fair skies, with a bit of ProAm racing tossed in! Gail Lowney Alofsin is a speaker, adjunct professor and business executive. She is the author of Your Someday is NOW – What are you Waiting For? A lifelong student and humanitarian, Gail believes that we all have the capability to be a leader in our own lives, influencing the lives of others to positive peak performance and success. An active volunteer since the age of 7, Gail is certain that leadership commences when we look beyond ourselves to enhance the lives of others – personally and professionally. She can be reached at 401-6404418, gail@gailspeaks.com, twitter: @gailalofsin and gailspeaks.com.


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EXHIBITOR SPOTLIGHT Maui Wowi Hawaiian was founded by Jeff and Jill Summerhays in 1982. They loved going to fairs and festivals with their family, but could never find anything healthy to provide their kids. So, they created an alternative to the sugary and fat laden festival snacks with a healthy beverage. In addition, they wanted to enjoy life, so they created a business model that was fun, flexible and mobile so they could offer their all-natural fresh fruit smoothies anywhere! In 2003, they added an exclusive line of specialty Hawaiian coffees to create the perfect dual line you see today. How many employees does your company have? We have 11 employees that work at corporate in Colorado, one that works remotely from paradise in Hawaii, and over 200 franchisees operating across the world. How has your company grown over the years? Maui Wowi has been successfully, yet quietly, growing for over 30 years. Franchisees work an estimated 10,000 events, including fairs and festivals, a year. Events include farmers markets, state fairs, airshows, rodeos, art shows, music festivals, and sporting events. What areas do you serve with your product/service? We serve our product/service all over the world. We have 210 franchisees that operate in all regions in the United States and in six countries. Give us your ‘Eelevator Pitch’ about your product/service. Maui Wowi is a one of a kind franchise that not only offers excellent authentic products but an entire lifestyle that exudes the Aloha Spirit. It’s a colorful breath of fresh air that instantly transports you to paradise with one sip of either a freshly blended fruit smoothie or a rich cup of premium roasted Hawaiian coffee. Our set-up is simple and flexible so we can bring the party to the people whether it’s at a large stadium or community farmer’s market. Our goal is to make connections with our customers and clients that make them want to return again and again. With the handmade beverage topped off with a little umbrella, it’s hard for them to walk away without a smile. What is your newest product/ service that you have to offer that attendees need to know about? We’re always creating new ways to add Aloha Spirit to our brand! Our newest product is Midnight Kona, a unique dark roast coffee with a heavy body and a hint of Kona’s smooth buttery finish. Back for 28

the summer, we also have our limited time offer smoothie- Orchard Peach. Its delicious fruit taste pairs perfectly with walking around an outdoor summer fair or festival. To appeal to younger demographics, while still staying consistent with our Hawaiian theme, we’ve added Hawaiian Shave Ice to our product mix. Offered in four flavors reminiscent of our smoothie flavors and served in a Maui Wowi flower souvenir cup, Hawaiian Shave Ice is a delicious treat to beat the summer heat. While it’s not new, it’s definitely something attendees need to know aboutSmoothies that Party! While our smoothies are delicious on their own, adding a shot of your favorite liquor make them just that much more exciting! What is different about your product/service vs. your competitors? It’s the best of both worlds; all-natural fresh fruit smoothies and gourmet Hawaiian coffees. We satisfy a wide range of customers with our dual beverage line. We serve authentic Hawaiian products in an atmosphere that exudes the Aloha Spirit of paradise- not to mention it’s healthy! Our smoothies are made with all-natural ingredients that include a nonfat, probiotic yogurt, fresh fruit puree and a banana- plus they’re gluten-free and kosher. Maui Wowi Hawaiian has been doing business for more than 30 years. We’ve been perfecting it for three decades, making it the successful, always fun brand it is today. How many years have you exhibited at the IFEA’s expo? We have been at the Expo in the past, but this is our first year back in quite a few years. Why did you decide to exhibit at the IFEA’s 60th Anniversary Convention & Expo? We are one of the world’s largest mobile concessionaires, so naturally this opportunity is perfect to showcase our

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delicious products and fun lifestyle brand. What do you hope to get out of exhibiting at this year’s expo? We hope to show Expo visitors what a delicious product we have and how flexible our mobile model can be for any event or festival. We hope to network with decision makers in order to create relationships that are beneficial to our franchisees and to our brand as a whole. What is the best sales advice you’ve ever received? Know your audience! Researching and understanding your audience is very important in sales and business, but especially in our business. Our franchisees work thousands of events a year, in every industry you can imagine. Understanding their audience and knowing what demographic to expect at each event allows them to offer a product mix that will cater to their customers. What is your customer service philosophy? Maui Wowi Hawaiian is a lifestyle brand. We were founded on the Aloha Spirit and believe it’s what draws people to buy one of our all-natural fresh fruit smoothies or a gourmet cup of coffeewe’re a vacation in a cup! Our customer service philosophy is first to never sacrifice the quality of our product. Second is the Aloha Spirit; creating a fun and inviting atmosphere that starts with an Aloha and ends with a Mahalo, we believe is the key to customer service success. CONTACT INFORMATION Melissa Shock Opportunity Development Manager Maui Wowi Hawaiian Coffees and Smoothies 1509 York Street Denver, CO 80206, USA +1-303-781-7800 mshock@mauiwowi.com www.mauiwowi.com


THE SPONSOR DOC

With Bruce L. Erley, APR, CFEE

Sponsor Fulfillment – Bringing Order to Chaos Dear Sponsor Doc: I am stressing out! My organization does five different events between Memorial Day and Labor Day and my job is to make sure all the sponsors are taken care from benefits fulfillment to onsite support and post event follow-up. There are just so many moving parts, I don’t know how to keep all those balls in the air without dropping them. Any advice would be so appreciated. - L.Z., Philadelphia, PA Dear L.Z.:

You need to be infected with GPD… German Personality Disorder. It is the affliction many of us have who are part anal retentive, part OCD and highly value organization and productivity. To keep so many details and deadline in place you need to make a plan and then work the plan. Here at CSG, we have three staff that do nothing but focus on the minutia of sponsor fulfillment. Their job is, in essence, to produce an effective and successful sponsor experience. Here are some to the best practices we use to keep so many details organized and sponsors happy. Assign a Point Person Sponsorship fulfillment needs to be the responsibility of a specific person, whether staff or volunteer, responsible for the “care & feeding” of sponsors. Often it will not be the person who “sold” the sponsorship. During your event this needs to be an exclusive or significant part of their job. Generally, I look for a person who is customer service oriented, an organized “detail person,” a good communicator, someone who will serve as the sponsor’s advocate and resource person as well as be a problem solver. Create an Internal Fulfillment Program How will you keep track of all the rights your sponsors have been promised and their fulfillment? We have found it most effective to create a Fulfillment Matrix, a spreadsheet of information that takes everything from proposals and agreements and puts them in one place. Among the information we will track on the Fulfillment Matrix are: • Contact info • Sponsorship Level • Logo/trademark benefits 30

• Ad & Promo benefits & deadlines • Digital and social media rights • Program and printed material recognition • Onsite benefits including signage, live recognition,& exhibit space • Hospitality benefits Activation Planning Understand what the sponsor wants to accomplish at your event and then help them develop an “Activation Plan.” Work with them to think through what they want to do onsite that will engage your attendees. Make sure they are doing their end of the planning. Communicate, Communicate, Communicate You need to be sure you provide, clear, timely information to your sponsors in a manner that is easy for them to review and respond. Set clear deadlines for things they need to provide you from ad layouts to ticket orders. Then don’t be surprised if they don’t meet them. You can help avoid missed deadlines by sending reminders, but don’t badger them. Onsite Management As they say, this is where the rubber meets the road. Our team is always there before the sponsor arrives. We make sure they are properly placed and ready to provide ancillary assistance they might need with their set-up. If we have done our work properly before the event, our principal role on site is to trouble shoot and resolve problems as well as quality assurance (e.g. assure sponsors banners are up, emcee has the proper recognition script, etc.) The key to our planning and preparation is that we want to think through the sponsors’ experience from beginning to

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end. If we catch most problems ahead of time, we have the capability to come up with solutions. Now, as you know with events, nothing is completely predictable, but I want to be sure that if an emergency arises, it is NOT one of our making or that we should have anticipated. As I said at the beginning of this letter, make a plan and the work the plan. You will find that you will sleep better at night and goodness knows, we need to keep up with that during event season. Best of Luck! With more than three decades in sponsorship sales and consultation, Bruce L. Erley is the President and CEO of the Creative Strategies Group, a full-service sponsorship and event marketing agency based in Denver, Colorado he founded in 1995. Accredited in Public Relations (APR) by the Public Relations Society of America and a Certified Festival & Events Executive (CFEE) by the International Festivals and Events Association, Erley is a highly-regarded speaker on event marketing and sponsorship having spoken on the topic around the world in such places as Dubai, Vienna, Beijing, Toronto and New York. Contact Info: Bruce L. Erley, APR, CFEE President & CEO Creative Strategies Group Phone: +1-303-558-8181 Business Email: berley@csg-sponsorship.com Column Enquiries Email: bruce@sponsordoc.com


EXHIBITOR SPOTLIGHT The Circle City Sidewalk Stompers Clown Band was founded in 1976 in Indianapolis, Indiana by Steve Sutherlin, who still leads the band today. One sousaphone, 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, 3 saxophones, a bass and snare drummer dress in colorful costumes and use fast-moving choreography. Early performances began in local city malls and progressed to fairs, expos, and even major sports arenas across the US and around the world. The Clown Band has been the official pep band for the Indianapolis Colts and Indiana Pacers and performs over 300 shows annually at corporate events, fairs, festivals, parades, and private parties. They’ve proudly entertained the crowds at the Indiana State Fair for close to 40 years. In addition to traveling around their native Hoosier State, the band has played across the continental US, Alaska, and traveled overseas to festivals in Nice, France, and Shanghai, China. How many employees does your company have? The band has approximately 24 members or about two for each playing position. How has your company grown over the years? The band prides itself on operating more like a family. Many members have been performing together for over 10 years (and in some cases closer to 20 years!) What areas do you serve with your product/service? The Circle City Sidewalk Stompers primarily perform in the United States, but have traveled to entertain at festivals and expos in France and China. Give us your ‘elevator pitch’ about your product/service. The Circle City Sidewalk Stompers Clown Band is an entertaining 12-person brass band that wears colorful costumes and performs fast-moving, family-friendly choreography to familiar tunes such as “When the Saints Go Marching In,” “Zoot Suit Riot,” “You’re Mama Don’t Dance,” “Sing, Sing, Sing,” and many more. The band can easily play while strolling through a crowd, march in parades, or stand and play from a repertoire of over 50 popular tunes. We can be your featured act as well as perform background music. In addition, we will work with your organization to wear outfits that fit with the theme of your event (such as The Blues Brothers, Santa Claus and Christmas themes, sports teams, etc.). With close to 40 years of entertainment excellence, dependability and FUN, let the Circle City Sidewalk Stompers

Clown Band add a special, unique touch to your next event!

the luxury of marketing to audiences across the country and around the globe.

What is your newest product/ service that you have to offer that attendees need to know about? The band prides itself on staying current as well as respecting our musical past. We cover most musical genres from pop, rock, jazz, Dixieland, country, rhythm and blues, funk, and even disco! Our musical repertoire includes songs that are hits now in 2015 in addition to music dating back to the 1920’s and 30’s.

What do you hope to get out of exhibiting at this year’s expo? Of course, we want to initiate contacts and contract for new gigs. The bottom line is we’re looking for partnerships and relationships. Whether we are annual festival acts or one-time event performers, our business is founded on solid, trustworthy and friendly relationships.

What is different about your product/service vs. Your competitors? The band attributes its success to our members’ excellent musicianship and ability to adapt to almost any performance situation. Our professionalism and family-friendly show makes us ideally suited for a wide variety of events and audiences from children to teens to adults to seniors. We’re not only family-friendly, we are like a family. This is such an important component of our philosophy that the band president’s son, Bryan, is one of the trumpet players and is poised to keep the performance traditions progressing well into the future. How many years have you exhibited at the IFEA’s expo? We’re proud to be represented for the very first time at the IFEA Expo in 2015. Why did you decide to exhibit at the IFEA’s 60th Anniversary Convention & Expo? We’re blessed with busy seasons and successful performances. The band has Summer 2015

What is the best sales advice you’ve ever received? Honesty, trust, and transparency begets the same. You may or may not get a gig this time around, but if you conduct yourself with honor, people will remember you. If you treat your customers with respect, they will pass along your name to others. ANYONE could be your next customer. What is your customer service philosophy? The band’s philosophy is to live by the Golden Rule, “So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets.” The Circle City Sidewalk Stompers Band is a family and our customers are always welcome at our table. CONTACT INFORMATION Steve Sutherlin Circle City Sidewalk Stompers Clown Band 249 Yandes Street Franklin, Indiana 46131 U.S.A. +1-317-696-4407 steve@clownband.com www.clownband.com

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Turnstiles: Marketing for Event Managers By Sean King

BRAND COMPATIBILITY TEST:

IS IT LOVE OR JUST LUST? EASY QUESTIONS TO FIND OUT IF YOUR NEW PARTNER IS YOUR BRAND SOULMATE How many times have you been lured by a magazine cover or Facebook post suggesting all you need to do is take a compatibility test and your relationship problems will be solved. Several apps and business models are built upon the very idea that love and longterm relationships can be determined by algorithms. Does Match.com sound familiar? If only there were a simple test to take to know whether two brands would be able to come together in a relationship and whether that union would be a success. The key to aligning sponsors, especially on a deeper, more meaningful level is to have the data to define your business objectives, but in the end you are talking about personal interactions. The relationships that matter are between you and your partner and between your partner and their customers, which in turn delight your customers or guests as well. Simply put: one has to appeal to the head and the heart simultaneously to win over their partner. 32

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We look to explore six questions that are inspired by those tabloid magazine tests, but can reveal more about you and your sponsorship partner before you walk down the marketing aisle. Question #1 What do you find most attractive about your partner? There are a lot of factors that draw one partner to another. But just as with your significant other, there need to be some qualities that create the initial mutual attraction. Partnering for money on the property’s end could mean a sacrifice to your mission or brand. While, partnering for a one-off promotion could damage the relationships you’ve built with other long-term customers and guests. However, there are many other attributes that can bring brands together in the first place. While it might not be as romantic as love at first site, business intangibles such as how your two brands might work together, the audiences you share, the alignment of the brand traits and the seemingly unlimited opportunities that are presented by the partners working together, provide for a great first conversation. Make sure to evaluate the qualities that have worked for you in the past and determine whether there are other partners that can work in a similar way. Question #2 Do your friends like him? Successful relationships between brands has as much to do with the “unseen” as it does with the “seen.” On the surface, everyone understands a brand partnership is about the pure business objectives and ROI of the coupling. But branding is an ongoing process. The alignment of a brand with the intangibles of a festival or property are as important as making sure the data backs up the business decision. The concepts everyone feels about your brand, but may not readily share, are just as important as income levels and home ownership data points. By mixing and matching brand attributes, you may be sending conflicting messages to your friends. If your friends expect a certain experience and engagement from your event, then you should do your best to maximize those opportunities. Otherwise, the alternative could at worst alienate your biggest fans or at the very least make virtually no impact at all for your event or your partner. Question #3 Do you like to do the same things? If it seems as if we’re staying on the same topic, and in a sense, we are. If you’ve created a persona around your event and

your brand you know what “they” are like. Fun-loving, creative, spunky, imaginative, engaging are all brand types. Now, let’s think of a fictional meeting between brands, yours and your new sponsors’, at a social event… Would they be drinking the same cocktail – or would it be a beer? Would they talk about their kids or about their recent weekend in Vegas? Would they go to the baseball game or the theater? The concept is that if the brands have the same things in common, then so will your customers or guests. If our brands share the same sensibilities, enjoy the same things in life, the alignment will make for a more meaningful relationship resulting in deeper engagement and support for the end accomplishment. Question #4 What’s more likely - a one-night stand or a 25th anniversary? The sponsorship equivalent of a onenight stand is a product launch. Some brand managers seem to live their professional lives as they may live their private lives, one meaningless rendezvous after another. On the other hand, business objectives change on both party’s behalf, and no-one wants the relationship to go stale. It is up to both brands to be creative and re-invent their partnership on an ongoing basis. Think about ways to incorporate social media or a contest or promotion into the relationship. Keeping it fresh and new is the key to longevity and before you know it, you’ll be celebrating anniversaries for long-standing partnerships that satisfy everyone’s needs and desires. Question #5 Do you speak the same language? This question has more to do with how you communicate than whether someone is speaking English or a foreign dialect. What is the tone and context of how you communicate? Do you use Twitter or Facebook, or does Instagram tell your story? Sure men and women speak a different language, but brand soulmates speak to their customers and guests in the same way as they provide truly remarkable experiences at every touchpoint. We’ve all heard the stories where the lines between sponsor and property are completely blurred. For many, this is the ultimate goal. One doesn’t know where one brand ends and another begins. This sort of total immersion may not be right for all brands, but for some, when all of the elements of audience, message and brand persona are aligned, it simply might not get any better!

Summer 2015

Question #6 Have you talked about your future? The goal for any partnership is long-term success. Few individuals or organizations go into a meaningful relationship with a desire for it to end as soon as it begins. If you’re in year three or more of a brand partnership, it might be time to talk about the long-term benefits of growing together. Strategic plans on both parties’ behalf are an interesting way to dig below the surface to determine where the partnership may be headed. Having “the talk” might also allow you to explore other larger initiatives that could be developed over the months and years to come. Looking beyond the immediate return and understanding the impact that a multi-year arrangement may have on the behalf of both groups is worthy of the conversation. One never knows what may come from a meaningful discussion about the long term future. At the very least, seeds can be planted for growth and there will be a much clearer view by all involved as to where the partnership is headed. In Conclusion Just as in relationships between individuals, what we’re all trying to build is authentic, beneficial relationships. What is different in the context of the partnerships between you and your partner is the impact on you and your audience and your partner and your audience. It's a symbiotic relationship that has tremendous upside potential, but for it to work effectively, everyone will have needed to have done their homework, have set a fully realized plan in motion and accounted for virtually any possible outcome. Best of luck in finding your soulmate! We’re certain there’s one or even more for your event and festival, but as with all things it takes a dedication to identifying, communicating and sharing your goals for the future, and if you’re lucky, you’ll be happily celebrating anniversary after anniversary of a truly remarkable and special relationship. Sean King has been consulting with small businesses and non-profits organizations for over 20 years. Cur­rently, Sean is the Director of Market­ing & Communications for Youth Edu­cation in the Arts (YEA!), a non-profit organization based in Allentown, PA which teaches life lessons through music. He also blogs regularly at www.artsmarketingblog.org. You can follow Sean on Twitter @skingaspire or contact him at: sking@yea.org

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The Power of Brand Presence at Festivals & Events By Marc Goulet South by Southwest and Coachella attendees likely noticed an uptick in brand presence this year, as event sponsorships, branded experiences, and the usage of guerrilla marketing tactics appeared to be everywhere. Examples that had people talking include: • GE’s BBQ Research Center that enabled the brand to demonstrate its scientific prowess via Austin’s all-compassing love of barbecue. • HBO and A&E both bringing hit shows to life with the Game of Thrones & Bates Motel experiences. • Heineken becoming the center of the Coachella experience by hosting some of the festival’s hottest acts at the Heineken House. With the 2015 festival circuit now in full swing, Russell Research conducted a survey among a sample of 578, 18-39 year olds and focused on the nearly one-third of adults between the ages of 18 and 39 (31%) who have attended at least one cultural event or festival in the past three years. This was accomplished by measuring past three-year attendance of 25 events that spanned across three major categories: • Arts Festivals: Influential events such as Sundance Film Festival, Art Basel, South by Southwest, and Comic-Con International • Sports: Major events such as the Super Bowl, Kentucky Derby, and X Games • Music Festivals: Popular U.S. music festivals including Coachella, Lollapalooza, Jazz Fest, and Austin City Limits. So who attends cultural events and festivals, and why are they so important for brands? 1. They are Early Adopters Festival and event goers are in search of the next big thing. More than one-quarter of recent event/festival attendees (27%) are usually one of the first to know about and purchase new products — nearly double the percentage of non-attendees (14%) who consider themselves early adopters. This is a natural fit for brands launching a new product or service. 2. They Have Large Social Circles & Followings Not only are attendees the first to try new products, they are more involved 34

in social media with built-in audiences to which they can broadcast their experiences. Festival and event attendees are significantly more likely to be on Instagram (61% vs. 44% of non-attendees) and Twitter (61% vs. 51%), have significantly larger followings on both sites, and on top of it — more Facebook friends: Average Number of Followers & Friends • Twitter Followers: 230 among attendees vs. 122 for non-attendees • Instagram Followers: 268 among attendees vs. 169 for non-attendees • Facebook Friends: 397 among attendees vs. 293 for non-attendees. Further, event attendees are more than twice as likely to have substantial follower counts — 12% have 500+ followers on Twitter (vs. 5% of non-attendees) and 17% have 500+ followers on Instagram (vs. 7% of nonattendees). In other words, they have a large, engaged audience. 3. They Serve as Brand Ambassadors The final piece of the puzzle is whether attendees are willing to talk about what they see and hear at major events. Fortunately, the answer is a resounding YES, as results are staggeringly attractive for brands: • 66% have posted a picture or update from an event • 43% have posted a picture or update about a brand at an event • 55% have purchased a product or service that was featured at the event or by an event sponsor Key Implication: If consumer-facing brands can find smart and creative ways to be a positive part of the event experience, it becomes an opportunity to make a lasting impression, among both attendees and their extensive social media circles.

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The study was conducted online by Russell Research from April 3 – 12, 2015, among 578 adults between the ages of 18 and 39. Figures for gender, age, and geography were weighted where necessary to match their actual proportions in the population. In theory, with probability samples of this size, one could say with 95-percent certainty that the results have a statistical precision of plus or minus 4.1 percentage points of what they would be if the entire adult population had been polled with complete accuracy. Marc Goulet is a native of New York’s Hudson Valley. Marc attended college in Buffalo and joined Russell Research in 1997. His Account Services Director role involves developing client relationships and the design/ analysis of both qualitative and quantitative research for clients. When not in the office, Marc tries to find the right balance between his love of endurance sports, music, and craft beer.


Your Event Has

IMPACT…

SHOW IT!

Commission Your IFEA Economic Impact Study Today

In uncertain times, we must often remind those whose support we depend upon, of the important economic and social value that our festivals and events bring to the communities we serve. Having a credible and current economic impact study can do just this, in addition to increasing credibility with stakeholders, providing quantified data to sponsors, presenting reliable data to base future marketing and programming decisions upon and much, much more. Unfortunately, this critical resource, especially with credible credentials, is often financially out of reach for most events even in a good economic environment. Recognizing this, the IFEA has created a cost effective, industry credible program to provide Economic Impact Studies at a budget-accessible investment. Call us today to learn more.

GETTING STARTED For more information about this valuable IFEA program, please contact one of our Business Development Directors: Steve Schmader, CFEE • 208-433-0950 Ext: *818 • schmader@ifea.com Ira Rosen, CFEE • 732-701-9323 • ira@ifea.com Penny Reeh, CFEE • 830-456-3829 • penny@ktc.com


By Kathryn May

From Volunteers to

I need

While the event staff is working hard behind the scenes, your festival guests will receive “help” from the mouths and hands of front line volunteers. Ironically, the public face of your event is the very group of people who spend the shortest amount of time each year with your operation. How do you ensure that your volunteer program is properly positioned to support your event while simultaneously developing volunteers who can meet super human expectations? The following article and questionnaire provides the opportunity for an internal assessment of your event volunteer management system. Event managers typically have solid measurements for success in publicity, sponsorship and ticket sales; however, assessing volunteer management programs may seem less tangible. The success of a good volunteer program involves the same key elements of managing full time employees. We will explore 36

help!

Directions? Maps? Programs?

the importance of training, defining job responsibilities, risk controls, scheduling, communications and evaluations…all with consideration to tremendous generational differences that add a complicated dimension to volunteer management in 2015. 1. Proper Volunteer Training • Scenario: A new event volunteer is trying to assist event participants but gives incorrect directions. • Scenario: A volunteer is unclear on his duties. He would like to check with a team leader but has not been introduced to anyone who appears to be in charge. • Scenario: A volunteer team leader is asked about the title event sponsor by a guest. The volunteer has no idea what service the title sponsor provides. These situations are strong indications of poor preparation by the volunteer manager and supporting team leaders. Good training sets the stage for volunteer confidence, competence and camara-

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derie. This training should be comparable to an employee job orientation with a lot of enthusiasm. Volunteer training is time for newcomers to be instructed on job specifics and to be introduced to their team. Team leaders and veteran volunteers have the opportunity to share their experience and welcome newcomers. Generation X and Y volunteers (Mid40s to teens) will seek training that gives them “event insider” status and a sense of job ownership. The more mature volunteers of the Boomer and Veteran generations will look for well-organized management and clear directions. The event staff has the opportunity to create a well-orchestrated team atmosphere with a motivational training program. 2. Realistic Job Descriptions • Scenario: The majority of volunteers are only interested in attending the event concert at no cost. They work as little as possible and leave as soon as they’ve “earned” their tickets.


• Scenario: A shy, reserved volunteer is assigned to work in a busy parking lot directing traffic. • Scenario: A fair skinned young volunteer is left alone at a remote entrance gate with no shade, sunscreen, break or water for four hours in the boiling sun. The top responsibility of the volunteer manager is to recruit volunteers who are truly helpful, dependable and productive. Unfortunately, many volunteer programs operate under the short-term aim of recruiting the most volunteers possible simply to fill slots. The pursuit of sheer numbers without an emphasis on position specifics (e.g. skills, restrictions, schedules) tends to be poor use of organizational resources. Quality is key. Remember, your volunteers are people, not cattle. Not all of your volunteers will show the same ability to carry out their assigned tasks. Recruiting the right people for the right positions on the right days is critical. The best approach is to recruit volunteers who match your organizational needs in order to form a long mutually beneficial relationship. It is critical to clearly define and communicate position requirements (e.g. technical skills, stamina/strength) and expectations (e.g. friendly, mobile, flexible, works well in high-stress situations) if you expect to recruit the appropriate people to advance your mission. Some volunteers will be patient with “seat warmer” positions, but younger volunteers will be more interested in positions that make an impact and help people directly. Younger volunteers also are most likely to expect good use of their time and talents. Talented volunteer managers will match a volunteer’s skills, interests, capabilities and availability with specific event needs for the most effective utilization of organizational resources. 3. Adequate Risk Controls • Scenario: A volunteer shows up for duty with an infant and a small pet dog. The dog bites a child at the event. • Scenario: A volunteer who is wearing sandals while moving chairs for a volunteer training, stubs her toe ripping off the toenail and part of the toe bed. She requires immediate surgery. • Scenario: Pregnant volunteer is handing out brochures. She trips over a misplaced box of brochures, falls down a short flight of stairs and goes into labor. • Scenario: Festival childcare provider is discovered to be a registered pedophile. Front page news that the festival did not screen its childcare providers. • Scenario: Well-meaning volunteer invites event guests who can’t find a hotel

to stay at his house. Event guests steal money and small electronics. • Scenario: Volunteer gets badly injured during an event. The event organization has insurance but it does not cover volunteers, only staff. Volunteer sues the title sponsor of the event. • Scenario: Volunteer driver is hit while driving an event car. The driver of the second car is uninsured and to make matters worse the volunteer’s driver license is expired.

ations. Online registration allows 24/7 access for the volunteer who wants to manage their own volunteer account by registering for preferred jobs and shifts. Online volunteer registration also answers the challenge of fewer staff and tight budgets. These registration tools decreases administrative work by 50-75% allowing volunteer managers to substantially increase their productivity while also substantially reducing mail and phone costs.

The scenarios, described above, are all based on real events. In every instance proper preventive measures were not taken. The volunteer was not given a dress code specifying closed toe shoes. Volunteers were not screened in advance for sensitive positions. Volunteers were told to assist guests in finding accommodations. Driver licenses were not checked during training. Risk control is like an umbrella in the rain. The umbrella prevents you from getting wet, cold and potentially sick. Proper risk control can protect your organization, sponsors and affiliates from unnecessary liability. Job perils, site concerns and basic security precautions are important risk elements to address starting in the registration process and on the volunteer waiver. Risk concerns should be reinforced in the volunteer handbook and training. Event managers still need to have insurance for the worst case scenario. All event volunteers are not covered by personal homeowners and motor vehicle insurance.

5. Evaluation • Scenario: High no show rate. Trouble recruiting new volunteers. • Scenario: High no return rate. Volunteers come once and don’t return the next year.

4. Volunteer Management Technology • Scenario: The volunteer provides contact information online but is not able to select her own jobs or shifts. She voices frustration to friends about the wasted time making multiple calls to coordinate with the volunteer manager. • Scenario: The volunteer manager spends weeks trying to manually match volunteers to jobs and shift times. Later the volunteer manager can’t get reports to sort correctly and stays up all night for a week trying to resolve the challenge. • Scenario: The volunteer manager does not require e-mail or cell phone contact information for all volunteers. Gas line blows up under volunteer parking garage. She is unable to communicate timely schedule changes or emergency information with event volunteers. Most events require X and Y generation volunteers who are relatively young, energetic, mobile and technically savvy. In our busy lives, online registration is an expectation for the X and Y generSummer 2015

The evaluation of your volunteer program should include feedback from leaders and frontline volunteers. Wrap up sessions should take place while the event recollections are still fresh in everyone’s minds. This objective discussion should include key staff and volunteer leaders. The volunteer operations and logistics wrap up is a review of what went right, what can be improved and recommendations. Your front line volunteers may participate in simple onsite surveys for immediate input. Anonymous electronic surveys can provide valuable feedback from your team leaders and your front line volunteers. Electronic surveys can be automatically set up to tabulate results. Conclusion You have considered the fundamentals of your volunteer management program. Now, consider the number of ✔s, ?s, Xs, and !!s on your checklist. Have you defined key volunteer management policies and procedures? Do you have opportunities to reduce and eliminate problem or potential risk areas? Did you identify tools for achieving continuous improvement? Are there items for corrective action? Can you highlight areas of good practice? Volunteers can be your greatest event assets. Prepare to get the best return on your volunteer investment!

Kathryn May is a Junior Account Manager at TRS. Want to read more? Get the most from your volunteers with our tried-and-true strategies in The Volunteer Playbook: Tactics Every Event Manager Should Know available now for download HERE on Smashwords. Kathryn can be reached at: mobile: 317.709.3750 or email: kmay@theregistrationsystem.com.

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Creating a Successful

MASCOT PROGRAM By Michael Baxter

38

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MASCOTS ROCK! Between theme parks, festivals, comic-cons, commercial brand marketing and savvy cities promoting their destination, mascots are a big deal. Wikipedia describes a mascot as ‘any person, animal, or object used to represent a group with a common public identity, such as a school, professional sports team, society, military unit, event or brand name.’ Though that wordy definition is true, one significant detail is missing from the description. Mascots are just plain FUN!  Over the years, mascots have become a “fun-damental” element in the marketing and entertainment experience of festivals and themed attractions around the world. Walt Disney once said that, "I only hope that we never lose sight of one thing – that it was all started by a mouse."  Disney had the vision to take that mouse and turn it into the most recognizable mascot in the world. When brought to life as a walk-around character in Disney attractions around the globe, the mouse continues to demonstrate the power that a well thought out and managed mascot program can bring to even the smallest festival or event.  Mascots rock.  They rock festival guests, event volunteers, the media and they can rock the bottom line when used to their fullest. WHAT’S IT GOING TO BE? Deciding on the appropriate theme for a mascot is among the top considerations for a successful program.  Would an old mustached railroad engineer convey the message better than a tall tale tellin’ cowpoke?  What’s it going to be? The right choice makes a world of difference in how well a character succeeds. In early 2011, Tomball, Texas decided to create its first ever marketing and festivals program in order to attract tourists and generate a new source of revenue.  Because of the attractions background of the City’s recently hired marketing director and the fact that the program was being started from scratch, it was decided to base the plan on the fundamentals of marketing the start-up a themed attraction.  One of first steps in the creative process was the development of a mascot program that would address several initial marketing goals: • A mascot had to reflect Tomball’s history • It would be used as a family friendly icon for the City’s new tourism and festivals program • It would allow for branding and increased guest awareness through merchandising, advertising and other marketing vehicles

• And, the mascot would provide on-site entertainment and photo ops during city signature festivals, allow for participation in trade shows and state tourism functions, and interact with the public at other high profile events. Given the significance of railroading in Tomball’s past, a locomotive engineer was the clear choice of a theme, and the name “Rusty Rails” was selected through a community wide contest involving the local newspaper and school district. Rusty has since been named the Best Festival Mascot in Texas by the Texas Festivals & Events Association for three consecutive years. Summer 2015

Similarly, “Buck” the official mascot of the George West Story Fest in George West, Texas was also conceived as a mascot with historical significance. “We live in cowboy country and had been using a cowboy caricature in our logo and other materials for many years. So, creating a mascot to match that image was what we wanted,” said Mary Margaret Campbell, Executive Director of the Story Fest.  “George West was named for the man who gave a part of his ranch for the town to be built on, so we decided to name our cowboy “Buck” in honor of Mr. West’s nephew . . . the name and the mascot design really fit the character of our festival and our heritage.”  

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SO, WHAT’S IN A NAME?             Combining a creative theme with an equally imaginative name opens all sorts of possibilities in a mascot program.  The Barbecue Festival in Lexington, North Carolina named its fresh-faced pink pig mascot, “Barbie Q”, while “Gourdy”, a one-of-a-kind, green gloved and booted, jumbo jack-o-lantern, is the face of the Half Moon Bay Art & Pumpkin Festival in Half Moon Bay, California. Then there’s “Freckles”, the seed-specked  walk-around spokesberry for the Poteet, Texas Strawberry Festival. One of Asia’s most popular mascots is Saipanda.  Saipanda is a rhino-horned panda from Saipan, hence the name. It was created to generate more tourism for the island. It’s all in the presentation . . . AND, IN THE BACKSTORY Creating an imaginative backstory can add to the quality and believability of mascot program. Rumor has it that the grandfather of Rusty Rails, Puffabelly Pete, was the railroad engineer who, in 1907, brought Thomas Ball to town for the official ceremony naming the community Tomball.  Coming from a long line of railroad men, Rusty traveled the tracks across Texas and finally returned home in 2012 to share his adventures, hometown tales, and the reasons why “Tomball is Texan for Fun” with visitors. 40

The Québec Winter Carnival has gained international fame over the years through its renowned mascot, Bonhomme Carnaval. The well recognized face of the celebration, Bonhomme Carnaval is a living replica of the snowmen that enchanted children of Québec City for generations. Created in 1954, Bonhomme proudly wears the traditional red hat and belt. IT’S ALIVE, IT’S ALIVE So, a theme has been chosen and some names have been kicked around, but you’re not sure whether to go with a full custom design or to look for a ready-made outfit off the rack. This is a decision most likely to be determined by budget, practical use, and the timeline for delivery. Off-the-rack mascots are, in most cases, ready to ship when ordered, less expensive than custom designs and open to aftermarket accessorizing to add that personal touch like shiny new wheels on a tricked out pick-up truck.  These characters are usually the ones seen representing high schools and small colleges, local businesses, and community organizations.  Depending on the manufacturer, use, and maintenance, they may also be somewhat disposable. There are pages of online retailers offering “knock-off” versions of popular characters alongside warm and fuzzy animals, and space aliens. Whether it’s a ferocious fire ant, floppy-eared dog, or a hillbilly bear, an in-stock mascot may fill the need

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for as little as a couple of hundred dollars upwards to around $1,200.00. The alternative is a custom designed mascot constructed to meet your specific needs and ideas. The advantages of a custom creation are many, while there are fewer disadvantages. Advantages? Getting exactly what you envisioned when first deciding to add a mascot to your festival team is at the top of the list.  It’s reassuring to work with creative professionals who can take a concept from the sketch pad to the midway, arena, or festival grounds. Custom designers understand that concepts and materials used in creating a mascot to be worn in Norway or New Hampshire may not wear well in Dubai or the Dominican Republic. Some designs may need special ventilation, or a built-in cooling or heating system, while others are good-to-go with a steady breeze through the vision panels.  Today there are a variety of materials for specific needs and environments.  In fact, there are even inflatable mascots available if it fills the need. The Internet is a great starting point for a search, but nothing beats a firsthand referral from a satisfied customer.  Using the network of IFEA members who have been through the process of interviewing mascot designers is a great way to find the right fit for any project.  The fun really begins once a core group of manufacturers has been chosen.  After interviewing five of the top manufactures in North American, the City of Tomball chose BAM! Mascots in Mississauga, Ontario to create Rusty Rails. With a mid-range bid compared to the others being considered, BAM! was the right fit for the Texas project.   Other Texas festivals such as the George West Story Fest and the Poteet Strawberry Festival work closely with IFEA member, dfest® (Dixie Flag Event Services Team) in San Antonio for their mascot needs. A disadvantage for some may be the price. The cost of a custom made mascot will vary, but expect to pay around $4,500 or more depending on the shop, detail of the design, and added bells and whistles, such as an in-head fan, carry bag, cool packs, and additional feet and hands. No matter what route you take, before signing the final contract, remember . . . You get what you pay for, and you only get one chance to make a positive first impression. Choose wisely! IT’S WHAT’S INSIDE THAT COUNTS Like your mom always told you, “it’s what’s inside that counts.” The best designed mascot can easily lose its appeal and impact without the right actor bringing it to life.  It may take auditioning a lot of candidates to find the right match for your character.  The most unassuming, young


shoved by a guest, walk away and let the wrangler respond and call for assistance. Don’t Get Hurt. A mascot actor may sometimes feel shielded when protected by the padding and helmeted head of the costume.  That over confidence could lead to risk taking and possible injury. 

person you know could become a rock star when hidden beneath the over-sized head of a fuzzy polka-dotted bear. On the other paw, a normally outgoing personality may lack what it takes to make mascot magic for your guests. Don’t settle.  Find the perfect match and bring that fur ball to life. There are a few basics to be mastered once the right actor has been chosen: • Mascot movements require exaggeration and bigger than life action. Go large! • Actors need to become comfortable in their second skin and learn its limitations. Big feet mean high steps.  A tall head means duck at doorways. • Actors need to understand their audiences. Not everyone appreciates a six-foot-tall carrot in boots and a crumpled straw hat. It’s almost like the fear of clowns for some, while others come running with hugs and kisses. • Actors must be aware of their surroundings.  There are ever-present safety issues, for example: small children under foot, stairways, low hanging objects, and individuals who may stumble into a mascot accidentally on-purpose just for grins. • Once the personality of the mascot has been determined, all actors should play the part the same way.  Rusty Rails is a veteran railroad man who struts with confidence when he walks and regularly poses for the camera with both thumbs up.  That distinctive gait and hand gesture are an integral part of who Rusty is in public and each actor realizes the importance. It’s always a good idea to have a mascot wrangler close by to enhance the guest ex-

perience and watch over the mascot as it performs and moves through the crowd. Your backup actor, or actors, makes for great wranglers because they know the requirements and hazards of the job. Tutorials and actual classroom training for mascots are available on-site and online.  A simple Internet search with terms such as Mascot School, Mascot Camp, or Mascot Training Video will get you started. MASCOT DO’S AND MASCOT DON’TS In order to sell the fantasy, there are lots of things that a mascot actor should do, and not do, while in costume.  For example . . . DON’TS…. Don’t Speak Even When Spoken To.  Unless specifically equipped for talking, mascots normally do not speak.  They express their emotions and respond to conversation through body language. Don’t Remove Any Part of the Costume in Public.  The fastest way to destroy the fantasy is for a mascot to take off the head in plain view of guests. Always dress and undress in a private area away from prying eyes.  Also, be sure to leave the dressing area with the mascot discretely tucked away in its tote and not tossed over the shoulder like some fuzzy roadkill. Don’t Hold Babies or Small Children.  With limited vision and padded gloves, a small child could easily slip through the hands of a mascot while posing for that perfect family photo.  If asked, just say no! Don’t Retaliate. Except in extreme cases, if a mascot is intentionally bumped or Summer 2015

DO’S… Do Dress for Success. Under the costume go with shorts and a t-shirt, socks on your feet and a sweatband or bandana on the head . . . unreachable sweat in your eyes can really spoil the moment for an actor. Do Hydrate Before Stepping Out.  Water or diluted sports drinks are essential given how much an actor will normally sweat while on-stage.  Hydrate leading up to the event, and then drink some more. Do Pace Yourself.  Spending too much time in-costume or wandering far away from a safe area can create a problem for actors needing a break.  Keep track of time and your location. Do Have Fun!  If an actor is truly enjoying himself and the interaction with festival guests, it will show in the performance.  At that point the acting becomes genuine and festival-goers appreciate the effort. THAT’S A WRAP Creating a successful mascot program takes imagination, planning, and creativity.  It’s show business in a festival setting.  An actor, a costume, and a story.  It’s a brand, it’s a memory to be shared with the family and it’s a commitment. As Walt Disney said, “…it was all started with a mouse.”  So, what will yours start with? “For more than 35-years, Michael Baxter has been creating festivals and promoting tourist destinations across the South. Named The Texas Festivals & Events Association Professional of the Year in 2013, Baxter currently serves on the TFEA Board of Directors, and is a member of the Texas Travel Industry Association. As a freelance writer and tourism/ festivals consultant, he has written for a variety of trade and general market publications, and has worked with destinations and attractions such as Dauphin Island, Alabama, Lake Lanier Islands, Georgia, and the City of Tomball, Texas. Over the years Baxter has created several mascots, such as Cap’n Sharkey for Galveston’s Sea-Arama Marineworld, and managed the mascot program for Hanna Barbera Land – Houston, Texas’ Traders Village Marketplaces and others.”

IFEA’s ie: the business of international events 41


To Screen or Not to Screen? Four Reasons You May Not be Screening Your Volunteers... And Why You Need to Start

You work in the nonprofit world because you genuinely want to make a difference. But nonprofit work can be challenging and even thankless. It’s encouraging when volunteers are willing to spend their free time helping your organization work toward a greater good – so encouraging that it can be hard to imagine that some of these individuals approach you with less-than-noble intentions. Unfortunately, dishonest volunteers – like long hours and strained budgets – are not new to nonprofits. Luckily, there is a way to identify many of these individuals before they are brought on board: volunteer background screening. 42

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Screening volunteers is sometimes viewed by service organizations as costly, time-consuming and inconvenient. For these reasons, some volunteer managers employed with nonprofit organizations choose not to screen their volunteers. Where do you stand when it comes to screening your volunteers? Do you also believe that screening is an unnecessary step in the volunteer onboarding process? How much damage can one volunteer do, right? More than you think. No nonprofit or volunteer program is exempt from the risks posed by untrustworthy volunteers; organizations of all shapes and sizes have been affected. That’s why more and more of them are screening their volunteers. Let’s take a quick look at the numbers.

what a volunteer scandal could do to your reputation, and how it could discourage potential volunteers and donors? Still, many nonprofit organizations have strong (and negative) opinions on volunteer screening. Let’s look at the four most common objections to adopting the practice. 4 Reasons You Might Object to Volunteer Screening – And Why You Should Reconsider 1. “Screening is Expensive.” Some organizations think screening is too expensive. And there’s historical evidence to back up this feeling. In 2000, each background check run by the United

How Many Organizations Screen Volunteers? The National Center for Victims of Crime conducted a survey to find out what types of organizations screen volunteers, how they go about screening and what information of organizations screen volunteers, how they go about screening and what information.1

517 Human service organizations were contacted:

86

%

12 %

Screen volunteers in some way.

ONLY 12 %

of survey participants don’t screen their volunteers at all.

Volunteer Screening is Essential Why is volunteer screening necessary for your organization…and for all nonprofits using volunteers? Unfortunately, people with criminal records may be more likely to view nonprofits as vulnerable, unsophisticated organizations that they can get involved with – and take advantage of. There is too much at stake to let one of these individuals begin work with your organization. Consider the safety of your co-workers and vulnerable participants. What about the protection of your assets? Have you thought about

72% Of volunteers are screened in local databases, but far fewer are checked against othercounty and state databases, sex offender registries, adult and child protective service databases, and fingerprint-based criminal databases. So the question remains, can the results of these backgroundscreens be trusted?

46% Of survey participants have encountered “inappropriate” candidates.

Way cost $100. Today, thanks to advancements in technology, that cost is much lower – typically under $35, depending on the thoroughness of the check and the size of your organization’s screening program. Still, volunteer background screening can be a major line item for an organization that already has to stretch inadequate funding across many programs. One approach taken by some organizations is to ask volunteers to optionally contribute to the cost of their background checks. You might think that asking these individuals to actually pay to work for Summer 2015

you, for free, would send them running. But you’d be surprised how many volunteers will elect to pay for all or part of their background checks when given the option. Verified Volunteers is witness to this emerging trend. In the first quarter of 2014, nearly 75% of organizations using the Verified Volunteers volunteer screening platform gave their volunteers the option to split the cost of their background checks with them. Almost a quarter of those volunteers obliged, paying for all or part of their check. In fact, the volunteers covered, on average, 91% of the cost of their checks. Screening can also be looked at as a time and cost savings. How? Data suggests that screened volunteers are more committed to the organizations they serve, meaning they show up more often. This translates into reduced recruiting costs, both in terms of time and dollars. Here’s another point you might consider. If you don’t conduct regular background checks before onboarding volunteers, you are opening your organization up to potential financial losses that can come as a consequence of inviting unchecked volunteers to work with you. Proper screening takes time and money, but it will ultimately save you money in the long run. In fact, savings can add up quickly and significantly. Takeaway: • Giving volunteers the option to pay for at least part of their check can add up to major savings. You don’t need to be forceful or demanding; just include the option during the background check order process. • When calculating the costs of conducting background checks, be sure to also consider ways you may recoup these expenses. For starters, have you thought about the impact this extra measure of protection may have on your insurance premiums? When talking with insurance brokers, be sure to mention how you use background checks as part of your risk management plan and ask if this will reduce your insurance rates.2 2. “Screening is for Other Organizations – Not Us.” “My volunteers don’t work with vulnerable populations. I don’t need to screen.” “I always watch my volunteers. I never leave them alone.” These are two common misconceptions. Luckily, many organizations are changing their tune when it comes to which of their volunteers they are screening. Verified Volunteers conducted a survey of 400 organizations across the United States and some interesting trends were

IFEA’s ie: the business of international events 43


revealed. The biggest of all was perhaps the fact that screening – for all volunteers – is on the rise. In 2011, 30% of all volunteers were being screened with a criminal background check. By 2014, this number had jumped to 40%. The biggest driver of this increase was organizations screening not just volunteers serving vulnerable populations, but everyone – whether episodic volunteers, office workers, or those holding any other “non-threatening” role. Takeaway: • Winging it and hoping for the best is not enough. Require background checks for all volunteers working with your organization – not just those working with vulnerable populations. Bad things can happen regardless of who your organization serves and whether or not you vigilantly “watch” your volunteers.

process takes too long. This complaint is understandable; waiting for a background check report takes time away from working toward the mission of the organization. The way to get around a lengthy screening process is to find a professional background screening service. By working with an established screening company, the process is streamlined in a way that allows organizations to onboard volunteers faster than ever before. For instance, the Verified Volunteers platform was developed exclusively for volunteer organizations to conduct and manage screenings. With the platform, background checks take hours or days – not weeks or months. However, always weigh quality against time savings. Do not accept a check that comes back instantly or within minutes. If it does, your report likely has missing, incomplete, and outdated information. It is not a quality, reliable report. Instead

1 IN 10 VOLUNTEER background checks come back with a previously undisclosed criminal history Just because volunteers don’t interact with participants doesn’t mean they pose less risk to your organization. Every year nonprofit fraud and embezzlement occurs on both large and small scales. The Washington Post reported that, between 2008 and 2012, more than 1,000 nonprofit organizations alerted the federal government that assets in amounts greater than $250,000 had been taken from their accounts through theft, embezzlement or unauthorized transfers.3 On a smaller scale, in Toledo, Ohio, an unpaid volunteer stole over $90,000 from a charter school after he was given access to its funds.4 3. “Screening Takes Too Long” “I need to get my volunteers on board. I can’t wait weeks to screen them!” Some volunteer managers think the screening process is too lengthy. But a little time is a small price to pay when it comes to participant safety. In the National Center for Victims of Crime survey, one in four survey participants say that the background check 44

IFEA’s ie: the business of international events

of relying on stale databases, you want the core of your screening to be focused on county courthouse searches. That’s where the most complete, recent, and trustworthy data can be found. This takes just a little bit longer, but goes a long way towards finding criminal records (and untrustworthy individuals) that nationwide databases often miss. Takeaway: • Do your research. The background check process does not have to take weeks. Find a company that can get you complete,accurate results quickly. Word of caution: Remember to be wary of screening companies that promise instant or lightning fast results. 4. “Screening Repels Volunteers.” “No volunteer wants to undergo a background check.” This is a major concern for some volunteer managers. You might feel uncomfortable asking a volunteer to submit to a background check. After all, you don’t want to drive them away. You need all the help you can get. While there may be pushback from a few people, many volunteers understand the importance of complying with background check policies. They are familiar with the screening process thanks to the pre-employment screens they have undergone. And background checks are becoming the norm when it comes to volunteering as well (as noted earlier, volunteer screening is on the rise all across the country). More than 62 million people volunteer annually in the

SOME SCREENING VENDORS GET YOU INFORMATION IN A JIFFY. It can be a matter of hours versus weeks.

3-7 WEEKS Average time for an FBI background check.

UNDER 2 DAYS Average time for a Verified Volunteers background check.

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JUST BECAUSE VOLUNTEERS DON’T INTERACT WITH PARTICIPANTS DOESN’T MEAN THEY POSE LESS RISK TO YOUR ORGANIZATION. Every year nonprofit fraud and embezzlement occurs on both large and small scales. The Washington Post reported that, between 2008 and 2012, more than 1,000 nonprofit organizations alerted the federal government that assets in amounts greater than $250,000 had been taken from their accounts through theft, embezzlement or unauthorized transfers.3 On a smaller scale, in Toledo, Ohio, an unpaid volunteer stole over $90,000 from a charter school after he was given access to its funds.4 United States.5 Tens of millions of these individuals are screened annually and those who truly want to contribute will not be scared off by this requirement. In the end, a good screening process shows that you care about your program and the quality of individuals who help you. Volunteers with good intentions should not have any trouble agreeing to such a check. Those who do are probably the wrong fit for your organization anyway. Takeaway: • Understand that high-quality volunteers – those who truly want to help and will prove to be the greatest assets to your organization – will not take issue with a background check requirement. Institute the policy. Conclusion Background checks do require time and money. But today, volunteer background checks can be completed faster than ever before – and for a fraction of the cost. With affordable tools at your fingertips, there is no reason not to screen. Within several hours or a couple of days, you can receive background checks for potential volunteers and minimize the risk of onboarding those with harmful intentions. If your job seems challenging now, imagine what it would be like with the added complications of lawsuits and

funding crises. Don’t let the four common objections to volunteer background screenings get the best of you.

2 Oklahoma Museums Association. (2000, December). Risk Management and Insurance for Nonprofits, Part I. Retrieved April 28, 2014, from http:// www.okmuseums.org/sites/oma2/ uploads/documents/Technical_Bulletins/Technical_Bulletin_38_-_ Risk_Management_Part_I.pdf

About Verified Volunteers Verified Volunteers is the only background check platform tailored to the specific needs of the service sector and the first online community to mobilize repeat, vetted volunteers. Our Volunteer Fast-Pass propels nonprofit organizations by empowering volunteers to take greater ownership of costly, time-consuming screening processes. Verified Volunteers is backed by SterlingBackcheck, one of the world’s largest background screening companies, and partnered with Points of Light, the world’s largest organization dedicated to volunteer service.

3 Stephens, J., & Flaherty, M. (2013, October 31). Inside the hidden world of thefts, scams and phantom purchases at the nation’s nonprofits. The Washington Post. Retrieved April 4, 2014, from http://www.washingtonpost.com/ investigations/inside-the-hiddenworld-of-thefts-scams-and-phantompurchases-at-the-nations-nonprofits/2013/10/26/825a82ca-0c26-11e39941-6711ed662e71_story.html

Visit www.verifiedvolunteers.com to learn more. REFERENCES: 1 Who’s Lending a Hand?” A National Survey of Nonprofit Volunteer Screening Practices. Victims of Crime. Last modified 2008. http://www.victimsofcrime.org/docs/Public%20library/ who’s-lending-a-hand.pdf?sfvrsn=10 Summer 2015

4 Blake, Erica. “Charter school volunteer is sent to prison.” Toledo Blade (Toledo, OH), February 28, 2008. https://www.toledoblade.com/local/2008/02/28/Charter-school-volunteer-is-sent-to-prison.html 5 Volunteering in the United States, 2013. (2014, February 25). U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved April 25, 2014, from http://www.bls. gov/news.release/volun.nr0.htm

IFEA’s ie: the business of international events 45


TOKENS Keep the

BEER,

Lines and

PROFITS Flowing

By Jim Wahl

For the thousands of visitors that go each year, Oktoberfest is a time honored tradition: a time to indulge in traditional German culture, food, and beers. This year, visitors got all that—and some schnitzel to boot, without any of the standing in line or fishing through wallets for exact change that until this year had been part of the time-honored tradition. The Germania Society of Cincinnati, which runs three German-themed festivals every year, switched from cash to tokens as a means of exchange, and saw not only a profit increase, but a more streamlined and easy to use sales system. Dennis Imwalle, Treasurer at the Germania society, was encouraged by an article he read in IFEA’s “ie” Magazine about an Oktoberfest in Mt. Angel, Oregon. He contacted the Mount Angel Oktoberfest officials who had successfully introduced tokens more than twelve years ago and sought their advice. The Mt Angel people were very helpful, and even offered some easy to follow rules for making the switch.

More Coin in the Lederhosen, More Time Too . . . The Germania Board was receptive to his token proposal and unanimously approved implementation at its major events. A Tokens Committee was subsequently organized to carry out the Board’s directive. The committee decided to try the switch from cash to tokens during their Maifest in May before the larger and more popular Oktoberfest in August. Setting up the festival logistics was relatively easy. Three token-selling booths were set up across the festival grounds to maximize patron access, each with either an ATM or an iPad equipped with a POS card swiper. The iPads were a new addition, and required wireless throughout the park. There were Wi-Fi systems installed in the park to provide ready access to the internet. Total wireless installation cost approximately $3,000. It was a worthwhile investment though, as 30% of the token sales were through credit cards. Once the system was in place, the sales started piling up and the lines started

shortening. It turned out at Maifest that using tokens is 5-10 times faster than cash transactions—there is no need to make change, and the beer or soft drink is being poured and served while the customer is putting down the tokens. Food is harder to serve as quickly because it takes more time to put a brat on a bun and add sauerkraut, so naturally it doesn’t move as fast as drink transactions. “We have some beer booths that sell more than 45 half barrels a day. You can’t imagine how easy this is with tokens,” Imwalle said. The tokens were such a success that they were a no-brainer to use at Oktoberfest, which attracts 4-5 times as many visitors. The Tokens Committee realized from the test-run at Maifest that staffing the token booths would require a lot of workers, as each booth requires 8-10


people. Luckily for the committee, the Germania Society has over 700 members. The major reason for using tokens is that large amounts of cash are much more secure because there are fewer “cash touches” by workers. There were no line bottlenecks created by tokens since the speed of transaction is incredibly fast. For example, soft drink booths alone saw an 8% sales increase. You‘d have never known that it was a new system— the transition was seamless. Weighing the Decision With tokens, the point of sale is not the only part that’s faster—counting each booth’s sales and the festival total sales are also sped up. Each service booth is set up with a token catcher—basically a large bucket with a lockable lid. At the end of each day, a worker from each booth brought the bucket to the Treasurer’s office and put the bucket on a scale. In less than 30 minutes, all the day’s sales were counted and most of the workers—all volunteers—were allowed to go home early. The speedy turnover after a sticky day of handling beers and bratwursts is in sharp contrast to previous years, where the counting took hours. Volunteers who were giving their time for free had to wait around until as late as 1:00 a.m. and they appreciated being released after they turned their pails in. It was also observed that volunteers became more flexible with their time— since they weren’t waiting until the wee hours after working a 4-hour shift, they signed on to work more shifts. It’s a simple process to count the tokens. Before the festival, the buckets are weighed empty and then scales are zeroed out for the weight of the bucket. Then, if you put in one token, the scale shows one. Put 10 in, and it registers 10. Some booths had upwards of 4,000 tokens, so counting by weight is much more accurate than one by one with singles, fives or tens. “We’ve convinced a lot of people time and again. We had tests where we’d put 100 tokens in and it would show 100 – even when it was off, it was reasonable, not glaring errors,” Imwalle said. Germania’s three major events account for nearly 75% of its annual budget and security concerns for Festival cash are a major consideration. Weighing the tokens also prevents money from exchanging hands, preventing errors in counting as well as sticky fingers. With 40 booths selling food, goods, and beer and 6-7 people in each booth per shift, there are a lot of people in contact with cash. Ten Oktoberfest beverage booths alone have more than

120,000 “human touches” during the three day event. With six figure cash totals floating around over the course of a few days, there’s a large chance of a few dollars going missing. Tips from the Token Trade One reason counting by weight is possible is that all the coins are the same denomination—each is $1. Other festivals have a $3 or a $5 coin, but Germania set the denomination at $1 to prevent customers from having to do coin math at the register. This also means everything at Oktoberfest had to be priced in whole numbers—$2 instead of $1.50. Another concern for Oktoberfest was safeguarding the token catcher buckets. Each bucket was secured in the various service booths with locked lids. At the end of each day, these token catchers were brought to the Treasurer’s office for counting. The empty token catchers were then returned to the service booths. The three booths that sell the Tokens to patrons have a portable lock box for their cash. These cash boxes are transported under armed security to the Treasurer’s office. Startup, Setup, Ready for the Next One A big advantage of the tokens was less need for cash at the startup of the day. Imwalle estimated they were able to cut the amount of cash in half. He still needed money to make change at the three token booths, but only three booths needed cash, as opposed to all 40 booths that sell food, beer, or merchandise. When volunteers came in for their shift, there wasn’t any startup money because it was all in tokens, there was no need to make change. After a year of using the tokens at various sized festivals, the battle to gain acceptance from the membership has been won. It took some politicking though, as there were the usual skeptics that were less than pleased with the change

at first and preconceived notions about the tokens ran deeper than the Hefeweizen. One criticism was that if the tokens didn’t work on Friday night, the Treasurer wouldn’t have enough time to go to the bank for startup money on Saturday and Sunday, since the banks close at noon on Saturday. Luckily, that wasn’t an issue because the token switch was so smooth. After that first day selling tokens, the various booth chairpersons were asked to evaluate the token operation. There were no negative comments. It went so smoothly that Imwalle sarcastically jibbed, “I don’t know if this token thing is gonna work…next year we’re going back to cash!” The beverage chairperson replied that if they ever went back to cash, he’d come at Imwalle with a cleaver. Nothing has made his job easier. It was an investment to begin the program, with a cost close to $20,000 for 300,000 tokens purchased from neighboring Osborne Coinage Company. That investment is a fixed asset, because The Germania Society can use the tokens forever until they wear out. Whereas tickets or cash get sticky and wet, the tokens look pristine—like they’ve never been used. Naturally, some tokens get lost or taken home by visitors, or even kept as souvenirs. But the vast majority of tokens that remain are currently in storage in all-weather cargo boxes, just waiting for the first light of spring for Maifest to begin. For Germania Society, switching to tokens saved time and provided some peace of mind. Customers found the system easy to use, and plopping tokens down on a counter was much easier than digging through purses and wallets for exact change. At the end of the day, the buckets are weighed, the totals added up, and the tokens released for use the next day. Cash is only exchanged at three specific token booths as opposed to 40, preventing errors and sticky fingers. Even a little token change like this proves that Continued on page 121

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IFEA’s ie: the business of international events 47


Economic Impact to the Local Economy Collaborating and Cooperating with Local Government as Social Entrepreneurs By Wes Tilghman

Is there a secret language to speaking with local government when you want their support? Maybe not a secret language per se, however in my opinion, opportunities do exist for considering how your mission aligns with local government's initiatives. When you need the local communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s support, you might consider taking time to prepare for how you will communicate the value your events provide, as an essential service. Three common roles local municipalities may establish include economic development, parks and recreation, and cultural art initiatives. Within one or all three of these realms, an opportunity exists to position your concepts and missions to align with the community's goals. The key is to communicate the benefits that festivals and events provide in such a way that help the public sector recognize how you support accomplishing their mission. For example, according to a report by the National Recreation and Parks Association (NRPA), Parks and Recreation plays a major role in tourism, which contributes significantly to the local economy. (Crompton, 2010). Attractions developed by the public sector that are likely to activate pleasure travel and tourism include recreation (festivals and cultural events, sports and outdoor tournaments) and the arts (theaters, art galleries, museums, performing groups, music, concerts).

48

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Recreation and Park Attractions in a Jurisdiction

Tourism

Conference and Convention Travel Opportunities for Local Residents

Pleasure Travel– Sphere of Interest

Business Travel Visiting Friends and Relatives– Personal Business

Recreation and Park Attractions NOT Operated by a Public Agency

Many regard tourism as a commercial phenomenon concerned with economic development that is rooted in the private domain. In contrast, parks and recreation typically is viewed as being concerned with social and resource issues and being rooted in the public domain. However, that perception of parks and recreation’s role is truncated. While we affirm the field’s social service role in providing parks and programs, we also affirm recreations role in attracting visitors to a community. (Crompton, 2010). This exhibit demonstrates the segments of travel and their inter-relationship with Parks and Recreation. This leads to the conclusion that in most communities, pleasure travel is a business that the public and non-profit sectors drive, and park and recreation agencies are central to. In most communities, attractions such as sports tournaments, festivals andcultural arts signify the public sector are engines of tourism. Economic Impact If in fact, we accept that the public sector attracts tourism to the local economy, then, it’s important to be able to communicate those tangible and intangible benefits. For example, a proportion of the tax funds invested in a parks and recreation agency’s festival serves as seed money that leverages substantial economic gains. Expanding on this concept urges us to tell our story in a holistic fashion, in order to capture the entire picture. Consider a traditional balance sheet for an arts festival produced by parks and recreation. Total income from exhibitors, sponsors and concessions may not exceed total operating expenditures, commonly perceived as a net loss.

However, if the parks and recreation agency used an economic balance sheet as tourism agencies do, then it would show a substantial return. Consider this example from one of North Carolina's longest running events, a one day arts festival in Chapel Hill, NC. The Festifall Arts Festivals draws upwards of fifteen thousand patrons each year to historic Franklin Street in Downtown Chapel Hill. Our mission is to celebrate the local arts culture in Orange County, provide opportunities for local artists to display their work, and promote awareness of the arts. Let’s take a closer look.

Festifall Arts Festival Up Close Agencies that present this kind of data in the form of an economic balance sheet to their stake holders, demonstrating their contribution to economic development, are likely to reposition themselves favorably in the minds of legislators and the general public. One of the first steps is to draw the conclusion for the potential economic benefits and positive impact festivals and events produce. Economic impact can be communicated as total expenditures and most notably, as a return on investment. Expenditures by event patrons include spending with hotels, restaurants, local retailers, etc. These returns are not only realized as total expenditures with local merchants, but also have far reaching impacts, such as the number of times one dollar of expenditures turns over in a local economy via purchases from local suppliers and service providers, or how many jobs are supported by total expenditures, and perhaps most meaningful to local government, the sales tax revenue generated as a result of total expenditures. Awaken Your Community with Art Arts managers working with a variety of arts and cultural organizations, provide a wide array of arts and cultural opportunities that offer benefits to individuals and societies. Participation in the arts occurs in a variety of contexts including museums, galleries, community arts centers, art fairs and festivals, and performance venues. Arts and cultural recreation opportunities continue to be both a part of public agencies’ responsibilities to their citizens, and viable offerings in terms of self-support programs. (Carpenter 2005). The

TOTAL REVENUES Artist/Exhibitor Fees

$21,178

Beverage Sales

$ 8,169

Sponsors & In-kind

$11,300

Total Revenue

$40,647

Production Expenses

$49,444

NET LOSS (INVESTMENT)

($8,797)

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IFEA’s ie: the business of international events 49


RESIDENTS NON-RESIDENTS EVENT ATTENDEES RESIDENTS

TOURISTS

TOTAL

10,350

5,857

16207

61 percent

39 percent

100 percent

$22.46

$37.71

$30.08

$232,461.00

$220,861.47

$453,322.47

Total Attendance Percent of Tourists Average Dollars Spent Event-Related Expenditures

ECONOMIC IMPACT OF SPENDING BY TOURISTS AT THE FESTIFALL ARTS FESTIVAL Direct Expenditures

$220,458.98

Total Impact on local Sales (1.5% modifier)

$330,688.48

Total Impact to Local Income (7.52 jobs)

$165,344.24

Local Sales Tax Revenue (2%)

$2,887.83

State Sales Tax Revenue (5.75%)

$ 7,195.52

Return on Investment to the community based on the Town’s $8,797 investment ($330,688/$8,797 total expenditures/net loss) Leverage ratio of 1:38 For each town dollar invested, Festifall generated $38 in a Positive Economic Impact importance of arts and cultural programming in recreation and leisure agencies is illustrated in an example from Boise, Idaho and the Treefort Music Festival, where the local government recognized the value of the event to the local community, and committed significant funding from the city’s department of art and history. Boise Mayor, Dave Bieter, named a new cultural ambassador for the City of Trees 50

in 2015. The Treefort Music Fest, an alternative music festival that brings hundreds of bands to Boise, will in its fourth year of operation, receive $25,000 as part of the honor through the Boise City Department of Arts and History. "Treefort is such a great event because of how organically Boise truly is," Bieter told a crowd at El Korah Shrine, one of the festival's venues, "Perhaps more than

IFEA’s ie: the business of international events

Summer 2015

any other event, the Treefort Music Fest captures the essence of Boise's creative, vibrant and unique cultural scene—especially its music." Obviously, the organizers for the Treefort Festival found it viable, to begin collaborating creatively with local legislators and program managers, in ways they were able to recognize meaningful value to both constituencies.


We often see media attention given to specific segments of leisure programming. It is not unusual to find that outdoor pursuits and sports are more frequently reported upon than art and cultural programs. However, one cannot assume that because arts and culture may be less visible, that people don’t appreciate the benefits of arts programs.(Carpenter 2005) Economic impact studies show the importance of arts and cultural activities to communities throughout North America. Studies show that when community leaders invest in the arts, they also invest in the economic health of their local communities. "Understanding and acknowledging the incredible economic impact of the nonprofit arts and culture, we must always remember their fundamental value. They foster beauty, creativity, originality, and vitality. The arts inspire us, sooth us, provoke us, involve us, and connect us. They also create jobs and contribute to the economy," said Robert L. Lynch, President and CEO of Americans for the Arts. The nonprofit arts and culture industry generates $85.4 million in annual economic activity in Orange County, NC —supporting 3,352 full-time equivalent jobs and generating $8.0 million in local and state government revenues, according to the Arts & Economic Prosperity IV national economic impact study. A comprehensive economic impact study of the nonprofit arts and culture industry, Arts & Economic Prosperity IV was conducted by Americans for the Arts (AFTA), and the nation’s leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education. Private sector businesses and organizations benefit from activity related spending by attendees who spend money on eating, transportation services and overnight lodging. Cultural activities attract tourists and spur the creation of ancillary facilities such as restaurants, hotels and the services needed to support them. Cultural facilities and events enhance property values, tax resources and overall profitability for communities. In doing so, the arts become a great contributor to urban and rural revitalization. (Arts & Economic Prosperity IV, 2012) The Americans for the Arts make it a practice to report findings associated with the economic impact of arts and culture participation. Including: • The total economic activity in the non-profit arts industry in the United States was $134 billion, which included the total spending by organizations ($53.2 billion) and spending by arts audiences ($80.8 billion).

• Two-thirds of American travelers included a cultural, arts, heritage or historic activity or event while on a trip of 50 miles or more, one-way. Cultural tourists spend more and stay longer than other types of U.S. tourists. • Non-local U.S. arts attendees (e.g., attending performances, festivals, etc.) spend almost twice as much as local attendees ($38.05 compared to $21.75). • 39.4 percent of American adults attend at least one live arts event such as jazz, classical music, opera, musical, play, ballet or art museum. Social Entrepreneurship Think about social entrepreneurship as extraordinary people coming up with brilliant ideas and against all the odds, succeed at creating new products and services that dramatically improve people’s lives. The social entrepreneur aims for value in the form of large-scale, transformational benefits to society. What distinguishes social entrepreneurship is the primacy of social benefit, what Duke University professor Greg Dees in his seminal work on the field characterizes as the pursuit of “mission-related impact.” Art and cultural activities not only contribute to the economic health of communities, they also create opportunities to enrich peoples’ lives and relationships with others. Positive outcomes can be realized through both individual and group cultural activities. Robert Putnam is one of a long series of writers on community and civic participation. The concept of social capital, advocated by Robert Putnam’s research (Putnam 2002), is relevant to those recreational professionals who see that public-based recreation experiences contribute positively to community development. Art and cultural leisure experiences are particularly advantageous because they create environments conducive to the development of social capital. Three examples will illustrate this. Researchers in Philadelphia found that local cultural activity had a dramatic influence on neighborhoods (Stern & Seifert, 2002). Their findings showed that: • Cultural activity drew new residents into communities, reducing poverty and increasing population • Cultural participation and diverse communities are mutually reinforcing and tend to promote gradual growth rather than rapid gentrification • Culture creates a positive social environment resulting in greater civic participation, lower truancy rates and lower delinquency rates • Cultural participation builds bridges across neighborhood, ethnic and class divides in ways that many other forms of civic engagement do not. Summer 2015

See Yourself as an Essential Service Economic impact, social entrepreneurship, and cultural events that enhance lives … all three good outcomes that beckon engagement with community stakeholders. These decision makers have the capacity to impact your success and establish the kind of results that make your mission a significant value to the local community. How you see yourself, your mission, and the outcomes you desire, all play a massive role in deciding how you might posture and position your organization to play an integral role in the community’s success. See the essence of applying yourself as an essential service to the community, rather than a leisure option. References • Crompton, John L. (2010), Measuring the Economic Impact of Park and Recreation Services, Research Series, Nation Recreation Parks Association • Carpenter, Gaylene, Edited by Mary Parr, Ph.D (2005), Awaken Your Agency with Art, Research Update • Americans for the Arts, (2012), Arts & Economic Prosperity IV, Economic Impact Study • Putnam, Robert D. (2002), Democracies in Flux: The Evolution of Social Capital in Contemporary Society, Oxford University Press. • Stern, Mark J. and Seifert, Susan C. (2010), Cultural Clusters: The Implications of Cultural Assets Agglomeration for Neighborhood Revitalization, Journal of Planning Education and Research.

Wes Tilghman is the Marketing & Sponsorship Manager for the Town of Chapel Hill’s Parks & Recreation Department. His unique role involves collaborating with other like-minded stakeholders, to attract and sustain vibrant economic endeavors. In 2012, Wes lead an economic impact study of Chapel Hill’s festivals and events, noting Chapel Hill generates a 1:40 ratio, forty dollars of total expenditures for every one dollar the town invests in festivals and events. Wes can be reached at: Wes Tilghman, Marketing & Sponsorship Manager Town of Chapel Hill Parks and Recreation 200 Plant Road Chapel Hill, NC 27514-5705 Phone: (919) 968-2823; Email: wtilghman@townofchapelhill.org www.chapelhillparks.org

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CREATIVE

Thomas Jefferson once said, “I’m a great believer in luck.”

INSURANCE IS NO

OXYMORON

By Melissa Matheson

While many people consider themselves to be lucky, or unlucky, we know one thing for sure: any task or event where one can be considered lucky or unlucky definitely stirs up conversation. Everything from winning the lottery, to getting a hole-in-one, to winning a car for choosing the right key to unlock it is a sure fire way to get people talking. When you incorporate a large sum of money or a coveted trip, or a fancy car into the promotion, it stirs up the commotion even more and gives people hope that they could be the “lucky” winner. 52

And let’s be honest, who doesn’t like feeling like that? Prize Indemnity insurance allows a sponsor, promoter, or event organizer to offer a large, risk-free prize for only a fraction of the cost. It can be used to create additional incentives for consumers to attend your event AND stay, and can help you collect valuable data about your consumers. In a study conducted by the University of Massachusetts Center for Spectator Sport Research about consumer response and interest to sweepstakes and promotions, 78% of the respondents believed that the value

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of the prize makes a promotion stand out and makes them want to participate. There are countless ways to make an insured promotion exciting while still being relevant and affordable. It can also be a great way to help accomplish marketing and advertising goals. Specific to the fair and festival industry, attracting sponsors, driving ticket sales, generating a database to be used for future marketing, and creating a buzz around an event seem to be the most poignant goals. Let’s explore some of the ways that insured promotions can help achieve them.


Goal #1: Attract Sponsors Insured promotions offer a great way to entice sponsors by giving them name recognition and advertising their brand. They deliver those objectives by offering sponsors the opportunity to place their brand front and center on “The Million Dollar Challenge” or the “Unlock the Car To Win Contest,” etc. As the fair or festival organizer, you can offer your prospective sponsors the opportunity to place their name on a crowd-drawing contest that gives consumers the chance at winning a large prize. Obviously if someone wins that large prize, it could potentially put you out of business, but that is where prize indemnity insurance comes in. Prize Insurance protects the prize value if the prize were to be won, while you pay a premium for the insurance based upon the odds of winning the prize. An example of this would be to offer a local car dealership (let’s just say Ford in this case) the opportunity to place their name and logo on the “Unlock Your Dream Car Promotion presented by XYZ Ford” if they will agree to be a platinum sponsor. You would have attendees enter their name into a drawing during the festival and then choose one lucky person to win a self-insured prize such as a gift-certificate or a “festival swag bag,” and then they also get to try their luck at picking 1 key out of 100 to see if it starts the car. If they choose the correct key that starts the car, they win it! Goal #2: Drive Ticket Sales Prior to your fair or festival you can attract more attendees by getting people excited about specific events that will be going on. There are a couple of ways to accomplish this by using prize indemnity insurance. One way to add an extra element of excitement is to advertise beforehand that if you buy your fair or festival tickets online, you will also have a chance at playing a themed lottery game online where you could win $100,000. The online game would be available to anyone to play after they purchase at least one ticket online. They would be brought to a webpage where there would be a grid of 48 pictures and they would have to choose 7 pictures. If their 7 selections matches the pre-selected 7 pictures, they win. In addition to driving ticket sales, this is also a great way to create a database of customer information to be used for future marketing purposes. You could also add another element of brand recognition for your exhibitors or sponsors by allowing them to provide you with a logo that you could use as one of the pictures in the grid. Another way to drive ticket sales is to run a sales promotion period based on the weather. With some advertising prior to

your fair or festival, let consumers know that if they purchase their tickets during a specific sales period and it reaches X degrees on the first day of the fair (or some other date), they will get a full refund on their purchase. For example, you could run this promotion to drive ticket sales to a headlining concert or another big act that is going on. Let’s say your fair runs from August 1st to the 15th and your headlining act is on August 8th. If consumers purchase their tickets to the headlining act between June 1st and June 30th they will be entered into the promotion. Then on August 1st, the opening day of the fair, if it reaches 100 degrees at the fairgrounds, everyone who bought their tickets during that sales period will receive a full refund. Likewise, we all know many people love to talk about sports and take great pride in their hometown teams. You could use this to your advantage by running a promotion based on a local sports team accomplishing a specific feat. The same premise would happen where everyone who made a purchase during a specified sales period would be entered into the promotion. Then, for example, if your hometown NFL team wins the Super Bowl, everyone gets a refund on their purchase. Depending on the timing of your festival, this could also work for your hometown MLB team winning the World Series or a local college team winning the Championship Game, etc. It could also just be based on a specific sports feat occurring, such as “If opening kickoff gets returned for a touchdown during the first game of the season,” or “the first pitch is hit for a homerun on opening day.” There are endless possibilities. Goal #3: Generate a Database to use for Future Marketing As technology advances on a daily basis, it allows us to market to consumers in an abundance of ways. Compiling a comprehensive database of attentive consumers is a valuable tool to have and there are some easy ways of doing this by using insured promotions. One way is to run a “$500,000 Mobile Phone Madness Promotion.” Drive consumers online to your website by offering them a chance at winning $500,000 (or some other amount or large prize) if their mobile phone number matches the pre-selected 10 digit number. On the website where they enter their mobile number to see if they’ve won, you could also require them to enter their name and email address and check off a box that opts them into your database. Another way is to have them enter an online promotion by registering with their Facebook or Twitter account. This is a great way to also drive traffic to your social media websites and get “friends” and “followers.” Other types of online promotions Summer 2015

that can help you compile a database, includes games of chance such as having the consumer enter their birth date to see if it matches the pre-selected birthdate. Goal #4: Create a “buzz” and get people talking What better way to create a buzz about your fair or festival than to offer the chance at winning a very large prize! You could advertise beforehand that everyone who comes through the gate will be given a raffle ticket for a chance to putt their way to $1 million. They would be instructed to enter their information on the ticket and then drop it into a bucket at a specific location at the fair or festival. One winner would be randomly drawn to win a gift card or some other small self-insured prize and they would also receive a chance to win $1 million by completing a putting contest. The bucket would be located in an area where a putting green is set up. During the fair or festival at a specified time, that lucky winner will be asked to go to the putting green area and have a chance at sinking a 10 ft. putt, then a 20 ft. putt, then a 30 ft. putt. If they make all three, they win $1 million which would be covered by insurance. You could also give away smaller self-insured prizes for making 1 out of the 3 or 2 out the 3 putts. Another idea is to give all of your attendees a chance at playing a game to win a large prize. An example of this would be to give everyone a ticket as they come through the gate which permits them to get one attempt at rolling 6 dice to spell out the word W-I-N-N-E-R to win $100,000. While people may find it fun to win a t-shirt or water bottle in a contest, they certainly won’t remember it as much as they would if they won $1 million from a contest they participated in at your event. In summary, whatever your marketing goals and objectives are, prize indemnity insurance can help you reach them through various fun and exciting ways, while still keeping your promotion budget intact. Melissa Matheson is the Senior Manager of Business Development at HCC Specialty Underwriters and has been with the company for 10 years. HCC Specialty Underwriters is a member agency of HCC Specialty, a division of HCC Insurance Holdings. HCC Specialty specializes in event, entertainment, hospitality, sports, leisure and travel insurance and has been in business for over 40 years. More information is available at www.hccspecialty.com or contact Melissa at (781) 994-6150 or mmatheson@hcc.com.

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TOP 10

By Amy Amdur

TIPS TO

DRAW MORE ATTENTION TO YOUR FESTIVAL BOOTH 2. Consistent Framing Try to have harmonious framing so that the public's attention is on your work, not on the frames. Instead of showing one style of artwork, you really want to show a group of work. It could also be by subject matter (the way it was painted). By having one or two frame styles it keeps the focus on your booth. 3. Hang a Large Impact Piece or Two in the Center of Your Back Wall It can help bring people into your booth and support the sales of your smaller pieces. When people are walking by your booth you have about 5-6 seconds to grab their attention. You want to slow the crowd down by seeing the larger, eye-catching piece towards the back of your booth. 4. Jewelers & Those with Small Pieces Consider photo blow ups of work on the back wall and the front lower sections of your cases. If the public can easily "see" your work from a distance, they are more apt to come into your booth for a closer look.

Festival season is upon us, which means artists of every kind of medium will be showcasing their creativity throughout the summer months. Although great art is essential to every booth, the way an artist chooses to present their space is key to attracting larger crowds. Discover 10 tips below for artists to keep in mind when setting up their booth during this year’s festival season. 1. Plan Your Booth Well Use graph paper or a computer layout program. Plan each wall, know the sizes of the work you intend to show. Hang pieces that stack on a vertical midline, and pieces that are side by side on a horizontal midline. Aim for symmetry. 54

5. 3D Artists Consider multiple display levels, and use pedestals to show your work. A more sophisticated layout is on multiple levels. Consider a vase or a sculpture in this instance. 6. Signage is Important Consider signage that reflects your art, not just a generic name sign. Velcro backed individual letters on fabric panels are a great to display your name as well. For example, if your palate is a “deep green” find signage that matches your work. You can even take that same look and translate that on business cards. Should not be generic, but specific to you. 7. Include a Ground Cover Solid color carpet remnants or throw rugs bought at a home supply store are inexpensive. Duct tape down all sides at the festival for safety. People often forget the ground when setting up the rest.

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8. Remember to Weigh Down Your Tent Connect the weights to the upper cross bars of your tent so that your hard work does not blow away. Wind is a force to be reckoned with, and it really doesn’t take a lot of wind to ruin your tent/booth. 9. The Tent Itself is Important A heavy, commercial grade tent with a sky light is best for most artists. A sturdy tent would be best, since they do not collapse in wind or rain. Also, these have strong structure to hold walls without sagging. A sky light allows for a brighter tent area and better viewing of the art work in addition to being able to see the true color and texture better. 10. Use a High Director Chair Choose a director's chair in a color that works with your booth. Web beach chairs do not belong. Hi-chairs put the artist on face level, not belt buckle level of some customers. The low beach or patio chairs do not look intentional in a booth, especially since the booth is essentially the on-site gallery of the artist. By following these few simple steps, you will hopefully draw more attention to your festival booth which should in turn, draw more sales!

Amy Amdur is the CEO of Amdur Productions, a nationally acclaimed arts festival production company. For more than thirty years, Amdur Productions has crafted and curated a selection of the country’s most prestigious juried art festivals, including the Chicago Botanic Garden Art Festival, Gold Coast Art Fair, and Port Clinton Art Festival. Founded 1983, Amdur Productions attracts thousands of guests to explore and enjoy a showcase of artists’ work in a free and fun environment. Several of Amdur Productions’ festivals have been selected as Sunshine Artist magazine’s top 100 best fine art and design shows.


6

International Festivals & Events Association

A

th

IFEA World

TUCSON, ARIZONA, U.S.A.

N N IVE RSARY

CO N V E N T I O N & EX P O SEPTEMBER 21-23, 2015

Presented by


A

6

N N IVE RSARY

CO N V E N T I O N th & EX P O “When we say Mitakuye Oyasin – ‘All Our Relations,’ the word Mitakuye means relations and Oyasin means more than family, more than a Nation, more than all of humankind. Everything that has a spirit.” Chief Arvol Looking Horse “When we talk about the power of celebration, we are referring to the unique ability of our events and industry to touch lives and bond peoples together, creating positive moments, memories and milestones that reflect who we are when we are at our best…as communities; as countries; as a common world. The events that our industry produces are a direct reflection of the heart, the soul and the spirit of those we exist for and the places we call home.” Steven Wood Schmader, CFEE President & CEO, IFEA World

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For as long as anyone can remember, people have celebrated. Celebration itself is perhaps the most common denominator that we have, with the unique ability to cross all barriers of race, religion, ethnicity, age, politics, economics, education and geography. From small, localized celebrations to mega-events with global outreach, ours is an industry that is built around dreams and imagination and the people who understand not only the importance of dreaming, but know how to make them come true. We are an industry of “memory makers.” We are also community builders, storytellers, vision painters, bridge builders, ambassadors, and the purveyors of possibility. We bring families, friends, communities, countries

and peoples together. We help them celebrate the special things in their lives, inspire them to see more, and provide the spark that allows them to light the world around them. That is the gift that our industry brings to the world and that is the legacy that we will leave. For the past 60 years, the International Festivals & Events Association (IFEA World) has been given (by those who shared their vision and trusted their legacy to us) the honor of representing and furthering this important industry. Of bringing together the best and the brightest; the leaders of the past, the present and the

future; the educators and the practitioners; government leaders and corporate sponsors; tourism, media and technology trend setters; event volunteers, staffs and Boards of Directors; ‘Experience Management’ professionals at every level who continue to expand the possibilities that await us, in a world that needs us now more than ever before. During this year’s IFEA 60th Anniversary Convention & Expo we will take time to celebrate and reflect upon our journey so far, with ‘all our relations’ around the world who have played so many important roles in getting us to this special milestone. But we will also look to the future, planning and remembering, as Walt

Disney reminded us all sixty years ago at the opening of Disneyland, that “Today, we are the shapers of the world of tomorrow.” With that in mind, we invite you and ‘all your relations’ to join your professional peers in Tucson, Arizona, U.S.A., at the JW Marriott Tucson Starr Pass Resort & Spa, this September 21st – 23rd, 2015 (three full days*) for what promises to be a very special industry gathering. (*Note: The IFEA 60th Anniversary Convention footprint has been expanded this year, with sessions running through 5:15pm on Wednesday, September 23rd, 2015.)

Summer 2015

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CONVENTION OPENING & KEYNOTE SPEAKERS The 60th Anniversary IFEA Convention & Expo officially opens on Monday, September 21st at 9:00 a.m., as we embrace the unique, colorful and energetic cultures of the American Southwest to welcome our professional peers, representing the positive and diverse power of celebration from around the world. Join us as Native American Spiritual Leader Larry Redhouse, a member of the Diné (Navajo) Tribe, helps us take a moment to celebrate the spirit of ‘All Our Relations’ through the centuries old ‘Mitakuye Oyasin’ (Mee-tah-kay Awe-sin) ceremony, reflecting on the connections we all have with the Earth and each other, finding focus, creating memories, and seeing our lives from a higher perspective. The calming serenity of this special ceremony will be followed by the high musical energy of local Mariachi performers Los Changuitos Feos De Tucson (Celebrating 50 Years of Youth Mariachi and Preservation of Musical Culture), together with Ballet Folklorico de Arizona from the Viva Performing Arts Center. Together they will surround your senses as naturally as the saguaro-covered desert foothills surround our resort.

OPENING KEYNOTE SPEAKER Future Focus: Sustaining the Long-Term Success of Global Festivals & Events Nick Dodds Managing Director Festivals & Events International We are very pleased to welcome our IFEA 60th Anniversary Convention Keynote Opener, Nick Dodds, Managing Director of Festivals & Events International, in London, England. Few people in our industry have the global experience and background to fully understand the past, present and future power of festivals and events, as well as their challenges and opportunities, as Nick Dodds. Nick has spent 30 years of deep involvement in all aspects of events, festivals and venues in both the commercial and public sectors. Before forming Festivals & Events International (FEI), working with and consulting to festivals and events worldwide, he served as the Chief Executive of the Brighton Festival (England’s largest festival and the second largest arts festival in the United Kingdom); Administrative Director of the Edinburgh International Festival (the largest arts festival in the United Kingdom), and the Chief Operating Officer of the London Organizing Committee 2012 Cultural Olympiad and London 2012 Festival – the largest UK-wide festival ever staged. Nick served on the Executive Board of IFEA Europe in 1994-95 and as Chairman of the Board in 1995 – 1996; as Chairman of the British Arts Festivals Association from 2003 – 2008; and just this year completed ‘Thundering Hooves 2.0: A Ten Year Strategy to Sustain the Success of Edinburgh’s Festivals.’

With warm welcomes from local dignitaries and an acknowledgment of the past 60 years, we will use our time together over the coming days to look to the future and the important roles that the events and industry we are all a part of, will continue to play in our communities and the world around us.

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CLOSING KEYNOTE SPEAKER “Lead Your Team, Don’t Just Manage The Process”

Steve McClatchy International Speaker, Trainer, Consultant, Author & President Alleer Training & Consulting Helping us put a fitting cap on our IFEA 60th Anniversary Convention, we are pleased to welcome back IFEA favorite, Steve McClatchy. New York Times Best Selling Author and speaker for over a decade on the topics of Leadership, Performance, Personal Growth, and Work/Life Engagement, Steve is the Founder of Alleer Training & Consulting, a firm focused on helping companies and individuals improve performance and achieve outstanding results. He has an extensive client list of Fortune 1000 companies, is a frequent guest lecturer in the graduate business programs at Harvard and Wharton, and has been widely quoted in The Wall Street Journal, Selling Power, WebMD Magazine, Fast Company, Entrepreneur, and Investor’s Business Daily. Steve’s keynotes are not only packed with insight, humor, and passion, but result in measurable improvements in performance, productivity, engagement, and workplace satisfaction. As we all look to the future, the Best-Selling Author of Decide, voted the Best Management Book of 2015, will remind us of our need to lead our teams to the future and the visions that we imagine. Management and leadership are very different from one another. Both are vital to the success of a team but each yields different results. If you are interested in creating a world-class team that is committed to improvement and embraces change this is a “don’t miss” presentation.

Summer 2015

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Sponsorship/Revenues

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION “We can always count on the IFEA to track and identify the issues that we need to be paying attention to - often before they become a reality in our own market - and then to provide ready access to the leading resources and solutions available to our industry as we craft our own response. We have been pleased to serve as an active link in the IFEA network through multiple generations of KDF leadership.” Mike Berry, CFEE President & CEO Kentucky Derby Festival 2008 IFEA Hall of Fame Inductee

The future awaits, limited only by our imagination and our power to inspire others. Education and knowledge often provide the foundation of that power; the credibility to draw others to our visions; the internal confidence that we are on the right pathway toward our goals and dreams. As the world around us continues to evolve, providing new challenges, new risks and new opportunities at every turn, professionals in our industry need a trusted source to keep them connected; initiating new conversations about the latest issues, trends and expectations, while sharing best practices from around the globe. A source to help strengthen and reinforce our ‘experience management’ skills; inspire future strategies and visions; and guide critical leadership decisions. For 60 years the IFEA has been that source; providing the festivals and events industry with the very best in professional education and training; a tradition that continues in Tucson. The IFEA prides itself on providing up to 90% new topics and speakers each year, insuring that attendees at all levels - first-timers and repeat attendees, new to the industry or seasoned professional - can all find the answers and creative new ideas that you are looking for. A sampling of this year’s topics and conversation starters, presented by the top leaders in our global industry, include*, among others: (* subject to change)

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• Great Expectations: Selling and Fulfilling Meaningful Sponsor Packages • Earning the Digital Age Sponsorship Dollar and Keeping It • Strategies, Tactics and Cool Ideas for Activating Sponsorship • Providing Sponsors With ROI Other Than On Event Days • Membership Clubs and VIP Experiences • The Value and Pitfalls of Partnering with Not-for-Profits • Rock Star Strategies for Sponsorship Success: Best Practices for Sponsorship Activation and Engagement • Post Event Recaps and Follow-Up that Lead to Renewals • Uncovering New Opportunities for Online Revenues

Technology, Creativity and Innovation • Transacting Success - Options, Expectations and Effectiveness for Handling Secure Financial Exchanges • Programming a High-Quality Entertainment Experience on a Real World Budget • Double Your Event Excitement through Social Media • Leading Edge vs. Must Have Technology: Maximizing the Event Experience and Your Resources • On the Right Track: The Tucson City & Event Street Car Partnership • Moving Beyond Engagement to Sales: Finding a Way to Measure the Real Return of Social Media • Beyond the Bounce Houses! Programming Quality Children’s Activities at your Festival • A Researcher’s Guide to Digital Experiences in Festival Settings • No Be Stale! Be FRESH!

Operations & Risk Management • Cybersecurity: The New Frontline • Designing Your Event Site for Maximum Return - Financially and Experientially • Contracts 101 - How Do the Contracts That I Sign Affect My Event? • Safe Havens: Protecting Your Event Against Homegrown Violent Extremists • The Top Insurance Risks and How to Protect Against Them • It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane . . . Wait, What the Heck is That and Why is it in My Airspace? • The 10 Most Important Elements of a Successful Parade • Proactive Planning: Minimizing Potentially Disruptive Elements at Your Event • The Application of Project Management to Events Management • Controlling Drug & Substance Abuse at Music Festivals and All Events • Riding Point: Managing Live Animal Units in Your Parade • The Keys to a Successful Food & Beverage Program • Off the Charts: The Impact of Mega Music Festivals on Entertainment for All • Fully Prepared: Safety & Security Plans and Audits • The Birth of a Parade and Lessons Learned Along the Way

Summer 2015


Marketing, Branding and Media Relations • The Building Blocks of Your Event Brand • Roots: Generational Differences in Volunteerism • Full Partners: Using Events to Market and Maximize the Downtown Experience • Whistle Stop Marketing - Expanding Your Brand and Audience Beyond Your Own Community • The Important Partnership Role Newspapers Still Play in Community Events • Building a Successful On-Line Community Calendar • On-Line Resources to Improve Marketing & Your Life - Parts 1 & 2 • ROR: How to Get the Best ‘Return-on-Research’ Done at Your Festival or Event

Leadership & Management

• Future Focus: Sustaining the Long-Term Success of Global Festivals & Events • Exploring Successful Event-City Partnership Models • For Better or For Worse: Event Sustainability and Growth Strategies in Fast-Growing, Urban Residential and Commercial Environments • Event Budgeting & Financial Management: A 365 Day Process • Maximizing the Tourism / Festivals & Events Partnership • Lighting the Journey for International Exchange • Inside the Success of the Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon • New Challenges and Opportunities Facing Airshows • Proper Response: What Role Can/Should Events & Event Leadership Play in Helping to Resolve Community Conflicts? • The Service Commitment: What Our Events Can Learn from JW Marriott • Arizona Trifecta (Super Bowl 2015; College Football National Championship 2016; NCAA Final Four 2017): Attracting and Hosting Mega-Sporting Events • 10 Ways to ‘Kill’ an Event Community • People - Still Your Greatest Asset! • Dealing with the Dilemma of Rising City Service Costs • Full Disclosure: Assuring Transparent Finance & Governance Policies • Macy*s Parade: New Challenges; New Directions • Lead Your Team; Don’t Just Manage the Process Speakers and conversation leaders at this year’s convention include many of the top professionals (past, present and future) and internationally recognized industry organizations in the world, including*, among others: (*subject to change) • Pasadena Tournament of Roses • (Indianapolis) 500 Festival • Creative Strategies Group • VISA • Festival Transaction Services • Arizona Department of Tourism

• Cultural Festivals / St. Louis Arts Fair • Haas & Wilkerson Insurance • VIZIO Fiesta Bowl • Saffire • Festivals & Events International

• Arizona 2015 Super Bowl Host Committee • O’Neill Marketing & Event Management • Dubai Festivals & Retail Establishment • Cherry Creek Arts Festival • Alleer Training & Consulting • Portland Rose Festival Foundation • Events Nova Scotia • Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon • Pai Chai University, South Korea • Memphis in May International Festival • Festivals & Events Association of Tucson and Southern Arizona • City of San Jose, California • McDonald’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, Chicago • EventSet Risk & Event Management, New Zealand • JW Marriott Starr Pass Resort & Spa • Watauga County (NC) Tourism Development Authority • Visit Tucson • Dubai Department of Tourism and Commerce Marketing • Kentucky Derby Festival • Fourth Avenue Merchants Association • California State University, Chico • Rotterdam Festivals, The Netherlands • International Council of Airshows • Des Moines Arts Festival • Kaliff Insurance • Arizona 2016 Organizing Committee for the NCAA College Football National Championship • Baku (Azerbaijan) 2015 European Games • City of Dublin, Ohio • City of Ottawa (Ontario, Canada) 2017 Celebrations

• Event Project Management Systems (EPMS.NET), Australia • McFaddin Associates, LLC • U.S. Department of Homeland Security • Skills Village 2030, South Africa • Macy*s Thanksgiving Day Parade and Annual Events • Fredericksburg, Texas Chamber of Commerce • Youth Education in the Arts • National Cherry Festival • Exelar Consulting • Arizona 2017 Final Four Host Committee • Tucson Rodeo Parade • Experimental Aircraft Association • Genoways Events • TicketFly • City of Tucson • Downtown Tempe Authority • City of Ottawa (Ontario, Canada) Event Central Branch • High Point University • Chattanooga Riverbend Festival • The Idaho Statesman • El Tour de Tucson • University of Manitoba, Canada • Entertainment Solutions • Downtown Tucson Partnership • County of Kaua`i, Hawai`i • American Metro • RealTime Marketing Group • Noise New Media • Dfest (Dixie Flag Event Services Team) • Norfolk Festevents • City of McAllen, Texas • Jinju City, South Korea • Arizona Daily Star • WOW Entertainment • International Downtown Association • SunFest of Palm Beach County • IFEA World Festival & Event Cities • IFEA Global Affiliates • …and Many More


SPECIAL FOCUS OPPORTUNITIES

FIRST-TIMER’S CONVENTION COMPASS

“Today, we are the shapers of the world of tomorrow.” – Walt Disney

Before you hit the ground running, stop by to meet some new IFEA friends on Sunday evening, September 20th, from 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m., at our ‘First-Timer’s Convention Compass’ session. We look forward to welcoming our first-time convention attendees and to sharing some valuable tips and advice on how to maximize your convention experience. Then, join us for Happy Hour in the dfest ®/ Dixie Flag Event Services Team Hospitality Suite to meet more new friends, find some dinner partners, and let the networking conversations begin!

“AFFINITY GROUP” SESSIONS IFEA Convention attendees have a unique opportunity to share “common ground” conversations with professional peers, discussing current trends, issues, challenges and opportunities, during our popular “Affinity Group” Sessions (Monday, September 21st, 2:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.), including those for: • CEO’s – Organizations with budgets under $500,000 • CEO’s – Organizations with budgets between $501,000 to $1.5 million • CEO’s – Organizations with budgets over $1.5 million • Sponsorship • Municipalities • Tourism Agencies • Arts Events • Parades • Young Professionals (for those 40 and under) • Event Education • Volunteer Programs • Operations Bring your questions and input to these valuable open-topic exchange sessions, scheduled early in the convention program to allow the opportunity to expand your conversations beyond the sessions. (*all sessions are subject to change)

“CRITICAL CONVERSATION” SESSIONS In today’s industry there are a growing number of topics that tend to be discussed far more informally than their very nature requires; perhaps because there are no easy answers; no go-to experts; or just not enough time to engage each one properly. Understanding that we need to start somewhere, the IFEA provides an opportunity to

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discuss, define and explore those topics further, with the goal of broadening our common awareness and defining what tools, resources and steps we (as the representative body for our global industry) may be able to develop, provide or undertake moving forward to help facilitate the growth and evolution of our field. ‘Critical Conversation’ session (Tuesday, September 22nd, 8:00 a.m. – 8:50 a.m.) topics include: • Proper Response: What Role Should/Can Events & Event Leadership Play in Helping to Resolve Community Conflicts • Proactive: Controlling Drug & Substance Abuse at Music Festivals and All Events • Dealing with the Dilemma of Rising City Service Costs

“INSPIRE THE INDUSTRY” LUNCH With the expansion of the convention to a full three days, we are pleased to add a new general session, the “Inspire the Industry Lunch,” with the goal of providing a targeted presentation(s), led by selected industry professionals, with a focus on topical trends, issues or creative inspiration that we can all take home and put to use in our own careers, events and communities. From leadership to technology and everything in-between, the “Inspire the Industry” presentations are sure to do just that. (Wednesday, September 23rd, 11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m.)

(*all sessions are subject to change)

‘OPEN MIC’ SESSIONS In addition to our regular breakout presentations, for those looking for a little more “back and forth” participation, selected educational sessions are designed as ‘Open Mic’ sessions, with defined topical areas that are geared to answering / discussing / debating any questions that may not have been covered or explored in another session. We want to make sure that you go home with the answers you need to be successful. Moderated ‘Open Mic’ sessions (Wednesday, September 23rd, 8:00 a.m.-8:50 a.m.) will include: • • • • •

“There is no better connection to our industry’s global professional network, and the experience and wisdom that lies within, than the IFEA.” - Johan Moerman, Managing Director Rotterdam Festivals, The Netherlands 2012 IFEA Hall of Fame Inductee

Sponsorship/Revenues Operations/Risk Management Media/Marketing Technology City Support

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CELEBRATING SUCCESS AND ACHIEVEMENT

2015

2015

Celebrating and recognizing the outstanding achievements of friends and peers, many whom have started and advanced the critical conversations that have expanded our creative and professional horizons for the last six decades, is a big part of what makes the IFEA Annual Convention both valuable and memorable. As we celebrate our own 60th Anniversary-Edition of the IFEA Convention & Expo we are pleased to continue taking those conversations and possibilities to new levels.

IFEA AWARDS LUNCHEON There are few things that mean more than being recognized by your professional peers. Don’t miss the 2015 IFEA Awards Luncheon (Monday, September 21st), sponsored by Lantis Fireworks & Lasers, as we pause to pay tribute to the people who have made/make our industry great and continue to light the way through their commitment and creativity.

Join your global peers as we: • Recognize our 2015 CFEE (Certified Festival & Event Executive) Graduates, who continue to raise the bar for everyone in our industry (the CFEE Professional Certification Program is sponsored by Kaliff Insurance); • Award the 2015 IFEA / Zambelli Fireworks Volunteer of the Year Award, sponsored by longtime IFEA Partner Zambelli Fireworks, recognizing the contribution of all volunteers to the success of our global events; • Recognize the Recipients of our 2015 IFEA World Festival & Event City Award, sponsored by IFEA Association Endorsed Partner VISA, recognizing outstanding city/event partnerships around the world; and • Pay tribute to our 2015 IFEA Hall of Fame Inductee, the highest honor bestowed in our field, in acknowledgment of their tremendous dedication to and impact on the festivals and events industry. (For more information about all of the above awards go to www.ifea.com.)

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“There is no greater honor than to be recognized by those who understand.” - Jean McFaddin, President McFaddin & Associates, LLC Past producer of the Macy*s Thanksgiving Day Parade for 25 Years 1999 IFEA Hall of Fame Inductee

20th ANNIVERSARY IFEA / HAAS & WILKERSON INSURANCE PINNACLE AWARDS

Join us as we put a memorable cap on the first day of the convention (Monday, September 21st) with the most anticipated event of the year. The IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Insurance Pinnacle Awards, celebrating their 20th Anniversary this year, pays tribute to both creativity and excellence in multiple categories, from marketing to merchandise; operations to sponsorship; all leading up to the presentation of the coveted Grand Pinnacle Award. This is the Academy Awards Ceremony for the festivals and events industry. The IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Insurance Pinnacle Awards, recognizing festival and event excellence for 20 years, are proudly sponsored by IFEA Association Endorsed Partner Haas & Wilkerson Insurance. Don’t miss this unopposed special event as we all wait to hear… “And the Pinnacle Award goes to…” (Note: The IFEA/Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Award final entry deadline is July 20th. For more information go to www.ifea.com.)

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INFORMAL GATHERINGS “The ready access to the best in our business, not only in sessions, but in every hallway, reception, and hospitality suite, is unprecedented. Our Board and Staff look forward to the IFEA Convention each year and consider the IFEA as part of the team that helps ensure our success.” - Bill Flinn Executive Director Pasadena Tournament of Roses One of the best parts of any professional convention is the chance to spend some dedicated time with friends and peers - reconnecting, looking ahead, planning that next great idea, sharing a laugh, a challenge, or a special memory. The IFEA 60th Anniversary Convention & Expo provides plenty of opportunities for those special informal and memorable gatherings and conversations.

IFEA 60th ANNIVERSARY CONVENTION GOLF TOURNAMENT New for our 60th Anniversary, we invite all golfers to be a part of our IFEA 60th Anniversary Convention Golf Tournament. This two person, best-ball scramble tournament will take place at the JW Marriott’s own Starr Pass Golf Club (rated by Condé Nast as a Top 100 Golf Resort), a 27-hole Arnold Palmer Signature Golf Course nestled against the backdrop of Tucson’s natural desert mountain landscape. The tournament will feature 18 challenging holes, combining two different and challenging courses for players of every level; The Roadrunner Course, offering unsurpassed views with dramatic elevation changes and the swirling winds created by the Tucson Mountains, and The Rattler, with a stunning view of Tucson and the surrounding mountain ranges.

dfest ® / DIXIE FLAG EVENT SERVICES TEAM HOSPITALITY SUITE

The dfest ®/ Dixie Flag Event Services Team Hospitality Suite, co-sponsored by long-time IFEA supporter dfest ®, is as much a part of the IFEA Convention as our breakout sessions, and we look forward to extending a warm Tucson welcome to everyone! Open Sunday night (beginning at 6:00 p.m.) to meet up with old friends and new, before dinner, Monday night (beginning at 9:00 p.m.) and Tuesday night (beginning at 10:30 p.m.), the dfest ® Hospitality Suite provides convention attendees with a time and a place to unwind, relax and connect outside of scheduled sessions and functions. Historically, the dfest ® Hospitality Suite is recognized as the hub of the IFEA’s convention networking system

The IFEA Tournament will be held on Sunday, September 20th, the day before the official convention start, beginning with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Registration is $125 per player and includes greens fee, golf cart, complimentary use of the driving range, on-course contests, non-alcoholic on-course beverages and lunch following the tournament. (Note: Rental clubs are available by contacting the Starr Pass Golf Club.)

To register, send the IFEA 60th Anniversary Convention Golf Tournament Entry Form in this brochure to the address on the form. Questions? Contact Jeff Curtis at JeffC@rosefestival.org. (Note: If enough players do not register for the tournament, individual tee times will be arranged.)

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“CONNECTIONS CAFÉ”

“Connections Café is the center of IFEA daytime gatherings and conversations. Located in the Arizona Ballroom Foyer, “Connections Café” is open every day throughout the convention, providing coffee and a relaxing atmosphere conducive to doing business one-on-one or simply catching up with friends. Promoting human connections – while cyber ones are accessible too - this comfortable venue is always a popular hang-out, providing the perfect venue for strengthening those personal connections that are so important to everyone’s success.

“TUCSON TRACKS”

(Create Your Own Uniquely Tucson Experience with Our FEATSAZ Hosts) Everyone is invited to join our local Tucson friends and peers, representing FEATSAZ (Festival & Events Association of Tucson and Southern Arizona), for a uniquely Tucson experience on Monday evening (September 21st). IFEA shuttles will get you to one of the fastest growing urban areas in the country, where you’ll have the opportunity to pick a ‘Tucson Track’ along the new Sun Link Streetcar route and join our local hosts for dinner and drinks at a selection of their favorite hangouts! Maybe you’ll choose 4th Avenue, home of the ‘Fourth Avenue Street Fair’ and Tucson’s most eclectic shopping district; Downtown, the city’s cultural hub, with theaters, live music venues, museums and a fascinating history; Presidio, with its colorful adobe row houses and narrow streets, Old Town Artisans, and the oldest Mexican restaurant in the country; Main Gate Square, a pedestrian-friendly dining and shopping destination adjacent to The University of Arizona and energized with the vibe of a university environment; or maybe you’ll choose to do a progressive visit to them all!

ONE ON ONE OPPORTUNITIES The IFEA 60th Anniversary Convention & Expo offers all attendees the unique opportunity, in one place and at one time, to be exposed to global industry leaders from festivals and events, large and small; tourism organizations; corporate and media representatives; cities and municipalities; academic institutions and more.

Who Will You Meet at the IFEA Convention? • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Seasoned Festival & Event Professionals Those New to the Festivals & Events Industry Festival & Event Board Members City Leadership Key Volunteers Festival & Event Sponsors/Sponsorship Agencies Suppliers to the Festivals & Events Industry Industry Consultants The Creative Sparks Behind IFEA Award-Winning Events & Cities Tourism Organizations, CVBs, and Chambers of Commerce Parks & Recreation Staff Educational Institutions/Faculty/Students Media Representatives Representatives from Allied Associations Professional ‘Experience Management’ Peers from Around the World All those with an Interest/Stake in the Festivals & Events Field

Start building and adding to your professional network today.

(Note: Dinner and Sun Link tickets are on your own for this open evening on the town. Routes and restaurants will be determined by our local Tucson friends.)

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IFEA EXPO: Celebrating 60 Years of Creative Partnerships Between Events and Industry Suppliers “Personal relationships are the most important key to good business. You can buy mailing lists; you can’t buy friendships. And the most valuable personal relationships are best built face-to-face. For 60 years the IFEA has been bringing our industry together face-to-face.” Pete Van de Putte, CFEE CEO Dfest ® / Dixie Flag Event Services Team 2011 IFEA Hall of Fame Inductee

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The most successful festivals and events in our industry share an important commonality; an understanding that the suppliers and vendors who support our industry are a critical part of keeping our events innovative, fresh, dynamic and part of the ‘leading edge’. They are one of our most committed stakeholders. They share their experience and skills with us, help us to meet new challenges with cost-effective solutions, and partner with us to turn our creative ideas and visions into successful realities. They help us to elevate the event experience for our attendees and our communities. The IFEA Expo trade show is one of the most important components of our convention. Geared specifically to festival and event innovators and decision-makers, the IFEA Expo features the most creative and leading edge ideas, products and services for all things imaginable, including: merchandise, insurance, giant parade inflatables, parade floats, children’s performers, food and beverage products, cash management services, marketing and web support, fencing, sponsor gifts, decorations, security, fireworks, lasers, university programs, face-painting, sand sculptures, portable restrooms, bleachers, entertainment and attractions, ticket control, confetti cannons, generators, tents, awards, radios, printing needs, sponsorship software and services; photography, publications, costumed mascots, staging, lights and sound, and much, much, more; usually at special convention pricing! Bring your list, your creativity, and your challenges and you will find many of the answers you are looking for at the IFEA Expo!

The IFEA Expo will be open on Tuesday, September 22nd, from 11:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and is divided into three main segments: • Expo Viewing and Lunch: 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. with lunch served from 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Whether you are hungry for ideas or hungry for lunch, the IFEA Expo trade show will fulfill both needs! (Unopposed by any other sessions); • Expo Viewing and Exhibitor Meetings: 2:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Don’t like the rush of the crowd? This is the perfect time to set up a one-on-one meeting with selected vendors to discuss your needs and visions in more detail. Pre-schedule your meetings ahead of the convention to maximize your time (Note: Vendor contact information can be found through our online Virtual Trade Show) or simply ask any vendor on the trade show floor what works best for them. • Expo Viewing and Happy Hour: 5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. with drinks and snacks available. Time to close your best deal and toast to your new partnerships! (Unopposed by any other sessions). Summer 2015

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RAISE THE BAR

Pre-Convention Education Opportunities

International Festivals & Events Association

Sponsored by Kaliff Insurance the IFEA’s Certified Festival & Event Executive (CFEE) FastTrack© program allows festival and event industry professionals to complete their professional certification and all required program components in one year and at special pricing that represents a substantial savings over class-by-class scheduling. CFEE classes, a required component toward the achievement of professional certification, are taught by leading professionals in our field and are open to all who desire to attend. Three of the six required core curriculum classes are offered each year leading into the convention on a rotating basis. New 2015 CFEE participants can potentially complete all of their required classes, electives, and written/speaking obligations in time to receive their CFEE Professional Certification at the 2016 Convention! And those who started in 2014 may be receiving yours in Tucson! (Note: Those completing all six CFEE core curriculum classes will receive a CFEA (Certified Festival & Event Associate) Certificate recognizing your educational accomplishment.

The IFEA Academy of Event Education Certifies that

Has Earned the Designation of

Attesting to successful completion of the required program of study, thereby reflecting a professional knowledge and philosophy of festival and special events management.

Steven Wood Schmader, CFEE, President & CEO, International Festivals & Events Association

CFEE FastTrack© PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION CLASSES

Cindy Lerick, Chair, International Festivals & Events Association

Date

Professional Certification Program Sponsored by Kaliff Insurance.

“Never stop raising the bar. The future belongs to those who continue to grow their knowledge base, expand their professional network, and stretch new boundaries of creativity.” - Jim Holt, CFEE President & CEO Memphis in May International Festival

THE 2015 FULL-DAY CFEE SEMINARS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING: Sponsorship/Sponsorship Service

Administration/Management

Friday, September 18, 2015 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Sunday, September 20, 2015 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Over the past generation the sponsorship of festivals and special events has evolved from the quasi-donation of money by a local business to a sophisticated marketing relationship involving the exchange of mutual value. The development of a comprehensive sponsorship plan and successful fulfillment program involves the coordination of numerous details and the working knowledge of a variety of factors. This area of instruction is designed to provide information about the fundamentals of sponsorship.

Using the development of a model business plan as a guide, these sessions will explore and reveal the process by which successful administration and management programs are developed. Session attendees will explore the ins and outs of managing a board of directors, building an effective leadership and administration team, identifying budget targets and making them work, establishing marketing plans, identifying competition and establishing a business paradigm that will give more, “gravitas,” to an event-producing organization.

Presented by Bruce Erley, CFEE, APR, President/CEO, Creative Strategies Group, Denver CO

Marketing/Media Relations Saturday, September 19, 2015 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. A strong marketing vision, direction, and ultimately a plan is essential in successful promotion of any company’s products or services. This area of instruction is designed to look at and provide an overview of marketing and media relations and specifically how these functions can be used to the unique needs of the festival and special events industry.

Presented by Penny McBride, CFEE, President & CEO, Fredericksburg Chamber of Commerce, Fredericksburg, TX Note: For a full class synopsis or overview of CFEE program requirements go to www. ifea.com. Registration for CFEE FastTrack Courses are separate from the IFEA’s 60th Anniversary Convention Registration, but can be done using the same form. Please contact Leslie McFarlane at +1-208-433-0950 Ext: 812 or leslie@ifea.com. Note: All IFEA training session topics and presenters are subject to change.

Presented by Becky Genoways, CFEE, President, Genoways Events; Program Specialist Contractor, Memphis in May International Festival, Memphis, TN 70

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Sponsored by


We’re Calling“IFEA Foundation

You Out! Join the IFEA Foundation as we step back in time in the old west town made famous as the location for more than 300 movies and TV shows! Put on your favorite western wear for an evening of rowdy, gun-fightin’ cowboys, striking can-can girls with skirts-a-shakin’ and a scenic ride on the CP Huntington Train around the perimeter of Old Tucson. You’ll get to tour the town’s movie-making hot spots and view movie memorabilia that is certain to bring back a favorite film, scene or actor! As time allows, you may want to browse through McLintock’s General Store for hats, artwork and other cowboy nostalgia. Then it’s onward to dinner and the very popular IFEA Foundation Auction at the Grand Palace Saloon and Rosa’s Cantina, where an amazing selection of one-of-a-kind, untouchable packages, including travel, products, dining, services, VIP Event Experience opportunities, and much more just arrived on the afternoon Stagecoach. This is your chance to get some great bargains – for you, your event, or the folks back home on the ranch - while supporting a great cause! Both Silent

for an ble Unforgetta

Night Party” and Auctisoonn at Old Tuc

and Live Auction items offer a way for everyone to be a part of the IFEA Foundation’s largest annual fund-raiser in support of the educational programs of the IFEA throughout the year and into the future! Careful the Sheriff doesn’t pick you out as a low-biddin’ varmint or you could be spendin’ some time behind bars in the Old Tucson jail! Special entertainment, music and a 60th Anniversary IFEA fireworks spectacular (sponsored by Lantis Fireworks & Lasers) at the famous Old Tucson Mission set, will send you home with a saddle bag full of memories! Best of all, the “IFEA Foundation Night Party and Auction at Old Tucson” is included at no extra charge as part of your convention registration! So mark your calendar and plan to be there! Note: The IFEA Foundation encourages you and/or your event/organization to donate a special item, experience package, travel opportunity, or product / service / dining package to be included in the IFEA Foundation Auction. Help support the IFEA’s educational mission and the future of our industry along with your professional peers from around the world. For more information call +1-208-433-0950 and talk to any IFEA staff member or go to the Foundation section of the IFEA home page at www.ifea.com.

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RETURN-ON-INVESTMENT We are so sure you will return home from the IFEA 60th Anniversary Convention & Expo with at least one idea, approach, relationship, or renewed energy and enthusiasm, that is worth at least the value of attending (and you actually did attend), that we are willing to guarantee a return on your investment. If not, you can write to us (with a “cc” to your board) explaining how you did not receive a return on your investment and we will refund your full registration fee..

There is no higher value available in our industry today than the IFEA Convention & Expo. Convention registration provides you with the following all-inclusive benefits: All Educational Breakout, Affinity Group, Critical Conversation and Open Mic sessions; the Convention Opening & Keynote Presentation; our Closing Keynote Presentation; the IFEA Awards Luncheon; the IFEA/Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards presentation; the IFEA Expo (including Lunch and Happy Hour Reception); the Inspire the Industry Lunch, the IFEA Foundation Night Party & Auction at Old Tucson; the dfest ®(Dixie Flag Event Services Team) Hospitality Suite; Connections Café/Coffee Breaks; Convention Program Book; Session Handouts; and much more. Note: Professional Certification (CFEE) courses prior to the official start of the convention are optional and require a separate registration. To avoid multiple registration processes, those interested in attending any of these may simply fill out the appropriate spaces on your convention registration form.

CONVENTION SCHOLARSHIPS “The National Cherry Blossom Festival was present at the very first meeting of the IFEA and continues that involvement as we celebrate the organization’s 60th anniversary. There are very few partnerships where the return-on-investment can be so easily justified over six decades. The IFEA is the clear leader in our field when it comes to professional networking, resources, education and representation.” Diana Mayhew, CFEE President National Cherry Blossom The IFEA understands that Return-On-Investment (ROI) is and should be a primary consideration of every leader – events, sponsors, municipalities, tourism organizations and others. With that at the forefront of our minds and conversations, we have designed the 60th Anniversary IFEA Convention & Expo to provide the highest level of return possible, from every angle – time, resources, information, creativity and access to the strongest network of professionals in our global industry. Whether you are a first-time or a long-time IFEA Convention & Expo attendee, it won’t be difficult to recognize the virtually limitless opportunities provided through professional conversations and networking; our all-inclusive registration, with no separately-ticketed events; our unique and easily accessible Tucson, Arizona location; amazing hotel values at the AAA 4-Diamond JW Marriott Tucson Starr Pass Resort & Spa; convenient access to professional certification courses prior to the official start of the convention (as your schedule may allow); and much more, including a cornucopia of educational sessions, discussion groups, and ready access to IFEA Expo vendors and suppliers, convention speakers and other global industry leaders who, together, are the foundation of the IFEA experience and the core of our global industry conversation. 72

IFEA’s ie: the business of international events

Since its’ founding in 1993 the IFEA Foundation has provided scholarship assistance to over 250 students, new professionals and financially challenged events, allowing them to attend the annual IFEA Convention, CFEE programs, and other special programs. Scholarship recipients are able to return home with new ideas, information and motivation to take their own events and careers to the next level.

Eighteen IFEA Foundation Legacy Scholarships are available each year to those who meet the qualified criteria. If you are interested in applying for an IFEA Foundation scholarship, more information and applications are available in the Foundation section of the IFEA home page at www.ifea.com. Application deadline for Legacy Scholarships Summer 2015is Friday, July 31st, 2015.


60th Annual Convention & Expo - Schedule At-A-Glance TIME

Fri., Sept. 18

Sat., Sept. 19

Sun., Sept. 20

Mon., Sept. 21

7:00 a.m. 7:30 a.m. 8:00 a.m. 8:30 a.m.

CFEE FastTrack© Breakfast

CFEE FastTrack© Breakfast

Tue., Sept. 22

Wed., Sept. 23

Trade Show Set-Up AM

Trade Show Tear Down AM

Educational Sessions

Educational Sessions

CFEE FastTrack© Breakfast

9:00 a.m. 9:30 a.m. 10:00 a.m. 10:30 a.m.

CFEE FastTrack© Class

CFEE FastTrack© Class

CFEE FastTrack© Class

Convention Opening & Keynote Speaker

11:00 a.m. Educational Sessions

11:30 a.m. 12:00 p.m. 12:30 p.m.

Lunch on Own

Lunch on Own

Lunch on Own IFEA Awards Luncheon

1:00 p.m. 1:30 p.m.

IFEA Expo Trade Show and Lunch

(Expo Continues through Educational Sessions)

‘Inspire the Industry’ (Box Lunch)

2:00 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 3:00 p.m.

CFEE FastTrack Class

©

CFEE FastTrack Class

©

CFEE FastTrack Class

©

Educational Sessions

Affinity Group Sessions Educational Sessions

3:30 p.m. 4:00 p.m. 4:30 p.m. First-Timer’s Convention Compass Session

5:00 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m.

Board Busses

6:30 p.m.

8:00 p.m.

Attendee Free Evening

Attendee Free Evening

Hospitality Suite Happy Hour Welcome

‘Tucson Tracks’ Attendee Free Evening IFEA Foundation Party & Auction

8:30 p.m. 9:00 p.m.

Attendee Free Evening

9:30 p.m. 10:00 p.m.

Departure or Free Time

dfest® Hospitality Suite

10:30 p.m. EDUCATION

IFEA Expo Trade Show Happy Hour Reception Board Busses

dfest®

7:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m.

Closing Session and Speaker

IFEA/Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards

dfest® Hospitality Suite NETWORKING/SOCIAL

CONTINUING EDUCATION

FREE TIME

* Connections Cafe is open all day during the convention hours for coffee breaks and networking.

AWARDS PROGRAMS

EXPO TRADE SHOW


IFEA 60th Anniversay Convention & Expo

September 21, 22, 23, 2015 • Tucson, AZ - U.S.A.

HOTEL INFORMATION: The JW Marriott Tucson Starr Pass in Tucson, Arizona, U.S.A. will serve as the headquarters for the IFEA Annual Convention. By staying at the IFEA designated hotel, you help us to keep our other convention costs down. For hotel reservation information, go to: www.ifea.com and select the 60th Annual Convention button on the front page for more information. Once registered, you will receive an email confirmation of your paid convention registration.

1. AFFILIATION Please submit one form for each attendee, payment may be combined. Organization: _________________________________________________________________________________ Promo Code: ________________ Name: _______________________________________________________________ Name for Badge: _____________________________________ Position Title: _________________________________________________________ First IFEA Convention

Yes

No

Address: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City, State/Province, Zip Code: __________________________________________ Country: ___________________________________________ Phone: _______________________________________________________________ E-mail: _____________________________________________ • For membership information please contact Beth Petersen at beth@ifea.com or +1-208-433-0950 ext. 816. 2. REGISTRATION FEES IFEA (Please submit all monies in U.S. Dollars only.)

IFEA Member Non-Member Special Early Bird Rate – 1st Attendee (By July 21st, 2015) $695 $895 $ ___________ 1st Attendee Rate (between July 22nd - September 11th, 2015) $795 $995 $ ___________ 1st Attendee Rate (after September 11th, 2015) $895 $1095 $ ___________ 2nd, 3rd, 4th Attendee (Same Organization) (Fill Out Attendee Info page 2) Qty. _____ x $595 each $795 each $ ___________ 5th Attendee or More (Same Organization) (Fill Out Attendee Info page 2) Qty. _____ x $495 each $695 each $ ___________ Full Time Student (Current Class Schedule Required) $345 each $545 each $ ___________ Qualified Volunteer (Contact IFEA for Definition) $345 each $545 each $ ___________ Spouse/Guest (Social Activities Only) $345 each $545 $ ___________ REGISTRATION FEES INCLUDE: All Educational Sessions during the main convention; All Coffee Breaks at Connections Cafe; Entrance to the dfest® Hospitality Suite; Entrance to the IFEA Awards Luncheon & Pinnacle Awards Presentation; Entrance to the IFEA Expo in addition to the Lunch and Happy Hour at the Expo; IFEA Foundation Auction Night Event; Industry Luncheon on final day; and IFEA Convention Program Book & Convention Attendee List.

3. PRE-CONVENTION ADDITIONAL EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES (Seminars and speakers subject to change.)

CFEE FastTrack© – September 18th, 19th, 20th: $500 $865 $ ___________ FastTrack© Registration Fee Includes All 6 Required Core Curriculum Courses. Days 1, 2, 3 Offered During the 60th Annual Convention & Expo. Days 4, 5, 6 to be Offered During the 61st Annual Convention & Expo. (If completing the second phase of the Convention Fast Track, contact clerick@culturalfestivals.com) Individual CFEE Day Registration: CFEE Seminar Day 1 – Friday, September 18th: $175 $335 $ ___________ Sponsorship/Sponsorship Service CFEE Seminar Day 2 – Saturday, September 19th: $175 $335 $ ___________ Marketing/Media Relations CFEE Seminar Day 3 – Sunday, September 20th: $175 $335 $ ___________ Administration/Management CFEE (Enrollment Fee) $200 $350 $ ___________ If starting the CFEE Program, this fee must be paid in addition to the FastTrack© Registration Fee. Final CFEE (Certification Fee) $250 $350 $ ___________ If finishing the CFEE Program and graduating at this years convention, this fee must be paid. (Must be an IFEA Member to Graduate.) 4. IFEA 60th ANNUAL CONVENTION & EXPO COLLECTORS LAPEL PIN Purchase your IFEA 60th Annual Convention Collectors Lapel Pin Qty. _____ x By purchasing a pin you will be entered into the ‘50/50 Raffle’ drawing at the IFEA Foundation Night Party & Auction.

$10

$10

$ ___________

TOTAL amount enclosed: $ ___________

5. PAYMENT: All fees are payable in U.S. Funds. Your registration form CANNOT be processed until payment is received. To ensure that you are pre-registered for the 60th IFEA Annual Conference & Expo, return your signed registration form with full payment by Tuesday, September 1st, 2015. After that, please call Leslie McFarlane to make sure your registration has been received at +1-208-433-0950 ext: *812. Select method of payment:

VISA

MasterCard

American Express

Discover

Check (make check payable to IFEA)

Print Cardholder Name: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Signature: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Credit Card Number:________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Expiration Date: _____________________________________________ CVN Code: __________________ (MC/Visa-3 digit code back) (AMX-4 digit code front) 6. CANCELLATION POLICY: Full refunds will be provided for cancellations made prior to 5 p.m. (Mountain Time), Fri., Sept. 4th, 2015. A 50% refund will be provided for cancellations made between 5 p.m. (MT), Fri., Sept. 4th, 2015 and 5 p.m. (MT) Fri., Sept. 11th, 2015. After 5 p.m. (MT), Fri., Sept. 11th, 2015, there will be no refunds or cancellations made. Please contact Leslie McFarlane for questions or cancellations (leslie@ifea.com or call +1-208-433-0950, Ext. *812). Fax: +1-208-433-9812 • Mail: 2603 W. Eastover Terrace, Boise, ID 83706, U.S.A. • Phone: +1-208-433-0950


International Festivals & Events Association

IFEA World

60th ANNIVERSARY CONVENTION

R U

O

E

N

INCLUDES:

T

T

GOL F NAM • 18 Holes of Golf with Cart • Complimentary Use of Driving Range • Lunch Following the Tournament

REGISTRATION: $125 PER PLAYER $250 PER TWO PERSON SCRAMBLE

• Non-Alcoholic Beverages on Course • On-Course Contests

TWO-PERSON BEST BALL SCRAMBLE

Sunday September 20th, 2015 • 8:30 A.M. Shotgun Start REGISTRATION FORM Name:________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Mailing Address:__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City, State/Province, Zip Code: __________________________________________________ Country: _________________________________________________ Cell Phone:________________________________________________ E-mail: ________________________ __________________________________________ Fax:_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Scramble Teammate Name (if applicable):__________________________________________________________________________________________________ PAYMENT INFORMATION _______ GOLFER (s) $125 each or _______ SCRAMBLE TEAM OF TWO $250 per team Select method of payment:

VISA

MasterCard

American Express

Discover

TOTAL PAYMENT $ __________________ Check (make check payable to IFEA in U.S. funds)

Print Cardholder Name: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Signature: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Credit Card Number: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Expiration Date: _______________________________________________

CVN Code: _______________________ (MC/Visa-3 digit code back) (AMX-4 digit code front)

Checks must be made to IFEA. Please send completed form and payment to: IFEA • 2603 W Eastover Terrace • Boise, ID 83706 • Email: leslie@ifea.com • Phone: +1-208-433-0950 • Fax: +1-208-433-9812


ASSOCIATION ENDORSED PARTNERS

ASSOCIATION SPONSORS

ASSOCIATION SUPPORTERS

CONVENTION PARTNERS 速

For IFEA sponsorship opportunities, contact Sylvia Allen, Associate Director of Sales at (732) 946-2711 or sylvia@ifea.com


International Festivals & Events Association

IFEA WORLD

IFEA’s 60th ANNIVERSARY EXPO

Tuesday, September 22, 2015 • 11:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m Part of the IFEA 60th Anniversary Convention Presented by Haas & Wilkerson Insurance September 21-23, 2015

JW Marriott Tucson St arr Pass Resort & Spa

TUCSON, AR IZONA, U.S.A. Summer 2015

IFEA’s ie: the business of international events 77


YOU BE th AT THE IFEA 60 ANNIVERSARY

WHY SHOU LD

CONVENTION & IN

TUCSON , ARIZONA?

EXPO 2015 78

EXPO

IFEAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ie: the business of international events

THIS IS YOUR TARGET MARKET: Meet the festivals and events (of all sizes), host cities, tourism organizations, sponsors, and academics who are the core of our industry. IFEA attendees are the key decision-makers for their events and organizations or carry substantial influence with those who are. STAND OUT FROM THE PACK: The IFEA Expo allows you to stand out from the competition. Being present is half the battle. GET ON THE SAME PROFESSIONAL PAGE: Participate in the entire IFEA convention; learn about the trends, issues, challenges and opportunities of your target market so that you can help them to understand how your product/service might benefit them directly; or design new products/services that do. SHOWCASE NEW IDEAS: IFEA attendees are always looking for new ideas that will help to keep their events fresh and exciting. The Expo is the place to showcase your latest and greatest products/services.

Presented by

Summer 2015

BUILD YOUR PROFESSIONAL NETWORK: Future successes and business are built upon the network that you build today. The leaders of our industry are never more accessible than they are at the IFEA Convention & Expo.


2015 IFEA EXPO PACKAGES EXHIBITOR PACKAGE:

$895 IFEA MEMBERS

Package Includes: • 8’x10’ Booth space • Exhibitor listing in IFEA Annual Convention & Expo Program • Inclusion on IFEA’s Virtual Online Trade Show with link to your website • Pre-Convention & Post Convention Mailing Lists • IFEA Expo Lunch & Happy Hour Reception

• Entrance to the dfest®/ Dixie Flag Event Services Team Hospitality Suite • Entrance to the IFEA Foundation Night Party & Auction • IFEA Convention Program Book • Exhibitor Communications, Updates and Tips from the IFEA

1 Day, 1 Exhibitor Participant and Booth

EXHIBITOR SPOTLIGHT ADVERTISING PACKAGE:

1 Day, 1 Exhibitor Participant, Booth and Advertising

$1,495 IFEA MEMBERS

$1,195 NON-IFEA MEMBERS

$1,795 NON-IFEA MEMBERS

(Limited Packages Available)

Package Includes: All items listed within IFEA Exhibitor Package, plus: • Full Page B&W Advertisement in IFEA Annual Convention & Expo Program Book ($645/$775 value) • Full Page Exhibitor Spotlight feature in IFEA’s “ie” Magazine. ($1,000 value) (Based on IFEA Questionnaire which will be provided upon sign-up.) Exhibitor Spotlight feature will be included within “ie” Magazine in one of the remaining issues in 2015 (August or November). Exhibitor is responsible for submitting requested information for

EXHIBITOR CONVENTION PACKAGE:

3 Day, 1 Exhibitor Participant, Booth and Convention Registration Package Includes: All items listed within IFEA Exhibitor Package, plus: • Full Registration to the IFEA 60th Anniversary Convention • All Educational Sessions during the main convention • Convention Opening & Keynote Speaker • All Coffee Breaks at Connections Café • Entrance to the dfest®/ Dixie Flag Event Services Team Hospitality Suite

FULL EXPERIENCE PACKAGE:

3 Day, 1 Exhibitor Participant, Booth, Advertising and Convention Registration Package Includes: All items listed within: Some items may be duplicated within packages – only one of each is provided per registered exhibitor.

EXHIBITOR PACKAGE ADD-ON ITEMS: Additional Convention Registration Includes all items in Convention Registration

Additional 1 Day Booth Worker

Includes meals and social activities for the day of the Expo

Prime Booth Location Attendee Bag Inserts Advertising & Marketing Opportunities

Spotlight by issue deadlines (August 10, 2015 or November 9, 2015.) If not received by these dates, this specific benefit for this package will be forfeited and is non-refundable.

• Exhibitor Spotlight Listing in IFEA Annual Convention & Expo Program

(company name, logo, overview (150 words or less), contact information, and highlighted booth numbers)

• Exhibitor Spotlight Listing in the IFEA Update Newsletter (company logo, tagline and link to your website)

$1,495 IFEA MEMBERS

$1,795 NON-IFEA MEMBERS

• Entrance to the IFEA Awards Luncheon • Entrance to the IFEA/Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards Presentation • Entrance to the IFEA Foundation Night Party & Auction • IFEA 60th Anniversary Convention & Expo collectors lapel pin • ‘Inspire the Industry’ Presentations Lunch • Closing Session & Speaker

$1,995 IFEA MEMBERS

$2,195 NON-IFEA MEMBERS

• IFEA Exhibitor Package • IFEA Exhibitor Spotlight Advertising Package • IFEA Exhibitor Convention Package

IFEA MEMBERS

NON-IFEA MEMBERS

$495

$695

$150

$250

$175 $495

$275 $795

Please see 2015 Advertising & Marketing Opportunities

Summer 2015

IFEA’s ie: the business of international events 79


EXPO DATES & TIMES Load In Tuesday, September 22, 2015 7:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. EXPO HOURS Tuesday, September 22, 2015 11:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. Expo Lunch: 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Whether you are hungry for ideas or hungry for lunch, the IFEA Expo trade show will fulfill both needs! Unopposed by any other sessions, this is your time to introduce your product or service to your fellow convention attendees for the first time. Meet someone you’d like to continue the conversation with? Invite them to return during the Exhibitor Meeting time for a more in-depth conversation. Exhibitor Meetings: 1:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Instead of closing your booth down during the educational sessions, use this time to make a deeper impact with potential buyers. Fill this time with one-on-one meetings and take the conversation more in-depth. Whether you pre-schedule your appointments or make them at the show, this open time gives you the added value to make the connections you want to further your business partnerships. Expo Happy Hour: 5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Celebrate a sale, continue the conversations, share a beverage with old friends - unopposed by other sessions, the ‘Expo Happy Hour,’ is the perfect end to a successful Expo.

BOOTH SPECIFICS AND DETAILS • Standard booth packages start at $895 for IFEA Members ($1,195 for Non-IFEA Members) for a 1 Day Exhibitor Package (1 day, 1 employee manned booth). Additional packages and custom options are available to meet exhibitor’s individual needs. • All booths will be 8’x10’ in size, equipped with 8’ back wall drape, 3’ side dividers and a booth identification sign with booth number. • Exhibitors requiring additional items (furniture/electrical etc.) may order/purchase from the Expo Service Company. The Service Company’s detailed package will be sent to all registered exhibitors 3 months prior to the IFEA Expo. • IFEA Exhibitors are required to furnish a certificate of insurance to IFEA prior to occupancy. Coverage must be for General Liability with a combined single limit of $1,000,000. • Live entertainment and demonstrations, while encouraged, shall not disturb adjacent exhibitors and their patrons. Musical instruments and P.A. systems may not be used in the exhibit hall. • Booth selection will be done on a first-come, first served basis. • Payment in full must be received with registration form.

TO RESERVE YOUR EXHIBIT SPACE, PLEASE CONTACT:

80

IFEA’s ie: the business of international events

Nicole Collins Director of Sales & Expo p. +208-433-0950 ext 815 f. +1-208-433-9812 e. nicole@ifea.com

Summer 2015

Sylvia Allen Associate Director of Sales p. +1-732-946-2711 f. +1-208-433-9812 e. sylvia@ifea.com


IFEA’s 60 th ANNIVERSARY EXPO BOOTH REGISTRATION FORM

JW Marriott Tucson Starr Pass Resort & Spa Tucson, Arizona, USA, September 22, 2015

(Part of the IFEA 60th Anniversary Convention, September 21-23, 2015)

EXHIBITOR: _______________________________________________________________________________________________ MEMBER

NON-MEMBER

EXHIBITOR PACKAGE

❍ $895

❍ $1,195

x _________ Booths $ ______________

EXHIBITOR SPOTLIGHT ADVERTISING PACKAGE

❍ $1,495

❍ $1,795

x _________ Booths $ ______________

EXHIBITOR CONVENTION PACKAGE

❍ $1,495

❍ $1,795

x _________ Booths $ ______________

FULL EXPERIENCE PACKAGE

❍ $1,995

❍ $2,195

x _________ Booths $ ______________

Additional Convention Registration

❍ $495

❍ $695

x ____ Registrations $ ______________

Additional 1 Day Booth Worker

❍ $150

❍ $250

x ________ Workers $ ______________

Prime Booth Location

❍ $175

❍ $275

x _________ Booths $ ______________

Attendee Bag Inserts

❍ $495

❍ $795

$ ______________

EXHIBITOR PACKAGE ADD-ON ITEMS: Includes all items in Convention Registration

Includes meals and social activities for the day of the Expo

All prices are in U.S. Dollars

TOTAL $ ______________

EXPO DATES & TIMES EXPO LOAD IN Tuesday, September 22, 2015 7:00 a.m.- 10:30 a.m.

EXPO HOURS Tuesday, September 22, 2015 11:00 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Expo Lunch: 12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. Exhibitor Meetings: 1:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Expo Happy Hour: 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

EXPO LOAD OUT Wednesday, September 23, 2015 7:00 a.m.- 9:00 a.m.

EXHIBITOR CATEGORIES All paid 2015 exhibitors will receive a complimentary line listing in IFEA’s Convention & Expo Program and on-line at www.ifea.com. Please complete “Program Listing” of product or service below. Check up to five general categories within which you’d like your company name to appear. Fill in up to five categories: ❍ Attractions ❍ Audio/Visual Equipment ❍ Banners/Flags ❍ Barricades ❍ Communications ❍ Concession/Catering ❍ Consulting ❍ Crowd Management ❍ Décor/Displays/Backdrops ❍ Entertainment/Talent

❍ Equipment Rental ❍ Event Management Software ❍ Event Supplies ❍ Event Support Services ❍ Financial ❍ Fireworks ❍ Fundraising ❍ Graphics ❍ Inflatables ❍ Insurance ❍ Internet

❍ Lasers ❍ Lighting ❍ Marketing ❍ Merchandising ❍ Mobile Apps/Storage ❍ Novelties ❍ Performing Artist ❍ Pins/Emblems ❍ Portable Fence ❍ Printing ❍ Production Company

❍ Restrooms ❍ Screen Print/Embroidery ❍ Special Effects ❍ Sponsorship ❍ Staging ❍ Temporary Credit Card ❍ Tents ❍ Ticketing/Wristbands ❍ Tokens ❍ Weather Monitoring ❍ Other___________________

PROGRAM LISTINGS Company Description (25 words or less) _____________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ To make a reservation or for more information please contact: Nicole Collins, Director of Sales & Expo Sylvia Allen, Associate Director of Sales Phone: +208-433-0950 ext 815 • Fax: +1-208-433-9812 • Email: nicole@ifea.com Phone: +1-732-946-2711 • Fax: +1-208-433-9812 • Email: sylvia@ifea.com International Festivals & Events Association • 2603 W. Eastover Terrace • Boise, ID 83706 • USA • Phone: +1-208-433-0950 • Fax: +1-208-433-9812 • www.ifea.com


IFEA’s 60 th ANNIVERSARY EXPO BOOTH REGISTRATION FORM

JW Marriott Tucson Starr Pass Resort & Spa Tucson, Arizona, USA, September 22, 2015

(Part of the IFEA 60th Anniversary Convention, September 21-23, 2015)

COMPLETE THIS FORM AND E-MAIL, MAIL OR FAX TO THE IFEA. List how you would like your organization to appear in the convention program and online: Exhibitor Name: _______________________________________ First Name for Badge: __________________________________ Title: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Company/Organization: _______________________________________________________________________________________ Address: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ City: ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ State/Province: ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Zip Code: ____________________________________________ Country: ______________________________________________ Phone:_______________________________________________ Fax:__________________________________________________ E-mail: _______________________________________________

Website: _____________________________________________

Additional Booth Worker: _______________________________ First Name for Badge: __________________________________ Title: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Additional Booth Worker: _______________________________ First Name for Badge: __________________________________ Title: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Contact information if different from above for all correspondence: ❍ SAME AS ABOVE Contact Name:_______________________________________________________________________________________________ Address: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ City: _________________________________________________ State/Prov.: ___________________________________________ Zip/Postal Code: ______________________________________ Country: ______________________________________________ Phone:_______________________________________________ Fax:__________________________________________________ E-mail: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Booth selection will be done on a first-come, first served basis. Payment in full must be received with registration form. ❍ TOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED $ ___________________________________ SELECT METHOD OF PAYMENT: ❍ VISA ❍ MasterCard ❍ American Express ❍ Discover ❍ Check (make check payable to IFEA in U.S. funds) Print Cardholder Name: _______________________________________________________________________________________ Signature: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Credit Card Number:__________________________________________________________________________________________ Expiration Date: _______________________________________ CVN Code: __________(MC/Visa-3 digit code back) (AMX-4 digit code front) ❍ I have read the rules and regulations below and agree to abide by them as a condition of participation. Liability: Applicant exhibits at his/her own risk. Neither International Festivals & Events Association, Inc., nor its employees, and/or its agents, either jointly or individually, is responsible for liability insurance coverage for bodily injury and property damage for Exhibitor's operation. Tradeshow participants are required to furnish to International Festivals & Events Association prior to occupancy a certificate of insurance. The coverage must be for General Liability with a combined single limit of $1,000,000. All insurance must be on an occurrence policy and must include International Festivals & Events Association as an additional insured. Neither IFEA nor its employees, and/or its agents, either jointly or individually, is responsible for any injury to exhibitors, their employees, guests or visitors within the confines of the space contracted by the exhibitor even if such injury is caused, or alleged to be caused, in whole or in part by the negligence of IFEA, its employees, agents or volunteers. The exhibitor assumes the entire responsibility and liability for losses, damages, and claims arising out of exhibitor’s activities on the Hotel premises and will indemnify, defend, and hold harmless the Hotel, its owner, and its management company, as well as their respective agents, servants, and employees from any and all such losses, damages, and claims. Acts of God: IFEA shall not have any liability whatsoever for any damage to any person, matter or thing resulting from storm, wind or water, or other acts of God, nor from fire, strikes or lockouts. If the exhibitor's show space has not been made available to the exhibitor for more than one 24 hour period by reasons of acts of God or from fire, then IFEA (promoter) shall return to the exhibitor payment made by deducting where from Promoter expenses occurred to that date. Character of Exhibits: IFEA reserves the right to request the removal of any items, which in its sole judgment do not conform to show guidelines. Failure to comply is just cause for removal of an exhibitor from the show. Payment Policy: All fees must be paid in full with this signed registration form. Cancellation Policy: Fees are non-refundable. Confirmation: Complete shipping and setup instructions will be emailed at a later date.

To make a reservation or for more information please contact: Nicole Collins, Director of Sales & Expo Sylvia Allen, Associate Director of Sales Phone: +208-433-0950 ext 815 • Fax: +1-208-433-9812 • Email: nicole@ifea.com Phone: +1-732-946-2711 • Fax: +1-208-433-9812 • Email: sylvia@ifea.com International Festivals & Events Association • 2603 W. Eastover Terrace • Boise, ID 83706 • USA • Phone: +1-208-433-0950 • Fax: +1-208-433-9812 • www.ifea.com


2015 IFEA Webinar Series

IFEA is pleased to present our 2015 Webinar Series! Offering online educational sessions hosted by industry leaders and special guests, the IFEA Webinar series covers a wide variety of topics important to your organization’s success. Webinars are easy to attend . . . just view and listen to the presentation online from the comfort of your own computer - without even leaving your desk! No Travel Expense Required. Can’t make the live presentation of the Webinar? All Live webinars are recorded and are available for 7 days following the live presentation to watch at your leisure. What better way to receive great educational information by great presenters while saving both time and travel expenses! Registering for a Webinar: Live Webinars are available for purchase via any of the following methods: • Online at the IFEA Store • Faxing or mailing in the Webinar Registration Form ❍ (See separate brochure/registration form for Webinars on Demand) • Calling the IFEA at +1-208-4330950 ext: 3 Webinar Start Time in Your Time Zone: 7:00 a.m. Hawaii 9:00 a.m. Alaska 10:00 a.m. Pacific 11:00 a.m. Mountain 12:00 p.m. Central 1:00 p.m. Eastern 6:00 p.m. GMT Webinar Length: 60 Minutes Individual Webinar Cost: • $59 - IFEA Members • $59 - Association Alliance Members

• $79 – Festival & Event Ontario Members • $99 - Non-IFEA Members Registration cost is per computer site for as many people as you can sit around your computer. Gather additional staff, volunteers, or board members around your computer so they too can join you for this learning experience at no additional charge! Buy More, Save More Webinars in Bulk Pricing: The more Webinars purchased, the more available for free. May combine Live Webinar Presentations and Pre-Recorded Webinars on Demand to take advantage of this special offer. See separate Webinars On Demand Brochure for On Demand schedule. (Call, Mail or Fax orders only, not available for online purchasing) • BUY 3 Webinars and Receive 1 FREE • BUY 5 Webinars and Receive 2 FREE • BUY 10 Webinars and Receive 5 FREE Questions? Contact: Nia Hovde, Director of Marketing & Communications at: nia@ifea.com

© Copyright 2015. The presentation, materials and content of these Webinars are the intellectual property of the International Festivals & Events Association (IFEA) and the specific presenter for each webinar. They are presented for the educational use of each paying customer to the IFEA. Any reproduction, rebroadcast or reselling of this webinar, or the content contained within, by an outside party, without the expressed written consent of the IFEA is strictly prohibited.

2015 IFEA WEBINAR SCHEDULE THURSDAY, JANUARY 29, 2015

The Ten Most Important Things You Can Know/Do to Increase Non-Sponsorship Revenue Becky Genoways, CFEE, President, Genoways Events, Rockford, IL CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2015

Online Resources to Improve Your Marketing and Your Life Kendra Wright, Partner & President, Saffire Events, Austin, TX CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2015

Critical Voice: Dealing with the Media During a Crisis Mike Berry, CFEE, President & CEO, Kentucky Derby Festival Gary Stinson, Digital Media Manager, Kentucky Derby Festival Louisville, KY CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2015

Building a Business Plan for Future Success Penny McBride, CFEE, President/CEO, Fredericksburg Chamber of Commerce Fredericksburg, TX CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2015

Building Blocks of Brands Sean King, Director of Marketing & Communications, Youth Education in the Arts Allentown, PA CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

Designing the Best Participant Experience Dr. Vern Biaett, CFEE, Assistant Professor of Events Management Nido R. Qubein School of Communication, High Point University, High Point, North Carolina CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2015

When, How and the Challenge of Expanding Your Event Ted Baroody, President, Norfolk Festevents, Norfolk, VA CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 2015

Strategies, Tactics and Cool Ideas for Activating Sponsorship Bruce Erley, CFEE, APR, President, Creative Strategies Group, Denver, CO CFEE Elective Credit: Economic Impact

THURSDAY, APRIL 23, 2015

Leadership at ALL Levels - YOU are YOUR Company! Gail Alofsin, Director of Corporate Partnerships, Newport Harbor Corporation, Newport, RI CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management

THURSDAY, APRIL 30, 2015

Event Budgeting & Financial Management: A 365 day Process Jeff Curtis, CEO, Portland Rose Festival Foundation, Portland, OR CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2015

It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane…Wait, What the Heck Is That? Jeff English, CFEE, Vice President of Administration/General Council Kentucky Derby Festival, Louisville, KY CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2015

Providing Sponsors With ROI Other Than On Event Days Kevin Grothe, Vice President of Sponsorships, Memphis in May International Festival Memphis, TN CFEE Elective Credit: Economic Impact

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2015

Membership Clubs and VIP Experiences Becky Genoways, CFEE, President, Genoways Events, Rockford, IL CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2015

Onsite Marketing Partnerships Chuck O’Connor, CFEE, Director of Corporate Partnerships, National Cherry Festival Traverse City, MI CFEE Elective Credit: Economic Impact

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2015

Beyond the Bounce Houses! Programming Children’s activities at your Festival Keli O’Neill Wenzel, President, Managing Partner O’Neill Marketing & Event Management, Kansas City, MO CFEE Elective Credit: Creativity/Innovation


Thursday, January 29, 2015 Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. MST The Ten Most Important Things You Can Know/ Do to Increase Non-Sponsorship Revenue Becky Genoways, CFEE, President Genoways Events Rockford, IL CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

In an industry that is constantly looking for new revenue streams and how to maximize current streams, operational consultant and expert Becky Genoways will share with attendees a ‘Top 10’ checklist of critical areas to revisit at your event for increasing non-sponsorship revenues. Becky Genoways is a leading industry consultant, educator and former President and CEO of On the Waterfront, Inc., a multiple-event production company located in Illinois. Genoways, a 30-year veteran of the festivals and events industry, is a Certified Festival & Event Executive (CFEE) , past Chair of the IFEA World Board of Directors and a member of the IFEA President’s Council. She has produced events of all sizes, from a local market with weekly attendance of 3,500 to a major music festival that attracted over 300,000 people. Genoways has presented professional training seminars throughout North America, in the Middle East and New Zealand.

Thursday, February 5, 2015 Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. MST Online Resources to Improve Your Marketing and Your Life Kendra Wright, Partner & President, Saffire Events, Austin, TX CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

In this fast-paced session, we will take you on a whirlwind tour of the latest and greatest online, smart phone and tablet tools and apps to help increase your efficiency, get control of your email, improve your communication and just have a better life! We’ll specifically discuss tools for marketing more effectively and wowing your web site visitors while saving your sanity. Get ready for an energetic pick-me-up, with lots of ideas you can implement easily and immediately! Kendra Wright started her career managing non-profit fundraising events. Then in 1995, as the internet came to being, she began doing online marketing, managing 284

global Internet strategies at a Fortune 1000 technology company. In 1998, Kendra left that company to found, Wright Strategies, working with clients like KEEN Footwear, Jeep, Panasonic, Intel, Nike and Chrysler. Finally in 2009, Kendra launched Saffire Events to deliver software that makes it easy for events and venues to market themselves online. It’s been a wild ride.

Thursday, February 12, 2015 Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. MST Critical Voice: Dealing with the Media During a Crisis Mike Berry, CFEE, President & CEO, Kentucky Derby Festival Gary Stinson, Digital Media Manager, Kentucky Derby Festival Louisville, KY CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management

Recent crisis situations at multiple events throughout our industry have exposed a blind spot that we can ill-afford to have. When an unexpected, especially life-threatening or injury inflicting, incident occurs at your event, there should already be in-place a plan for how to respond and address the multiple media sources that will absolutely be waiting with microphone or keyboard in hand (social media included). That is not the time to start thinking about what to do. This very important session will talk about the pre-planning, preparations and real-time responses that need to be in place well before dealing with the media during a crisis. Mike Berry, CFEE is president & CEO of Kentucky Derby Festival, Inc. (KDF). Since February 1997, Berry has been responsible for the oversight of the Kentucky Derby Festival - one of the largest community festivals in the United States. He manages a full-time staff of 22 employees and serves on a 75-member board of directors for the Kentucky Derby Festival. Berry is also board member of the Kentucky Derby Festival Foundation, a 501(c)3 not-for-profit charity that receives and manages charitable contributions on behalf of the Kentucky Derby Festival, Inc. Prior to his current position, Mike Berry has served the KDF as: vice President & managing director (1990-1997), director of marketing and corporate relations (1988-1990), and events coordinator (1986-1988). He also served as administrative assistant to Governor Martha Layne Collins (1983-1986). Mike Berry is also very active in the community. He is a member of the International Festivals and Events Association Board of Directors, the Greater Louisville Sports Commission Board of Directors, the Louisville Theatri-

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cal Association (Broadway Series) Board of Directors, and the Music Theatre Louisville Board of Directors, among others. Gary Stinson joined the Kentucky Derby Festival as the Digital Media Manager in early 2013. In a newly developed digital role, Gary focuses on the daily communications on all social media platforms including the Festival’s Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Gary also manages other digital platforms for the Festival including the official website and smart phone app, as well as working with the media during the Festival peak season. Gary graduated from Campbellsville University in Campbellsville, KY in 2008 with a Bachelors of Arts degree in Public Relations and Journalism.

Thursday, February 19, 2015 Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. MST Building a Business Plan for Future Success Penny McBride, CFEE, President/CEO Fredericksburg Chamber of Commerce Fredericksburg, TX CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management

Many events today (new and long-running) find themselves in a similar position...looking to the future with a need to create (or re-create) an event that serves changing audiences, changing communities and in the end, makes money. This important workshop will focus on the planning processes necessary to build a profitable event. Learn how to create a written business plan that will provide organizational clarity and higher efficiency. You’ll take home dozens of ideas that will help your next event be better, happier and more profitable than ever before! Penny C. McBride, CFEE is the President & CEO of the Fredericksburg Chamber of Commerce. For 14 years prior to starting with the Chamber she owned Indigo Resource Group, an outsource firm that specialized in providing marketing, consulting and management services to tourism-related businesses and organizations. She continues to work as a consultant, speaker, trainer and writer. Her speaking clients have included the International Tour & Travel Research Association, Argentina Economic Development Federation, Dubai Events and Promotions Establishment, Hawaii Tourism Authority, Illinois Special Events Network, and Festivals & Events Ontario. Since 2008, she has worked on a contract basis as the Director of Business Development for the International Festivals & Events Association (IFEA). In this capacity she developed IFEA’s Economic Impact Assessment and Sponsor Forum products,


along with a variety of other services. Penny also teaches two of the six required core courses for IFEA’s Certified Festival & Event Executive (CFEE) program. She earned her CFEE designation in 2009, becoming part of an elite group of industry event professionals to hold this global designation.

Thursday, February 26, 2015 Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. MST Building Blocks of Brands Sean King, Director of Marketing & Communications Youth Education in the Arts, Allentown, PA CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

Your brand is not what you say it is, it’s what other say about it. What are attendees, volunteers and others saying about your event? Take part in an interactive 60 minute discussion on the elements of your brand, how to build your brand and helpful hints on how to make your brand work for you, your sponsors and all of the stakeholders in your event. Sean King has been consulting with small businesses and non-profit organizations for over 20 years. Currently, Sean is the Director of Marketing & Communications for Youth Education in the Arts (YEA!) a national non-profit musical youth organization based in Allentown, Pa. which teaches life lessons through music. Sean also serves as the marketing Chairperson for the Hamilton District Main Street program in Allentown. He also blogs at artsmarketingblog.org and you can follow him on Twitter @skingaspire. Sean resides with his wife Natalie and son Haydn in the global crossroads of Fogelsville, PA.

Thursday, March 12, 2015 Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. MST Designing the Best Participant Experience Dr. Vern Biaett, CFEE, Assistant Professor of Events Management Nido R. Qubein School of Communication, High Point University, High Point, NC CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

Many of you as an event managers have become industry experts at Production Design and know quite a bit about coordinating of the operational WOW! logistical factors needed to make an event special. The same might be said about Marketing, Sponsorship, Volunteer management, and Financial matters. What, however, do you actually

know about Experience Design? This session provides a starting place for event managers to understand what is experience design, what constitutes best experiences, and some ideas on how to go about creating experiences that can lead to increased social capital among attendees and enhance community development. Today we live in an experience economy where people have come to expect quality products and services while they search out extraordinary life experiences. It is critical that festivals and events are part of the Experience Design conversation. Following a career in leisure services that included producing festivals and events for the cities of Phoenix and Glendale, Arizona for twenty years, in 2006 Vern became a Faculty Associate at Arizona State University where he primarily taught event management courses in a certificate program he co-created. In 2013 he completed his PhD and in 2014 accepted his current position as the Assistant Professor of Events Management in the Nido R. Qubein School of Communication at High Point University in North Carolina. Dr. Biaett is a lifetime Certified Festival & Event Executive, was a founding member of the Arizona Festivals & Events Association, and is a past board member of the IFEA Foundation.

Thursday, March 26, 2015 Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. MST When, How and the Challenge of Expanding Your Event Ted Baroody, President, Norfolk Festevents, Norfolk, VA CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

With today’s challenges for maximizing revenues and finding new resources to turn to, many events are considering expanding their events...adding new, potential revenue-driving events to their current line-up (concerts; participant sporting events; etc.); taking on the management of outside existing events; or creating a totally new event in the ‘off’ season. While potentially driving new revenue streams, these decisions also stretch staff resources and take away the ‘normal’ year-round focus from the primary and original events (creatively; operationally and fund-raising efforts). When do these decisions make sense and at what investment/return ratio? Join our panel as they debate this growing issue.Ted Baroody is a graduate of North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. After college he moved to Norfolk, Virginia to start his own small sports marketing company, Victory Promotions. After a couple of Summer 2015

years of power boat racing production under Victory Promotions, he served as Marketing Director for a group of local radio stations in Virginia Beach, Virginia for 5 years. From 1996 to 2011 he was the Director of Development of the not-forprofit event marketing company, Norfolk Festevents, Ltd. known as “Festevents,” and is now the President of Festevents. Ted also works with many non-profit organizations as a volunteer, event coordinator and as a board member and is on the IFEA Foundation Board of Directors.

Thursday, April 9, 2015 Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. MST Strategies, Tactics and Cool Ideas for Activating Sponsorship Bruce Erley, CFEE, APR, President, Creative Strategies Group Denver, CO CFEE Elective Credit: Economic Impact

If you aren’t helping your sponsors come up with the right promotional plans to reach and engage your attendees, you are going to be left in the dust! The first step is for both the organizer and the sponsor to recognize that sponsorship is just an event marketing platform upon which you must create effective activations to achieve their marketing, communications and sales objectives. This session will review the reasons behind creating experiences that build your sponsors’ brands while enhancing your event. Learn the five key criteria for successful activations and see some of the cool ideas others are using. Bruce Erley, CFEE, APR is a 30-year veteran of the event marketing and sponsorship field and is regarded as a leading sponsorship expert for the festivals industry. He founded Creative Strategies Group (CSG) in 1995. Prior to that time, Bruce was the Vice President for Marketing and Sales for the International, educational and cultural organization, Up with People, where he directed sponsor sales, entertainment marketing and merchandising operations. At Creative Strategies Group, Bruce conducts all general consultation, including the development of property audits, sponsorship plans, corporate sponsorship programs and training, as well as directs CSG’s ongoing operations. Erley is widely acclaimed as a top presenter on sponsorship topics for the festivals and events industry.

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Thursday, April 23, 2015 Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. MST Leadership at ALL Levels YOU are YOUR Company! Gail Alofsin, Director of Corporate Partnerships Newport Harbor Corporation, Newport, RI CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management

Wherever you are on the “leadership ladder,” this webinar will assist you in cultivating the characteristics, skills and vision you need to lead and be led. Focused on the importance of internal and external leadership perception and the foundations that lead to effective execution, this webinar will also review “Best Practices” in both written and verbal communication. YOU are YOUR company! Leadership is a mindset and it starts with you. Gail Alofsin is the Director of Corporate Partnerships, Newport Harbor Corporation and has had the privilege of being involved in all aspects of event production for over two decades. Her current position is focused on prospecting, procuring and retaining corporate sponsors for the concerts and events produced at the Newport Yachting Center. A graduate of Tufts University, Gail’s passion for education led her to the University of Rhode Island where she has been welcomed as an adjunct professor in the Communication, Journalism and Public Relations departments since 1999 – 30 consecutive semesters! Gail has been speaking for over two decades at national and international conferences inclusive of IEG (International Events Group) and IFEA (International Festivals & Events Association). Her new book, Your Someday is NOW, focuses on work/life integration and personal branding, and was released in January of 2014.

Thursday, April 30, 2015 Time:11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. MST Event Budgeting & Financial Management: A 365 day Process Jeff Curtis, CEO Portland Rose Festival Foundation Portland, OR CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management

The Portland Rose Festival is an event with a 107 year tradition, always driven by strong financial principles and sound budgeting techniques. Over the years, the festival has adapted it fiscal year budgeting to allow for greater 486

flexibility and overall management accountability. This presentation will provide valuable inside knowledge on how festivals and events can build an effective budget. This session will walk you through a 365 day approach to budget management, giving webinar participants valuable insight into budget philosophy and specific tactics that fosters a flexible way to create and manage a fiscal year budget. Jeff Curtis, Executive Director of the Portland Rose Festival Foundation has the responsibility of producing Portland’s annual world-class, award winning celebration along with a full time staff, and many dedicated volunteers. Jeff has been with the Festival since 1998, and his many accomplishments include the Foundation’s transition to a full-fledged 501(c) (3) organization, stewardship of the Rose Festival’s Centennial anniversary celebration in 2007, and overseeing the major relocation of Festival headquarters to its new historic home on the Waterfront of Portland in 2010. Jeff has a bachelor’s degree in Sports Science from the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California, and is an inaugural graduate of Leadership Portland, a program developed and produced by the Portland Business Alliance.

Thursday, October 8, 2015 Time:11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. MST It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane…Wait, What the Heck Is That? Jeff English, CFEE, Vice President of Administration/General Council Kentucky Derby Festival, Louisville, KY CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

If your event is held in an outdoor venue, chances are somebody is going to try and fly a drone over it. Having gained in popularity at events ever since one was flown through a fireworks show at SunFest in 2014, drones are now considered a serious safety risk by the Federal Government and law enforcement officials. What risks and threats do drones pose to your event? What recourse does your event have against a drone operator? What can be done to prevent drones from flying through your venue? Jeff English, Sr. Vice President of Administration and General Counsel at Kentucky Derby Festival, will share his insight and research on this new and serious issue facing the festival and event industry. Jeff English, CFEE is the Sr. Vice President of Administration/General Counsel of the Kentucky Derby Festival. After graduating from Washburn University School of Law (Topeka, KS) in 2004, Jeff worked in politics and practiced law before joining the KDF staff. He is charged with overseeing all of Festival’s legal

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issues and serving as its risk management officer. He also manages the Merchandise Department and the 501(c)3 not-for-profit Kentucky Derby Festival Foundation.

Thursday, October 15, 2015 Time:11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. MST Providing Sponsors With ROI Other Than On Event Days Kevin Grothe Vice President of Sponsorships Memphis in May International Festival, Memphis, TN CFEE Elective Credit: Economic Impact

Corporations are constantly evaluating their marketing strategies, including their sponsorships. In some cases, providing ROI during a one, two or three-day event may no longer be sufficient. This session will look at ways to provide additional ROI to sponsors other than during the days of your event. Kevin Grothe has more than 25 years of sales, marketing and fund raising experience in the event industry. He has been with Memphis in May International Festival for 8 years and is the Vice President of Sponsorships. Kevin has worked with several national accounts including Caesar’s Entertainment, Target and the Ford Motor Company. Through successfully negotiating and implementing a myriad of sponsorship strategies, revenue has increased from $1 million to nearly 1.5 million. Previously, Kevin was the Associate Athletic Director for External Affairs for the University of Memphis. While with the University, he oversaw an $8 million capital campaign. He has also held positions with the Mid-American Conference, Miami University, the University of Iowa and Influence America.

Thursday, October 22, 2015 Time:11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. MST Membership Clubs and VIP Experiences Becky Genoways, CFEE, President Genoways Events Rockford, Illinois CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management

Festival upgraded experiences, membership clubs and VIP hospitality venues can enhance your patrons’ experience by providing amenities, benefits and activities that are not available to the general public and boost your budget without requiring a significant commitment


of resources. From small intimate settings to large corporate tents, upgraded experiences are a non-traditional revenue source that will make your patrons happy and boost your budget. Becky Genoways, CFEE is a leading industry consultant, educator and former President and CEO of On the Waterfront, Inc., a multiple-event production company located in Illinois. Genoways, a 30-year veteran of the festivals and events industry, is a Certified Festival & Event Executive (CFEE) , past Chair of the IFEA World Board of Directors and a member of the IFEA President’s Council. She has produced events of all sizes, from a local market with weekly attendance of 3,500 to a major music festival that attracted over 300,000 people. Genoways has presented professional training seminars throughout North America, in the Middle East and New Zealand.

Thursday, October 29, 2015 Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. MST Onsite Marketing Partnerships Chuck O’Connor, CFEE, Director of Corporate Partnerships National Cherry Festival Traverse City, MI CFEE Elective Credit: Economic Impact

Tapping into your attendee’s passion for your event through a live marketing experience can be one of the best activation tools you own. Learn best practices related to this lucrative experiential marketing asset that will deliver crucial ROI to the sponsor, while enhancing the experience of your guests. Chuck O’Connor, CFEE is a corporate sponsorship seller, strategist and instructor. He spent ten years in television and radio advertising sales management before joining the National Cherry Festival as Director of Marketing & Corporate Partnerships in 1993. Chuck’s responsibilities include negotiating and implementing all sponsorships, as well as overseeing the Festival’s marketing and public relations effort. Chuck also owns Event Marketing Group, LLC, a company which specializes in event sponsorship sales and consulting. A member of the President’s Council of the IFEA, he has been a speaker and webinar presenter on sponsorship issues for IFEA, MFEA, IEG, the Hawaiian Tourism Authority, and the Illinois Special Events Network.

Thursday, November 5, 2015 Time:11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. MST Beyond the Bounce Houses! Programming Children’s Activities at Your Festival Keli O’Neill Wenzel, President, Managing Partner, O’Neill Marketing & Event Management, Kansas City, MO CFEE Elective Credit: Creativity/Innovation

The key to success is with the children. If you can effectively serve them, you will have the attention of the parents, the grandparents and other extended family and friends. And yet, we don’t focus nearly enough of our time and resources on creating and imagining high-quality children’s activities, entertainment and other options. Listen to ways to think beyond the bounce houses and execute a children’s area that kids AND parents will both enjoy.

Webinars On Demand

Looking for a different webinar topic – don’t forget to check out our Webinars OnDemand – previously recorded webinars that are now available for download. For a complete list of available Webinars On Demand, just go to the IFEA Store.

How Webinars Work

IFEA Webinars are Website-enabled seminars that function much like a teleconference. They use your computer’s Website browser to display presentation materials and other applications important to the Webinar topic, with the audio portion of the presentation provided either through your computer speakers or over the phone. Once your registration has been submitted, you will receive an email from the IFEA confirming that you have been registered for the Webinar. The day before the scheduled Webinar, you will receive an email with specific instructions on how to log in for the Webinar. You will receive this email again, the day of the Webinar. Once this information has been received, joining a Webinar is as easy as 1, 2, 3! 1. Log In To The Webinar: To start the Webinar, log in to the specific website address that you received for the Webinar and connect to the presen-

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President/Managing Partner of O’Neill Marketing & Event Management. Keli is the creator and orchestrator of many of Kansas City’s most successful civic, corporate and entertainment events. She serves as the founding Executive Director of the highly successful Kansas City Irish Fest. She is co-founder and Producer of the Jiggle Jam Family Music Fest, as well as executive producer of Boulevardia Craft Beer and Music festival and Kansas City RiverFest (KC’s largest Independence Day Celebration). Other recent projects include VIP coordination for Amway Global Presents the Tina Turner Tour, planning and management for the opening of the National WWI Museum at Kansas City’s landmark Liberty Memorial, opening events for the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, director of Kansas City’s City-Wide Events committee for the 2012 MLB All Star Game, marketing and communication liaison for the Big 12 Championships.

tation. Webinars can be viewed on virtually any computer with a highspeed internet connection. 2. Listening To The Webinar: After you’ve logged in and gained access to the Website, you have two options to listen to the audio portion. You can either dial the telephone number provided to hear the webinar via a conference call, or if you have computer speakers, you may listen via your computer speakers. (The phone number provided will not be an 800 number, so all costs for the call will be incurred by the registrant.) 3. Sit Back and Learn: Once you are logged in, all you need to do is sit back and learn! It’s just like any other seminar, except you’re sitting comfortably at your own desk! Throughout the webinar, you are able to ask questions to the presenter using the online Question/Answer messaging system that is part of the Webinar screen. The Webinar Organizer will view your question and present it to the speaker at the end of the presentation. Along with the Webinar itself, all registered attendees will receive a copy of the presentation used for the webinar prior to the webinar start time in addition to the recorded copy of the webinar after the webinar presentation.

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PRESENTING SPONSOR

IFEA WORLD FESTIVAL & EVENT CITY

©

AWARD PROGRAM “Recognizing the best in city-event leadership and partnerships around the world.”


ABOUT THE

IFEA WORLD FESTIVAL & EVENT CITY AWARD

©

The IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © was designed and created as a way for the global festivals and events industry to openly encourage, support, learn from and recognize positive local environments for festivals and events worldwide. If you are considering applying for this prestigious award, you already understand the important role that festivals and events play in your community by: • Adding to the quality of life for local residents; • Driving tourism; • Showcasing a positive community brand and image to the media, business community, and visitors; • Creating economic impact that translates into jobs, tax revenues and enhanced infrastructure improvements; • Providing enhanced exposure opportunities for the arts, not-for-profit causes and other community programs and venues; • Promoting volunteerism and bonding the many elements of the community together; • Encouraging community investment, participation, creativity and vision; and • Building irreplaceable ‘community capital’ for the future. To achieve and maximize these important returns for the markets that they serve, we must clearly understand their direct correlation to the partnerships with and support from the local community, at all levels, that is critical to the success and sustainability of existing festivals and events, as well as the ability to attract and encourage new events. Through this special award the IFEA is pleased to recognize those cities and markets who have worked, through concerted efforts, to provide an environment conducive to successful festivals and events. For each year’s selected cities, the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © provides: • A strong platform from which to recognize the success of current and on-going efforts by every component of your community; • A clear positioning statement to encourage continued infrastructure, policy and process enhancement and expansion; and • A powerful marketing statement for use in recruiting and encouraging new festivals, events and businesses. We look forward to working with you, your city and community partners to recognize the quality efforts and support that you have successfully developed over the years and should be rightfully proud of. Thank you for your continued support of, and partnership with, the festivals and events industry. Best of Luck with your entry! 90

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VISA: GLOBAL SPONSOR OF THE IFEA WORLD FESTIVAL & EVENT CITY AWARD

©

In 2011, VISA joined with the International Festivals & Events Association to become the presenting sponsor of the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award, creating a natural partnership between the global events industry and the globally recognized financial leader. “Through this unique and special award, the IFEA hopes to create and expand the dialogue between events and cities around the world, at a time when each needs to be supporting the other more than ever. VISA is the ideal partner for this program and together we look forward to creating new and ongoing opportunities to explore and inspire these important city/event partnerships, redefining ‘best practices’ and setting the stage for the future,” said Steven Wood Schmader, CFEE, President & CEO of IFEA World. Charles Brown, Chairman & CEO of Festival Transaction Services and Festival Media Corporation, representing VISA in recognizing the previous IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© recipients, commented that “The IFEA has successfully built a global network of event professionals and resources that are changing the face of the industry and VISA is proud to be a part of that effort.” Festival Transaction Services has formed a new partnership that includes VISA, Bank of America Merchant Services and First Data Corporation – the three largest financial services companies in the United States – to provide cash management services to the festivals and events industry around the world. “We know that the professionals in the global festivals and events industry today are in need of strong and reliable partners – from recognition to cash management systems that can help them enhance the attendee experience, increase revenues and build stronger financial foundations. We can now bring that to the table and are excited about working with the IFEA to help strengthen the success of festivals and events around the world,” noted Brown. For more information on VISA products and services for festivals and events, please contact Jim Shanklin, Executive Vice President of Festival Transaction Services/Festival Media Corporation at +1-206-381-5202 or jshanklin@festmedia.com.

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ENTRY INFORMATION Quick Reference Guide DEADLINES

• Entry Deadline: 5:00 p.m. (Mountain Time Zone) – Monday, July 20th, 2015 • Entry must include completed entry, additional requested details and application form with payment • Due to time constraints in judging, late entries cannot be accepted.

FEES

The total cost to enter the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© is $695 (U.S. Dollars) for IFEA Members and $895 (U.S. Dollars) for non-IFEA Members per entry. Payment may be made using a Visa, MasterCard or American Express credit card or by Check (made payable to the IFEA) or by Wire Transfer. For more information on Wire Transfers and transfer fees, please contact IFEA at +1-208-433-0950.

ELIGIBILITY

Applications for the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © may be submitted by the City itself or by an event(s) on behalf of their City. It is our hope that the application process itself will result in an even closer working partnership and dialogue between the Applicant City and the festivals and events who serve that market. Applicants may re-apply for the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © each year.

JUDGING

Judging of the IFEA World Festival & Event City entries is done by an international panel of respected event professionals, who have been pleased to discover that there are many amazing programs happening around the world that will help us all to raise the bar for our own communities, showing us what is possible – at every level – when vision and leadership combine. The IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © are presented on an individual basis to exemplary cities around the world that we hope others will emulate. The awards are not designed as a competition of one city against another, but rather to recognize those individual cities

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that have ‘raised the bar’ for everyone, taking into account the cultural, economic and geographic challenges that they have met, mastered and often changed along the way. For that reason, we may present multiple awards each year, while some will be encouraged to strengthen or make adjustments to selected components of their entry criteria for reconsideration in future years.

SCORING SYSTEM

• A possible total of 100 points may be awarded to each entry based upon the individual components listed under Sections 1-6 of the overall entry. • Failure to meet all requirements or answer/ provide all necessary information may impact judging decisions and will result in a deduction of points. • If a section or element does not apply to your City, please state this within your entry (explaining why it does not apply) in order to avoid losing points.

SELECTION AND NOTIFICATION

• Award Recipients will be notified via email by August 21st, 2015. Notification will go to the primary contact listed on the entry application. • The 2015 IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © will be presented during the IFEA’s 60th Annual Convention & Expo, September 21-23, 2015 in Tucson, AZ. Each recipient city will be highlighted in a brief video presentation at the award ceremony and on-site throughout the convention.

MAXIMIZING YOUR AWARD

Being selected as an IFEA World Festival & Event City is only the beginning of the benefits to be gained from this special honor. The IFEA will help each recipient with ideas on how to maximize and leverage your award, with specific examples from previous recipients. • Each winning recipient of the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © will receive an engraved award suitable for indoor display and a personal letter of congratulations. • Duplicate IFEA World Festival & Event City awards, flags (for display or flying) and other recognition items are available for purchase by award recipients wishing to share their honor with the many partners who helped them to win. • Winning recipients will be provided with the rights to use the 2015 IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© Winner logo


on their websites, press releases and other appropriate City letterhead, brochures, marketing materials, etc. • The IFEA will announce all IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© recipients in an international press release to the world’s leading media sources, including all local market media contacts provided to the IFEA by selected applicants. • IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© recipients will be featured in a special on-line tribute section at www.ifea.com in perpetuity and in a special section of ie: the business of international events, the IFEA’s industry-leading magazine. • Each winning recipient will receive a oneyear complimentary IFEA membership.

RELEASE & USAGE

• By submitting your entry to the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award, you automatically grant the IFEA the right to use any materials from your entry for editorial, analytical, promotional or any other purpose without additional permission or compensation. All materials and photos submitted as part of the application will become the property of the IFEA. • Entries submitted are not able to be returned. Copies should be made prior to submitting your entry, as desired. Note: Proprietary or sensitive information will not be shared if identified clearly. • Winning applicants agree that the IFEA may use their City name and representative photos in all press releases and program marketing materials, both hard copy and electronic versions. • Your entry into the competition is acknowledgement of these terms.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Working in partnership with local community leadership, festivals, events, organizations and businesses, please provide a clear overview and understanding of the festival and event environment in your City/Market through your responses to each defined section. The application process in itself is a great opportunity to evaluate internally the areas where your City excels and other areas where you may be able to strengthen your efforts and further support local programs. Cities interested in being considered for the annual IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© must submit and include the following information: 1. A completed entry form providing contact and payment information.

2. A one (1) paragraph description of your city (to be used for promotional purposes by the IFEA). 3. An email list of your local media contacts in Excel format for IFEA for use in announcing the selected recipients. 4. A representative photograph highlighting your City and/or events. (A least 300 dpi in size) 5. A three (3) minute video presentation representing your City. (Refer to Important Details section below for video format.) 6. A one (1) page introductory letter stating why your City should be selected to receive the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award. 7. Your overall completed IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© Entry providing responses and supporting information for the following sections. Refer to pages 6-9 for detailed descriptions required for each section. This part of your entry must be submitted as one (1) singular entry piece/ document/PowerPoint/Pdf, etc.: ❍ Section 1: Community Overview ❍ Section 2: Community Festivals & Events ❍ Section 3: City/Government Support of Festivals & Events ❍ Section 4: Non-Governmental Community Support of Festivals & Events ❍ Section 5: Leveraging ‘Community Capital’ Created by Festivals & Events ❍ Section 6: Extra Credit To view examples of past IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© recipient entries, go to: www.ifea.com / Industry Awards / World Festival & Event City Award / Recipients.

IMPORTANT DETAILS

• Please submit your main entry (as listed in components 6-7 under Entry Requirements above), as one (1) singular entry piece/document/ PowerPoint/Pdf, etc. Components 1-5 listed under Entry Requirements may be submitted as separate pieces from the main entry, but must be submitted at the same time. • All entry information should be provided in English and typed using 10-point Arial font. • Please submit your overall entry via Email (preferred method of submitting entry.) Please create entry in a Word, PowerPoint, PDF document, tif, jpg or other standard format. If entry must be mailed, please submit your overall entry on a CD, or USB flash drive to the IFEA World Headquarters in the format listed above. • To submit Video portion of entry, please email video file as an MP4, WMF, MOV or provide a link to an online video location such as YouTube. If mailing video on a

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disk or USB Drive, please submit video as an MPF, WMF, MOV. (DVD’s should be encoded for Region 1 or Region 0 DVD capabilities.) • Entries over one Meg must be provided as a link to a fixed site with no expiration timeframe.

TIPS & POINTERS

• Not all components under a specific section will pertain to everyone. Don’t worry; there are no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ answers and our international judging panel will base their decisions on overall impressions after reviewing all of the submitted information. We are all learning from each other, with the goal of strengthening the partnerships, benefits and returns to our respective communities from the festivals and events that are such an important part of the community fabric and we hope to find additional new ideas being implemented from within all of the award entries that we can share in the future. • Responses to the requested information may require a straight-forward numerical answer, or a more descriptive definition. While we have placed no limits on length, we encourage you to provide the most succinct answers possible that clearly make your point. • If you have any questions or need clarification on any criteria, please do not hesitate to contact us. • Support materials, photos, videos, brochures, copies, etc. should be inserted following the responses to each section. • As needed, we may communicate with the primary contact on the application to clarify any questions that may arise.

SEND ENTRIES TO

Please email completed entries, application form and payment to: nia@ifea.com. Entry, payment and application form may be mailed if necessary. Be sure to provide entry on a disk or a USB Flash Drive in a word, PowerPoint, PDF or other standard format. Please mail to: IFEA World Festival & Event City Award 2603 W. Eastover Terrace Boise, ID 83706 U.S.A.

QUESTIONS?

Contact: • Steve Schmader at schmader@ifea.com • Nia Hovde at nia@ifea.com • Phone: +1-208-433-0950 ext:3


IFEA World Festival & Event City Award

©

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Working in partnership with local community leadership, festivals, events, organizations and businesses, please provide a clear overview and understanding of the festival and event environment in your City/Market through responses to each of the following sections. The application process in itself is a great opportunity to evaluate internally the areas where your City excels and other areas where you may be able to strengthen your efforts and further support local programs. Please submit the following information: 1. A completed entry form providing contact and payment information. 2. A one (1) paragraph description of your city (to be used for promotional purposes by the IFEA) 3. An email list of your local media in Excel format for IFEA to use to announce the selected recipients. 4. An individual photograph representing your city. (A least 300 dpi in size). 5. A three (3) minute video presentation representing your city. (Refer to Important Details section for video format.) 6. A one (1) page introductory letter stating why your City should be selected to receive the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award. 7. Your overall completed IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© Entry providing responses and supporting information for Sections 1-6 below. This part of your entry must be submitted as one (1) singular entry piece/document/PowerPoint/Pdf, etc. Please refer to the Entry Requirements and Important Details sections for specific entry formats and details. To view examples of past IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© recipient entries, go to: www.ifea.com / Industry Awards / World Festival & Event City Award / Recipients

Section 1. Community Overview Goal: The information in this section should help provide us with a better understanding of your community and the infrastructure in place to host and/or support those producing and attending festivals and events. • Please provide an overview of your community that will provide us with as many elements as possible, such as: a. Current City Population b. Current SMSA or LUZ Population (Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area or Large Urban Zone) c. Population within a 50 Mile Radius of Applicant City d. Primary Festival and Event Venues Available (Indoor and Outdoor. For example: Theatres, Plazas, Bandshells, Parks, Stadiums, Fairgrounds, Sport Facilities, Convention Centers, etc., including those facilities planned for completion within the next two years. Include Estimated Capacities for each. For outdoor venues, use a formula of 1 person per 3 square feet if no other total capacity numbers are available.) e. Water and Power Accessibility in Outdoor Venues f. Hospital and Emergency Response Availability g. Total Number of Hotel Rooms Available h. Public Transportation Options i. Parking Availability (Paid lots, meters, and free) j. Walking Paths, Bicycle Lanes k. Estimated City Visitors Annually Attributed to Festivals and Events

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Section 2. Community Festivals and Events Goal: The information in this section should provide us with an understanding of the diversity and success of current festivals and events that serve your city residents and visitors throughout the year. • Please provide us with a good overview of the leading festivals and events currently operating in your market. A full-year calendar of events is very helpful as we consider this area. Please provide the following for the ‘Top 10’ festivals or events in your market: a. Festival or Event Name b. Top Executive Contact Information c. Number of Years Festival or Event has been Produced d. Event Dates (Minimally the month held, with days if clearly defined – For example: the last weekend in June. If the event is a series, list the starting and ending dates – For example: Every Wednesday, June through August.) e. Primary Target Audience (For example: Families; Young Adults; Seniors; Children; Specific Cultural Heritage Groups; All Community Segments; Out-of-Market Visitors, etc.) f. Recurrence Cycle (Annually, Every 5 Years, etc.) g. Estimated Combined Aggregate Attendance

Section 3. City/Governmental Support of Festivals and Events Goal: The information in this section should help us to understand the strength and depth of support by the applicant City and other area governmental bodies (County, State, taxing districts, etc.) and demonstrate a clear awareness of event support needs by government agencies and officials. • Please define or describe each of the following elements (a-i) below, as completely and accurately as possible. • Where available and appropriate, please provide examples and copies. • If a section or element does not apply to your city, please state this within your entry and why it does not apply and/or what you may have/use instead. a. Defined and Accessible Public Objectives and Support Statements for Festivals and Events by the City and Other Local Government Agencies b. Direct Funding Support Provided to and/or Budgeted for Festivals and Events from the City or Other Government Agencies c. In-Kind Services Support Provided to and/or Budgeted for Festivals and Events from the City or Other Government Agencies d. Defined Role of the City in Festival and Event Approval e. City-Provided Festival and Event Process Coordination and Assistance Systems (For example: Existence of a City Events Department; ‘One-Stop Shopping’ for Permitting and Municipal Service Needs; Shared Resource Programs for Volunteer Recruitment/Management, Non-Proprietary Equipment Usage/Maintenance, Insurance/Music Licensing Provisions, etc.) f. Participation in Official Capacity by City Department Representatives on Boards and Planning Committees of Local Festivals and Events g. Local Laws, Ordinances, Regulations, Permits and Policies Impacting and Supportive of Festivals and Events (For example: noise ordinances, traffic regulations, curfews, parking fees, fireworks regulations, ambush marketing control, alcohol service requirements, taxes, food safety, insurance requirements, etc.) h. City Provided Festival and Event Training Programs (For example: Marketing, Planning, Budgeting, Risk Management, Alcohol Service, City Department Introductions, Professional Certification, etc.) i. Direct Industry Involvement / Memberships by Any of the Above

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Section 4. Non-Governmental Community Support of Festivals and Events Goal: The information in this section should help us to understand the commitment to festivals and events and direct support provided by community individuals and non-governmental organizations. Without this type of support most festivals and events could not achieve the level of success that these important partnerships help to build. • Please define or describe how each of the following elements/organizations (a-l) below (if applicable) lends their support to ensure the success and outreach of local festivals and events completely and accurately as possible. • Answers should be provided as an overview reflective of the entire community versus an individual event/organization, with enough detail to provide a clear picture of support. • If a section or element does not apply to your city, please state this within your entry and why it does not apply and/or what you may have/use instead. a. Volunteer Involvement b. Sponsorship Support (include in your answer a list of the ten (10) most prominent corporate sponsors in your market) c. Media Support d. Chamber of Commerce / Convention & Visitors Bureau Support (Promotion and marketing activities, familiarization tours, travel writer access, material creation, information distribution, grant funding, visitor hosting, etc.) e. Downtown Associations (Support by Downtown merchants and businesses) f. Organizations to Assist Individuals with Disabilities g. Local Event Cooperatives h. Sports Commissions i. Educational Institution Support j. Special Incentives/Discounts Provided to Festivals and Events by Local Venues k. Access to Industry Suppliers in the Local Market (For example: banners and decorations; generators; portable toilets; merchandise; generators; stage, lights & sound; golf carts; security; chairs; barricades; ATM’s; communication services; etc.) l. Direct Industry Involvement / Memberships by Any of the Above

Section 5. Leveraging ‘Community Capital’ Created by Festivals & Events Goal: The information in this section should help us to understand how the City and its non-governmental partners maximize the ‘community capital’ created by festivals and events in your market. • Please define or describe how your City uses the branding and marketing images/ opportunities provided by your local festivals and events to leverage return in other areas. • These may include, the items below, among others. • If a section or element does not apply to your city, please state this within your entry and why it does not apply and/or what you may have/use instead. a. Community Branding (How are local festivals and events used promote and build upon the positive image of the city?) b. Promoting Tourism (How are local festivals and events used to promote tourism visits?) c. Convention Marketing (How are local festivals and events used to recruit conventions to the city during the times that festival or event activities may serve as an extra incentive for choosing a destination?) d. Corporate Recruiting Efforts (How are local festivals and events used by Economic Development efforts to recruit new businesses to consider choosing your market for their operations?)

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Summer 2015


e. Relocation Packets and Information (How are local festivals and events used in information designed to entice individuals / organizations to relocate to your city?) f. Familiarization Tours (How are local festivals and events used by your City and Convention & Visitors Bureau as part of ‘Familiarization Tours’ for visiting meeting planners, VIP’s, etc.) g. Out-of-Market Media Coverage (How are local festivals and events used to secure interest in coverage from out-of-market media sources, travel writers, etc.?) h. Enhancing Exposure to the Arts and Other Causes (How are local festivals and events used to feature, highlight, expose new audiences to, or drive support for the arts and other causes?) i. Creating Highly Visible Public Relations Campaigns for City Facilities and Services (How are local festivals and events used to drive positive public relations campaigns for things like police image, parks usage, fire safety, EMT roles and support needs, use of local transportation options, marketing of/exposure to local venues, support of local bond issues, etc.?) j. Encouraging Community Bonding, Participation, and Celebration (How are local festivals and events used by the City to bond all of the diverse elements of the community together, encourage community involvement and support, and celebrate who we are when we are at our best?) k. Highlighting or Developing Underused Venues or Sections of the Community (How are local festivals and events used to encourage usage of or exposure to underused venues or city neighborhoods, underdeveloped sections of the City, etc.?) l. Creating Legacies and Images Beyond the Event (How are local festivals and events used to create lasting legacies (venues, programs, infrastructures and images of the City after and in-between events?)

Section 6. Extra Credit This section provides an opportunity to highlight any other programs, services, resources, activities, etc., that may not have been included or covered in the previous sections. Some examples may include the items below, among others, a. Skills Development - Availability of Certificate or Degree Programs in Festival & Event Management through a Local University or Private Provider b. Members of Your Event Community Who Currently Hold a Certified Festival & Event Executive (CFEE) Designation c. Secondary School System Graduation Requirements that Encourage Volunteerism and Community Service during Festivals and Events d. A Festival and Event Shared Resource Program in Your City (For example: shared warehousing, office space, equipment, staff, etc.) e. Efforts to Actively Recruit New Events to Your City (Please include reference to any applications made/secured if this area pertains) f. Other Creative Endeavors

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IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© APPLICATION Entry Deadline: 5:00 p.m. (MST) Monday, July 20th, 2015 Submit Entries, Entry Form and Payment to: Email: nia@ifea.com (preferred method of receiving entry.) If shipping entry, send to: IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© • 2603 Eastover Terrace, Boise, ID 83706 USA Phone: +1-208-433-0950 ext: 3 – nia@ifea.com

CITY APPLICANT INFORMATION (Please print clearly) Applicant City Name (If including information from surrounding market or suburb communities, please note those in parenthesis):______________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ State / Province or Territory: __________________________________________________________________________________________________ Country: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Global Region: (Choose one)

m Africa

m Asia

m Australia / New Zealand

m Europe

m Latin America

m The Middle East (MENASA)

m North America

Note: Politically connected islands and territories should choose the region of their most direct affiliation. m Other (If you choose ‘Other’ please clearly specify location below.) __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Population Level (select one):

m Under 1 million m Over 1 million

PRIMARY CONTACT INFORMATION (Please print clearly) The following information should pertain to the primary individual with whom the IFEA should communicate with, as necessary, throughout the award judging and selection process. Name: ___________________________________________________________ Title: __________________________________________________ Organization: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Mailing Address: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City, State, Country, Postal Code: _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone (Business): _________________________________________________ Phone (Mobile): _________________________________________ Fax: _____________________________________________________________ E-Mail: _________________________________________________ Note: The Recipient City will receive a complimentary membership for one year in IFEA through our appropriate global affiliate. If different from the Primary Contact please let us know who should receive this membership.

RELEASE & USAGE

• By submitting your entry to the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award©, you automatically grant the IFEA the right to use any materials from your entries for editorial, analytical, promotional or any other purpose without additional compensation. All materials and photos submitted as part of the application will become the property of the IFEA.

• Winning applicants agree that the IFEA may use their City name and representative photos in all press releases and program marketing materials, both hard copy and electronic versions. • Your entry into the competition is acknowledgement of these terms.

PAYMENT TOTAL

IFEA Member Non IFEA Member IFEA World Festival & Event City Award©: Number of Entries:_________x m $695 USD Per Entry m $895 USD Per Entry = $_____________

PAYMENT INFORMATION Please select your method of payment:

m VISA

m MasterCard

m American Express m Check (Made payable to the IFEA) m Wire Transfers: (Contact Leslie McFarlane at leslie@ifea.com for details)

Print Cardholder Name: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Signature: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Credit Card Number:________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Expiration Date: _____________________________________________ CVN Code: _________________ (VISA/MC-3 digit code back) (AMX-4 digit code front)

DID YOU REMEMBER TO: m Complete the entry form providing contact and payment information? m Submit a one (1) paragraph description of your city (to be used for promotional purposes by the IFEA)? m Submit an email list of your local media in Excel format for IFEA to use to announce the selected recipients? m Submit an individual photograph representing your city. (A least 300 dpi in size)?

m Submit a three (3) minute video presentation representing your city? m Submit a one (1) page introductory letter stating why your City should be selected to receive the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award©? m Submit your overall completed IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© Entry providing responses and supporting information for Sections 1-6? Is this entry submitted as one (1) singular entry piece/document/ PowerPoint/Pdf, etc.? Is this entry provided on a disk, USB Flash Drive or electronically in a Word, PowerPoint, PDF or other standard format?


Past IFEA World Festival & Event Cities Each year, the International Festivals & Events Association announces the recipients of the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award, presented by VISA at the Annual IFEA Convention & Expo. The IFEA would like to congratulate each winning city. For more information about each winning city - go to: www.ifea.com / Industry Awards / IFEA World Festival & Event City Awards / Past Event Cities

2014 IFEA World Festival & Event City Award Recipients 2010 IFEA World Festival & Event City Award Recipients • • • • • •

Dubai, United Arab Emirates Dublin, Ohio, United States Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States São Paulo, Brazil Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

2013 IFEA World Festival & Event City Award Recipients • • • • • • •

Boston, Massachusetts, United States Hwacheon-Gun, Gangwon-do, South Korea Nice, Côte d’Azur, France Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Rotorua, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand Salvador, Bahia, Brazil Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

2012 IFEA World Festival & Event City Awards Recipients • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Ballito-KwaDukuza, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa Campos do Jordão, São Paulo, Brazil Denver, Colorado, United States of America Dubai, United Arab Emirates Dublin, Ohio, United States of America Grapevine, Texas, United States of America Hampyeong-gun, Jeonlanam-do, Korea Lhasa, Tibet Autonomous Region, People’s Republic of China London, England Maribor, Slovenia Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, The Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

2011 IFEA World Festival & Event City Award Recipients • • • • • • • • • •

Dubai, United Arab Emirates Gimje-si, Jeollabuk-do, South Korea Indianapolis, Indiana, United States Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa Joinville, Santa Catarina, Brazil Meizhou Island of Putian City, Fujian Province, China Reykjavik, Iceland São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Shanghai, China Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Boryeong-si, Chungcheongnam-do, Korea Edinburgh, Scotland Geumsan-gun, Chungcheongnam-do, Korea Hidalgo, Texas, United States Jinju-si, Gyeongsangnam-do, Korea Louisville, Kentucky, United States Norfolk, Virginia, United States Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Rotterdam, The Netherlands Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Salvador, Bahia, Brasil Taupo, New Zealand


LEGACY SCHOLARSHIPS Supporting and Educating the Festivals & Events Industry Since 1993.

Each of the following IFEA Foundation Legacy Scholarships serve a selected audience(s) within our industry, as identified, by providing an annual scholarship to the IFEA Annual Convention & Expo (registration only). We invite you to look through the opportunities, take a moment to learn a little more about the special individuals and groups attached to each, and apply for those that you may qualify for. For more information, go to: www.ifea.com. The Nick Corda Memorial Scholarship Providing support to young/new professionals currently completing their education or with less than three years in the industry. The Carolyn and Lee Crayton Legacy Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/organization from a smaller market, with grand visions for helping their community through events, but not yet a budget to match those visions. The Judy Flanagan Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/ organization whose event involves a parade.

The Georgia Festivals & Events Association Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/organization from Georgia.   The Bill & Gretchen Lofthouse Memorial Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/organization currently struggling with short-term economic or start-up challenges. The Mampre Media International Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual working with media/marketing responsibilities for an event. The Jean McFaddin Legacy Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/organization who has had at least 2 years active involvement, either as staff or volunteer, in producing a multi-dimensional event and whose career/lives have been inspired or touched by the Macy*s Thanksgiving Day Parade. The Daniel A. Mangeot Memorial Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/organization seeking advanced education and professional certification. This scholarship provides core curriculum registration fees toward the attainment of the IFEA’s Certified Festival & Event Executive (CFEE) designation. The Mid-Atlantic Festival & Event Professionals Scholarship  Providing support to a deserving individual/organization within the Mid-Atlantic United States.

The Richard Nicholls Memorial Scholarship Providing support to a deserving High School senior or College Student with a history of commitment to participating or volunteering in non-profit events / organizations; someone who is well-rounded in extra-curricular activities in and outside of campus life and who has a passion for helping others and/or supporting a cause that enhances the quality of life for individuals or the community at large. The Bruce & Kathy Skinner Scholarship Providing support to young/new professionals currently completing their education or with less than three years in the industry. The John Stewart Memorial Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual working with technology responsibilities supporting an event(s).

The Tennessee Festival & Event Professionals Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/organization from Tennessee.   The Pete Van de Putte Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/organization from Texas.  

The Joe & Gloria Vera Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/organization from Texas.  

The Don E. Whitely Memorial Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/organization whose event involves a parade. The Kay Wolf Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/organization from Texas.  

The George Zambelli, Sr. Memorial Scholarship Providing support to a deserving volunteer who has given their time and energies to their community festival/event.

For more information about how you can sponsor an IFEA Foundation Legacy Scholarship, call +1-208-433-0950 or email Schmader@ifea.com. For more details about each Legacy Scholarship, go to www.ifea.com


1995 - 2015 2015 IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson

20 Y E ARS of PINNACLES

Pinnacle Awards Competition Call for Entries

Gain the recognition your event deserves…

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ach year, the International Festivals & Events Association recognizes outstanding accomplishments and top quality creative, promotional, operational and community outreach programs and materials produced by festivals and events around the world, with the Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards Competition. This prestigious awards competition strives for the highest degree of excellence in festival and event promotions and operations, and in doing so, has raised the standards and quality of the festivals & events industry to new levels. From events large or small, cities, festivals, chambers, universities, parks & recreation departments, vendors & suppliers, and everything in between, events and promotions of nearly every type and size will have the opportunity to be recognized, as entries are categorized into organizations with similar sized budgets. From best Event Poster, T-Shirt, Hat, Promotional Brochure, Website, TV Promotion and Social Media site to best Volunteer Program, Green Program, Sponsor Follow-Up Report and Media Relations Campaign, there’s a place for almost every element of your event to be recognized. The IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards have provided many outstanding examples of how event producers can use innovation and creativity to achieve a higher level of success. One of the goals of the IFEA is to promote the professionalism of our members and the festivals and events industry as a whole. Therefore, to add further impact to the winning organizations, the IFEA will provide your organization with a press release template for you to distribute to your media list explaining the award and the competition. Your organization will be recognized for taking part in raising the level of professionalism throughout the industry, while at the same time improving your community. So what are you waiting for, gather your items, fill out the entry form, and send them off to be judged against the best of the best, in the festivals and events industry. Then get ready to hear your organization’s name announced at the 60th Annual IFEA Convention & Expo, September 21-23, 2015 in Tucson, AZ. Summer 2015

IFEA’s ie: the business of international events 101


THE CONTEST DEADLINES • EARLY BIRD ENTRY DEADLINE: 5:00 p.m. (MST), MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2015 ❍ Entries received on or prior to June 15, 2015 will receive the Member early bird rate of $30 per entry or $75 per Grand Pinnacle entry or the Non-Member early bird rate of $60 per entry or $150 per Grand Pinnacle entry depending on IFEA Membership status. • FINAL ENTRY DEADLINE: 5:00 p.m. (MST), MONDAY, JULY 20, 2015 ❍ Entries received between Tuesday, June 16, 2015 and Monday, July 20, 2015 will receive the Member final entry rate of $35 per entry or $100 per Grand Pinnacle entry; or the Non-Member final entry rate of $75 per entry or $200 per Grand Pinnacle entry depending on IFEA Membership status. ELIGIBILITY • Entries must have been produced and / or used for the first time between July 22, 2014 and July 20, 2015. • Entries must be submitted in their original format unless previously approved. For Questions Contact: Nia Hovde, nia@ifea.com. • Payment in full must be received with entries for entries to be deemed eligible. • Entries and entry forms must be submitted in English. • Font size for any written text must not be smaller than 10pt. • To receive the member rate for Pinnacle entries you must be an IFEA member in good standing. • Each entry form submitted must be completed in its entirety in order for items to be judged eligible. • Entry must be received at the IFEA Office by the above dates to be eligible. • Please consider the processing of your credit card or the cashing of your check for your Pinnacle entries, notice that your entries were received and processed. IMPORTANT NOTES • Items submitted are NOT able to be returned. • Judges will not refer to items in other categories, nor will they transfer items already judged in other categories (the number of entries must equal the number of categories entered). • A separate entry form must be submitted for each entry (copy as necessary). • Multiple entries or categories on a single form will not be accepted. • For all entries, please paper clip/bull clip entry form to item. Please do not glue or tape form to item. • Multiple entries within the same notebook/ bound format/ CD/ USB Drive, will not be accepted. Please separate entries. • Entries required to be submitted in a “notebook” (Categories 1, 38-68) means that the entry should be submitted in some sort of bound format in order to keep all the materials together. For example, a 3 ring binder; spiral bound; in a report cover or a bound publication with hard/soft covers. Please do not staple or paper clip your entries together. • UPDATED: If submitting categories 1 or 38-68, in addition to the printed entry you submit, please also submit each entry as a single pdf document (including all supporting materials within that single document.) Please submit PDF on a USB ThumbDrive or Disk. If submitting one or more entries from categories 1 or 38-68, please include all entries on a single USB Thumbdrive/Disk and attach to overall payment form. • When submitting your total entries, please also submit a high resolution copy of your organization or event logo. Please email to nia@ifea.com – subject “Logo for 2015 Pinnacle Entry – and your event/organization name.” A HOW TO GUIDE • All categories are listed on the left side of each page • Entry information required for each category is listed under the

specific category on the left (if applicable). This information is unique to that specific category. • Any supporting questions and supporting material requirements needed for each category or group of categories, is listed on the right side of each page (if applicable.) THE JUDGES The judges are recognized professionals in the areas of graphic design, promotions and public relations; broadcast, print and online media; and special event planning and management. SCORING SYSTEM • Categories 1, 38-68 will be judged using a point system for each individual entry. Each entry is scored separately. Scores will not be combined. • A possible total of 100 points may be awarded to each entry. • Be sure to answer and include all necessary information for each entry. • If a required element within an entry is not applicable to your event, please state so within your entry to avoid being marked down on points or indicate what element you have instead. • The scoring system is not applicable to TV, Radio, Multimedia, Print & some Merchandising categories. • We are unable to provide you with the points awarded for each of your entries. • Failure to meet all requirements or answer / provide all necessary information will result in a deduction of points. THE WINNERS • All finalists for the IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards will be notified by email the last week of August, 2015. Notification will go to the primary IFEA Member in addition to the contact listed on the Awards entry form. • The 2015 IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Award winners will be announced at the 60th Annual IFEA Convention & Expo, September 21-23, 2015 in Tucson, AZ. • If you are not present at the Awards Presentation to accept your award(s), they will be mailed to you after the Annual Convention. Expect 3-4 weeks for delivery. If shipping costs for your award exceeds $15 USD, you will be sent an invoice for the shipping charges. • Organizations submitting entries for the Grand Pinnacle category must register at least one person for the 60th Annual IFEA Convention & Expo, September 21-23, 2015 in Tucson, AZ. or arrange for a representative to accept any award won on your behalf. • Gold winning entries will be on display during the 60th Annual IFEA Convention & Expo. • Winning entries will also be available to view at www.ifea.com shortly after the 60th Annual IFEA Convention & Expo. RELEASE & USAGE • By submitting your entry to the IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Award Competition, you automatically grant the IFEA the right to use any materials and / or photos from your entries for editorial, analytical, promotional or any other purpose without additional compensation or permission. In addition, you acknowledge your entry/ies are not returnable. Your entry into the competition is acknowledgment of these terms. SHIP ENTRIES TO: IFEA Pinnacle Awards Competition International Festivals & Events Association 2603 W Eastover Terrace, Boise, ID 83706, USA Phone: +1-208-433-0950 ext: 3 • Please try to avoid using packing peanuts/popcorn when shipping your entry. • For packing tips, go to www.ifea.com and then Industry Awards / Pinnacle Awards / 2015 Pinnacle Awards

2102 2015 IFEA’s IFEA ie: /the Haas business & Wilkerson of international Pinnacle Awards events Brochure Summer 2015


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS As you prepare your entries, you will have many questions. To help answer many of your questions, we have posted our most frequently asked questions on the IFEA website at www.ifea.com / Awards / Pinnacle Awards / 2015 Pinnacle Awards, check back often as we’ll continue to post questions and answers as they come in. If you have any further questions about the IFEA/Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards, please contact Nia Hovde at +1-208-433-0950 Ext 3 or nia@ifea.com. Go to www.ifea.com to find answers to common questions such as: • When you ask for entries in the original format, what does that apply to? • What do you mean when you say, please provide entries in a ‘notebook’ or ‘bound format’? • For the more in depth entries (categories 1, 38-68) do I have to answer or provide information for all the criteria and requirements listed under the category? • Referring to the above question, what if something in a specific category that is required, either does not apply to our event, or we are unable to provide the information required. • Certain entries ask for budget information, however we aren’t able to reveal certain elements of that information as it is not public knowledge. How can I answer the required information if I’m not able to provide it? • On certain entries, it says we can only provide 5 examples of supporting materials . . . how can I possibly only provide 5 examples!? • Why do we need to provide certain entries on disk or Thumbdrive? • Referring to the above question, am I able to save all of the entries I’m submitting on one disk/Thumbdrive, instead of saving each individually? • Are we able to enter the same event into multiple categories? • Are we able to enter multiple items (that are different) in the same category, for the same event? • I’m not a member of the IFEA, am I still able to enter? • Can I pay for my entries via a wire transfer? • How are the Pinnacle Award Entries Judged? • Why do you not publish the points awarded for each entry in the list of winning entries? • Who judges the Pinnacle Entries? • Why aren’t we able to know the names of the judges? • It looks like there’s even more requirements for some categories . . what specifically do I need to answer for categories 1, 38-68? • For the above listed categories . . . what order should I list my entry in, in response to the requirements?

• For categories 1, 38-68, that require written information and are also required to be put into a ‘notebook’ or ‘bound format’ be sure to submit the information in that category in the order that it is asked so it’s easier for the judges to compare one entry to another. • When saving your entry to a disk or Thumbdrive to go along side your individual entry, be sure to save your entry as one document – instead of multiple documents. • When putting together categories 1, 38-68 that require a lot of work to create . . . if you have time, make 2 copies! What better way to keep a record of what you did each year not only at your event, but also for the next year’s Pinnacles! • Remember the eligibility period for the pinnacles. Entries must have been produced and/or used for the first time between July 22, 2014 and July 20, 2015. So if you produced an event during that time, or any materials for your event were produced during that time (even if the actual event was outside of that time frame) it’s eligible! • If you are required to write something for your entry, make sure it is well written and easy to read. • The more organized your entries are, the easier it is to understand your message. • With all entries, guide the judges to what you want them to see. Highlight the important parts. • Don’t overwhelm the judges with too much information. Summarize the statistics and only display your best footage/news clippings. Quantity is not always quality. • On categories 1, 38-68 (categories that have a lot of requirements), be sure to have someone that is not closely tied to your event read through your entry to see if everything makes sense. Sometimes you may be too close to your event and you may not include certain information, since it may be too obvious to you. But it may be a vital piece of information. If your entry makes sense to an outsider to your event, it should make sense to the judges. • Many of the judges may not know anything about your event, so make sure your explanations are clear enough so they feel like they have just attended/participated in your program. • Proof, Proof, Proof!! Yes, we do mark you down for typos! • When in doubt – ASK. If you’re not sure on something, please contact Nia Hovde +1-208-433-0950 ext: 3 or nia@ifea.com. QUESTIONS? • Contact: Nia Hovde, Director of Marketing & Communications at Phone: +1-208-433-0950 ext: 3 or Email: nia@ifea.com • For additional information and FAQ’s, go to www.ifea.com/ Industry Awards / Pinnacle Awards

TIPS AND POINTERS Never participated in the Pinnacle Awards Program before? Looking for some helpful tips and pointers on how to enter? Below are just a few tips to hopefully point you in the right direction. Be sure to also review the Pinnacle FAQ’s and the Pinnacle Packing Tips. • Start Early! • Don’t wait until the deadlines are almost here to get your entries submitted! If you have time to work on your entries early, do so and then get them in early! • We will start accepting entries as soon as you want to start sending them in! • Do not mount any of the merchandise on poster board/foam core/card board etc. It’s much easier for the judges to pick up, look at and perhaps try the items on, if they are standing alone. • Be sure to read and follow all the criteria and requirements for each entry. The criteria and requirements are always being updated, so be sure to review the changes before you start.

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THE GRAND PINNACLE • • • •

Educational Program Children’s Program Food & Beverage Program Entertainment Program (music, artists, theatre, performers etc.) • Merchandise Program • Community Outreach Program • Emergency Preparedness Program e. Descriptions of any other Special Programs unique to your event.

1) GRAND PINNACLE The Grand Pinnacle is the highest award given by the IFEA in recognition of those Festivals and Events* who have a balance of all the elements necessary to ensure a successful event. (*Of those events who enter and judged within each of the four separate budget categories.) ENTRY INFORMATION: For entry, please provide a detailed description to each section requested within: 1. Introductory Information 2. Additional Requirements 3. Supporting Materials 4. Supporting Questions • Submit entire Grand Pinnacle Entry within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as 1 (one) document) on a CD or Thumbdrive. Attach CD or Thumbdrive to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on 1 (one) CD or Thumbdrive.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed here. • Points will be awarded to the individual sections of your entry, in addition to the overall Judges Criteria points. 1. Introductory Information: (10 points) Within a maximum of 4 pages (total), provide an overview of your event, stating your event’s: a. Event Dates b. Purpose / Mission c. History/Description of Event d. Types of Activities Included Under the Festival / Event Umbrella e. Overall Revenue and Expense Budget f. Estimated Economic Impact g. Attendance Numbers & Demographics h. Volunteer Count & Demographics i. Staffing Numbers and Positions j. Founding / Incorporation Date and Management System (i.e.: 501(c)3 non-profit staff & volunteer board; city managed; profit-making partnership, etc.) 2. Additional Requirements: (40 Points) Include a detailed overview of each of the sections listed below (a-e*) for your festival / event, using no more than two (2) pages for each section. • Make each section a separate tab in entry in order for the judges to clearly identify them. • If your festival/event does not include one or more of the sections listed below, please provide an overview as to why your event does not include that element, or what you provide instead, so as not to lose points. a. Promotional/Marketing Campaign & Media Outreach (Includes but not limited to: What was your overall message/ slogan/image that you projected for your event this year? What was your target population, who received the message, what types of mediums did you utilize and who promoted your message. ) b. Website / Social Media / Multi-Media Program /Campaign c. Overall Sponsorship Program (Provide an overview of your overall sponsorship program – how many sponsors, who are they and what do they sponsor and total sponsorship funds.) d. Critical Component Programs *Provide up to a one (1) page description for each of the following programs (if not applicable, please state as such and/or what your festival/event has in its place.) • Volunteer Program • Green Program

3. Supporting Materials: (10 Points) • Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the festival/event - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area in the 2.) Additional Requirements section (if applicable) (a-e). • Supporting materials may be placed within a specific section of the entry, or at the end. 4. Supporting Questions: (10 points) Please answer the following questions. (Maximum of 1 page per question) a. What did you do to update / change the event from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? ❍ If the event is a new event, please answer the following question instead: • “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the event, and how did you handle them?” b. Please provide measurable results / examples for question (a). c. What makes the event stand out as an internationally recognized event? d. Why should the event win the IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Grand Pinnacle Award? Judging Criteria: (30 points) The Grand Pinnacle Entry will be judged based on the following criteria. Please refer to the Entry Information for further details. The following Judging Criteria is applicable to both the individual entry and the overall event. • Is the entry / event well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / event designed and laid out well? • Is the event creative and / or unique? • Does the entry relay the image of the event? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Does the entry match the purpose / mission for the event? • Have all requirements been met? Additional Notes: • Be sure to answer and provide information for every section and area listed in the entry requirements. Failure to provide information for each section / element will result in a deduction of points. If a required element is not applicable to your event, please state as such and/or what your festival/event has in its place. • This entry is separate from all other categories and divisions. Judges will not refer to, or transfer items from other categories. • Organizations submitting entries for the Grand Pinnacle category must register at least one person for the 60th Annual IFEA Convention & Expo, September 21-23, 2015 in Tucson, AZ. or arrange for a representative to accept any award your behalf.

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CATEGORIES TELEVISION & RADIO ENTRIES 2)

BEST TV PROMOTION

3)

BEST FULL LENGTH TV PROMOTION

4)

BEST FULL LENGTH TV PROGRAM

5)

BEST EVENT VIDEO

6)

BEST RADIO PROMOTION

(Ad Spot or PSA)

(Local Programming)

(National Promotion / Syndication) (For Sale)

(Ad Spot or PSA)

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 2-7: • All TV/video entries should be encoded for Region 1 or Region 0 DVD capabilities. Submit entry on a DVD or Thumbdrive. Entry should be viewable in Windows Media Player or QuickTime. (Please do not submit Blu-Ray Disks.) • All Radio entries should be submitted on a CD or Thumbdrive (not a DVD) Entry should preferably be submitted as a wave file or MP3 file. • Label DVD / CD / Thumbdrive and attach entry form to case. • Only one video/radio spot per DVD / CD / Thumbdrive. Submit EACH entry SEPARATELY. DO NOT combine multiple entries on DVD / CD / Thumbdrive. • These are standalone items and no written information is required. • Make all DVD’s / CD’s set to Auto Play. Judging Criteria: • Does the entry relay the image of the event? • Is the item creative and / or unique? • Is the message clear? • Is the item organized? • What is the “Usability” factor? • What is the overall impression?

MULTIMEDIA ENTRIES 7)

BEST EVENT WEBSITE

8)

BEST ORGANIZATION WEBSITE

9)

BEST EVENT / ORGANIZATION E-NEWSLETTER

(Submit web address only – clearly print website address on entry form under section 3.) (Submit web address only – clearly print website address on entry form under section 3.)

(Clearly print or type a link to download materials on entry form under Section 3. Submit 3 consecutive issues.)

10) BEST MISCELLANEOUS MULTIMEDIA

(Includes, but is not limited to items such as: Screen Savers, Live Web-casts, Electronic Billboards, etc. Submit in format used. Preferable method for Videos is a YouTube link. Only one multimedia item per entry. Clearly print or type link on entry form under Section 3 - type on separate sheet of paper if necessary - or submit on Thumbdrive.)

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 7-12: • For categories 7, 8, 11 & 12 site will be reviewed online by judges. • Be sure to make the website link go to exactly where you wish the judges to go first. • Refer to any additional entry information listed next to each category. • These are standalone items and no written information is required. Judging Criteria: • Does the entry / item relay the image of the event? • Is the item creative and / or unique? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / item organized? • What is the “Usability” factor? • What is the overall impression?

11) BEST SOCIAL MEDIA SITE

(Submit Social Media Site Address – clearly print address on entry form under section 3.)

12) BEST FESTIVAL / EVENT MOBILE APPLICATION

(Submit web address or instructions on how to obtain the App, clearly print address on entry form under Section 3.) Summer 2015

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CATEGORIES PROMOTIONAL PRINTED ENTRIES 13) BEST EVENT PROGRAM 14) BEST NEWSPAPER INSERT / SUPPLEMENT 15) BEST PROMOTIONAL BROCHURE 16) BEST EVENT / ORGANIZATION NEWSLETTER (Submit three consecutive issues.)

17) BEST MISCELLANEOUS PRINTED MATERIALS (MULTIPLE PAGE)

(Includes but not limited to: direct mail brochures, cookbooks, annual reports, etc. - One item per entry.)

18) BEST MISCELLANEOUS PRINTED MATERIALS (SINGLE PAGE)

(Includes but not limited to direct mail pieces, rack cards, fliers, maps, etc. Only one item per entry. Mounting on Poster board, optional)

19) BEST COMPANY IMAGE PIECES

(Includes but is not limited to: Letterhead, envelopes, logo, etc.). (One item per entry)

20) BEST COVER DESIGN

(Submit cover only – mounted on poster board. Covers of Magazine, Newspaper, Brochures, Programs all acceptable.)

21) BEST SINGLE NEWSPAPER DISPLAY AD (Submit entry mounted on poster board.)

22) BEST SINGLE MAGAZINE DISPLAY AD (Submit ad mounted on poster board.)

23) BEST AD SERIES

(Submit a maximum of 5 ads.) (If possible, mount all ads one same poster board.)

24) BEST PROMOTIONAL POSTER

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 13-17: • These are stand alone items and no written information is required. • Submit each entry in original format if possible • Submit categories 13-17 with the entry form securely paper clipped/bull clipped to the back. • Do not mount on display board. Judging Criteria • Does the entry relay the image of the event? • Is the item creative and / or unique? • Is the item designed / laid out well? • Is the message clear? • Is the item organized? • Is the item usable / functional? • What is the overall impression? ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 18-28: • Submit categories 18-23, 26-27 each mounted on a single, black display board with a maximum of 2 inch margins. • Submit categories 24-25 each rolled up in a poster mailing tube. Do not fold the poster. Do not mount the poster on poster board. • Only one entry per board. • These are standalone items and no written information is required. Judging Criteria • Does the item / entry relay the image of the event? • Is the item creative and / or unique? • Is the item designed / laid out well? • Is the message clear? • Is the item organized? • Is the item usable / functional? • What is the overall impression?

(For posters not for sale at Festival or Event but used for promotional purposes to promote event) (Do not mount. Submit in poster tube.)

25) BEST COMMEMORATIVE POSTER

(For posters specifically for sale at festival or event.) (Do not mount. Submit in poster tube.)

26) BEST EVENT PROMOTIONAL PHOTOGRAPH

(Promotional photograph for your event) (Photo Dimensions: 8 inches x 10 inches. Submit photo mounted on Poster board - 2 inch margins.)

27) BEST OUTDOOR BILLBOARD

(Submit photo or print out of billboard, mounted on poster board.)

28) BEST EVENT INVITATION

(Single or Multiple Page. Do NOT mount this category on

poster board.)

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CATEGORIES EVENT DÉCOR & AMBIANCE ENTRIES 29) BEST STREET BANNER

(Submit photo or printouts of banner only, mounted on poster board. Do not send actual banner.)

30) BEST MISCELLANEOUS ON-SITE DECOR

(Includes but is not limited to: directional signage, stage backdrops, entryways, flags, inflatables, etc.) (Submit only one decor item per entry.) (Submit photo of decor, mounted on poster board.)

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 29-30: • Submit categories 29-30 each mounted on a single, black display board with a maximum of 2 inch margins. • Only one entry per board. • These are standalone items and no written information is required. Judging Criteria: • Does the item / entry relay the image of the event? • Is the item creative and / or unique? • Is the item designed / laid out well? • Is the message clear? • Is the item organized? • Is the item usable / functional? • What is the overall impression?

MERCHANDISE ENTRIES For merchandise sold at Festival / Event / Organization. 31) BEST T-SHIRT DESIGN

(Does not include Tank Tops, Long-Sleeve T-Shirts or Collared/Polo Shirts)

32) BEST PIN OR BUTTON

(Please mount pin on poster board with 2 inch margins maximum.) (For single pins only, no pin sets.)

33) BEST HAT 34) BEST OTHER MERCHANDISE

(For merchandise other than T-shirts, pins, hats etc. that you have for sale at your festival/event.)

35) BEST MISCELLANEOUS CLOTHING

(i.e. - jackets, sweatshirts, long-sleeve t-shirts, polo shirts, tank tops, socks, scarves, etc.)

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 31-37: • Submit actual merchandise items for categories 31- 37 as is. • These are standalone items and no written information is required. • Do not mount merchandise items on poster board – except Best Pin or Button. Judging Criteria: • Does the entry / item relay the image of the event? • Is the item creative and / or unique? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / item organized? • What is the “Usability” factor? • What is the overall impression?

36) BEST NEW MERCHANDISE

(New merchandise to your festival/event/organization within the past festival season.)

37) BEST SPONSOR GIFT

(A gift a festival/event gives to a sponsor of their festival/event.)

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CATEGORIES SPONSORSHIP ENTRIES 38) BEST TARGETED SPONSOR SOLICITATION PROPOSAL

(Actual Sponsorship Proposal that was used to target a specific sponsor for your festival/event.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following using no more than one (1) page per section: a. Introduction and description of main event. b. Name of Sponsor c. Introduction, effectiveness and success of Sponsor solicitation package

2. Supporting Materials: a. Please provide a sponsor solicitation package that was actually used to target a specific sponsor. • Provide in the format used to present to the sponsor and with any other additional materials that were sent with the proposal. (Okay to substitute name of sponsor for generic name for confidentiality, however please make it clear on your entry you are doing this.)

39) BEST INDIVIDUAL SPONSOR FOLLOW-UP REPORT

(Actual Follow-Up Report that was generated for a specific sponsor for your festival/event.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following using no more than one(1) page per section: a. Introduction and description of main event. b. Name of Sponsor c. Introduction and effectiveness of Sponsor follow-up report 2. Supporting Materials: a. Please provide a sponsor follow-up report that was actually sent to a specific sponsor. • Provide in the format used to present to the sponsor and with any other additional materials that were sent with the report. (Okay to substitute name of sponsor for generic name for confidentiality, however please make it clear on your entry you are doing this.)

40) BEST SPONSOR PARTNER

(Entry should highlight a specific sponsor that stands out above all others.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following using no more than one (1) page per section: a. Introduction & description of main event b. Name of Sponsor c. Description of sponsor; level of sponsorship (cash/in-kind); details of benefit package and length of sponsorship/ partnership d. Quantity and quality of support to event by sponsor e. Goals and success of relationships for both event and sponsor f. How the sponsor stands out over all other sponsors. g. Activation of Sponsorship by Sponsor ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORY 40: • Submit category 40 within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.)

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ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 38-39: • Submit category 38-39 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or Thumbdrive.) For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (20 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Materials: (50 points) Please provide materials listed under the specific category to the left. Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. 3. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the item / entry well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met? • Would you recommend or support this opportunity if in a position to do so?

• Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or Thumbdrive.) For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (70 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • What is the overall impression? • Have all requirements been met?

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CATEGORIES SPONSORSHIP ENTRIES 41) BEST SINGLE NEW SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITY

(New activity / program within an Event created specifically to recruit a new sponsor or created after a new sponsor came on board.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & description of main event b. Name of Opportunity and Sponsor c. Description and purpose of New Sponsorship Opportunity d. Description of the targeted sponsor for the opportunity and why the sponsor was targeted e. Explain the synergy between the event and sponsor f. Overall effectiveness / success of the sponsorship 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

42) BEST SPONSORSHIP PROGRAM FOR INDIVIDUAL SPONSOR

(Activity or program within a Festival or Event created for a specific sponsor.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & description of main event b. Name of Program and Sponsor c. Description and purpose of event/program being sponsored d. Description of sponsor; level of sponsorship (cash/in-kind); details of benefit package and length of sponsorship/ partnership e. Overall effectiveness / success of the program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

43) BEST OVERALL SPONSORSHIP PROGRAM

(Entry should focus on the entire sponsorship program for all sponsors for the entire event.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & description of main event b. Description of overall Sponsorship Program c. List of all current sponsors for event; levels of support; longevity of each d. Available benefit packages and valuation formulas e. Description of sponsor research targeting and sales process f. Description of sponsor service team and steps taken when new agreement is signed. g. Describe current sponsor renewal process & retention rate h. Overall effectiveness / success of the program i. Supporting Materials: Please provide a copy of Sponsor Agreement Sales Packet / Proposal; a copy of Sponsorship Follow Up Report and a sample of Sponsor Agreement 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 41-43: • Submit category 41-43 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or Thumbdrive.) For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this program from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the program is a new program, please answer the following question instead: “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the program, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program. Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. Please limit your supporting materials to those actually sent / used with sponsor: • Printed materials (brochures / programs etc.) • Promotion / marketing / media materials • Supporting photographs • Measurable results: tangible & intangible 4. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the program / entry well organized? • Is the content professional? Is the message clear? • Is the program / entry designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met? • Would you recommend or support this opportunity if in a position to do so?

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CATEGORIES FESTIVAL & EVENT CRITICAL COMPONENT ENTRIES 44) BEST VOLUNTEER PROGRAM

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 44-45:

(For overall Volunteer Programs at an Event/Festival/ Organization)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section, together with applicable examples: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Volunteer Program c. Target audience / attendance / number of participants d. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event e. Volunteer demographics (age, gender, individuals, charities, schools etc.) f. Volunteer job descriptions g. Recruitment methods / materials / applications h. Communication methods / materials i. Training guides / programs / handbooks / materials j. Organization & schedule information / materials k. Volunteer perks / benefits l. Appreciation / recognition methods/ materials m. Retention methods / materials n. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with program and benefits to each (if applicable) o. Overall revenue/expense budget of program p. Overall effectiveness / success of program q. Measurable results: ratio of volunteers to guests; # of volunteers; # of volunteer hours; # of volunteers in database; estimate of the financial value of your volunteers. 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

45) BEST GREEN PROGRAM

(For festivals/events with implemented green/recycling programs at their event.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Green Program c. Target audience / attendance / number of participants d. What “Green” initiatives were used at event (i.e. – recycling; alternative methods of transportation; renewable energy etc.) e. How were initiatives promoted to the public? Include marketing materials. f. Education programs pertaining to green program (for public, sponsors, volunteers etc.) g. How was green program enforced / encouraged, tracked, and staffed? h. Who assisted green program (vendors, volunteers etc.) i. Measurable results – how much was recycled; savings / cost of Green program; carbon footprint reduction j. Non-tangible results: education; awareness; involvement etc. k. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event l. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with program and benefits to each (if applicable) m. Tie-in of program to main event n. Overall revenue/expense budget of program o. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry. 110

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• Submit categories 44 & 45 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or Thumbdrive.) For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this program from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the program is a new program, please answer the following question instead. • “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the program, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area listed below (if applicable). Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Printed materials (brochures, handbooks, Recruiting materials, evaluation forms, signage, etc.) • Promotional / marketing / media materials • Merchandise materials (photographs accepted) • Information provided to participants / volunteers / sponsors / students / charities etc. • Supporting photographs • Measurable results: tangible & intangible 4. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?

Summer 2015


FESTIVAL & EVENT CRITICAL COMPONENT ENTRIES 46) BEST EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

(For festivals/events who have a specific educational component built into their programming.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Educational Program c. Target audience / attendance / number of participants d. Provide a detailed description of the education program / curriculum e. Who provided the education and in what setting f. Involvement by local educational institutions and professional education (if any) g. What was the take-away for attendees / participants? h. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event i. Tie-in of program to main event j. Overall revenue/expense budget of program k. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with program and benefits to each (if applicable) l. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

47) BEST CHILDREN’S PROGRAMMING (For festivals/events who have specific programming for Children) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Children’s Program c. Target Audience / main target age group d. Attendance / number of participants e. Activities /entertainment provided f. Local School involvement g. Tie-in of program to main event h. Overall revenue and expense budget of specific program / event i. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with event / program and benefits to each (if applicable) j. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event k. What makes the program unique and creative? l. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

48) BEST COMMUNITY OUTREACH PROGRAM

(Programming done throughout the year to benefit and help include all parts of the community, while enhancing the image and brand of your event/organization throughout the year.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Outreach Program c. Target audience / attendance / number of participants d. Impact program had on the community e. Tie-in of program to main event f. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event g. Overall revenue/expense budget of specific program h. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with program and benefits to each (if applicable) i. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry. Summer 2015

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 46-48: • Submit categories 46, 47, 48 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or Thumbdrive.) For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this program from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the program is a new program, please answer the following question instead. • “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the program, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area listed below (if applicable). Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Printed materials (brochures, handbooks, Recruiting materials, evaluation forms, signage, etc.) • Promotional / marketing / media materials • Merchandise materials (photographs accepted) • Information provided to participants / volunteers / sponsors / students / charities etc. • Supporting photographs • Measurable results: tangible & intangible 4. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?

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FESTIVAL & EVENT CRITICAL COMPONENT ENTRIES 49

BEST EVENT / PROGRAM WITHIN AN EVENT TO BENEFIT A CAUSE

(Entry may include fundraising programs as well as awareness programs.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Event/Program c. Description of selected cause and why/how it was selected d. Target audience / attendance / number of participants e. Tie-in of program to main event f. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event g. Overall revenue/expense budget of specific event/program h. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with event / program and benefits to each (if applicable) i. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

50) BEST EVENT (WITHIN AN EXISTING FESTIVAL) (Entry to highlight a specific event that is held during the course of a larger festival/event.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Event within Festival c. Target audience and attendance / number of participants d. Overall revenue/expense budget of event e. Tie-in of program to main festival f. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event g. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with event and benefits to each (if applicable) h. What makes the event unique & creative? i. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

51) BEST EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS & RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR AN EVENT

(Entry to focus on the overall risk management / emergency preparedness plan for a specific festival/event.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Risk Management Plan c. Target audience / attendance / number of participants d. Overall revenue and expense budget of specific program / event e. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event f. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with event / program and benefits to each (if applicable) g. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry. ❍ Please submit a detailed documentation of the security plan used at your event

52) BEST FOOD & BEVERAGE PROGRAM

(Entry to focus on the overall food and beverage opportunities available during the course of a specific festival/event.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) pages to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Food & Beverage Program c. Number and types of vendors d. Site Plan (i.e.: Food Courts, Crowd Flow etc.) e. Cash Management Process f. Fee Structures g. Alcohol Beverage Training/Control h. Vendor Application Process i. Festival/Event Controlled Products & Services (i.e.: Festival-only controlled product sales, Vendor required product use, etc.) j. Promotional activities to drive business k. Power/Water Access l. Waste Disposal 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 49-52: • Submit categories 49, 50, 51, 52 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or Thumbdrive.) For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this program from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the program is a new program, please answer the following question instead. ❍ “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the program, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area listed below (if applicable). Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. ❍ Printed materials (brochures, handbooks, Recruiting materials, evaluation forms, signage, etc.) ❍ Promotional / marketing / media materials ❍ Merchandise materials (photographs accepted) ❍ Information provided to participants / volunteers / sponsors / students / charities etc. ❍ Supporting photographs ❍ Measurable results: tangible & intangible 4. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?


CATEGORIES FESTIVAL & EVENT CRITICAL COMPONENT ENTRIES 53)

BEST NEW EVENT

(For festival or event created from scratch within the past year.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of New Event c. Target audience and attendance / number of participants d. Overall revenue/ expense budget of event e. Duration of program (start to finish) f. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with event and benefits to each (if applicable) g. What makes the event unique & creative? h. Overall effectiveness / success of event 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

54)

BEST NEW PROMOTION ACTIVITY

(Entry should focus on a specific promotion done by festival/event/vendor/supplier to promote a product, service, event, company, entertainment etc.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event/organization b. Description and purpose / objective of Promotion c. Description of what was being promoted (merchandise, event, company, entertainment; etc.) d. What makes this promotion different from any other promotions? e. Target audience for promotion f. Attendance / number of participants (if applicable) g. Tie-in of promotion to main event/organization h. Overall revenue and expense budget of specific promotion i. Duration of promotion (start to finish) j. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with event/ organization and promotion and benefits to each (if applicable) k. Overall effectiveness / success of promotion 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

55)

BEST NEW ATTENDEE SERVICE

56)

BEST MONEY-MAKING IDEA

(Any product or service designed with the intent of enhancing the attendee experience at a festival or event.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) pages to explain each section: a. Description of new product or service b. Goals & objectives of product or service c. Application of product or service at an event d. Overall effectiveness of product or services e. Target market for product or service f. Measurable results: tangible & intangible 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

(Entry should focus on a specific idea implemented at a festival/event that generated revenue.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & description of main event b. Description of money-making idea c. Target audience (if applicable) d. Attendance / number of participants (if applicable) e. Mediums used to promote idea (if applicable) f. Tie-in of promotion to main event/organization g. Overall revenue and expense budget of specific idea h. Overall effectiveness / success of idea 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 53-56: • Submit categories 53, 54, 55, 56 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or Thumbdrive.) For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question (10 points) • What challenges/obstacles did you foresee/encounter in creating the program/activity/idea, and how did you handle them? 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area listed below (if applicable). Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Printed materials (brochures, handbooks, signage, etc.) • Promotional / marketing / media materials • Merchandise materials (photographs accepted) • Information provided to participants • Supporting photographs • Measurable results: tangible & intangible 3. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?


CATEGORIES FESTIVAL & EVENT CRITICAL COMPONENT ENTRIES 57) BEST OVERALL MERCHANDISING PROGRAM

(Entry should focus on the entire merchandising program for the entire festival/event/organization.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & background of event b. Description of merchandising program c. Overall revenue and expense budget for merchandise lines d. Target market for merchandise program (population / location) e. Marketing efforts tied to merchandise program f. Community support in selling / distributing merchandise g. Measurable results (Including number / variety of items; number of outlets selling items, etc.) h. Overall effectiveness of merchandise program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry. ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORY 57: • Submit category 57 within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or Thumbdrive.) For entry, please provide detailed information to the

58) BEST VENDOR / SUPPLIER

(Entry should highlight a specific vendor or supplier to the festival/event that stands out above all others.) (Festival or Event must submit this entry)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) pages to explain each section: a. Description of vendor / supplier b. How the vendor / supplier stands out over all other vendor / suppliers c. Quantity and quality of service and support to event by Vendor / Supplier d. Length of relationship between vendor and event e. Tangible benefits of relationship to both event and vendor.

following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this program from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the program is a new program, please answer the following question instead: “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the program, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please include a sample selection of actual merchandise items available. • Also include photographs of all merchandise items available in your merchandise program. • Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. 4. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?

For entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (70 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • What is the overall impression? • Have all requirements been met?

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORY 58: • Submit category 58 within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or Thumbdrive.) 114

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CATEGORIES MEDIA RELATIONS ENTRIES For effective media campaigns that generated news coverage, instead of paid or donated advertising time. 59) BEST PRESS / MEDIA KIT

(For festivals/events/organizations to not only provide actual press/media kit used, but to demonstrate its effectiveness and use.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & background of campaign / event b. Provide actual media kit used to send out for your event c. Target audience / demographics for the media d. Target location (communities / cities / states) for media e. Types of mediums used for media outreach f. Measurable results indicating: • Number of publications / cities / states targeted • Percent of distribution that covered news • Longevity of media coverage • Increase / decrease in media from previous years 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

60) MOST CREATIVE / EFFECTIVE NEWS STUNT (For Festivals/Events/Organizations who generated publicity through a media stunt to promote their event/cause etc.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & background of campaign / event b. A detailed description of the news stunt c. How did the news stunt fit in to the overall media campaign for your event? d. Sponsor / charity involvement (if any) and why e. Was there an increase in media coverage for your event as a result of the stunt? 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

61) BEST MEDIA RELATIONS CAMPAIGN (Entry should focus on the entire media relations campaign for a specific festival or event.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & background of campaign / event b. Purpose / objective of the media relations campaign c. A detailed outline of your entire media relations campaign for your event. d. Target audience / demographics for the media e. Target location (communities / cities / states) for media f. Types of mediums used for media outreach g. Measurable results indicating: ❍ Number of publications / cities / states targeted ❍ Percent of distribution that covered news ❍ Attendance results based on media outreach / campaign ❍ Income results based on media outreach / campaign ❍ Longevity of media coverage ❍ Increase / decrease in media from previous years. h. Overall effectiveness of the campaign 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 59-61: • Submit categories 59, 60, 61 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or Thumbdrive.) For entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this promotion from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the promotion is a new promotion, please answer the following question instead. • “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the promotion, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area listed below (if applicable). Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Printed materials (press releases, news clippings, etc.) • Promotional materials • Video / audio documentation (Please limit to 1 example – provide written explanation of further examples) • Supporting photographs 4. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / campaign well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / campaign designed and laid out well? • Is the campaign creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?

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CATEGORIES EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS OFFERING EVENT MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS 62) BEST EVENT MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATE DEGREE

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & History of School/University b. Purpose / objective of Event Management Associate Degree c. Date degree/program was founded & time frame the course is offered d. Number of staff members & student to staff ratio e. Number of students enrolled / number graduated f. Tuition costs / Financial assistance offered g. Overall revenue and expense budget of program h. Writing/Speaking/Testing/Research requirements for students i. Practical event experience required (internships/assigned event management etc.) j. Overall effectiveness of degree/program - Alumni success (what are alumni of program doing now?) 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

63) BEST EVENT MANAGEMENT BACHELOR DEGREE

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & History of School/University b. Purpose / objective of Event Management Bachelor Degree c. Date degree/program was founded & time frame the course is offered d. Number of staff members & student to staff ratio e. Number of students enrolled / number graduated f. Tuition costs / Financial assistance offered g. Overall revenue and expense budget of program h. Writing/Speaking/Testing/Research requirements for students i. Practical event experience required (internships/assigned event management etc.) j. Overall effectiveness of degree/program - Alumni success (what are alumni of program doing now?) 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

64) BEST EVENT MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATION PROGRAM

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & History of School/University b. Purpose / objective of Event Management Certification Program c. Date degree/program was founded & time frame the course is offered d. Number of staff members & student to staff ratio e. Number of students enrolled / number graduated f. Tuition costs / Financial assistance offered g. Overall revenue and expense budget of program h. Writing/Speaking/Testing/Research requirements for students i. Practical event experience required (internships/assigned event management etc.) j. Overall effectiveness of degree/program - Alumni success (what are alumni of program doing now?) 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 62-64: • Submit categories 62, 63, 64 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or Thumbdrive.) For entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question (10 points) • What did you do to update/change the Degree from the year before? Were your updates/changes successful? Please providw measurable results/examples. • If the Degree is a new program, please answer the following questions instead: • What challenges/obstacles did you foresee/encounter in creating the program and how did you handle them? 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points)

Please also include any and all of the following Supporting Materials. Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Student recruiting materials • Student application materials • Marketing materials for program • Complete outline and syllabus of course(s) • Reading requirements list for students • Sample testing Materials 4. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?


CATEGORIES EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS OFFERING EVENT MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS 65) BEST ONLINE EVENT MANAGEMENT TRAINING PROGRAM 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & History of School/University b. Purpose / objective of Online Event Management Training Program c. Date degree/program was founded & time frame the course is offered d. Number of staff members & student to staff ratio e. Number of students enrolled / number graduated f. Tuition costs / Financial assistance offered g. Overall revenue and expense budget of program h. Writing/Speaking/Testing/Research requirements for students i. Practical event experience required (internships/assigned event management etc.) j. Overall effectiveness of degree/program - Alumni success (what are alumni of program doing now?) 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

66) BEST FESTIVAL & EVENT MANAGEMENT MASTERS PROGRAM

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & History of School/University b. Purpose / objective of Festival & Event Management Masters Program c. Date degree/program was founded & time frame the course is offered d. Number of staff members & student to staff ratio e. Number of students enrolled / number graduated f. Tuition costs / Financial assistance offered g. Overall revenue and expense budget of program h. Writing/Speaking/Testing/Research requirements for students i. Practical event experience required (internships/assigned event management etc.) j. Overall effectiveness of degree/program - Alumni success (what are alumni of program doing now?) 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

67) BEST FESTIVAL & EVENT MANAGEMENT PHD PROGRAM

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & History of School/University b. Purpose / objective of Festival & Event Management PhD Program c. Date degree/program was founded & time frame the course is offered d. Number of staff members & student to staff ratio e. Number of students enrolled / number graduated f. Tuition costs / Financial assistance offered g. Overall revenue and expense budget of program h. Writing/Speaking/Testing/Research requirements for students i. Practical event experience required (internships/assigned event management etc.) j. Overall effectiveness of degree/program - Alumni success (what are alumni of program doing now?) 2. Supporting Question - Anwser question listed to the right, here. 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 65-67: • Submit categories 65, 66, 67 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or Thumbdrive.) For entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question (10 points) • What did you do to update/change the Degree from the year before? Were your updates/changes successful? Please providw measurable results/examples. • If the Degree is a new program, please answer the following questions instead: • What challenges/obstacles did you foresee/encounter in creating the program and how did you handle them? 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points)

Please also include any and all of the following Supporting Materials. • Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Student recruiting materials • Student application materials • Marketing materials for program • Complete outline and syllabus of course(s) • Reading requirements list for students • Sample testing Materials 4. Judging Criteria: (30 points) • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?


CATEGORIES JUST FOR FUN 68) BEST PROMOTION PUBLICIZING AN IFEA / HAAS & WILKERSON PINNACLE AWARD WIN

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORY 68: • Submit category 68 within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or Thumbdrive. Attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or Thumbdrive.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Describe the promotion that took place to celebrate your IFEA/Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Award win.

For entry, please provide detailed information to the following:

(No Charge to enter this Category) Were you recognized for your outstanding accomplishments with an IFEA/Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Award last year? Gain further recognition for your award and event by promoting your Pinnacle Win, and then share with us what you did!

2. Supporting Questions: Please answer the following supporting questions, using no more than one (1) page for each question: a. What has winning an IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Award meant to your event? b. How have you used winning an award(s) to your advantage? c. How has winning an award(s) enhanced your presence within your community? d. How has winning an award(s) increased leverage / funding / sponsorship for your event? 3. Supporting Materials: Please also include any and all of the following supporting materials – limiting it to no more than 5 examples of each: • Promotion materials used to promote award • Media clippings from promotion • Examples of IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Winner logo placement

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1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) Please answer questions listed under specific category to the left. 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please provide materials listed under the specific category to the left. Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. 4. Judging Criteria: (30 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / promotion well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / promotion designed and laid out well? • Is the promotion creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?

Summer 2015


ENTRY FORM REQUIREMENTS

• Please submit one overall entry form with total payment - list all en-

2015

AWARDS

tries submitted on this form. (Be sure to complete sections 1 & 4.)

• Please also submit TWO copies of each individual entry form •

RELEASE AND USAGE

By submitting your entry to the IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards, you automatically grant the IFEA the right to use any materials from your entries for editorial, analytical, promotional or any other purpose without additional compensation. In addition, you acknowledge your entry / ies are not returnable. Your entry into the competition is acknowledgment of these terms.

• •

– one to be attached to each individual entry – and one to be submitted with payment and overall entry form. (Complete sections 1, 2, 3 on each entry form.) Be sure payment information is NOT filled out on these copies. If one organization is entering items for multiple events produced, please submit a separate payment form / overall entry form for each event to allow for proper credit to be given to that event. Please be sure to PRINT your organization, event, sponsor or program name clearly and correctly - as this is how it will appear on any award if won. NEW - Please email a high resolution copy of your organization or event logo to nia@ifea.com - subject “2015 Pinnacle Entry Logo” & Your Event / Logo Name.

Sections 1, 2 and 3 must be completed twice for each entry. One copy attached to each individual entry, and one copy attached to payment form. 1. ENTRANT INFORMATION (Required for each entry) (Tip: Complete Section 1. Then make copies to complete form for each entry.) How you list your organization / event name will be how it is listed on any award won. PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY. Organization: ________________________________________________________________________ Membership #: ____________________________ Name of Event (if different from organization): ________________________________________________________________________________________ Name of Specific Program and/or Program Sponsor (applies to Categories 38-68): ________________________________________________________ Address (Do not list P.O. Box): ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ City: ____________________________________ State: _____ Zip Code: _____________________ Country: __________________________________ Contact Person: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone:______________________________________________ E-mail: ____________________________________________________________________ Website: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 2. BUDGET INFORMATION (Required for each entry) Organization’s Event Expense Budget: (USD, include all cash outflows). Each entry category is divided into the budget categories below. Gold, Silver and Bronze Awards will be given in each budget category unless the number of entries warrants budgets to be combined, or as determined by the judges. under $250,000

$250,000 - $749,999

$750,000 - $1.5 million

over $1.5 million

3. ENTRY INFORMATION (Required for each entry) Category Name (required): _____________________________________________________________ Category Number (required): ________________ Entry Description: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ (Provide brief identifying description for each entry or Name of your specific Program being entered, Sponsor Name, web address etc.) Complete section 4 ONCE. Attach payment for all entries combined.

4. PAYMENT INFORMATION

Total Categories Entered: List which categories you are entering and how many of each. This is so we can account for all of your entries when they arrive. (e.g. 1, 2, 2, 3, 5, 7…): ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Entries received with payment by 5:00 p.m. June 15, 2015 (MST) will receive the Member early bird rate of $30 per entry or $100 per Grand Pinnacle Entry; or the Non-Member early bird rate of $60 per entry or $150 per Grand Pinnacle entry, depending on IFEA Membership Status. Entries received between June 16, 2015 and July 20, 2015 will receive the Member final entry rate of $35 per entry or $100 per Grand Pinnacle entry; or the Non-Member final entry rate of $75 per entry or $200 per Grand Pinnacle entry, depending on IFEA Membership Status. Questions: Contact nia@ifea.com. Early Bird Member Rates (Before June 15, 2015)

Final Entry Member Rates (June 16 - July 20, 2015)

Early Bird Non-Member Rates (Before June 15, 2015)

Final Entry Non-Member Rates (June 16 - July 20, 2015)

Grand Pinnacle:

$75 x _____= $_______

$100 x _____= $_______

$150 x _____= $_______

$200 x _____= $_______

Pinnacle Entries: (Categories 2-67)

$30 x _____= $_______

$35 x _____= $_______

$60 x ______= $_______

$75 x ______= $ _______

Category #68: $ 0 x _____ = $_______ (Just for Fun Category) TOTAL NUMBER OF ENTRIES: __________________________ TOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED: $ _____________________________________ Check (Make checks payable to IFEA)

Visa

MasterCard

American Express

Print Cardholder Name: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Signature: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Credit Card Number:_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Expiration Date: _____________________________________________ CVN Code: ______________________(MC / VISA-3 digit code back) (AMX-4 digit code front) DID YOU REMEMBER TO Include your payment for total entries along with 1 overall entry form listing each category number entered Include 2 individual entry forms for each item – one Include each entry (as requested) on a disk or Thumbdrive attached to payment form. with item, one with payment, do not list payment details on these forms Email organization / event logo to nia@ifea.com Review all rules for entry submission – go to: Pinnacle Awards section at www.ifea.com for more info. International Festivals & Events Association • 2603 W Eastover Terrace • Boise, ID 83706 U.S.A. • phone: +1.208.433.0950 • fax: +1.208.433.9812 • web: www.ifea.com

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MARKETPLACE BANNERS/FLAGS dfest® - DIXIE FLAG EVENT SERVICES TEAM - The ONE source for creative design, custom decorations, street banners, mascots, video marketing & installation for events. All services tailored to fit your unique needs. Contact: Pete Van de Putte Jr., CFEE, President; Address: 1930 N. Pan Am Expressway, San Antonio, TX 78208; Phone: (800) 356-4085; Fax: 210-227-5920; Email: sales@dixieflag.com; Website: www.dixieflag.com. FINANCIAL VISA / FESTIVALS.COM - Festival Transaction Services, a Festival Media Corporation company, brings true cashless transactions to festivals, fairs and community events through strategic partnerships with Visa and Bank of America Merchant Services (BAMS). Contact: Jim Shanklin; Address: 2033 Sixth Avenue-Ste 810, Seattle WA 98121; Phone: 206-381-5200; Email: jshanklin@festmedia.com. FIREWORKS LANTIS FIREWORKS AND LASERS - Provides display fireworks and laser specialists, computerized, choreographed fireworks, indoor/outdoor programs, special effects. Fully licensed and insured in Nevada, Arizona, Utah, Wyoming, Idaho, Colorado, Texas and Alaska. Contact: PO Box 491, Draper, UT 84020-0491; Phone: 800-443-3040; Email: lantispyro@yahoo.com; Website: http://www. lantisfireworks.com/v3/. INSURANCE HAAS & WILKERSON INSURANCE – Over 50 years experience in the entertainment industry, providing insurance programs designed to meet the specific needs of your event. Clients throughout the US include festivals, parades, carnivals and more. Contact: Carol Porter, CPCU, Broker; Address: 4300 Shawnee Mission Parkway, Fairway, KS 66205; Phone: 800-821-7703; Fax: 913-676-9293; Email: carol.porter@hwins.com; Website: www.hwins.com. KALIFF INSURANCE - Founded in 1917, Kaliff Insurance provides specialty insurance for festivals, fairs, parades, rodeos, carnivals and more. We insure the serious side of fun! Contact: Bruce Smiley-Kaliff; Address: 1250 NE Loop 410 Ste 920, San Antonio TX 78209; Phone: 210-829-7634 Fax: 210-829-7636; Email: bas@kaliff.com; Website: www.kaliff.com. K & K INSURANCE – For 60 years, K & K insurance has been recognized as the leading provider of SPORTS-LEISURE & ENTERTAINMENT insurance products. Contact: Mark Herberger; Address: 1712 Magnavox Way, Fort Wayne, IN 46804; Call: 1-866-554-4636; Email: mark.herberger@kandkinsurance.com. Website: KandKinsurance.com.

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INTERNET POINTSMAP® - PointsMap® has proven to be an effective and useful software for Festivals and Events. Create custom points at their exact location on your PointsMap with photos, descriptions, website links, multi-media, PDF’s and even “inside maps”. Your visitors can “PLAN” before the festival using their desktop computer, and then “NAVIGATE” the festival using their Smartphone. Visit www. PointsMap.com/SLAF and http://www.PointsMap.com/WichitaRiverFest/ to see how PointsMap is being used. It’s easy to use and extremely affordable. Contact: Jerry Waddell Address: 1100 Riverfront Pkwy, Chattanooga, TN 374022171; Phone: 423-894-2677; Email: jerryw@videoideas.com; Website: www.pointsmap.com. QUICKEDGE™ (EDGEWORKS GROUP LLC) - Since 1994 our mission has been to drive more business through your website. We plan, design, build, and market successful websites by integrating customized online strategies including search engine optimization, affiliate marketing, email marketing, and more. If this kind of experience and approach is what you’re looking for, we’d love to hear from you. Address: 26361 Crown Valley Parkway, Suite 203, Mission Viejo CA 92691; Phone: 866-888-7313 x701; Email: info@edgeworksgroup.com; Website: www.edgeworksgroup.com. SAFFIRE EVENTS - Saffire is award-winning software providing events & venues with beautifully designed, online event destinations, including integrated content management, mobile, social, ecommerce, email and more. Contact: Kendra Wright, Address: 248 Addie Roy Rd, Ste B-106, Austin TX 78746-4133; Phone: 512-430-1123; Email: info@saffireevents.com; Website: www.saffireevents.com. PUBLICATIONS TRIPINFO.COM - Their widely recognized database drives their reference media, constantly updated by travel destinations who submit their information updates online. Publishes website, print atlas & handbook, newsletters, and road maps. Address: 3103 Medlock Bridge Rd, Norcross, GA 30071-5401; Phone: 770-825-0220; Email: mark@tripinfo.com; Website: www.tripinfo.com. SPONSORSHIP IGE - The leading provider of consulting, valuation, research, published information and training in the global sponsorship industry. Address: 640 N LaSalle Ste 450, Chicago, IL 60654-3186; Phone: 312-944-1727; Website: http://www. sponsorship.com. TICKETING INTERACTIVE TICKETING - is an industry leader in online and onsite ticketing, providing a comprehensive ticketing solution with dynamic online sales tools, innovative mobile scanning options and secure onsite point of sale. Contact: Paul Lauterjung, Sales Manager; Address: 93 S Jackson St #20360, Seattle, WA 98104; Phone: 877-253-5676; Email: paul.lauterjung@interactiveticketing.com; Website: http://www.interactiveticketing.com/online-sales

Summer 2015


Continued from page 47

time-honored traditions like Oktoberfest can still learn new tricks. Five Rules for Making the Switch to Tokens: 1. The tokens must represent the same denomination—we set them all at $1. 2. You must have a booth to sell the tokens—we had three. The tokens were pre-packed in 10 or 20 in a plastic bag, and we never had a line. 3. The tokens for sale must be secured safely in the Tokens booth. We used special cash boxes secured by chains with lids to safeguard the cash. 4. You can’t let the tokens already sold for food or drink leak back into the festival elsewhere—tokens have to be treated as cash once they are spent. This is the purpose of the token catchers. 5. Purchase an amount of tokens comparable to the amount of cash handled during your busiest festival day.

Continued from page 20

Does your event have a military connection? That is always worth profiling. Are you holding an air show? Make sure you play up the military connection of aircraft that will be in the sky and maybe showcased on the ground as well. If you don’t have a direct military connection, but may be offering discounts to retired or active duty military personnel, you can always send out a release, and plan to have a local serviceman or woman available to do an interview on why such a discount will be welcomed. And of course, the media always like superlatives. If your event is the biggest, oldest, largest, tallest, longest, loudest, best attended, longest running, largest fundraiser or some other “est”, make sure to make note of that in your publicity materials. The third largest county fair in the region is not necessarily newsworthy. However, the longest running music festival west of the Rockies is something to crow about. So as you make your plans, and pray to the weather gods for cooperation, I hope that some of the thoughts listed above will give you some good ideas for gaining positive publicity for your upcoming event. Good luck!

Jim Wahl is with Wahl Marketing in Cincinnati, OH. He can be reached at: (513) 561-2002, jim@wahlmarketing.com. Established in 1835, Osborne Coinage is America’s oldest private mint. They produce high quality custom minted coins, tokens, medallions, and key chains in aluminum, brass, red brass, nickel-silver, bronze, and even fine silver and solid gold. For more information on Osborne products for ad specialties and premiums, visit www. asisupplier.com/75260 or contact Osborne Coinage Co., at (866) 2740868 ext 222 or e-mail at sales@ osbornecoinage.com.

Continued from page 16

Need Medical Assistance? • Remember when you had to call the doctor to get refills, make appointments and more? Now all that and more can be done online or in apps. For instance, the Walgreens app will call your doctor for refills and text you when your prescriptions are ready. Your insurance company probably also has an app, and your doctor may be online. • To check medical symptom, iTriage is a great app that could save you a trip to the doctor. • We also like Pediatric SymptomMD to help diagnose illness specifically in children. Are You a Weather Buff? • In our business, weather is everything, and in addition to nice features like radar, 15-day forecast and integrated weather alerts, AccuWeather includes a MinuteCast feature that tells you precipitation chances by the minute for the next two hours! (And if it’s raining, it will tell you exactly when it will end!)

enhance your life! Let me know what you think if you use any of these apps. In the next few issues, we’ll be sharing work apps, marketing apps, travel apps and podcasts, so feel free to send us ideas for any of these areas as well. Until next time, be well! Kendra Wright started her career managing non-profit fundraising events. Then in an “about face,” she took a job managing global Internet strategies at a Fortune 1000 company in 1995, just as the internet came to being. She left that company in 1998 to found Wright Strategies, working with clients like KEEN Footwear, Nike Jeep, Chrysler, Intel and Panasonic. Then in 2009, Kendra launched Saffire to do integrated online marketing and ticketing for hundreds of events, venues and destinations. It’s been a wild ride! Kendra can be reached at kendra@saffire.com, and more information about Saffire can be found at www.saffire.com.

Scott Fraser is a veteran communications professional with more than 30 years’ experience. As principal of Fraser Communications Group, he provides public relations, media relations and crisis communications advice for his clients who range from small non-profits, to international corporations. He has been hired to protect the reputations of companies in crisis, and gain positive public exposure for clients ranging from an emerging high tech company to established organizations in industry and healthcare. Sought after as a public speaker, Fraser also is an adjunct professor at Salve Regina University in Newport, RI, teaching courses in Crisis Communications and Public Relations. You can reach Scott at: sfraser@frasercomm.com, (401) 647-3444 and follow him @ frasercomm on Twitter.

There you have it – our wrap-up of some of the best apps and online tools to Continued from page 19

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IFEA

C AR E E R N E T WOR K

The Power of Bringing Great People Together with Great Careers Looking for an experienced employee to fill that vital job position? Interested in a career or wanting to advance yourself in the festivals and events field? Want to be sure that you target the top people in the festivals and events industry and ensure that your organization doesn't miss the most qualified candidate available? IFEA's Career Network can help. Now with a new partnership through online job board and applicant tracking system, TeamWork Online, your search base for positions and your reach to find qualified candidates has grown exponentially within the live festivals & events industry. With a reach of over 1.25 million potential candidates and educators interested in sports and live event positions, this new partnership between IFEA and TeamWork Online not only brings increased qualified candidates to your employment position,

but also increased employment positions to those candidates looking for employment! Positions range from top management positions such as CEO, Presidents and Executive Director to Special Events Coordinator, Volunteer Coordinator, Sponsorship Sales and more. Even internship and volunteer positions can be posted! Even better, if there’s not a position posted in an area or company you’re interested in, the TeamWork Online system can notify you when something becomes available! It’s an ever expansive employment network that is constantly talking and working on your behalf! If you are currently in search of a candidate, or are someone in search of employment, get started in your search today through IFEA Partner, TeamWork Online.

Got www.ifea.com and look under Resources

Profile for International Festivals & Events Association

ie: the business of international events - Summer 2015  

IFEA's quarterly magazine, "ie: the business of international events" is our most popular and widespread publication. From articles such as...

ie: the business of international events - Summer 2015  

IFEA's quarterly magazine, "ie: the business of international events" is our most popular and widespread publication. From articles such as...