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the business of international events

BOSTON STRONG.

One City’s Story of Safety, Security, and Sustainability

A Love Connection: Smartphones, Tablets and Apps 2014 Award Program Brochures Now Available


Some Ideas Rise Above the Rest

The FTS Prepaid Card-As-Ticket SM The FTS Visa prepaid Card-as-Ticket merges all tickets into one prepaid debit card—entry, concert, midway, food & beverage tickets—and tracks sales of each independently. It also can increase your event’s bottom line with VIP benefits or sponsor offers. The FTS Visa® partnership plus FTS technology offer these features and more through FTS Cash Management Services. But the better idea doesn’t stop here. How about no ticket service fees? That’s right. FTS does not charge a service fee for the Card-as-Ticket. Or private labeling each card to your event? That’s possible, too. The FTS Card-as-Ticket crowns the FTS Cash Management Services portfolio, including online automated vendor booth sales and sales commission administration—sales and commissions directly into your bank account from your FTS secure account at www.festbiz.com. No faxes, no settlement meetings to copy and exchange; time saved for you and for your vendors and artists.

To Find ouT more

Check out FTS at www.festbiz.com. Sign up for a personal web presentation. You’ll be glad you did.


TWO PROGRAMS GUARANTEED TO INCREASE YOUR SPONSORSHIP REVENUE! International Festivals & Events Association

SPONSOR SUMMIT

Sponsorship is the fuel for the festival and events industry engine. Strengthen the partnerships you have built with your festival’s sponsors by hosting an IFEA Sponsor Summit. When sponsors have to make difficult resource allocation decisions, they will remember the sponsor properties that gave them the tools and ideas they need to gain even greater value from their sponsorship investment.

SPONSOR AUDIT

Are you getting the most out of your sponsorship program? Is your sponsorship program performing at its peak or could it be strengthened? Have you identified and valued all of your sponsorable benefits and assets; or is their valuable ‘real estate’ going untapped? Have you been so busy recruiting, servicing and retaining the sponsors you have that you haven’t had time to step back and evaluate your overall sponsorship program to see if there is room for improvement? If all of these questions have left you with even more questions, it may be time for an IFEA Sponsorship Audit! To set up a Sponsor Summit or Sponsor Audit or for more information about these valuable IFEA programs, please contact:

SYLVIA ALLEN, CFEE +1-732-241-1144 • sylvia@ifea.com International Festivals & Events Association 2603 W. Eastover Terrace • Boise, ID 83706 • USA Phone: +1-208-433-0950 • Fax: +1-208-433-9812 www.ifea.com


the business of international events

F E ATU R E S

BOSTON STRONG.

One City’s Story of Safety, Security, and Sustainability

A Love Connection: Smartphones, Tablets and Apps 2014 Award Program Brochures Now Available

On the Cover: IFEA World President & CEO Steven Wood Schmader, CFEE and Festival Transaction Services Chairman & CEO Charles Brown (on behalf of VISA) present a customized IFEA World Festival & Event City® flag to Thomas Grilk, Executive Director of the Boston Athletic Association, during the IFEA’s 58th Annual Convention & Expo. Boston was one of seven cities honored with the award in 2013.

DEPARTMENTS 8 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 52 53

President’s Letter In the Board Room The Sponsor Doc Insurance Insights The Un-comfort Zone English 101 Turnstiles: Marketing for Event Managers People Profile Hall of Fame IFEA World Festival & Event City 66 Pinnacle Awards 86 Volunteer of the Year 89 Event Management School 99 IFEA Webinar Series 106 Board Table 108 Foundation 110 Marketplace Winter 2013 Volume 24, Issue 4 “ie” is published quarterly by the International Festivals & Events Association, 2603 W. Eastover Terrace, Boise, ID 83706, USA. Permission to quote from material herein is granted provided proper credit is given to IFEA. Subscriptions are available for $50 per year.

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Event Directors Share Tips from the Ticketing Trenches By Florence May

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A Love Connection: Smartphones, Tablets and Apps By Ellesor Holder

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You’re the Owner, You’re the Expert By Russell Trahan

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Using Google Analytics to Understand Your Web Traffic and Optimize Your Content By Brandy Hartley

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Three Simple Ideas to Increase Success in Festival and Event Operations By Cindy Verge

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Putting the Pieces Together By Cindy Lerick

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Boston Awarded IFEA World Festival and Event City By Charlotte J. DeWitt, CFEE

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First Night: Another Night By Charlotte J. DeWitt, CFEE


ASSOCIATION PARTNER

ASSOCIATION PARTNER

ASSOCIATION PARTNER

ASSOCIATION PARTNER


PRESIDENT’S LETTER The Best Holiday Gift May Be a Bookmark

At our IFEA 58th Annual Convention & Expo in Pittsburgh, PA in September, I spoke about building bridges to connect our global industry. One of the quotes that I made reference to was from Oprah Winfrey, who said “I am where I am because of the bridges that I have crossed;” a quote that keeps coming back to me, but especially so at this time of year. In the United States we are getting ready to celebrate our Thanksgiving Holiday, followed quickly by Christmas; both holidays that bring about welcome reflections of friends and family around the world. Reflections that serve like life’s bookmarks, to be quickly referenced among cherished memories, or as we

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may need some special inspiration to get through current challenges. Among my bookmarks are cast a very broad and expansive array of characters (many of you among them) and experiences, reaching back across my childhood, my school years, my career, my travels, my family, and the world around me over the years – historical markers, music, fashion (some best forgotten), and more. Not all of the bookmarks are positive or nostalgic, but I am pleased to say that a large majority still fall into those categories. There are others, as we all have experienced, that fall into less desirable categories, such as fear and sadness; pain and worry; loss and sorrow; regret and remorse; stress and battles. But no matter the category, I have learned and grown from them all, although not necessarily as I might have predicted at the time, or that I even recognized in some cases until many years later. Characters and experiences that have taught me skills, established my values, built my trust, expanded my horizons, grounded me, made me laugh…and cry, given me confidence and strength, taught me empathy, allowed me to love, inspired new visions, earned my loyalties, highlighted my strengths and weaknesses, and reminded me of the lives that I have touched, in turn. And in my reflections, I have come to realize that our events…of every genre… that we all produce, create, embellish and influence for our own communities around the world, are the same. They have their own bookmarks, filled with unforgettable footnotes and addendums of the countless staffs, volunteers, sponsors, interns, community and industry partners, and attendees that have made so many of our successes possible and our disappointments bearable. Bookmarks of ‘war stories’ and experiences that make us laugh or recall how we achieved things

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we didn’t think possible. Bookmarks that we would like to forget, but that remind us of our unique abilities to persevere through unimaginable challenges and the importance that we do. Bookmarks of generations touched, imaginations spurred, possibilities inspired, communities strengthened and a world brought closer together through what we have the very good fortune to be a part of every day. My son, working on a class project that required he interview me about my life, tried patiently to understand as I mulled over each ‘simple’ question; wondering why I needed so much time to formulate my answers. But as I reflected on each question, my mind was revisiting countless bookmarks along my journey that, in some fashion, had shaped each answer. These were the ‘bridges’ that I had crossed to get to where and who I am today. When he finally asked “How would you like to be remembered?” (a little early in my life to be asking such things I hope), I responded that I would like to be a positive bookmark in as many stories as possible, referenced fondly and frequently for a long, long time. At this special season, I thank each of you for being important bookmarks along my personal journey and the journey of the IFEA. Have a safe, healthy and happy holiday!


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Your Event Has

IMPACT…

SHOW IT!

Commission Your IFEA Economic Impact Study Today

In uncertain times, we must often remind those whose support we depend upon, of the important economic and social value that our festivals and events bring to the communities we serve. Having a credible and current economic impact study can do just this, in addition to increasing credibility with stakeholders, providing quantified data to sponsors, presenting reliable data to base future marketing and programming decisions upon and much, much more. Unfortunately, this critical resource, especially with credible credentials, is often financially out of reach for most events even in a good economic environment. Recognizing this, the IFEA has created a cost effective, industry credible program to provide Economic Impact Studies at a budget-accessible investment. Call us today to learn more.

GETTING STARTED For more information about this valuable IFEA program, please contact one of our Business Development Directors: Steve Schmader, CFEE • 208-433-0950 Ext: *818 • schmader@ifea.com Ira Rosen, CFEE • 732-701-9323 • ira@ifea.com Penny Reeh, CFEE • 830-456-3829 • penny@ktc.com


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P.O. Box 17225 • San Antonio, Texas 78217 210-829-7634 • Fax: 210-829-7636 • Web: www.kaliff.com

2603 W Eastover Terrace • Boise, Idaho 83706 208-433-0950 • Fax: 208-433-9812


By Mitch Dorger

In the Board Room

What Staff? – Keeping Operations and Governance Separate in an Organization with No Staff I recently conducted a workshop for nonprofit executives and board members in my community. During the workshop, I presented and explained the generally accepted best practices in nonprofit governance. One of these is for boards to stay out of operations and focus on the areas of strategic direction, policy, oversight and evaluation. I firmly believe in this advice as I have seen first-hand what happens when a board moves the focus of its attention to operational matters. If they are allowed to, operational activities will take over the board’s agenda and leave little or no time for important governance matters. This is not just my experience; it is the experience of almost every nonprofit CEO or ED I have discussed this subject with. Virtually all agree that operations is a “Siren’s Song” for nonprofit board members. It has an almost irresistible attraction. Why is it that board members gravitate to operations? I have some ideas, and while they have not been scientifically validated, I believe they are fairly accurate reasons for the attraction to operational matters. 1. Board members can get their arms and minds around operational issues. I know people that believe it is easier to run a 150-person operating committee than to develop a 2-page policy statement for the board. Governance can be hard work, and sometimes it seems very esoteric to those trying to grasp the fundamentals. 2. The psychic and emotional payback in operations is relatively quick. You 12

know in a short period of time if the decisions made are good ones and what the impact is. Governance issues take much longer. A new policy or governance decision may take years to provide any positive psychic reward to the board members involved. 3. In many organizations, operational activities are where the action is. It is not nearly as much fun to work on a governance matter as it is to run an event or provide some useful service. There are probably several other reasons that we could discuss in an expanded treatment of this topic, but I have already digressed too much from the purpose of this chapter. So let’s return to my workshop presentation. As I was cautioning the audience to keep board members focused on governance responsibilities and out of operational matters, a hand went up in

the back of the room. The woman raising her hand said, “What do we do if the board is all there is – no staff and no other volunteers?” Actually this situation is not all that uncommon. Nonprofit organizations have been proliferating in recent years, and many of these new organizations are grassroots organization without staffs. Her question was a good one, and, frankly, one that I had not thought through carefully. My initial advice was to perhaps divide meeting agendas into two separate sessions -- one on governance and one on operational matters. Or as an alternative, I suggested separating them by holding different types of meetings at different times: One to address governance issues, and the other to address operational matters. I further suggested that no matter which of these approaches they decided on, the board chair had to keep the group clearly focused on the fact that they have two sets of responsibilities and that operations cannot be allowed to take over the agenda. To ensure the future success of the organization, time must be reserved for such things as mission, vision, strategic direction, policy, public perception, and financial oversight and all the other important responsibilities that boards have. My answer seemed to satisfy the questioner, but I had a nagging feeling that I had not truly explored all the available options to help this type of organization keep their responsibilities in order. I decided to throw the question open to the experts on a discussion group that focuses on board governance. Here are some of the suggestions that came out of the discussion group. The first response recommended dividing the board into committees that cover both governance matters and operational matters. The suggested governance committees were finance, governance, and development. The operating committees would then be structured around the activities and/or events of the organization. Board members could serve on

If they are allowed to, operational activities will take over the board’s agenda and leave little or no time for important governance matters.

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IFEA VISION

A globally united industry that touches lives in a positive way through celebration.

Publisher & Editor Steven Wood Schmader, CFEE, President & CEO Assistant Editor Nia Hovde, Vice President/Director of Marketing Advertising Sylvia Allen, Director of Partnership Marketing Advertising Sales & Expo Booking Art Director Craig Sarton, Creative Director Contributing Writers Charlotte J. DeWitt, CFEE, Mitch Dorger, Jeff English, Bruce L. Erley, APR, CFEE, Becky Genoways, CFEE, Brandy Hartley, Ellesor Holder, Sean King, Cindy Lerick, J.D. Linn, Florence May, Russell Trahan, Cindy Verge, Robert Wilson Photography Judy Barnard, Charlotte J. DeWitt, CFEE

With respect to interactions with members/customers or those applying to be members/customers, the IFEA will not cause or allow conditions, procedures, or decisions which are unsafe, undignified, unnecessarily intrusive, or which fail to provide appropriate confidentiality or privacy. If you believe that you have not been accorded a reasonable interpretation of your rights under this policy, please contact the IFEA office at +1-208-433-0950 ext. 18.

For association or publication information: IFEA World Headquarters 2603 W. Eastover Terrace • Boise, ID 83706, U.S.A. +1.208.433.0950 Fax +1.208.433.9812 http://www.ifea.com

different committees and be engaged in both operational and governance issues, but while working in any one committee their attention would be limited to the charter of that committee. Another response suggested dividing into two separate boards, one called the Governance Board with appropriate governance responsibilities and the other called the Administrative Board. Specific job descriptions would be developed for each to ensure that the two boards knew their limits and areas of responsibility. A third recommendation was to use the board officers to oversee operational matters. The specific suggestion was that the vice president, treasurer and secretary would oversee operational matters while the president and any remaining directors would focus their attention on governance issues. (Of course, all officers would participate in all governance discussions.) A fourth suggestion was similar to one I mentioned earlier. Keep one board, but designate portions of the meeting for operational issues and governance matters. Another added that perhaps a physical signal could be used by the chair to designate the portions of the meeting. A colored scarf or hat worn by the chair would

remind the board members to keep their focus on the type of issues to be discussed during that portion of the meeting. A final suggestion was to relook at the whole nature of board committees. Specifically, this suggestion entailed throwing out the traditional committees that boards have and reorganizing into three new committees: Operations Oversight, Association Development, and Association Future. This option envisioned that the Operating Oversight Committee would actually run the operations and keep the board informed through the use of reports and consent agenda items which would hopefully then allow the actual board meeting time to focus on strategic matters. The important thing to note is that while the nature of the specific techniques suggested to separate operations from governance varied significantly, there was overwhelming agreement on a few things: 1. Operating without staff can be very difficult. 2. Operational matters can squeeze out governance matters if allowed to do so, and this should not be allowed to happen. Winter 2013

3. There is no single recommended way to separate the functions. It is more a matter of board preference, but whichever technique is used, the board needs to discipline itself to understand and deal with both types of responsibilities. I hope this short discussion will help board leaders who are struggling with how to balance operations with governance in an organization that has nothing but board volunteers to carry out both types of responsibilities. Think about the options above and select the one that seems best for your organization. Give it a try. Any of these options is better than not recognizing the problem and leaving the agenda to chance and individual whims.

Mitch Dorger is the principal of Dorger Consulting. He is a specialist at improving organizational effectiveness, particularly nonprofit organizations. He can be reached at mitch@ dorger.com or 626-255-5832.

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THE SPONSOR DOC

With Bruce L. Erley, APR, CFEE

#EffectiveSponsorship #DigitalActivation #MoBucks Dear Sponsor Doc: My sponsors keep asking me for more benefits on my event website and Facebook page. I’ve always included their logos and a link to their sites. Is there more I should be doing? A.B. Colorado Dear M.C.:

I’m going to take a leap here that you are not in your 20’s. I’m not either, but I have a couple Millennials who work for me. What you are describing is “digital activation” and yes, it is likely the most in-demand types of promotion we are creating for our partners. Essentially, digital activation is when you utilize your event’s digital resources from websites to social media to mobile platforms to create promotions that better achieve the objectives and ROI for your sponsors. While displaying your sponsors’ logo on your website qualifies as a digital activation, it is a “passive platform” that is barely scratching the surface of the really cool and effective promotions many events are conducting with their sponsors. From Facebook contests, to electronic event guides, to text coupons, to tablet-based photo promotions, there is no end to the ideas you can accomplish digitally. Your sponsors are looking for digital activations that “push” them out to your audience using social media. Push Platforms include: • Social Media platforms (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, etc.) • Blasts (E-Newsletters, blogs, special sponsor offers) • Texting (Mobile “clubs,” special offers, people’s choice awards, etc.) These push platforms are great for providing sponsors with the opportunity to submit reader-relevant information 14

such as stretching and exercise tips for the night before a century bike ride, or recipes from the culinary demonstration stage, etc. The next digital platform you can use for sponsor promotions are “E-Collateral Materials” which essentially is the information my event organizers now provided in digital formats in lieu of print. Examples include virtual goodie bags or interactive event maps such as those offered by companies like Guidebook. Your audience can download onto their smart phone a map of your festival site, list of exhibitor, stage schedule and dining options. Your sponsors get ID, links, the ability to make offers, etc. Then there are “Digital Promotions” which are specially designed sponsor activations created expressly for digital implementation. These can include Facebook promotions (e.g. Post your favorite Parade of Lights memory to win two Frontier Airline tickets), to attendee engagement (e.g. Take a quick quiz on an iPad to see which animal at the Denver Zoo you are the most like.) Sponsors love digital promotions because they increase overall impressions, reach a targeted demo and expand the sponsorship reach beyond live attendees. Further, they are immediate, sharable (viral) and cost efficient. Most of all, sponsors love that they are measurable and can provide immediate quantifiable metrics as to their effectiveness, (e.g. number of impressions, click though rate, views, shares, redemptions, etc.)

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The bottom line is that social media is here to stay and you need to be working with your sponsors to create engaging, interactive and relevant digital promotions. And take my advice…hire a twenty something to help you maneuver through it, or maybe the teenager who lives next door. #ImTooOldForThis With more than three decades in sponsorship sales and consultation, Bruce L. Erley is the President and CEO of the Creative Strategies Group, a full-service sponsorship and event marketing agency based in Denver, Colorado he founded in 1995. Accredited in Public Relations (APR) by the Public Relations Society of America and a Certified Festival & Events Executive (CFEE) by the International Festivals and Events Association, Erley is a highly-regarded speaker on event marketing and sponsorship having spoken on the topic around the world in such places as Dubai, Vienna, Beijing, Toronto and New York. Contact Info: Bruce L. Erley, APR, CFEE President & CEO Creative Strategies Group Phone: +1-303-558-8181 Business Email: berley@csg-sponsorship.com Column Enquiries Email: bruce@sponsordoc.com


INSURANCE INSIGHTS by J.D. Linn

The Importance of a Broker All too often, the perception of an insurance broker has been diluted down to the idea that their sole purpose is to obtain quotes and obtain the lowest price. But, the services you receive from your broker should go far beyond checking the insurance markets for better pricing. The following are things that a quality broker will do to properly service your event. Finding the Right Insurance Program • Risk Analysis - One of the most important parts of a broker’s job is having a thorough understanding of your organization’s operations. And while the amount of information collected during the application and underwriting process can seem excessive, a broker cannot responsibly create an insurance program to protect your assets without it. So even though it might be convenient, beware of brokers that are not collecting the amount of info necessary to understand your event’s operations and exposures.

broker may need to negotiate with the carrier to remove any exclusions that are unacceptable. Risk Management Consultation

• Risk Tolerance Assessment - Once there is a firm understanding of your organization’s liability exposures, the broker should assess how many of those exposures you want to insure. Do you want rain insurance for your concerts? Do you want to insure your rented equipment? Do you want medical coverage for your volunteers? Etc. This assessment can usually be done during the application processes.

• Contractual Analysis - The contracts you have in place with your vendors, performers, amusement ride companies, and other contractors can contain language that holds your organization liability for the activities and negligence of those contractors. Your broker should be willing to review these contracts and suggest any reasonable changes that can better protect you from the operations of your contractors. The broker should also be willing to review sponsorship contracts to make sure that the insurance program he/she has in place for your event is in compliance with the requirements of the sponsor’s contract. After all the work you put into getting those sponsors, make sure you don’t lose one over an insurance issue. Also, you should have any of these contracts in question reviewed by your broker before the contracts are signed.

• Policy Analysis - The broker now has the task of approaching the insurance companies that are best suited to handle each type of coverage you require. He/she must then analyze the policy forms and make sure you understand any of the exclusions in your proposed policies. These can drastically change the coverage offered, and generally vary from one carrier to the next, especially in the event industry. The

• Certificates of Insurance - Your broker should make sure you understand the importance of collecting certificates of insurance and what being named an “additional insured” means. If needed, he/she should also show you how to review certificates for accuracy and be willing to review any certificate you are unsure of. Having correct certificates of insurance from all of your vendors, exhibitors and contractors can

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significantly reduce your chances of having a claim. • Loss Control - Depending on the size and scope of your event you may or may not have a need for onsite loss control services, or claims management services. These services should be discussed during the broker’s presentation of your insurance program. • Accessibility - Once all of the above tasks have been performed, the broker and/or account manager should be accessible and timely in getting back to you when you need something or have questions. There are a limited number of insurance brokers in the event industry and finding the right one for your organization shouldn’t be done just by looking at who can get the lowest pricing. Your insurance and risk management shouldn’t be viewed as a commodity, but rather a valued business partner, protecting your assets and financial life, much as your accountant or lawyer would. When faced with a potential legal battle, you wouldn’t choose an attorney based on price alone. If you’re currently choosing your broker this way, you may regret it when faced with a claim. For 70 years Haas & Wilkerson Insurance has been one of the largest providers of insurance representation to the entertainment industry. The agency is national in scope, with approximately 100 associates providing technical expertise and quality insurance representation at a competitive price. Beyond the standard price quotation, services include coverage analysis and recommendations at no additional cost. Our clients include fairs, festivals, carnivals, amusement parks, rodeos and special events throughout the United States. For more information contact Carol Porter 913-676-9258.


Is Your Online Marketing

PLUGGED IN? Let the IFEA Take a Look with our New Online Marketing Audit Program

If you are like most events/organizations, your on-line marketing presence and visibility is really just a summation of non-related, often outdated, components and links and access to miscellaneous tools/ toys that someone in a seminar somewhere said that you should be using, with no real ‘plan’ to it at all. You may not even be sure anymore just what you have or what it should do, let alone having a plan for strengthening / upgrading it. If this sounds like you, it’s probably time for an online tune-up. We’ll make sure your Online Marketing is Plugged In! Working with some of the most experienced professionals in the field, IFEA is pleased to offer our new “IFEA Online Marketing Audit.” The Audit includes a formal evaluation of a festival/ event’s online visibility by an expert team from Edgeworks Group that includes web developers, social media consultants and online marketers. This broad assessment – a starting point for defining both a short-and-long term roadmap for creating a powerful online presence covers your event/ organization’s: • Online reputation • Social and mobile integrations • Search optimization • Website usability • Social media efforts. • Installation of tracking tools • Updates and customizations to existing tracking programs • Verification of Webmaster tools for both Bing and Google

To learn more about the IFEA’s Online Marketing Audit, please contact: Nia Hovde, Vice President & Director of Marketing & Communications at nia@ifea.com or +1-208-433-0950 ext: 3 or Click Here


THE UN-COMFORT ZONE

With Robert Wilson

Keep Your Power "Baby Bobby! Baby Bobby!" The words stung and Mike knew it - he could read it in my face. "Sticks and stones may break my bones, but names will never hurt me!" I yelled back. Mike just laughed; he knew I didn't believe it. Bolstered by figuring out how to push my buttons, he continued to torment me as I walked home from school. "Baby Bobby! Baby Bobby!" The charge had an element of truth because I had cried several times in first grade, but I was now in fifth grade and had long outgrown my fear of school. I recalled the menacing teacher who pounded her paddle on our desks and threatened to spank us if we kept talking in class. She made several kids cry, but I was the one who got the reputation. It wasn't fair, but four years later I was still ashamed of my crying and Mike knew it. He continued the harassment. "Baby Bobby! Baby Bobby!" He stuck his face right in mine and stated deliberately, "Baby... Bobby!" I punched him in the nose, and suddenly he was the one crying. I had to fight several more boys that year before the name-calling stopped. It was not the solution I wanted, but it worked. It took me years to learn that the problem was mine; that I was giving away my power every time I 18

reacted to taunting and teasing. And, it's a problem that doesn't go away with childhood. Insecure adults wanting to feel superior will seek out your weaknesses and attempt to make you feel bad. Several years ago, I was invited to speak on Creative Thinking in Business to a civic club luncheon. During the meal, a man at my table sneered, "Sooo, you're a motivational speaker. Well, motivate me!" His tone of voice said it all - the difference between him and a school yard bully was the accompanying, "Na Na Na Na Nah." I was shocked by the un-professionalism, and thought, "I'm getting heckled, and I'm not even on stage yet." So, I laughed and said, "Dude, nobody can motivate you, but you." He shocked me a second time by apologizing after my presentation. He explained that the club had a new speaker each week who tried to sell something, and that most of them were boring. To his surprise, he said he found my presentation entertaining and motivating. If we give in to bullies, they can rob us of our confidence and our

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motivation. Lately, I've worked with my children on how to not give their power away when kids assault them verbally. "Laugh it off," I tell them, "even if the words hurt. Fake it if you have to; the trick is to fool them into thinking it doesn't bother you." My friend Rob Maxwell uses what he calls Verbal Judo to fend off words that hit like a fist. "In some martial arts," he explains, "you don't meet force with force. Instead, you take your opponent's thrust and redirect it away from you. Often their own energy works against them." As an example, he told me of a college friend who was teasing him about losing his hair. Rob replied, "It's true John, I am losing my hair, but you were always the handsome one." Robert Evans Wilson, Jr. is an author, speaker and humorist. He works with companies that want to be more competitive and with people who want to think like innovators. For more information on Robert, please visit www. jumpstartyourmeeting.com.


“Fund for the Future�

Make a Pledge Today. Contact any IFEA Foundation Board, IFEA World Board, or IFEA Staff Member for more information. Individual and Organizational Contributions are welcomed and encouraged. All contributions are tax-deductible in the United States. For more information go to www.ifea.com.


ENGLISH 101

By Jeff English, CFEE

GO AHEAD, KICK MY TIRES So I’m halfway through my presentation entitled, “Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition” at the 58th Annual IFEA Convention and Expo in Pittsburgh. The crowd was the largest to ever attend my legal hot topics review and up to this point they had been very active and engaged. Side note: My personal belief is that a good crowd gathered because of the snappy title, but I’ll digress about effective marketing and advertising in a later column. I get to the point in my presentation where I review how not to get sued at your event. I flash a bunch of pictures up on the screen showing trip and fall hazards, golf carts, snags, and propane tanks……basically the worst parts of the Bible according to the Festival and Event industry. I then ask: How many of you have asked your insurance company to conduct an insurance audit at your event? Crickets. Buehler? Trust me; my reaction would have been the same had I been sitting in that room. The terms “insurance” and “audit” don’t mix well. When I was contacted by Haas & Wilkerson and told that a representative would be conducting a “Loss Control Visit” (otherwise known as insurance audit) at the KDF BalloonFest and Marathon/ miniMarathon from April 28-30, 2011, I needed to take a moment and breathe into my trusty paper bag. Our office then began a fire drill of sorts. I held meetings with our management and event teams asking that they do their level best to put lipstick on our “lovely” pig. Whatever could be done must be done to make this guy believe that our events were safe and perfect. If he were to find anything wrong, nothing short of a giant hike in insurance rates (best case) or shutting down the Festival (worst case) would be our rightful punishment. Boy was I wrong! When Tom Dixon from ACE Loss Control arrived in Louisville he ended up being part tourist and part teacher. He and 20

I met at the BallonFest venue and went on a walking tour. He focused much of his attention on slip and fall risks by simply pointing out areas we need to fix, along with those situations where KDF had done a good job preventing risk. He did the same at our Marathon/miniMarathon venue. He pointed out a potential snag injury on a bleacher and a propane tank that hadn’t been chained up. Nothing about the visit felt threatening, confrontational or intrusive. He was simply there to “kick the tires” and provide us with recommendations on how we can do things even better. Shortly after his visit, we received a follow-up letter that was very complimentary of our team and events. It included specific notes on a few areas where we could improve. It was all done under the banner of making our events safer. You see, what I failed to understand was that our insurance carrier doesn’t make money if people get hurt at our events. If our events are safe, fewer people get hurt, which leads to fewer injury claims and lawsuits. Tom’s visit allowed KDF to take a good look at

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our risk management safeguards and implement improvements where needed. Whichever company is your insurance carrier, I’d highly recommend contacting them to schedule a Loss Control Visit. Doing so might prevent you from receiving a letter demanding a trial by jury when someone trips over a rogue water hose.

Jeff English, CFEE is the Senior Vice President and General Counsel for the Kentucky Derby Festival. He works on all legal issues facing the Festival, but also manages the merchandise department and the 501(c)3 Kentucky Derby Festival Foundation. For whatever reason, they also put him in charge of IT. A lawyer running IT - yeah, what could go wrong there? Anyways, he's been there for 6 years and can't believe they pay him to do this job. His boss also can't believe they actually pay him.


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For IFEA sponsorship opportunities, contact Sylvia Allen, Director of Partnership Marketing at (732) 946-2711 or sylvia@ifea.com


Turnstiles: Marketing for Event Managers By Sean King

#Whippersnappers Too: Tales from the Frontlines of Multi-Generational Marketing; Reaching Millennials, Boomers and Zombies?! Thanks to the fine folks at IFEA, I was able to present a seminar at the most recent Annual Conference in Pittsburgh entitled #Whippersnappers: Marketing Community Events in Today’s Multi-Generational World. In the course of the presentation and subsequent post-talk follow-up, I was asked to provide additional real world examples of multi-generational marketing. It’s my pleasure to share three brief examples from my recent work on a niche marching music event, a summer music and food festival in a medium-sized city and America’s oldest Halloween parade in that same city. All three of these events did not have huge media budgets, but rather insisted that we be creative to reach millennials, boomers, zombies and more. For this edition of Turnstiles, we’re going to take a slightly different approach and provide easily digestible nuggets of information rather than a traditional narrative. I’m hoping this type of format works for you and can serve as a blueprint to break down the different audience segments you reach and allow you to analyze the methods you use to reach your audience.

by. The creation of a pre-event Alumni Party allowed for attendees to rekindle old friendships and meet new friends who had participation in common. • Media: Facebook and personal email • Takeaway: Even after 40+ years, the basics of high school cliques are still at work and can be used to help drive attendance at any event by using social connections and bringing folks together for their own enjoyment in the backdrop of your event.

Event #1 Drum Corps: An American Tradition – Philadelphia, 4th of July and a tradition-rich, ticketed drum and bugle corps competition. Perfect mix right? Not exactly. Far too many summer, holiday events happening in the City of Brotherly Love meant we needed to focus specifically on our core audience and the subsets of that audience through marketing, promotion and media.

Segment: High School Students • Generation: Young Millennials • Key Approach: Promotion of a Text 2 Win contest for tickets to the event. 30,000 text votes were cast for an entire high school band to win free admission to the event. The investment of the free tickets was more than offset by the word-of-mouth benefits gained throughout the teenage universe we were trying to reach. • Media: Text messaging • Takeaway: 95%+ open rates on text messages is too irresistible to avoid. For those who want to reach the teen demographic, research is needed to find a cost-effective solution to outbound text messaging and in-bound tracking, but once you have your plan in place, the results are definitely worth the investment.

Segment: Alumni • Generation: Early boomer • Key Approach: Concentrate on the social connections and powerful memories of their youth. The first step was to identify networkers and leaders from years gone

Segment: Families • Generation: Generation X • Key Approach: Promotion via Mommy blogs to reach mothers and decision makers within families to arrange an outing to the event.

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• Media: Blogs • Takeaway: Every little bit counts and the extra few hundred tickets sold and interest generated through this influential channel helps create momentum towards our ultimate goal. If you are promoting a niche event, there’s a good chance a subsection of a larger audience will have interest in attending your event. However, don’t spend too many resources on every small segments, make sure your investment will provide adequate ROI. Event #2 Blues, Brews and Barbeque – The City of Allentown, PA (pop. 100,000), in cooperation with its Main Street Chamber of Commerce program, organizes and promotes a one-day free music and food festival each June for the community at large. After experiencing incremental growth over its first several years, the past few years have seen significant increases in attendance by incorporating a mix of social and traditional media. By breaking the audience segments into “blues,” “brews” and “barbeques,” organizers have been able to target three demographics of music fans, craft beer lovers and foodies. While these are not specific generational segments, the tactics used to reach them are similar, and the demographics of the generations align themselves in unique ways. Segment: Blues • Generation: Late Millennials and Young Gen Y-ers • Key Approach: Reaching out to the performing group’s fan bases and


entertainment publications to promote performances by regional music acts that headline the music festival. • Media: Music/entertainment pubs and websites, Facebook and Twitter. • Takeaway: Music is the ultimate connector and tapping into the loyal fan bases of popular blues bands through Facebook and Twitter helps drive attendance. Seeing the festival as a sum of its parts, breaking down several channels to reach each audience’s affinity allows you to benefit from their attendance at your festival and the additional revenue gained from food and beverage sales, vendor fees and sponsorships. Segment: Brews • Generation: Millennials and craft beer fans • Key Approach: By focusing on the brew aspect of the festival, the typical “good time” crowd who enjoys a large festival or party scene will put you in their calendar when the main focus is on the brews. Additionally, a niche market of craft beer fans will be sure to attend solely because of their passion for beer. • Media: Social and regional food/beer/ wine periodicals, websites • Takeaway: Never underestimate the draw of a good time in a festival atmosphere. Momentum means everything and if you’ve had success drawing large crowds in the past, you should find success building on the shared experience. However, the shared experience transfers similarly to those who may share the same passion, in this case beer, and the opportunity to share a communal experience allows fans to meet others with the same passion. Segment: Barbeque • Generation: Generation X and Boomers • Key Approach: Reaching out to foodies and families. Using the local and regional blogs and tapping in to the social networks of food fans, particularly barbeque, provides for ways to promote the event and spur people on to attend the event with friends and family. • Media: Social media and niche blogs (food) and supplemented by food pages in traditional media • Takeaway: Similar to the craft brew messaging, the foodie message allows attendees to take part in an event based on a passion of theirs and enjoy it with new and old friends alike. In recent years, chefs and eating establishments have become like musicians in cultivating a following, and if promoted correctly, more and more people will line up for the food at your event.

Event #3 America’s Oldest Halloween Parade – Founded in 1905 when the Marine Band marched through the streets of Allentown, PA on their way to a rehearsal and young children fell in line wearing costumes, the oldest Halloween Parade in America had fallen on hard times recently. The number of participants, and in turn, the number of people attending the parade had been dwindling recently, as had been the overall entertainment quality of the parade. In order to reposition the Parade, several programmatic decisions were made to improve the product including pre-and post-parade events, expanded marching band invitations and an emphasis on contemporary dance ensembles. Decisions were also made to increase the marketing and promotional component of the community parade to restore its glory as a signature event for Band City USA. Segment: Zombies • Generation: Millennials • Key Approach: Connecting with a high profile regional amusement park, Halloween party stores and attractions. Additionally, tapping into the current infatuation by young people about all things ‘zombie,’ it was a natural tie to lead the parade with a Zombie Walk at the perfect time of year. • Media: Strategic partnerships, Facebook • Takeaway: Tying into an element that is currently in the mainstream public conscience is always a good start. When it can be thematically tied into your event and leveraged for additional participation and entertainment value, it is a win-win for everyone. Explore all opportunities, no matter how farfetched, in order to engage the different generational and audience segments. Segment: Young Families • Generation: Generation X and Y • Key Approach: Partnering with the main radio stations in the area for a widespread pro bono advertising campaign led families to line the streets for the parade. Enlisting the morning team of the most popular Top 40 station created an avenue to reach the largest amount of young families, specifically those with children of trick-or-treat age. • Media: Traditional mass media • Takeaway: Thanks to Sirius, Spotify and the many options for listening to your music, local Top 40 radio still provides an unequalled way to reach the mass audience for an event attended by the general public. From the media’s point of view, aligning themselves with a community event is one of the few advantages they have over proWinter 2013

grammed, web-based music delivery. Take advantage of it! Segment: Multi-cultural, inner city families • Generation: Young Latinos and their families • Key Approach: Incorporating popular, local hip-hop dance groups, programming has been able to drive participation and attendance. • Media: Local Hispanic media, grass roots word of mouth • Takeaway: By appealing to the substantial Latino population in Allentown, the audience by this segment at the parade has grown proportionally. Hiphop dance companies have become a popular feature in the community and by tapping into their families and members of their loyal following, spectators have been driven by the opportunities to see their favorites participate in the parade. As you can see through these brief examples, there are as many solutions as there are members of your audience. In the end, we are always to be looking at creating the most effective way for us to deliver what seems to be a personalized message, although it is done in a ‘mass media’ way through all of the channels we have available. The paradoxical phrase of ‘individual mass marketing’ could not be truer in today’s media and marketing world. We wish you well on finding ways for you to solve your challenges on the way to soldout, standing room only events and great experiences for your audiences! As always, if you have any questions, thoughts or feedback, please email me at sking.aspire@gmail.com or visit www. artsarketingblog.com. I’m happy to speak with you about the challenges you face reaching a multi-generational audience and devise some solutions to help you. Also, I’ll be posting additional trials and tribulations from my experiences in order to rid the world once and for all of inefficient and ineffective marketing.

Sean King has been consulting with small businesses and non-profits organizations for over 20 years. Currently, Sean is the Director of Marketing & Communications for Youth Education in the Arts (YEA!), a non-profit organization based in Allentown, PA which teaches life lessons through music. He also blogs regularly at www.artsmarketingblog.org. You can follow Sean on Twitter @skingaspire or contact him at: sking@yea.org

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PEOPLE Jeff English, CFEE The Kentucky Derby Festival is a two-week spring celebration of 70 events. Our average attendance is over 1.5 million and the economic impact was measured at $127.9 million based on a 2011 study commissioned with the University of Louisville. KDF also relies on a network of over 4,000 volunteers and a full-time staff of 23 to make the magic happen!

IN CONVERSATION How did you get into events? I had just started practicing law in Kansas City and received a call from Ben Johnson, a good friend of mine, inviting Jacque and me to the 2007 Kentucky Derby. Of course we said yes. What I didn’t know was that Ben planned on “kicking my tires” to see if Mike Berry, KDF President & CEO, viewed me as a good replacement for Ben, who was moving on to a local law firm. After I returned home to Kansas, Ben called and said I needed to apply for the job. I did and was offered the position in July 2007.

FACTS ON FILE

What has been your biggest professional challenge? My biggest professional challenge was making the decision not to practice law immediately after graduating from law school. In the spring of 2004 I graduated from law school and was also managing a congressional race in Kansas. With Election Day six months away, there was no way I could both manage the race and study for the bar exam. I dove headfirst into trying to win the campaign, which we ultimately ended up losing in spectacular fashion. I guess I did a good enough job managing the campaign, however, that I was offered the chance to work in Washington, DC, at a political consulting firm. Once again, I had to decide whether to practice law or continue working in politics. I moved to DC and helped manage congressional races and provide strategic political consulting for another 2 years. This time around I won a few races, but knew it was time to head back to Kansas and put my law degree to good use. Upon moving back, I realized that almost everything I learned in law school had been lost in the political fog of the previous three years. I had to basically relearn most of law school in a matter of months before taking the exam, along with reopening doors and making connections to find a job in the legal profession. It all worked out in the end, but the period of time spent studying for the bar exam from almost square one without a solid job prospect was a challenge.

Family: Wife – Jacque Daughter – Abigail (3 years old)

What do you do to relax? I exercise most mornings by either running or doing some kind of workout. Anyone who plays golf knows that it is supposed to be relaxing, except if you are not very good at it. I’m also a big fan of watching sports, especially Kansas Jayhawk basketball and Kansas City Chiefs football.

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Years in the Business: 6 Degree: Political Science/Juris Doctor

Last book read: “A Game of Thrones” by George R. R. Martin , but that was on a beach during vacation last summer. The last book I actually read was, "When You Give a Dog a Doughnut" during bedtime with Abigail. Last business book read: “The One Day Contract: How to Add Value to Every Minute of Your Life” by Coach Rick Pitino Jeff English, CFEE Senior Vice President of Administration/General Counsel Kentucky Derby Festival, Inc. 1001 S. Third Street Louisville, KY 40203 +1-502-572-3856 jenglish@kdf.org www.kdf.org


Good

Great

CFEE

Maybe it’s Time to be Recognized for What You Bring to the Table.

As a professional in the Festivals & Events Industry, you know the difference between Good and Great. You’ve dedicated yourself to the “whatever it takes” approach that has become your hallmark. You understand the importance and value of continuing to hone your skills, growing your knowledge base, expanding your professional network, and surrounding yourself with others who have reached the top levels of their careers as well.

CFEE (Certified Festival & Event Executive), the IFEA’s professional certification program, provides the essential difference between good and great among professionals in our industry. It signifies the highest level of achievement. Attainment of your CFEE certification provides recognition of your commitment to excellence, experience, and to your career, placing you in an elite group of the top festival and event professionals in your field. It’s a statement of quality that you bring to the table.

For more information about the IFEA’s professional certification program, and our 2011 CFEE FastTrack® Program, contact Bette Montieth at bette@ifea.com or call +1-208-433-0950. The CFEE Professional Certification Program is Sponsored by


Event Directors Share Tips from the Ticketing Trenches By Florence May

There is nothing quite as exciting than talking to event management experts – one in particular being energetic leader of the Virginia and DC festival scene, Barry Feil, the creative Executive Director of Celebrate Fairfax. Meeting him leaves you a little breathless! In addition to being passionate about growing the hugely successful Celebrate Fairfax; he is overflowing with ideas about how to expand ticketing sales to a variety of audiences. When we asked Barry about some of his Ticketing tips and pointers, he provided us with six great tips which we’ve shared with you below. Target the Most Profitable Ticket Buyers Barry advises event managers to “think of their festivals as a business.” He encourages a focus on an audience who are consumers of your target sales items and promoters of the event. “Do your event attendees like the bands AND the beer, international food, organic products, local art or other items that create event revenue at your event?” And he adds, “Do you know what percentage of your attendees tell Friends & Family about your event?” Sell Early! Weather is a continuous gamble for outdoor events. Online sales are a critical path to reduce risk and guarantee a profitable event. Barry recommends that online 26

promotions should begins 8 weeks prior to the event with a focus on people who have come before. He uses a super early bird combo ticket with ride passes. “Promote early and give previous years attendees a reason to purchase early.” Barry reminds us, “This is your opportunity to rainproof your event!” Grow the E-mail List! That’s it. Grow Family participation Barry is testing new marketing partnerships. He was looking for organizations who trust and love the festival. He found an ideal partnership with Not For Profits exhibiting at the festival to create online e-mail and social media campaigns talking about the festival. Every ticket sold using a NFP code helps grow the e-mail list. And every festival ticket sold sends money back to the NFP as a reward.

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Grow Awareness Barry has grown Celebrate Fairfax while decreasing his promotional budget. Barry’s two cents on Social Media? Facebook Ad: Grow your likes via e-mail campaigns. Focus FB ads on new audiences not those people who like your festival page. Make Facebook ads cost effective. Twitter: Not great for ticket sales but re-tweets are great for awareness. Google: Works if you use the right keywords. Create ads that mention radio stations that play music of your artists and locations related to artists and your event location. Mention keywords in Google ads. Pandora: 0% so far but still working on it. Great Experience People come back to events when they have good memories. Unfortunately great bands can be overshadowed by long lines, dirty bathrooms or feeling unsafe. Go fast! Experienced staff is a key element to reducing traffic at the gate. In addition, be certain to regularly move money from gates to secure locations to reduce theft risk. Barry closes with a reminder, “Remember a Great Event Experience is Everything!” TRS provides volunteer management, event registration and general admission ticketing solutions to local, national and international events. Call Florence May at 317-966-6919 for more information or visit the TRS website for a free product demo.


It’s Always a Blast!

From music festivals, cultural events, community festivals, and everything in-between.

Book direct:

Cindy Geib cindy@rivercitybrass.org

800-292-7222

www.rivercitybrass.org


: n o i t c e n

n o C ove

, s e n AL o h p t s r p a p Sm and A s t e r e l d l b o Ta By Ellesor H

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Devices: Your Love Connection For many of us, it is love at first sight. For others, it takes time and nurturing. But regardless of how you get involved, Festival and Event planners around the world are fully committed to their smartphones, tablets and apps. A Lasting Relationship In the last 5 years, the way we communicate with virtually everyone in our lives, personally and professionally, is through the devices we hold in our hands. In fact, according to the ICT Data and Statistics Division of the Telecommunication Development Bureau, there are 6.8 billion mobile-cellular subscriptions in the world today which is about how many people there are on earth. Smartphones make up a billion of those subscriptions and the market is expected to just keep growing with a 27% increase to over 900 million units sold this year. Our love goes beyond our mobile phones, we also can’t live without our tablets either. Sales of tablets are expected to increase by almost 50%, to over 190 million units sold, according to research by the International Data Corporation (IDC). The designs may change. The shapes may morph. The colors may get brighter. But we love our hand-held, mobile devices. Attached at the Hip Look around and you’ll be hard pressed to see anyone without their smartphone or tablet in their hand, on their hip or in their purse or briefcase. We are chatting, texting and sharing at lightning speed. How many times a day do you think you check your mobile phone? Twenty times a day? Fifty times a day? More? In a study by Kleiner Perkins Caufield and Byers, researchers found the average user actually checks their phone close to 150 times per day. In their annual Internet Trends report carried out in May this year, the researchers discovered people check their phones, on average, 23 times a day for messaging, 22 times for voice calls and 18 times to get the time. Leading up to and during a festival or event, those of us in the industry probably blow those numbers into the triple digit 4G-sphere. So with these devices such a part of our lives, what are the ways Festival Directors and Event Planners are utilizing today’s mobile technology? The Heart of Building a Relationship No surprise here. Texting is at the heart of it all when it comes to communication. However, the reasons vary. Kimberly Starnes, Festival Director of the South Carolina Strawberry Festival in Fort Mill, SC stated, “Texting is key for us especially when we are on site and there is so much noise surrounding us. We can quickly and easily communicate an important message with each other and keep moving. We also can share pictures through texting which is more private and can help us be prepared for a situation whether with a sponsor, volunteer or festival attendee.” Charlie Barrineau, City Manager of Uptown Greenwood, South Carolina reports that texting is how he, his staff and City Council members stay on top of breaking news and important information during an event. It allows them to respond quickly and have just the facts at hand. Most importantly, Barrineau can send a group text and reach everyone in one swoop so everyone involved no matter where they are at the time have the information. An App Affair “We love the scheduling app Doodle.com,” reported Starnes. “With our Team Leaders and volunteers so busy with their own jobs and lives, Doodle helps us coordinate times and dates for meetings easily in the months and weeks leading up to the South Carolina Strawberry Festival.” This app even incorporates a calendar. For me, I couldn’t live without iThought for managing all 36 events of the South Carolina Festival of Flowers in Greenwood, SC. I find this app essential for keeping up with all the different aspects of each event. This app promotes itself as a mind-mapping tool that “enables you to visually, organize your thoughts, ideas and information.” I say it is a mind-memory tool and Winter 2013

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it keeps me on task and organized down to the smallest details of every event and activity. Plus I can share the iThought mind-mapping charts with Event Chairs and committees even if they don’t have the app. I just share it as a PDF. You can also be as creative and fun as you want using the functions of iThought. Scott Huntley, Festival Director of the Columbus Arts Festival feels, “The most important app and program I use for working and exchanging information is Dropbox. I can work on a document on my computer in the office put it in Dropbox, then continue to work on it on my iPad while at the airport and then finish working on it at the hotel that night.” He added, “I can have files, images and documents shared and edited or revised quickly and then easily accessible. Dropbox is by far one of the best tools available on the internet today.” On average, those of us with a smartphone have 26 apps lighting up our screens according to Google’s Our Mobile Planet data. But we have access to over 1.5 million apps in the Apple App Store and Google Play. However, the statistics show that 1 in 4 apps downloaded are abandoned after the first use. The ones that stick are the ones that make us more organized and more in control. Take for example, CloudOn. I can open, edit, and save existing documents via my iPhone or iPad using CloudOn. Best of all, it works with Dropbox and also Google Drive allowing me to access my Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint files which I use on my desktop in my office. I can open them, and then easily make edits and changes. Like a lot of people today, I am using both Microsoft and Apple operating systems so an app like CloudOn is essential to my work. In Sync With Your New Love Keynote and PowerPoint are two of the most classic presentation tools that turn graphs, words and pictures into impressive presentations. Darrell Manis, an Events Director with the Gatlinburg, Tennessee Convention and Visitors Bureau says iPads are an integral part of their staff’s daily work now. “It is just perfect for making presentations to businesses and sponsors. Depending on the size of the audience, we will either project the presentation onto a screen or just use the iPad itself.” Whether you are meeting a sponsor for lunch, sharing details with your Event volunteers or making a formal presentation to a packed auditorium, you can show them dazzling images and important data using your tablet. On Mashable. com, writer Sarah Ang listed these shining star programs for making a “killer” pre30

sentation: Preze, Google Presentations, Haiku Deck and Projeqt. In keeping up with the latest news about the Columbus Arts Festival, Scott Huntley reports, “We also love tools like Google alerts. It feeds our collective ego” he said with a chuckle, “and allows us to see immediately what press we are getting through blogs, articles or web pages which lets us see how we are showing up on the internet.” Keeping the Flame Alive Socially We all know the power of Facebook for spreading the word of our events and interacting with our followers. But many of the Festival Execs and Planners I spoke with also reported using the “Groups” Feature to communicate with staff and volunteers. You can still share updates, photos, documents and messages but it is just with the people you include in the Facebook group. Best of all it is totally private among the members. Manis stated that is one of the ways the staff at the Gatlinburg, Tennessee CVB communicates with each other. “We may post a picture in our private Group page on Facebook and that way we can see it collectively, make comments and then decide to post it to the public page or not,” he said. Another benefit of Facebook Groups is you can share your Dropbox files within the group. So no matter where you are in the world and what device you are working from, if you use Dropbox, you have access to all your images, files and documents and can share on Facebook with the people helping you coordinate and organize your Festival or event. Remembering...Everything How in the world do you keep up with it all? Sharing information is one critical aspect of a Festival Director or Event planner’s job. But remembering all the details is another feat to master. Sure you can place a Post-it-Note on virtually every surface of your office, car and bathroom to remind you of your tasks. Or you can look to an app like Evernote. It too works across all devices (and computers) and allows you to save, clip, research, share, collaborate, link, and plan and, best of all, keep everything that is important to you all in one place. There are plenty of useful apps to choose from for helping you stay organized and on task. Portio Research is forecasting 82 billion apps will be downloaded worldwide this year. All you have to do is take the time, ok, find the time, to experiment with a few and then choose the ones that fit with the way you and your mind works. Then stick with

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those apps. The last thing you need or want is for all this technology to overwhelm you and keep you at the bottom of the learning curve. A Marriage Made in Cyber-Heaven Do your own research by surfing the web for popular or highly rated productivity apps and programs. Ask your colleagues for advice. Read reviews. Consider the apps listed in this article. Get to know the features. Then go ahead and commit. If you’re a little tentative, download the free ones first. When you’re ready to take the app leap of faith, download the ones with a fee. You won’t regret it. And you’ll live and work happily ever after. Apps Worth Flirting With 1 Evernote 2 Eventbrite 3 Doodle 4 Plancast 5 Dropbox 6 iThought 7 Cloudon 8 SoundGecko 9 Skype 10 efax Social Networking Apps You’ll Just Love Tried and True: 11 Instagram 12 Twitter 13 Facebook 14 Pinterest 15 Google+ 16 Foursquare 17 Hootsuite 18 Evite Making More of a Scene: 19 Vine 20 Quora 21 Snaphat 22 Pic Stitch Ellesor G. Holder has an extensive background in advertising, marketing and PR. Three years ago, she went from a volunteer Event Chair to the Executive Director of the South Carolina Festival of Flowers in Greenwood, SC. This year, the Festival celebrated 46 years and hosted 36 events in the month of June with their Uptown “Safari” themed Topiary Display as the main attraction. The Festival also achieved record numbers in attendance and economic impact. In 2012, Holder received the IFEA’s Daniel A. Mangeot Memorial Scholarship for acquiring the CFEE Certification. She plans to receive her designation at the Annual IFEA Conference in 2014.


IFEA

C AR E E R N E T WOR K

The Power of Bringing Great People Together with Great Careers Looking for an experienced employee to fill that vital job position? Interested in a career or wanting to advance yourself in the festivals and events field? Want to be sure that you target the top people in the festivals and events industry and ensure that your organization doesn't miss the most qualified candidate available? IFEA's Career Network can help. Now with a new partnership through online job board and applicant tracking system, TeamWork Online, your search base for positions and your reach to find qualified candidates has grown exponentially within the live festivals & events industry. With a reach of over 1.25 million potential candidates and educators interested in sports and live event positions, this new partnership between IFEA and TeamWork Online not only brings increased qualified candidates to your employment position,

but also increased employment positions to those candidates looking for employment! Positions range from top management positions such as CEO, Presidents and Executive Director to Special Events Coordinator, Volunteer Coordinator, Sponsorship Sales and more. Even internship and volunteer positions can be posted! Even better, if there’s not a position posted in an area or company you’re interested in, the TeamWork Online system can notify you when something becomes available! It’s an ever expansive employment network that is constantly talking and working on your behalf! If you are currently in search of a candidate, or are someone in search of employment, get started in your search today through IFEA Partner, TeamWork Online.

Got www.ifea.com and look under Resources


YOU’RE THE OWNER, YOU’RE THE EXPERT Five Ways to Leverage Your Business Acumen Locally

By Russell Trahan 32

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For William, finally hanging the ‘grand opening’ banner on the facade of his business was a dream realized. After years of drafting and redrafting plans and budgets, applying for loans and acquiring the initial capital to break ground on his new property, he was able to turn his goal of owning and operating a local business into a reality. At a recent chamber of commerce meeting, William found himself in a conversation with a colleague that proved invaluable. Amidst discussion of business tactics and customer development techniques, he was clued into a spectrum of opportunities to generate brand recognition and supplemental revenue that he was previously unaware of. As the proprietor, William’s expertise not only applies to the daily operations of his business, but to the wider-scope of finding success in the small-business sector as a whole – and in a bipolar

1. Speaking at Service Clubs Getting involved with speaking at local service clubs is a fantastic way to introduce yourself to the professional-minded public, and to share your business savvy with others. The first step is to research service clubs in your area, and start contacting the necessary parties about guest-speaking opportunities. Now, the initial hang-up most business owners find is that they do not see how sharing the inner-workings of their specific business will be of value to anyone else. When speaking, you need to stretch your expertise so that it applies to a wider audience – not just those in your immediate industry. You do not need to delve into the intricate details of how your particular trade is run – there are overarching principles that apply to operating a flourishing business – and as an example of the payoff that comes with applying them, you are qualified to educate others (while subtlety promoting yourself). Starting to speak at the local level can also catalyze a larger speaking career. Begin crafting a presentation and approaching the necessary parties to get your voice heard. 2. Stir the Pot by Writing Op-Eds Tossing a bit of proverbial kerosene on a contentious conversation is an assured way to cause your name to resonate within your community. There are numerous hot-button business issues that continuously circulate in the media and spur lively debates – minimum wage, unions and mandatory insurance, to name a few. By writing an opinion-editorial that could possibly be placed in daily newspapers with large circulations, you can state your position on a variety of relevant issues, and establish a wider-range of name-recognition.

economic landscape, there is tangible demand for individuals with proven accomplishments in this area. Regardless of his status as a neophyte to the world of business ownership, there are opportunities available to leverage his knowledge. Here are a few of the ways that you, as a business owner, can employ your unique brand of expertise to build your local reputation and secure a stout customer base:

3. Foster a Thriving Business Community with Mentoring What better way to put your skills on display than to take an aspiring business-owner under your wing? Businesses thrive when there is a layer of mutual support, and that often involves working together for a common goal: carving a niche in the community for profitable, locally-owned companies. Attend networking events and connect with others who are in the same position you were in before your dream became an actuality – an individual with an idea and an implementable plan, and coach them through the process that you experienced. Starting a business can be a painstaking and often frustrating progression; by acting in a mentoring and advisory role for others, you can help navigate some of the Winter 2013

roadblocks that come along the way, and create a tightknit community of proprietors and reciprocal customers for life. 4. Guest Columns in Local Publications Weekly and monthly tabloid-sized publications are regularly seeking fresh content with local-angles to fill space on their pages, and submitting guest columns reinforces your identity as a stalwart in the local business arena. Common themes can include commercial trends, regional events or opportunities – essentially any topic that allows you to provide your unique insight. The readership of homegrown newspapers and magazines is extremely diverse. From the college student seeking weekend plans to the local business magnate in the market for legitimate sales prospects, there is a forum to offer your advice and expertise to a varied audience, which brings a wide-ranging customer base through your doors. 5. Participate in Regional Radio Interviews While guest columns and opinion-editorials in print have a longer-lasting impact toward your business aims – it is a permanent medium for your thoughts and know-how – radio interviews can provide an immediate boon to your profit margins. Connecting with decision-makers with local radio outlets – via social media or email – is a fantastic first step to donning headphones and contributing in-studio. Many producers and personalities are also active at community networking events, and a brief conversation and a number exchange may lead to an on-air interview. After his enlightening conversation, William began employing the techniques outlined by his colleague, and saw a significant increase in his bottom-line and local profile. By utilizing his distinct set of expertise to contribute in other facets of the business realm, he has amplified his reach and cemented his position as an erudite force in the local community. Russell Trahan is President of PR/PR, a boutique public relations agency specializing in positioning clients in front of their target market in print and online. PR/PR represents experts of all kinds who are seeking national exposure for their business or organization. Russell and PR/PR will raise your business’ awareness in the eyes of your clients and customers. For more information, please visit www.prpr.net or email mail@prpr.net for a free consultation.

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site speed behavior flow content drilldown

social channels

views

web traffic

tracker acquisition reports

navigation structure

exit rate

evaluate land

load time

homepage

page

USING GOOGLE ANALYTICS bounce TO UNDERSTAND YOUR content reports tagged press campaigns

search ranking

BY BRANDY HARTLEY

AND OPTIMIZE YOUR CONTENT You may have seen my article in the Fall 2013 issue of “ie” about using social media to improve your festival’s rankings in search, and a brief overview of Google Analytics. Analytics is the most valuable Google tool you may not be using. And it’s free, so what’s not to love? In this issue, I’ll discuss using Google Analytics to track and understand traffic (which we hate on the road but love on the web!) and the most useful content reports to help you improve your page content and navigation structure. Getting Started It’s simple to get going with Google Analytics. First, create an account at the Google Analytics homepage and set up on your website. Festivals who work with Ticketfly and have Ticketfly-powered websites are already set up with Google Analytics by default, and can track actual ticket sales conversions back to different traffic sources. 34

When you click into the Analytics site for reporting, Google drops you into the “Audience Overview” for the past month. You can use the left-hand navigation to move through the different reporting options. If you adjust the reporting date range, it will carry over to each report you visit. There is a detailed Google Analytics Help page that answers questions about everything from basic to advanced features such as adding in dimensions and adding custom segments of visitors to your report. It’s easy to get caught up in the rabbit hole of data that Google provides, but if you start off simple and follow these guidelines you’ll be amazed how much impact it can have on your

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festival’s marketing tactics and success. Now let’s hit the road and dive into the wonderful world of website traffic! ACQUISITION REPORTS Keyword > Paid and Organic  Why It’s Important: Keyword reports let you explore your total web traffic grouped by paid SEM campaign keywords and organic keywords. Reviewing organic keywords may help you learn how people find you. Sample Insight: Analyzing the data for tagged campaigns can reveal which marketing effort (a paid ad, a link from your blog, your email newsletter, etc.) was most effective at delivering traffic.


Next Steps: You can mine this information to use with your paid search engine marketing (SEM) efforts or to edit your site content to include these words as part of search engine optimization (SEO). One thing to keep in mind is that Keyword reporting will often show “(not provided)” in the list. This is in response to consumer privacy settings, as Google has adapted their policies to suit users’ requests. All Traffic  Why It’s Important: This report provides the information you need to evaluate the value of traffic sources. You can dig into traffic referred from links on other websites and in tagged press campaigns you may create to track impact. Key metrics to consider for insights about customer engagement from sources are visits, # of pages per visit, visit duration, and bounce rate. Sample Insight: You may find that your site has a high bounce rate, which measures the percentage of visitors who enter your site and “bounce” (leave) rather than continue viewing other pages on your site. Don’t automatically assume that this means your site isn’t performing well. Next Steps: Depending on the content of each page, a high bounce rate could be reflective of how easy your site makes it for the consumer to find that “Buy Tickets” button for an event and click through to your ticketing provider to make a purchase! If you see unexpected sources, do research on that source. You may have found a new site to partner with for press releases and promotions.   Social  Why It’s Important: Social reports give you the lowdown on social network referral and trackbacks will show you other websites that are linking to your site. Getting the scoop on social networks may yield some surprises. Sample Insight: You might discover that your forgotten Yelp profile is actually driving a significant amount of traffic to your site. Social network optimization does have an impact on website search rankings, as we mentioned in the Fall 2013 issue. Social reports remind you that it’s time to tend that garden and make sure your profiles are up to date. Next Steps: Using Trackbacks, you may discover websites with articles about your events. If you like them, share the article on your site or social channels to help strengthen the relationship. Everyone wants traffic – at least online!   BEHAVIOR REPORTS Behavior Flow  Why It’s Important: Behavior Flow reveals the pathways your customers travel

when they navigate your website. Understanding what is popular helps you identify content that needs improvement. In some cases, you may decide to remove a page from your site. After all, would a restaurant keep a dish on its menu if no one ever bought it? Sample Insight: There is a page on your site that you believe is vital to your business, yet receives very little traffic. Next Steps: Think like a consumer. Is the intended audience not seeing the link to that page? Update your navigation or put a photo on the homepage that links to it. Are people exiting the page a few seconds after landing? Experiment with your page content layout! Make one change at a time, and then re-visit the report to check for improvement. Site Content: Content Drilldown  Why It’s important: Content Drilldown displays information related to page views, time spent on the page, bounce rate, and exit rate. Your main website goal is likely to be selling tickets. For any e-commerce web site, the amount of time spent on a page may be secondary to moving customers effectively into the purchase process. With that in mind, the collection of pages where you feature Ticketfly purchase links is where you hope to see the most action. Bounce rate = percentage of visitors that both landed and exited from the reported page. Exit rate = percentage of visitors leaving your website from the reported page. Sample Insight: The majority of users land, then bounce, and exit from event pages. A slightly smaller group lands on your homepage, and has much lower bounce and exit rates. The homepage is where you have upcoming and just announced event lists prominently displayed. Next Steps:  Ask “Why?” and think through the possible answers. Customers who have first seen the event page link via search or on social media have a specific goal before coming to your site. In this case, the high bounce rate may indicate either getting information like ticket price and show time and quickly exiting, or clicking the “Buy Tickets” link and moving to your ticketing provider’s to make their purchase. In contrast, your homepage lends itself to event discovery and has lower bounce and exits because you’ve made it simple for customers to find new events they want to explore, so they move deeper into the website. Site Speed: Page Timings  Why It’s Important: Page Timings helps you identify factors that affect the loading Winter 2013

speed of critical pages like your home and calendar page, so that you can solve performance problems. For example, you may want to look for performance issues based on differences between web browsers. Sample Insight: The homepage takes much longer to load on a mobile device when compared to the overall total load time for the page. Next Steps: Review related data in the report to determine the cause. Is it because your website redirects to a mobile-optimized version? Are there differences if you look at the original source of the traffic? Once you’ve identified the potential cause, you may decide if it is critical to take steps to improve the page load time for the mobile user. To recap, here are some simple steps to help you get started:  1. Open up Google Analytics and take a tour of the help content. 2. Check your Acquisition and Behavior reports to see which marketing channels bring you the most traffic and how customers spend time on your site. 3. Look for unexpected sources to find new marketing channels to develop. 4. Check your Social report to see which social networks are most active for you and focus efforts on those that are driving unexpected traffic.

Ticketfly is an integrated ticketing and marketing platform for event promoters of any size, from standing-room-only clubs to festival grounds and arenas with reserved seating. The Ticketfly platform provides a full suite of integrated ticketing, mobile and social marketing, email and analytics tools that streamline operations and increase ticket sales. Prominent Ticketfly festival clients in the U.S. and Canada include Camp Bisco (NY), Life is good™ festival (MA), the Original Renaissance Pleasure Faire, the Pitchfork Music Festival (Chicago), Southern Ground Music & Food Festival (Nashville and Charleston), Noise Pop (San Francisco), Riot Fest (Chicago, Denver, and Toronto), the Preakness Stakes and InfieldFest (Baltimore), and Virgin Mobile FreeFest (DC). To find events near you, visit ticketfly. com. For more information about Ticketfly, visit start.ticketfly.com, connect on Facebook at facebook.com/ticketfly, or follow us on Twitter at twitter. com/ticketfly.

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Three Simple Ideas to Increase Success in Festival and Event Operations

1 Eliminating 2 Planning 3 Flexibility By Cindy Verge 36

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“What do you do if something goes wrong” is one of my favorite questions ever asked by a reporter. Obviously this person had never been involved in producing an event or a festival. (My answer was: that is “WHEN something goes wrong.”) It is a dream of mine to one day to truly say nothing went wrong or perhaps everything went according to plan, but so far that hasn’t happened! After 14 years in the industry, I have developed some working guidelines that greatly reduce the possibility of things going wrong. For me, I see three keys to dealing with the everyday management of festivals and events: eliminating, planning and flexibility. They can also be a starting point for dealing with truly major catastrophes, which fortunately occur less often for all of us.

our brochure and on official merchandise each year. In order to meet all the production and event deadlines, we choose our artists 18 months ahead of the festival that will feature their artwork. Once the timeline is in place, develop checklists for the individual aspects of the festival, event or task. The timeline I use for our Key Bank Tulip Ambassador Event is a good example. It takes place in early February, but work on it begins much earlier.

In this case, information needs to get to fourth and fifth grade classrooms in January after Christmas break (and in this case because of the holiday, earlier isn’t better). We start work on this aspect of the event in December which allows us to determine individual school and district requirements. If all of this was left until January, a small staff augmented by volunteers couldn’t get the information out in a timely manner. By developing a timeline and breaking the event down into individual tasks that are completed as early as possible, needless stress is ELIMINATED and time exists if something unforeseen develops. As you can see, the event timeline puts contacting the various districts in our area in December, along with updating the information to be sent out. This particular event timeline has changed as every event timeline should not become a static – each particular timeline should be reviewed at its conclusion to determine if anything needs to change. Once you are confident you have an adequate timeline, the next step is to develop

E NT CH ECK

SSADOR EV TU LIP AM BA

ASSIG NE D TO

Eliminating Eliminating involves pre-planning, double checking and taking care of absolutely everything possible before the start of the event or festival. Good planning allows you to lay the groundwork for your festival, much like a foundation. It is much easier to keep building on a solid start than to try and prop up something poorly executed. It also builds in time to adjust when the unexpected arises. Checklists and timelines help to identify and schedule tasks, ELIMINATING surprises as much as possible, so nothing gets missed as the event date approaches. Be sure to break down checklists and timelines from the overall festival timeline to those needed for individual events. Large events may also need to be broken down to several individual timelines, depending on the complexity. There are data base programs and spreadsheets that can help if the details are overwhelming, but something simple can also work well. The first step for a timeline is to start with the event date and work backwards. Decide when you need items – supplies, t-shirt designs, artist contracts, lighting contracts, original art, board decisions – in order to have everything ready in time for the event/festival. For instance, we commission a different piece of art each year and use the piece as our poster, on

TAS K

Cindy

DEAD LIN E

LIST COMPLETED

November November

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Click on graphic to see full pdf of example. Winter 2013

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a checklist. The checklist shows more details and allows someone at a glance to see if all is progressing according to schedule. Checklists and timelines won’t work if everything is left for one person to do – delegate! Assign specific jobs on the checklist and follow up to make sure they are completed. Remember to be flexible and focus on the end result. Evaluate whether the task is completed correctly, as opposed to is it completed exactly the way you would have done it. This kind of detailed task tracking allows staff and volunteers to get all the small things done that make up a festival without feeling overwhelmed. It also prevents information residing with just one person – ELIMINATING the stress of what to do if the festival director is in the hospital with pneumonia, has a family emergency, etc. Planning Planning goes beyond the timelines and checklists. It should involve the overall operation of your festival or event, including staffing, traffic control, crowd control, and major factors (weather for instance) that festival organizers cannot control. Planning should involve spending time thinking “what if.” Every festival has “what ifs” that happen, some big and some little. By at least thinking about possibilities, contingencies can be prepared and ready to go. This thinking can be big – preparing for the catastrophic terrorist attack – but for most of us, it again involves the little things. Planning also involves thinking ahead for the future, which can be as simple as what to do for the 25th anniversary of your festival or as complex as planning for funding changes in traffic control/flow. “What if” planning should include your volunteers. Treat volunteers much like employees – use applications, get emergency phone contacts, and provide job descriptions and acceptable conduct guidelines for them. Take the time to train your volunteers for the job they are doing. Answer the question “What if our volunteers were like employees?” Your festival relies on its volunteers to handle a myriad of jobs; make every effort to have them prepared for the tasks. This can be done in groups, by assigning lead volunteers to mentor and train new recruits, or by one-on-one training by festival staff. Volunteers are the best cheerleaders for your festival AND, when empowered, do amazing work. Also remember that your volunteers either are retired from day jobs or have day jobs. Utilize that expertise in your planning. Listen for suggestions and be open for new ideas. Weather is a big “what if” for many festivals and events. The Skagit Valley Tulip Festival is no exception. Our star attrac38

tion (100’s of acres of blooming tulips) loves cool temperatures and rain, which makes it rather difficult for the people coming to enjoy the flowers. We schedule the festival for 30 days with “bloom dates according to Mother Nature.” You can’t plan the weather, but you can know what the weather is likely to do – hot, cold, wet, etc. – and help your visitors prepare. Keep emphasizing what people need to be ready for. Get that information out in your printed and digital material. Think through (and write down) what the festival staff and event organizers will do in an emergency situation – what if the river floods during your festival, if it is too cold for toads to come out, if the ice isn’t thick enough for races – plan for the what if and know who will answer questions, how to help visitors already on-site and those in transit, and how to decide to cancel or keep going. Use your Social Media sites, your festival website, and electronic newsletters in the months preceding and during your festival to get current and up-to-date information (weather, a cancelled appearance, etc.) out to your festival fans. Make sure the messages match and have someone available to monitor, answer questions and update as needed. Also notify conventional media as appropriate, depending on the information you need to get out. Flexibility Once you have eliminated as many variables as possible and have planned for as many aspects as possible, spend some time anticipating what will happen. Know that things will happen that aren’t according to plan and be ready with a flexible plan of action. Sometimes the plans are small, sometimes large, but it is always easier to have responses ready rather than reacting. For instance, using social media and website postings to give sponsors an extra round of publicity is a great idea and is something that festivals and events should utilize. But, anticipate, that as you highlight different sponsors, you will get a call asking “why wasn’t I there?” Allow the flexibility in your publicity schedule to incorporate a sponsor’s concerns and tweak your plans accordingly. And, of course, when doing this sort of publicity, make sure you have the information at hand to tell sponsors either the date they’ve been highlighted or the date they are scheduled to appear. Weather questions are always good exercises in flexibility. They are also usually painfully obvious, so be flexible in your response, decide what you want to communicate, and continue to get your message across regardless how many versions of the question you receive. Members of the news media will want to know how the rain,

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snow, etc. will affect your festival. You don’t want to be caught on a live camera shot or live radio without an answer. Know, for instance, what you will say when someone asks: “Did the snow harm the tulips?” Yes, that was a real question . . . it didn’t kill the tulips, it didn’t harm them really, but we opted not to publish any pictures as it wasn’t the image we wanted to convey. By the time the festival opened for the day, most of the snow was gone and it was sunny and cold! Most of all, while you are busy being flexible, smile! Flexibility works best in conjunction with good knowledge and preparation. Being prepared allows you to travel to a network studio to do a live on-air interview or to take a VIP on a personal tour. Being surprised is good when it’s a birthday party, but not when you are running a festival or event. Remember that things not going according to plan can be positive as well. Look for opportunities and adapt your event or festival to include the new element. Sometimes the change can be small – say a donation of potted plants for your volunteer thank you banquet – or much bigger, like a person coming in and wanting to become a festival sponsor at a major level after all the pre-planned spots are filled. Naturally in both cases, you are flexible and incorporate the new elements. Flexibility allows festivals to embrace their audience and communities and try new things. It involves a lot of listening and being willing to try new ideas. If you start an event planning meeting with “this is the way we’ve always...” it is just another way of saying “we don’t want to change.” Change and unpredictability will always be a part of the festivals and events industry. Dealing with those elements is vital to the success of individual festivals and events. The ideas outlined here have been developed through trial and error over the past 10 years of managing the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival. These techniques have worked to eliminate variables and accomplish tasks, allowed the use of advance planning to identify and quell potential problems, and provided a flexible response to festival management. Cindy Verge – As with many of us in the Festivals and Events industry, I came to be an Executive Director after first working elsewhere – as a writer, editor, office supervisor, and newspaper reporter in my case. My formal education is from the University of Washington where I earned a BA in Communications. I have two daughters (21 and 24) and am happily married to my husband, Tom, for 31 years and counting.


JANUARY 19 – 23, 2014 A Comprehensive Training and Educational Experience for those producing and/or working closely with community events. The Event Management School at Oglebay National Training Center in West Virginia is designed around the concept of bringing new and mid-career industry professionals together with some of the most highly-respected and experienced professionals in the field for a comprehensive educational and networking opportunity that will cover the critical basics of successful event management – from sponsorship/revenues to operations/risk management, media/marketing to volunteers/team building, business/budgeting to community/city partnerships and more – and then test your knowledge/skills/creativity against your peers. A two-year program, second year students will work closely with Event Management School expert advisors/instructors to design/create a complete event template to be presented as part of their final assessment project. Don’t miss out on this unique opportunity.

Presented by a Partnership For Excellence in Event Education.

For more information: http://www.nrpa.org/event-school/ 800.626.NRPA (6772) 7-1-1 for speech and hearing impaired

www.IFEA.com +1. 208.433.0950

www.OGLEBAY-RESORT.com/schools 800.624.6988, ext. 4126


G N I T S T E U C P PIE R E E H H T T GE chnology t.o r e i T a O F ew T rt N uis A g n o gi L n i t r n B i a S rick the by

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Saint Louis Art Fair Stats Number of Points : 334 Time to complete : 26 hrs URL : www.PointsMap.com/SLAF

I

first encountered the PointsMap online mapping program two years ago during the IFEA Annual Conference. My first impression was that the program was an impressive tool that would never fit within the budget for the Saint Louis Art Fair, and even if it could, our tiny staff would not have the time or technical capabilities to build out a map. The next year, I met PointsMap president Jerry Waddell and discussed the possibility of using the PointsMap program for the 2013 fair. The $999 introductory set-up fee turns the map into a great value, and the $100 per month hosting fee is pennies when compared to normal printing costs. My fears about the staff shortage and knowledge needed to produce a map were quickly allayed. We built the map from start to finish in less than 26 hours spread over a few weeks. The work was split between myself and our college intern; we both got past the learning curve within an hour and found the program extremely intuitive and very easy to use. Using an online map versus printed material

means that if we had any changes or artists drop out, we could modify the information quickly with just a few clicks and users could then see the updates instantly. Each PointsMap begins with a unique Google Map™ and your own domain URL for your PointsMap. You can center the map anywhere and at any zoom level. For the Saint Louis Art Fair, we were able to set the view to show just our six city block area. Our map, which eventually totaled over three hundred Points of Interest,

“...we could modify the information quickly with just a few clicks and users could then see the updates instantly.

seemed very daunting at this stage. We created Categories for each art medium as well as restaurants, vendors and services. As we started to build out these Categories, things seemed to just fall into place. We really Winter 2013

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wanted to get everything we could out of the program and to that end we made certain that each of the almost two hundred artists had a picture of their art, a link to their website and a short biography on their individual Points. Musical performers have similar information and in a lot of cases we linked videos of previous performances or music videos that open inside of PointsMap. This not only let visitors to the fair learn about the creators behind the work they were buying, but also directed more traffic to the artists’ websites. Next year, we’re hoping to open up the artists’ access to their own Points so they can add even more information and links. Each Point can honestly be its own mini website. The longest part of the work was simply putting the icons on the map in the correct locations, but since many of our artists 42

are located in the same booths every year, our 2014 PointsMap will only need slight updating on that front. This reusability is a tremendous asset for us. Using an importing function PointsMap has provided, we can change almost every piece of data on the map using just a spreadsheet. We already had

manual is available for Administrators that takes you step-by-step through setting up and maintaining a map as well as addressing every option in the program. The website has training videos, guided demo for visitors and multiple Q&A pages available. The support staff is always

“Each Point can honestly be its own mini website.” most of the information we entered into our PointsMap in other locations; this program gave us an easy to use interface to bring it all together. I can really see the Saint Louis Art Fair being a paperless event within the next few years using PointsMap. We even created an access area for our volunteers and vendors to view helpful videos, training and exhibitor guides and registration information. PointsMap has a lot of support options available as well. A comprehensive

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willing to address any concerns or questions as well. One of the most effective things about the program is PointsMap Mobile. Since PointsMap is an online program rather than just a smartphonebased application, the desktop version which works on both PCs and tablets, can be used by Administrators to edit the map and by visitors to preplan their outings. Unlike normal apps, PointsMap Mobile accesses the


same information and keeps the map updated. PointsMap Mobile works with a smartphone’s GPS and can locate you on the map, making navigation very simple. Another part of wayfinding with PointsMap is PID numbers. A PID number is assigned to each Point.

Entering the number into the Find by PID page will take you directly to that Point on the map. This gives artists the chance to post their number at their booth so potential customers can read up on them quickly. PointsMap is developing an app for the PathMaps wayfinding feature, but even this will rely on the same online mapping system to keep data constantly up-to-date. PointsMap has opened up doors for tracking key volunteers around the festival. An add-on feature would allow certain individuals to mark their location with their smartphones and auto update a related Point on the PointsMap. This could also come in handy while laying out Points that do not have a physical address associated with them. I think one reason for our great success with PointsMap was our marketing. In order to get the maximum exposure for the new program, we embedded it in our

website; passed out business cards displaying a QR Code that linked to the map, featured the same QR Code on much of our signage; and reached out to the media for some coverage of PointsMap in action at the fair. I am constantly thinking of new approaches I can take to adding ideas onto our PointsMap or ways this program could be used for other events. I think PointsMap is a perfect partner for festivals, fairs, and events. It has a reasonable price tag, a user-friendly interface and a multitude of applications. Visit www.PointsMap.com/SLAF to see Cindy’s map To take advantage of this limited time special pricing for IFEA members, or for more information, visit www.PointsMap.com or Contact Jerry Waddell at jerryw@pointsmap.com 423.894.2677 Layout & Design : Chris Harvey

We were able to make use of PointsMap’s Inside Maps to showcase exhibits in the Creative Castle. This allowed us to create a “sub map” and highlight each artist, their pieces and their talent.

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by Charlotte J. DeWitt, CFEE

BOSTON AWARDED IFEA WORLD FESTIVAL AND EVENT CITY

BOSTON STRONG ONE CITY’S STORY OF SAFETY, SECURITY, AND SUSTAINABILITY

All photos courtesy Charlotte J. DeWitt, CFEE. 44 44

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When the bombs went off at 2:50 p.m. on April 15th, world attention focused instantly on the horror at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, the world's oldest annual marathon and one of the most prestigious road racing events in the world. If you were a runner, a fast runner, you could have been a statistic. If you were a slow runner, you were diverted from the 26-mile (42KM) course and brought to safety. And if you lived in the city of Boston or its immediate suburbs of Cambridge and Watertown, you were in lockdown—recorded calls from the Mayor’s Office told residents to stay home, lock the doors, and stay put. Day and night, helicopters shuttled overhead and sirens screamed, racing from one side of the city to the other through barricaded streets eerily empty. Live media broadcasts pre-empted all other programming. It was a state of siege, a war zone, cell phone signals temporarily suspended to preclude any further detonations; subways, trains, and busses at a standstill. Images still remain—dazed runners wrapped in reflective, metallic blankets, shivering in the cold spring air of northern New England, searching for family and friends. A lone woman crying as she talked on her cell phone walking through the Boston Public Gardens. At the arch of the little foot bridge near the famous swan boats, a cluster of white-coated doctors listening to their leader. Soon, their white coats would be stained with blood. Street closures, ambulances lined up as far as the eye could see, armed police and other law enforcement officials at every intersection and barricade. Shopping malls closed and

heavily guarded. School busses filled with runners’ gear—unloaded, piled numerically on the street behind the race headquarters. Hotels in the immediate area guiding registered guests caught on the outside, through the barriers. This is not that story. This is the story of rebirth and healing—the rejuvenation of the soul of a city-- and Boston did it—and continues to do it—flawlessly and relentlessly. Boston Strong Overnight, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick and Boston Mayor Thomas Menino announced the establishment of The One Fund Boston to raise money for the benefit of those families most affected by the tragic events of the Boston Marathon. Key to the launch of the fund

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was a US$1 million commitment by John Hancock Financial Services, headquartered in Boston for more than 150 years and a major sponsor of the Marathon since 1986. Other corporations and some 185,000 individuals soon followed suit, with over US$69.8 million raised since the fund was founded on April 16, 2013. From that initial response in April, heralded by a proliferation of street banners proclaiming “Boston Strong. Help Heal: The 1 Fund,” the groundswell of support has grown daily, as much the peoples’ expression of solidarity as the city’s. Throughout Boston, both immediately and continuously thereafter, the psychological healing goes on, even now. Once the street barricades were removed, city busses began to run again, with those on Boylston Street, the site of the bombings, displaying rotating messages that alternated with the name of the destination: We Are One Boston>Route 39> Boston Strong> Route 39. Businesses along the finish line at Boylston Street painted their windows with the Marathon colors of blue and yellow, emblazoning the message on their storefronts: Boston Strong.

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And at nearby Copley Square, what started as a peoples’ display of flowers and wreathes at the closest street barricade to the finish line, grew so large that it was moved to the park and became a living memorial to the victims, a memorial with a message: We are Boston. Boston Strong. In a novel way of emotional healing, members of a local canine corps walked the streets with specially trained dogs which pedestrians petted and interacted with as a form of grief therapy. The T-shirt as Fundraiser And of course, overnight there were the inevitable solidarity-themed T-shirts… this time, with a twist: profits were donated to The One Fund. The Boston Athletic Association (BAA) with BAA sponsor Adidas, official apparel supplier to the Boston Marathon for the past 25 years, offered commemorative T-shirts with “Boston Stands As One” and the logo of the BAA as the design. The first batch of the shirts sold out almost immediately according to an April 19th article in BloombergBusinessweek.com, with the full purchase price of each shirt donated to The One Fund. According to BAA Marketing and Communications Director Jack Fleming, more than US$1.3 million was raised for The One Fund. The limited-edition shirts sold for US$26.20, a price inspired by the Marathon. Another T-shirt, the Boston Strong T-shirt, was an initiative conceived the evening of the bombings by Nicholas Reynolds and Chris Dobens, later joined by Lane Brenner, all students at Boston’s Emerson College. The blue and yellow T-shirts were a unique, non-profit fundraiser: $15 of every $20 sale was donated 46

to The One Fund Boston, with the remaining $5 allocated to production costs. By the end of May, the trio had raised $870,000 for the fund. The shirts are still available throughout Boston. Beyond the fund-raising aspect of these shirts, people continue to wear them as a show of solidarity and a means of boosting the psychological healing of the city—each a type of walking billboard. You’ve Got a Friend: Boston in Concert The Boston Strong benefit concert on May 30th sold out online in five minutes for the 19,600-seat TD Garden event. Organized by Live Nation New England to benefit Marathon bombing victims through The One Fund Boston, the Boston

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Strong: An Evening of Support and Celebration raised more than US$2 million, the largest donation from a single source to The One Fund Boston according to its organizers. Headliners such as Aerosmith, Boston, James Taylor, J. Geils Band, and New Kids on the Block, all with roots in Boston, plus luminaries such as Carole King and Jimmy Buffet, waived performance and licensing fees to help the cause. John Hancock Financial Services, a major Boston Marathon sponsor, covered the editing and post-production costs for the June 29th broadcast of the concert on Boston’s WCVB-TV (Channel 5) for those unable to get tickets to the live May concert. The healing continues. The Marathon finish line has been repainted. Stores and restaurants along Boylston Street have reopened. In May, a pub crawl along Boylston Street with inexpensive drinks was launched to draw people back to the area of the explosions. A 10K race sponsored by the BAA took place on Boston Common on June 23rd with some 6,500 runners participating… fearlessly. Every single runner showed up. The city reclaimed itself. At Fenway Park, home of the Boston Red Sox baseball team, singer Neil Diamond came to center field for the team’s season opening game and sang a live performance of his song Sweet Caroline, typically sung during the “seventh inning stretch” of a home game. He waived all royalties and instead, gave them to The One Fund. But the fund-raising still has not stopped. Even after payments of nearly $61 million were made to Marathon bombing victims in late June, donations continue to pour in from contributors ranging


from PGA golfer Henrik Stenson, who pledged a portion of his recent $1.44 million Deutsche Bank Championship winnings, to the popular Maine outdoor apparel retailer L.L. Bean, who sold out 3,500 tote bags at $49 each to raise money for the fund. The bags were made from an old infield tarp from Fenway Park. One of the more unusual fundraisers came from an unlikely source: tattoos. Hundreds of people dealt with their emotional devastation by getting tattoos to memorialize the event. Tattoo artists of Good Mojo Tattoos in Beverly, Massachusetts, raised $4,000 to help victims, with the initial weekend event extended into two weeks due to public response. There is even a bill before the Massachusetts legislature to create a “Boston Strong” license plate, with proceeds to benefit The One Fund. A similar plate has raised $4.4 million for Massachusetts 9/11 victims since 2003. And after months of repairs, Marathon Sports, site of the first explosion at the finish line, has reopened. Boston Strong: Instant Solidarity Thomas Grilk, Executive Director of the Boston Athletic Association (BAA), explained Boston’s solidarity at a Fourth of July address at Boston’s historic Faneuil Hall Marketplace just prior to the city’s annual national day celebration at the Esplanade, the original target of the bombers. The BAA has organized the Boston Marathon® since the event’s inception in 1897. Excerpts below: “…The strength of Boston is the strength of Bostonians…we’ve been Boston Strong all along. It’s in our nature.  In

our culture.  In our history—In the darkest early days of the Revolutionary War, Sam Adams wrote a friend with a message Bostonians have taken to heart across the ages: “Nil desperandum," he said.  "Never despair.” And we never do… What is Boston Strong? It means that people here have the will to live their lives in their own way, no matter what the challenge. We have heard the term Boston Strong in the days since April 15. But the essence, the core, of that strength was there long before.  We were Boston Strong that April night in 1775 when Paul Revere set out on a midnight ride—Boston Strong when the city went up in flames in 1872—and Boston Strong the moment the first bomb went off on Boylston Street on April 15—all before those two words, “Boston” and “Strong,” were put together on a single sign. Because as soon as that first explosion was heard, people did what good sense and sweet reason would tell any of us NOT to do—they ran TOWARD the bomb, and then, they ran toward ANOTHER one…

ple, and injure hundreds of them. The strength to say we do not and will never give in to those who attack us in this way—to say that we will honor those who died and those who have suffered, honoring them by living our lives as Americans and helping those injured victims to do the same—that is the strength of Boston. And there will need to be another element of that strength. The strength we give in our support to those who were injured, and those who lost family members. We need to unite to help them remain Boston Strong, as they deal, for the rest of their lives, with what happened on April 15. It is a commitment we all will share. Boston Strong is a rallying cry. But it is a cry that envelops a truth that sustains us all. And like so many powerful truths, ours is a simple one. It is just this: We don’t give in. The people injured in April don’t give in. You here today, you don’t give in. The hundreds of thousands of people we will see tonight on the Esplanade, they don’t give in. Our nation’s founders, who declared on the Fourth of July that the strength of this nation would be the freedom to live our lives without fear, they didn’t give in. And the people, who live their lives every day, here and across America, don’t give in. They, and we, all of us, are borne on by that enduring strength. A simple. enduring strength. We don’t give in. No matter what. That’s the strength of Boston. And it makes all of us, enduring and forever, Boston Strong.”

In the days and weeks and now months that have followed, we have seen that Boston Strong stands as a symbol for what we already knew: that people here won’t be stopped by the acts of a few, no matter how horrifying, no matter how calculated to make all of us cower and hide… That is the strength of Boston; that is the “strong” in Boston Strong. It is the strength to be yourself, and to do what you always do, even if someone goes to merciless, evil lengths to try to stop you. Even if they kill and maim. Even if they threaten thousands of peoWinter 2013

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by Charlotte J. DeWitt, CFEE

FIRST NIGHT: ANOTHER NIGHT BOSTON STRONG

All photos courtesy First Night. 48 48

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After the scorching temperatures of this past summer, it is difficult to replay memories of the howling winds and subzero temperatures that plagued Boston’s oldest… and only… New Year’s Eve festival, First Night Boston, the past three years. But this year, the first day of summer marked the beginning of the last days of operations for the 37-year-old private, non-profit organization, producer of the oldest and largest New Year’s Eve celebration of the arts in North America. It also marked its rebirth, thanks to the City of Boston’s Office of Arts, Tourism, and Special Events, which has taken over stewardship of the event. Director Christopher Cook says the festival will continue. First Night Boston was the flagship of the First Night movement that started in 1976 as a response by Boston’s artistic community to deaths from drunken driving on New Year’s Eve. It later gave rise to over 200 First Night celebrations worldwide as Millennium clocks from Greenwich, England, to Hastings, New Zealand, struck midnight. Signature events for the winter event in Boston included ice sculptures, a grand processional/Mardi Gras carnival-style parade, fireworks, art installations, concerts, and a day-long family festival. All First Night festivals were, by design, alcohol-free. On June 21st, First Night Boston’s Board of Directors announced its decision to cease operations on June 30th. The closure meant the loss of three full-time positions, one part-time position, six year-round contractor positions, and various seasonal contract festival production positions.

“The last several years have become increasingly challenging for us,” said Executive Director Geri Guardino in her closing remarks to Boston media, “and our business model is no longer sustainable.” A well-known, well-respected figure in the city’s arts community, Guardino directed First Night Boston for the past seventeen years, aggressively cutting the festival’s budget from $1.3 million in 2008 to $900,000 during its last year and voluntarily taking a steep salary cut that same year in order to keep the event alive. To her credit, when First Night officially closed its doors this past June, it did so debt-free, using a small reserve to pay its bills before closing its doors. The mainstay of the organization’s revenues had traditionally been the sale of its First Night button, which gave free entrance

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to the more than 200 performances and activities in 35 venues throughout the city. Retailing for US$18, the buttons accounted for some $510,000 in revenues of the First Night 2013 budget of $900,000, or about 57% of the festival costs and its year-round First Night Neighborhood Network outreach and arts education program-- an unlikely amount for the projected revenues for First Night 2014 and one of the contributing factors in the decision to cease operations. Other sources of revenue came from foundations and grants, corporate sponsorship, and charitable donations, all of which had been diminishing over the past few years. Traditionally, the City of Boston provided in-kind city services (police, public works cleanup, and permitting) and a nominal amount of cash, while the Boston Convention and Visitors Bureau provided marketing and promotional support to the annual event through its extensive resources. Under the festival’s reorganizational plan, this support will continue for First Night 2014. “When you look at the estimated economic impact, it’s around $25 million. It means something to the restaurants, the MBTA (Metropolitan Boston Transit Authority), the service industry professionals-- it’s a revenue generator … so I think the event is safe, but how it goes forward, that’s going to alter and change,” said Cook during an interview this past June with WBUR-FM. One of the anticipated changes deals with the city government itself: after twenty years in office, Mayor Thomas M. Menino decided not to run for re-election. Boston voters elected Martin "Marty" Walsh as Menino's successor on November 5th, and as with most political changes of this nature, the new mayor will appoint his own department heads. In terms of Boston’s festivals and events, and especially in terms of First Night, this is significant.

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FIRST NIGHT BOSTON 2013 AT A GLANCE: DECEMBER 31, 2012 Attendees.........................................................................................................................1 Million Button Buyers....................................................................................................................30,000 Artists.................................................................................................................................... 1,000 Activities...................................................................................................................................200 Venues.........................................................................................................................................35 Budget:.................................................................................US $900,000; 65% funds artists Cost Per Person Attending...........................................................................................US$0.90 Economic Impact........................................................$25million annually in fourth quarter Source: Boston Police Department News, Dec. 30, 2012 The City of Boston’s Office of Arts, Tourism, and Special Events is involved with some 220 festivals and events each year. Over 21 million people visit the city annually.

First Night Finances: Four Factors First Night Boston, like many non-profit arts organizations, was hard-hit by the 2008 recession. Overall, major funding and sponsorship had fallen by seventy per cent since 2003, from $880,000 to $263,000. The top four reasons for declining revenues include:

The decline in foundation support impacted First Night’s cash flow and put the organization at risk—thus contributing to its decision to close operations. 3. Weather and Earned Income Snow, ice, and near-arctic temperatures inevitably have an effect on a one-day, outdoor winter festival’s attendance and therefore, its income stream. The sale of First Night buttons accounted for 57% of the event’s revenues this past New Year’s Eve, but in prior years, button revenue was severely impacted by the snow storms of 2010 and 2011. The organization eventu-

1. Declining Corporate Sponsorship A decade ago, the event drew $474,000 from corporate sponsors. By 2013, sponsorship income had dwindled to $156,000 – one third of what it had been according to both the Boston Globe and WBUR-FM. Patrick B. Moscaritolo, president of the Greater Boston Convention and Visitors Bureau, attributed the decline to the changing nature of corporate sponsorship: companies today are looking for more sustained exposure than the one-day event could provide. Guardino agreed. “Corporations wanted more bang for their buck,” she said. Losing Boston-based sponsors like Fidelity and Fleet Bank had a major impact on the organization’s finances. 2. Declining Support from Foundations Income from foundations, meanwhile, plummeted from $364,000 to less than $50,000—not quite 14% of what it had been. Cook attributed this to the changing nature of foundation goals: “Foundations don’t support events,” he said in an interview with the author. “They are focused more on social justice or projects with a long-term impact, such as education.” 50

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ally recouped its losses through aggressive financial management, but weather will always be a concern. 4. Organizational Model The ability of an organization to sustain an office with year-round staff producing one major one-day event is challenging at best. Even with its Neighborhood Network activities, First Night Boston needed a broader portfolio of events in order to pro rate its ongoing costs. “I think we’re in an era of strategic partnerships and collaborations and First Night, like many arts organizations, is faced with the question of ‘what’s the next stage of our life cycle?’” said Cook (WBUR-FM interview), adding that the days of a stand-alone, non-profit organization are over. By taking on stewardship of First Night, the City of Boston has relieved the festival of some of its overhead costs. This is consistent with what other cities throughout the world have done in order to support a rich cultural life for their residents. Festival Phoenix: The Next First Night Both Christopher Cook and Patrick Moscaritolo are full of praise for First Night and all it does for both the Boston economy and the social unity of a city in celebration, but recognize that some change is inevitable. What’s next? Cook hopes to focus on the core, free, outdoor


FOR MORE INFORMATION: THOMAS GRILK Executive Director JACK FLEMING Marketing and Communications Director Boston Athletic Association 40 Trinity Place, 4th floor Boston MA 02116 USA T +1 (617) 236-1652 x 2627 F +1 617-236-4505 tgrilk@baa.org fleming@baa.org www.baa.org

components, such as ice sculptures, art installations, and the grand procession; to add value to the First Night button while reducing its cost from $18 to $10; and to forge partnerships with other organizations, such as the city’s historic Faneuil Hall marketplace, one of America’s top tourist destinations and host to a new “ice bar,” an idea originating in northern Sweden. Two New Year's Eve fireworks shows are also on the menu. Meanwhile, staff for First Night has been pared down to a producer, with supportive services from the city’s technical staff and a strategic planning consultant with a strong background in corporate sponsorship. “Mostly,” says Cook, “we anticipate contracting heavily with former staff and other event personnel as the event approaches.” The city also has its own inventory of event-related equipment, which should cut down on direct costs related to producing First Night 2014 on December 31st, 2013. The First Night Family Festival at the Hynes Convention Center has always been well-received, and this year, Cook hopes to add another element at nearby Copley Square: digital dances and digital mapping for young adults age 18 and older at the Liberty Mutual Copley Stage. The Boston Globe is a media sponsor. And on his wish list? Expanding the one-day festival into a winter carnival of several days, with First Night the signature event. “First Night is one of our core anchor

events in the city, and along with the Boston Marathon and Fourth of July on the Esplanade, a major draw for visitors and residents alike,” says Cook. Financial Update: Timing is Everything On October 8th, the Highland Street Foundation announced that it will donate $100,000 towards First Night Boston, making it the “lead sponsor” for 2014. The fit is a good one: the non-profit foundation targets projects benefiting children and families in Massachusetts and California, with education, mentorship, and the arts three of its focal points. The foundation is based in suburban Newton, Massachusetts. Other philanthropic angels are hovering nearby according to the City. The donation, coupled with support from the City of Boston’s Office of Arts, Tourism, and Special Events and the Greater Boston Convention and Visitors Bureau, means that First Night Boston will live to ring in 2014. When the First Night Grand Procession moves down Boylston Street on New Year’s Eve, it will retrace the route of the Boston Marathon, a statement by participants as well as spectators, that the city has reclaimed what was lost temporarily in the face of terrorism. Record crowds are expected. This philosophy is yet another reason why Boston received the IFEA World Festival and Event City Award this year. Boston Strong. It takes care of its own. Winter 2013

CHRISTOPHER COOK Director City of Boston’s Office of Arts, Tourism, and Special Events Boston City Hall, Room 802 Boston, MA 02201 USA T +1 (617) 635-4447 F +1 (617) 635-4428 christopher.cook@cityofboston.gov www.cityofboston.gov/arts   PATRICK B. MOSCARITOLO President and CEO Greater Boston Convention and Visitors Bureau 2 Copley Place suite 105 Boston, MA 02116 USA T +1 617-867-8235 F +1 (617) 424-7664 patm@bostonusa.com www.BostonUSA.com Charlotte DeWitt is a member of the IFEA Hall of Fame, the industry’s highest honor. As president of International Events, Ltd., she has served as a cultural ambassador and events architect and strategist in some 29 countries since 1979, designing and producing over 150 waterfront festivals and international events. She will speak at the Congreso Especializado para Ferias Populares y Festivales in León, Mexico, in January 2014 and the Festivals and Events Ontario conference in Toronto in March. Charlotte is Past Chairman of IFEA/World (IFEA) and founder/ past President/ CEO of IFEA Europe. She lived in Sweden from 1994-2004. CHARLOTTE J. DEWITT, CFEE President International Events, Ltd. 249 West Newton St., #8 Boston, MA 02116 USA M +1 617 513 5696 charlotte@internationaleventsltd.com www.internationaleventsltd.com

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2014Call for Inductees Please submit the following information for your nomination: A.

INDIVIDUAL SUBMITTING NOMINEE 1. Name • Organization • Address • City • State Zip • Phone • Fax • Email 2. If your nominee is selected, will you be willing to help ensure that they attend the luncheon? 3. If your nominee is selected, will you be willing to assist the IFEA and the inductee in gather ing materials to prepare their induction video?

B. NOMINEE INFORMATION 1. Name • Position • Address • City • State • Zip Phone • Fax • Email

Known as the associations most prestigious honor, the IFEA Hall of Fame recognizes those outstanding individuals who, through their exceptional work and achievements, have made a significant contribution to the Festivals and Events Industry. The International Festivals & Events Association is now accepting nominations from its members for those individuals who meet this standard for the 2014 Induction Ceremony. The Hall of Fame Committee will review all nominations and select one or more individuals to be honored in to the IFEA Hall of Fame. The Honoree (s) will be the guest (s) of the IFEA on an all-expense* paid trip to the 59th Annual IFEA Convention & Expo location and date TBD, where they will be inducted at a reception, in their honor. NOMINATION CRITERIA Nominations must represent a current or past IFEA member who has made substantial achievements and/or contributions to the festivals and events industry. Nominees can be retired and represent any facet of our industry (i.e. vendor, supporter, senior professional, etc.). (Current IFEA Board of Directors and Staff Members are not eligible to be nominated).

C.

NOMINATION QUESTIONS • Please answer each of the following questions citing specific examples. Points will be awarded for each question. Points awarded are listed below. • Please provide up to a 1 (one) page response (single sided) for each of the below questions, for a maximum total of 4 (four) pages. 1. Explain how your nominee has made a difference to the festivals & events industry. (25 points) 2. Submit a general overview of your nominee’s career, including organizations they have worked for, positions held, titles, awards, etc. (25 points) 3. Describe the level of involvement your nominee has had with the IFEA during their career. (25 points) 4. What void would there be if he/she were not an event professional? (25 points)

D. ENTRY FORMAT: Please EMAIL your nomination in a Word document. E. SUBMIT ENTRIES TO: Nia Hovde, Director of Marketing & Communications at nia@ifea.com F. QUESTIONS: Please contact: Nia Hovde – nia@ifea.com +1-208-433-0950 ext: 3 To view a complete list of past inductees and their stories go to the Industry Awards / Hall of Fame section on www.ifea.com.

Nominations should be submitted no later than 5:00 PM (MST) Monday, June 9th, 2014

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PRESENTING SPONSOR

IFEA WORLD FESTIVAL & EVENT CITY

©

AWARD PROGRAM “Recognizing the best in city-event leadership and partnerships around the world.”


ABOUT THE

IFEA WORLD FESTIVAL & EVENT CITY AWARD

©

The IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © was designed and created as a way for the global festivals and events industry to openly encourage, support, learn from and recognize positive local environments for festivals and events worldwide. If you are considering applying for this prestigious award, you already understand the important role that festivals and events play in your community by: • Adding to the quality of life for local residents; • Driving tourism; • Showcasing a positive community brand and image to the media, business community, and visitors; • Creating economic impact that translates into jobs, tax revenues and enhanced infrastructure improvements; • Providing enhanced exposure opportunities for the arts, not-for-profit causes and other community programs and venues; • Promoting volunteerism and bonding the many elements of the community together; • Encouraging community investment, participation, creativity and vision; and • Building irreplaceable ‘community capital’ for the future. To achieve and maximize these important returns for the markets that they serve, we must clearly understand their direct correlation to the partnerships with and support from the local community, at all levels, that is critical to the success and sustainability of existing festivals and events, as well as the ability to attract and encourage new events. Through this special award the IFEA is pleased to recognize those cities and markets who have worked, through concerted efforts, to provide an environment conducive to successful festivals and events. For each year’s selected cities, the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © provides: • A strong platform from which to recognize the success of current and on-going efforts by every component of your community; • A clear positioning statement to encourage continued infrastructure, policy and process enhancement and expansion; and • A powerful marketing statement for use in recruiting and encouraging new festivals, events and businesses. We look forward to working with you, your city and community partners to recognize the quality efforts and support that you have successfully developed over the years and should be rightfully proud of. Thank you for your continued support of, and partnership with, the festivals and events industry. Best of Luck with your entry!

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VISA: GLOBAL SPONSOR OF THE IFEA WORLD FESTIVAL & EVENT CITY AWARD

©

In 2011, VISA joined with the International Festivals & Events Association to become the presenting sponsor of the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award, creating a natural partnership between the global events industry and the globally recognized financial leader. “Through this unique and special award, the IFEA hopes to create and expand the dialogue between events and cities around the world, at a time when each needs to be supporting the other more than ever. VISA is the ideal partner for this program and together we look forward to creating new and ongoing opportunities to explore and inspire these important city/event partnerships, redefining ‘best practices’ and setting the stage for the future,” said Steven Wood Schmader, CFEE, President & CEO of IFEA World. Charles Brown, Chairman & CEO of Festival Transaction Services and Festival Media Corporation, representing VISA in recognizing the previous IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© recipients, commented that “The IFEA has successfully built a global network of event professionals and resources that are changing the face of the industry and VISA is proud to be a part of that effort.” Festival Transaction Services has formed a new partnership that includes VISA, Bank of America Merchant Services and First Data Corporation – the three largest financial services companies in the United States – to provide cash management services to the festivals and events industry around the world. “We know that the professionals in the global festivals and events industry today are in need of strong and reliable partners – from recognition to cash management systems that can help them enhance the attendee experience, increase revenues and build stronger financial foundations. We can now bring that to the table and are excited about working with the IFEA to help strengthen the success of festivals and events around the world,” noted Brown. For more information on VISA products and services for festivals and events, please contact Jim Shanklin, Executive Vice President of Festival Transaction Services/Festival Media Corporation at +1-206-381-5202 or jshanklin@festmedia.com.


ENTRY INFORMATION Quick Reference Guide DEADLINES

• Entry Deadline: 5:00 p.m. (Mountain Time Zone) – Monday, July 14th, 2014 • Entry must include completed entry, additional requested details and application form with payment • Due to time constraints in judging, late entries cannot be accepted.

FEES

The total cost to enter the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© is $695 (U.S. Dollars) for IFEA Members and $895 (U.S. Dollars) for non-IFEA Members per entry. Payment may be made using a Visa, MasterCard or American Express credit card or by Check (made payable to the IFEA) or by Wire Transfer. For more information on Wire Transfers and transfer fees, please contact Bette Monteith at bette@ ifea.com or +1-208-433-0950 ext: 2.

ELIGIBILITY

Applications for the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © may be submitted by the City itself or by an event(s) on behalf of their City. It is our hope that the application process itself will result in an even closer working partnership and dialogue between the Applicant City and the festivals and events who serve that market. Applicants may re-apply for the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © each year.

JUDGING

Judging of the IFEA World Festival & Event City entries is done by an international panel of respected event professionals, who have been pleased to discover that there are many amazing programs happening around the world that will help us all to raise the bar for our own communities, showing us what is possible – at every level – when vision and leadership combine. The IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © are presented on an individual basis to exemplary cities around the world that we hope others will emulate. The awards are not designed as a competition of one city against another, but rather to recognize those individual cities

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that have ‘raised the bar’ for everyone, taking into account the cultural, economic and geographic challenges that they have met, mastered and often changed along the way. For that reason, we may present multiple awards each year, while some will be encouraged to strengthen or make adjustments to selected components of their entry criteria for reconsideration in future years.

SCORING SYSTEM

• A possible total of 100 points may be awarded to each entry based upon the individual components listed under Sections 1-6 of the overall entry. • Failure to meet all requirements or answer/ provide all necessary information may impact judging decisions and will result in a deduction of points. • If a section or element does not apply to your City, please state this within your entry (explaining why it does not apply) in order to avoid losing points.

SELECTION AND NOTIFICATION

• Award Recipients will be notified via email by August 21st, 2014. Notification will go to the primary contact listed on the entry application. • The 2014 IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © will be presented during the IFEA’s 59th Annual Convention & Expo, Date & Location TBA. Each recipient city will be highlighted in a brief video presentation at the award ceremony and on-site throughout the convention.

MAXIMIZING YOUR AWARD

Being selected as an IFEA World Festival & Event City is only the beginning of the benefits to be gained from this special honor. The IFEA will help each recipient with ideas on how to maximize and leverage your award, with specific examples from previous recipients. • Each winning recipient of the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award © will receive an engraved award suitable for indoor display and a personal letter of congratulations. • Duplicate IFEA World Festival & Event City awards, flags (for display or flying) and other recognition items are available for purchase by award recipients wishing to share their honor with the many partners who helped them to win. • Winning recipients will be provided with the rights to use the 2014 IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© Winner logo


on their websites, press releases and other appropriate City letterhead, brochures, marketing materials, etc. • The IFEA will announce all IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© recipients in an international press release to the world’s leading media sources, including all local market media contacts provided to the IFEA by selected applicants. • IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© recipients will be featured in a special on-line tribute section at www.ifea.com in perpetuity and in a special section of ie: the business of international events, the IFEA’s industry-leading magazine. • Each winning recipient will receive a oneyear complimentary IFEA membership.

RELEASE & USAGE

• By submitting your entry to the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award, you automatically grant the IFEA the right to use any materials from your entry for editorial, analytical, promotional or any other purpose without additional permission or compensation. All materials and photos submitted as part of the application will become the property of the IFEA. • Entries submitted are not able to be returned. Copies should be made prior to submitting your entry, as desired. Note: Proprietary or sensitive information will not be shared if identified clearly. • Winning applicants agree that the IFEA may use their City name and representative photos in all press releases and program marketing materials, both hard copy and electronic versions. • Your entry into the competition is acknowledgement of these terms.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Working in partnership with local community leadership, festivals, events, organizations and businesses, please provide a clear overview and understanding of the festival and event environment in your City/Market through your responses to each defined section. The application process in itself is a great opportunity to evaluate internally the areas where your City excels and other areas where you may be able to strengthen your efforts and further support local programs. Cities interested in being considered for the annual IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© must submit and include the following information: 1. A completed entry form providing contact and payment information.

2. A one (1) paragraph description of your city (to be used for promotional purposes by the IFEA). 3. An email list of your local media contacts in Excel format for IFEA for use in announcing the selected recipients. 4. A representative photograph highlighting your City and/or events. (A least 300 dpi in size) 5. A three (3) minute video presentation representing your City. (Refer to Important Details section below for video format.) 6. A one (1) page introductory letter stating why your City should be selected to receive the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award. 7. Your overall completed IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© Entry providing responses and supporting information for the following sections. Refer to pages 6-9 for detailed descriptions required for each section. This part of your entry must be submitted as one (1) singular entry piece/ document/PowerPoint/Pdf, etc.: ❍ Section 1: Community Overview ❍ Section 2: Community Festivals & Events ❍ Section 3: City/Government Support of Festivals & Events ❍ Section 4: Non-Governmental Community Support of Festivals & Events ❍ Section 5: Leveraging ‘Community Capital’ Created by Festivals & Events ❍ Section 6: Extra Credit To view examples of past IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© recipient entries, go to: www.ifea.com / Industry Awards / World Festival & Event City Award / Recipients.

IMPORTANT DETAILS

• Please submit your main entry (as listed in components 6-7 under Entry Requirements above), as one (1) singular entry piece/document/ PowerPoint/Pdf, etc. Components 1-5 listed under Entry Requirements may be submitted as separate pieces from the main entry, but must be submitted at the same time. • All entry information should be provided in English and typed using 10-point Arial font. • Please submit your overall entry via Email (preferred method of submitting entry.) Please create entry in a Word, PowerPoint, PDF document, tif, jpg or other standard format. If entry must be mailed, please submit your overall entry on a CD, or USB flash drive to the IFEA World Headquarters in the format listed above. • To submit Video portion of entry, please email video file as an MP4, WMF, MOV - or provide a link to an online video location such as YouTube. If mailing video on a

disk or USB Drive, please submit video as an MPF, WMF, MOV. (DVD’s should be encoded for Region 1 or Region 0 DVD capabilities.) • Entries over one Meg must be provided as a link to a fixed site with no expiration timeframe.

TIPS & POINTERS

• Not all components under a specific section will pertain to everyone. Don’t worry; there are no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ answers and our international judging panel will base their decisions on overall impressions after reviewing all of the submitted information. We are all learning from each other, with the goal of strengthening the partnerships, benefits and returns to our respective communities from the festivals and events that are such an important part of the community fabric and we hope to find additional new ideas being implemented from within all of the award entries that we can share in the future. • Responses to the requested information may require a straight-forward numerical answer, or a more descriptive definition. While we have placed no limits on length, we encourage you to provide the most succinct answers possible that clearly make your point. • If you have any questions or need clarification on any criteria, please do not hesitate to contact us. • Support materials, photos, videos, brochures, copies, etc. should be inserted following the responses to each section. • As needed, we may communicate with the primary contact on the application to clarify any questions that may arise.

SEND ENTRIES TO

Please email completed entries, application form and payment to: nia@ifea.com. Entry, payment and application form may be mailed if necessary. Be sure to provide entry on a disk or a USB Flash Drive in a word, PowerPoint, PDF or other standard format. Please mail to: IFEA World Festival & Event City Award 2603 W. Eastover Terrace Boise, ID 83706 U.S.A.

QUESTIONS?

Contact: • Steve Schmader at schmader@ifea.com • Nia Hovde at nia@ifea.com • Phone: +1-208-433-0950 ext:3


IFEA World Festival & Event City Award

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ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Working in partnership with local community leadership, festivals, events, organizations and businesses, please provide a clear overview and understanding of the festival and event environment in your City/Market through responses to each of the following sections. The application process in itself is a great opportunity to evaluate internally the areas where your City excels and other areas where you may be able to strengthen your efforts and further support local programs. Please submit the following information: 1. A completed entry form providing contact and payment information. 2. A one (1) paragraph description of your city (to be used for promotional purposes by the IFEA) 3. An email list of your local media in Excel format for IFEA to use to announce the selected recipients. 4. An individual photograph representing your city. (A least 300 dpi in size). 5. A three (3) minute video presentation representing your city. (Refer to Important Details section for video format.) 6. A one (1) page introductory letter stating why your City should be selected to receive the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award. 7. Your overall completed IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© Entry providing responses and supporting information for Sections 1-6 below. This part of your entry must be submitted as one (1) singular entry piece/document/PowerPoint/Pdf, etc. Please refer to the Entry Requirements and Important Details sections for specific entry formats and details. To view examples of past IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© recipient entries, go to: www.ifea.com / Industry Awards / World Festival & Event City Award / Recipients

Section 1. Community Overview Goal: The information in this section should help provide us with a better understanding of your community and the infrastructure in place to host and/or support those producing and attending festivals and events. • Please provide an overview of your community that will provide us with as many elements as possible, such as: a. Current City Population b. Current SMSA or LUZ Population (Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area or Large Urban Zone) c. Population within a 50 Mile Radius of Applicant City d. Primary Festival and Event Venues Available (Indoor and Outdoor. For example: Theatres, Plazas, Bandshells, Parks, Stadiums, Fairgrounds, Sport Facilities, Convention Centers, etc., including those facilities planned for completion within the next two years. Include Estimated Capacities for each. For outdoor venues, use a formula of 1 person per 3 square feet if no other total capacity numbers are available.) e. Water and Power Accessibility in Outdoor Venues f. Hospital and Emergency Response Availability g. Total Number of Hotel Rooms Available h. Public Transportation Options i. Parking Availability (Paid lots, meters, and free) j. Walking Paths, Bicycle Lanes k. Estimated City Visitors Annually Attributed to Festivals and Events


Section 2. Community Festivals and Events Goal: The information in this section should provide us with an understanding of the diversity and success of current festivals and events that serve your city residents and visitors throughout the year. • Please provide us with a good overview of the leading festivals and events currently operating in your market. A full-year calendar of events is very helpful as we consider this area. Please provide the following for the ‘Top 10’ festivals or events in your market: a. Festival or Event Name b. Top Executive Contact Information c. Number of Years Festival or Event has been Produced d. Event Dates (Minimally the month held, with days if clearly defined – For example: the last weekend in June. If the event is a series, list the starting and ending dates – For example: Every Wednesday, June through August.) e. Primary Target Audience (For example: Families; Young Adults; Seniors; Children; Specific Cultural Heritage Groups; All Community Segments; Out-of-Market Visitors, etc.) f. Recurrence Cycle (Annually, Every 5 Years, etc.) g. Estimated Combined Aggregate Attendance

Section 3. City/Governmental Support of Festivals and Events Goal: The information in this section should help us to understand the strength and depth of support by the applicant City and other area governmental bodies (County, State, taxing districts, etc.) and demonstrate a clear awareness of event support needs by government agencies and officials. • Please define or describe each of the following elements (a-i) below, as completely and accurately as possible. • Where available and appropriate, please provide examples and copies. • If a section or element does not apply to your city, please state this within your entry and why it does not apply and/or what you may have/use instead. a. Defined and Accessible Public Objectives and Support Statements for Festivals and Events by the City and Other Local Government Agencies b. Direct Funding Support Provided to and/or Budgeted for Festivals and Events from the City or Other Government Agencies c. In-Kind Services Support Provided to and/or Budgeted for Festivals and Events from the City or Other Government Agencies d. Defined Role of the City in Festival and Event Approval e. City-Provided Festival and Event Process Coordination and Assistance Systems (For example: Existence of a City Events Department; ‘One-Stop Shopping’ for Permitting and Municipal Service Needs; Shared Resource Programs for Volunteer Recruitment/Management, Non-Proprietary Equipment Usage/Maintenance, Insurance/Music Licensing Provisions, etc.) f. Participation in Official Capacity by City Department Representatives on Boards and Planning Committees of Local Festivals and Events g. Local Laws, Ordinances, Regulations, Permits and Policies Impacting and Supportive of Festivals and Events (For example: noise ordinances, traffic regulations, curfews, parking fees, fireworks regulations, ambush marketing control, alcohol service requirements, taxes, food safety, insurance requirements, etc.) h. City Provided Festival and Event Training Programs (For example: Marketing, Planning, Budgeting, Risk Management, Alcohol Service, City Department Introductions, Professional Certification, etc.) i. Direct Industry Involvement / Memberships by Any of the Above


Section 4. Non-Governmental Community Support of Festivals and Events Goal: The information in this section should help us to understand the commitment to festivals and events and direct support provided by community individuals and non-governmental organizations. Without this type of support most festivals and events could not achieve the level of success that these important partnerships help to build. • Please define or describe how each of the following elements/organizations (a-l) below (if applicable) lends their support to ensure the success and outreach of local festivals and events completely and accurately as possible. • Answers should be provided as an overview reflective of the entire community versus an individual event/organization, with enough detail to provide a clear picture of support. • If a section or element does not apply to your city, please state this within your entry and why it does not apply and/or what you may have/use instead. a. Volunteer Involvement b. Sponsorship Support (include in your answer a list of the ten (10) most prominent corporate sponsors in your market) c. Media Support d. Chamber of Commerce / Convention & Visitors Bureau Support (Promotion and marketing activities, familiarization tours, travel writer access, material creation, information distribution, grant funding, visitor hosting, etc.) e. Downtown Associations (Support by Downtown merchants and businesses) f. Organizations to Assist Individuals with Disabilities g. Local Event Cooperatives h. Sports Commissions i. Educational Institution Support j. Special Incentives/Discounts Provided to Festivals and Events by Local Venues k. Access to Industry Suppliers in the Local Market (For example: banners and decorations; generators; portable toilets; merchandise; generators; stage, lights & sound; golf carts; security; chairs; barricades; ATM’s; communication services; etc.) l. Direct Industry Involvement / Memberships by Any of the Above

Section 5. Leveraging ‘Community Capital’ Created by Festivals & Events

Goal: The information in this section should help us to understand how the City and its non-governmental partners maximize the ‘community capital’ created by festivals and events in your market. • Please define or describe how your City uses the branding and marketing images/ opportunities provided by your local festivals and events to leverage return in other areas. • These may include, the items below, among others. • If a section or element does not apply to your city, please state this within your entry and why it does not apply and/or what you may have/use instead. a. Community Branding (How are local festivals and events used promote and build upon the positive image of the city?) b. Promoting Tourism (How are local festivals and events used to promote tourism visits?) c. Convention Marketing (How are local festivals and events used to recruit conventions to the city during the times that festival or event activities may serve as an extra incentive for choosing a destination?) d. Corporate Recruiting Efforts (How are local festivals and events used by Economic Development efforts to recruit new businesses to consider choosing your market for their operations?)

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e. Relocation Packets and Information (How are local festivals and events used in information designed to entice individuals / organizations to relocate to your city?) f. Familiarization Tours (How are local festivals and events used by your City and Convention & Visitors Bureau as part of ‘Familiarization Tours’ for visiting meeting planners, VIP’s, etc.) g. Out-of-Market Media Coverage (How are local festivals and events used to secure interest in coverage from out-of-market media sources, travel writers, etc.?) h. Enhancing Exposure to the Arts and Other Causes (How are local festivals and events used to feature, highlight, expose new audiences to, or drive support for the arts and other causes?) i. Creating Highly Visible Public Relations Campaigns for City Facilities and Services (How are local festivals and events used to drive positive public relations campaigns for things like police image, parks usage, fire safety, EMT roles and support needs, use of local transportation options, marketing of/exposure to local venues, support of local bond issues, etc.?) j. Encouraging Community Bonding, Participation, and Celebration (How are local festivals and events used by the City to bond all of the diverse elements of the community together, encourage community involvement and support, and celebrate who we are when we are at our best?) k. Highlighting or Developing Underused Venues or Sections of the Community (How are local festivals and events used to encourage usage of or exposure to underused venues or city neighborhoods, underdeveloped sections of the City, etc.?) l. Creating Legacies and Images Beyond the Event (How are local festivals and events used to create lasting legacies (venues, programs, infrastructures and images of the City after and in-between events?)

Section 6. Extra Credit This section provides an opportunity to highlight any other programs, services, resources, activities, etc., that may not have been included or covered in the previous sections. Some examples may include the items below, among others, a. Skills Development - Availability of Certificate or Degree Programs in Festival & Event Management through a Local University or Private Provider b. Members of Your Event Community Who Currently Hold a Certified Festival & Event Executive (CFEE) Designation c. Secondary School System Graduation Requirements that Encourage Volunteerism and Community Service during Festivals and Events d. A Festival and Event Shared Resource Program in Your City (For example: shared warehousing, office space, equipment, staff, etc.) e. Efforts to Actively Recruit New Events to Your City (Please include reference to any applications made/secured if this area pertains) f. Other Creative Endeavors

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IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© APPLICATION Entry Deadline: 5:00 p.m. (MST) Wednesday, July 14th, 2014 Submit Entries, Entry Form and Payment to: Email: nia@ifea.com (preferred method of receiving entry.) If shipping entry, send to: IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© • 2603 Eastover Terrace, Boise, ID 83706 USA Phone: +1-208-433-0950 ext: 3 – nia@ifea.com

CITY APPLICANT INFORMATION (Please print clearly) Applicant City Name (If including information from surrounding market or suburb communities, please note those in parenthesis): ______________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ State / Province or Territory: __________________________________________________________________________________________________ Country: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Global Region: (Choose one)

❍ Africa ❍ Asia ❍ Australia / New Zealand ❍ Europe ❍ Latin America ❍ The Middle East (MENASA) ❍ North America Note: Politically connected islands and territories should choose the region of their most direct affiliation. ❍ Other (If you choose ‘Other’ please clearly specify location below.) __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Population Level (select one):

❍ Under 1 million ❍ Over 1 million

PRIMARY CONTACT INFORMATION (Please print clearly) The following information should pertain to the primary individual with whom the IFEA should communicate with, as necessary, throughout the award judging and selection process. Name: ___________________________________________________________ Title: __________________________________________________ Organization: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Mailing Address: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City, State, Country, Postal Code: _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone (Business): _________________________________________________ Phone (Mobile): _________________________________________ Fax: _____________________________________________________________ E-Mail: _________________________________________________ Note: The Recipient City will receive a complimentary membership for one year in IFEA through our appropriate global affiliate. If different from the Primary Contact please let us know who should receive this membership.

RELEASE & USAGE

• By submitting your entry to the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award©, you automatically grant the IFEA the right to use any materials from your entries for editorial, analytical, promotional or any other purpose without additional compensation. All materials and photos submitted as part of the application will become the property of the IFEA.

• Winning applicants agree that the IFEA may use their City name and representative photos in all press releases and program marketing materials, both hard copy and electronic versions. • Your entry into the competition is acknowledgement of these terms.

PAYMENT TOTAL

IFEA Member Non IFEA Member IFEA World Festival & Event City Award©: Number of Entries:_________x ❍ $695 USD Per Entry ❍ $895 USD Per Entry = $_____________

PAYMENT INFORMATION Please select your method of payment:

❍ VISA

❍ MasterCard

❍ American Express ❍ Check (Made payable to the IFEA) ❍ Wire Transfers: (Contact Bette Monteith at bette@ifea.com for details)

Print Cardholder Name: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Signature: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Credit Card Number: ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Expiration Date: _____________________________________________ CVN Code: _________________ (VISA/MC-3 digit code back) (AMX-4 digit code front)

DID YOU REMEMBER TO:

❍ Complete the entry form providing contact and payment information? ❍ Submit a one (1) paragraph description of your city (to be used for promotional purposes by the IFEA)? ❍ Submit an email list of your local media in Excel format for IFEA to use to announce the selected recipients? ❍ Submit an individual photograph representing your city. (A least 300 dpi in size)?

❍ Submit a three (3) minute video presentation representing your city? ❍ Submit a one (1) page introductory letter stating why your City should be selected to receive the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award©? ❍ Submit your overall completed IFEA World Festival & Event City Award© Entry providing responses and supporting information for Sections 1-6? Is this entry submitted as one (1) singular entry piece/document/ PowerPoint/Pdf, etc.? Is this entry provided on a disk, USB Flash Drive or electronically in a Word, PowerPoint, PDF or other standard format?


The International

Nice Côte d'Azur, France

Festivals & Events Association announced and recognized the 2013 recipients of the “IFEA World Festival & Event City” award during the 58th Annual IFEA

Nestled between the summits of the Southern Alps range and the Mediterranean Sea, Nice, capital of the French Riviera, has stood as a major destination for international tourism for more than 150 Boston Massachusetts, United States

Convention & Expo in Pittsburgh, PA, United States on September 16, 2013. The IFEA would like to congratulate all of our 2013 IFEA World Festival & Event City Award Recipients. 64

Visitors soon discover that Boston, Massachusetts, is a city where the old and the new are in constant conversation with one another, where cobble-stoned streets meet glass-enclosed shopping galleries, the historic Freedom Trail’s landmarks stand beside cutting-edge restaurants, and renowned performance theatres brush shoulders with trendy nightclubs. And when it comes to festivals and BIG events-- no one puts on a party better than Boston! Annual traditions include the world famous Boston Marathon, Harborfest (featuring the ever-popular Chowderfest and Fourth of July Esplanade Concert and Fireworks), the Boston Pride Festival, the

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years. Blessed with 300 days of sunshine a year and a very specific light that has inspired the greatest paint masters and film makers for more than two centuries, Nice shines over its 2000 year history. Thanks to its international airport (1st after Paris CDG), Nice draws visitors from all over the world, all year round. Visitors love to stroll the shore of the Baie des Anges, the streets of the old town, the flower market, or in one of the 20 free entrance museums in the city including modern art and classics like the ones dedicated to Matisse or Chagall. As a year round destination, Nice offers a full program of international, contemporary and traditional events, to enhance its capability and tradition of welcoming visitors. Outside the Box Festival, and Summer Arts Weekend—plus-- the Head of the Charles Regatta, the largest 2-day regatta in the world, and First Night Boston, the city’s iconic New Year’s Eve celebration which became the inspiration for over sixty other First Night® celebrations throughout the U.S.. Numerous smaller festivals enjoyed by both Bostonians and visitors include ethnic, culinary, and the performing and visual arts. Boston has also hosted several national and international events, including the Bicentennial of the War of 1812 and Tall Ships, the U.S. Gymnastics and U.S. Figure Skating Championships, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Lacrosse Championship, the Volvo Ocean Race, Red Bull’s Cliff Diving World Series, and the National Hockey League Winter Classic. The City of Boston’s Office of Arts, Tourism, and Special Events is involved with some 220 festivals and events each year, with marketing and promotional support from the Greater Boston Convention and Visitors Bureau. Over 21 million people visit the city annually. (Boston Marathon photo credit Greater Boston CVB).


Hwacheon-Gun Gangwon-do, South Korea

Hwacheon-gun is a county in Gangwon Province, South Korea. The county consists largely of mountains and rivers, between which are small farming communities, military bases and military training Ottawa Ontario, Canada

Ottawa is the capital of Canada, and the fourth largest city in the country. The city is located on the south bank of the Ottawa River in the eastern portion of Southern Ontario. Ottawa borders Gatineau, Quebec, and together they form the National Capital Region (NCR). Founded in 1826 as Bytown and incorporated as "Ottawa" in 1855, the city has evolved into a political and technological and special event centre of Canada.

Rotorua Bay of Plenty, New Zealand

“Rotorua - feel the spirit – Manaakitanga” is our catch-cry ... and it holds a pretty

grounds. The area is renowned for its rivers, lake trout, indigenous otters, and natural scenery As Gangwon Province is South Korea's coldest region, Hwacheon is home to an ice fishing festival in which thousands of competitors try to catch as many sancheoneo (wild trout) as possible. This takes place in the Hwacheoncheon (stream) during the month of January, attracting roughly 1,000,000 visitors annually. Other annual events in Hwacheon include the jjokbae (water raft) Festival in late July, the Tomato Festival in mid-August, and the Dragon Festival. It will be hosting the 16th World Winter Cities Conference for Mayors in 2014.

Its original boundaries were expanded through numerous minor annexations and ultimately replaced by a new city incorporation and major amalgamation in 2001 which significantly increased its land area. The name "Ottawa" is derived from the Algonquin word adawe, meaning "to trade". Initially an Irish and French Christian settlement, Ottawa has become a multicultural city with a diverse population Ottawa is fast becoming a leading centre for performing arts and professional sports. Supported by a number of established and new performing arts venue the destination annually presents a wide variety of cultural and sport entertainment. Annual music festivals in a range of genres sprinkle the event calendar and offer support to the long list of event options presented daily in the destination. This all serves to enhance Ottawa’s vibrant cultural, tourism and sporting industry.

powerful promise as well as an invitation to experience our extraordinary slice of New Zealand. Located in the central North Island, the Rotorua district has a multicultural population of approximately 69,000 people. Rotorua is a city of spirit and adventure; an iconic tourism destination for both New Zealand travelers and international visitors. Known for its beautiful lakes, spectacular geothermal attractions, stunning scenery, Maori culture and its warm and friendly people, Rotorua is renowned for its welcoming hospitality and great experiences, not to mention, the home of many great festivals and events. Winter 2013

Salvador Bahia, Brazil

The largest city on the northeast coast of Brazil and the capital of the Northeastern Brazilian state of Bahia, Salvador is best known for its street carnival – a 6 day nonstop party and the biggest display of popular Brazilian culture. With 25 km of city streets filled with the more than 2 million people per day, party goers dance and have fun alongside the 200+ groups participating in the parade. With such a diverse group of performers such as trip groups, afro groups, afoxes, transvestite groups, kid’s groups, native Indian groups and percussion in addition to the 7,000 artists making up the bands, percussion and orchestras, carnival in Salvador is a contagious and unique party experience, where the crowd gets together to celebrate happiness. Sydney New South Wales, Australia

Sydney is Australia’s true global city – it leads and defines the world’s contemporary view of the nation. It is a city known for its beauty, its creativity, its dynamism and economic and cultural leadership. Sydney’s extraverted heart is expressed through its festivals and events. These events unite communities, celebrate life, talent and achievement – and reach out beyond the city to other parts of Australia and the rest of the world. They express why Sydney is a great place to live, to work, to invest and to visit. To learn more about each of the 2013 IFEA World Festival & Event City Award Recipients, Click Here.

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C O N G R AT U L AT I O N S to our 2013 Grand Pinnacle Winners Budget: Under $250,000 Gold - BorderFest Association - Festival of Lights - Hidalgo, TX - U.S.A. Silver - Gatlinburg Convention & Visitors Bureau Gatlinburg Fantasy of Lights Christmas Parade - Gatlinburg, TN - U.S.A. Bronze - Canada Place - Christmas at Canada Place - Vancouver, BC - Canada Budget: $250,000 to $750,000 Gold - Greater Issaquah Chamber of Commerce - Issaquah Salmon Days Festival Thrills & Gills - Issaquah, WA - U.S.A. Silver - Cultural Festivals - Saint Louis Art Fair presented by Sterling Bank - Saint Louis, MO - U.S.A. Bronze - BorderFest Association - BorderFest 2013 "Celebrating the Cultural Treasures of Mexico" Presented by Kraft - Hidalgo - TX - U.S.A. Budget: $750,000 to $1.5 Million Gold - Cherry Creek Arts Festival - Denver, CO - U.S.A. Silver - Des Moines Arts Festival速 - Des Moines, IA - U.S.A. Bronze - Music for All - 2012 Bands of America Grand National Championships presented by Yamaha - Indianapolis, IN - U.S.A. Budget: Over $1.5 Million Gold - Kentucky Derby Festival - The Stories You Tell Happen Here - Louisville, KY - U.S.A. Silver - 500 Festival, Inc. - 500 Festival - Indianapolis, IN - U.S.A. Bronze - National Cherry Blossom Festival - Washington, DC - U.S.A. To view the complete list of 2013 IFEA/Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Award Winners and some of the winning entries, Click Here. MARK YOUR CALENDARS FOR THE 2014 IFEA/HAAS & WILKERSON PINNACLE AWARDS ENTRY DEADLINES

Earlybird Deadline: June 23, 2014 Final Deadline: July 21, 2014

Proud to insure excellence in the festivals & events industry


2014 IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson

Pinnacle Awards Competition Call for Entries Gain the recognition your event deserves…

E

ach year, the International Festivals & Events Association recognizes outstanding accomplishments and top quality creative, promotional, operational and community outreach programs and materials produced by festivals and events around the world, with the Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards Competition. This prestigious awards competition strives for the highest degree of excellence in festival and event promotions and operations, and in doing so, has raised the standards and quality of the festivals & events industry to new levels. From events large or small, cities, festivals, chambers, universities, parks & recreation departments, vendors & suppliers, and everything in between, events and promotions of nearly every type and size will have the opportunity to be recognized, as entries are categorized into organizations with similar sized budgets. From best Event Poster, T-Shirt, Hat, Promotional Brochure, Website, TV Promotion and Social Media site to best Volunteer Program, Green Program, Sponsor Follow-Up Report and Media Relations Campaign, there’s a place for almost every element of your event to be recognized. The IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards have provided many outstanding examples of how event producers can use innovation and creativity to achieve a higher level of success. One of the goals of the IFEA is to promote the professionalism of our members and the festivals and events industry as a whole. Therefore, to add further impact to the winning organizations, the IFEA will provide your organization with a press release template for you to distribute to your media list explaining the award and the competition. Your organization will be recognized for taking part in raising the level of professionalism throughout the industry, while at the same time improving your community. So what are you waiting for, gather your items, fill out the entry form, and send them off to be judged against the best of the best, in the festivals and events industry. Then get ready to hear your organization’s name announced at the 59th Annual IFEA Convention & Expo, Date & Location TBA. Winter 2013

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THE CONTEST DEADLINES • EARLY BIRD ENTRY DEADLINE: 5:00 p.m. (MST), MONDAY, JUNE 23, 2014 ❍ Entries received on or prior to June 23, 2014 will receive the Member early bird rate of $30 per entry or $50 per Grand Pinnacle entry or the Non-Member early bird rate of $60 per entry or $100 per Grand Pinnacle entry depending on IFEA Membership status. • FINAL ENTRY DEADLINE: 5:00 p.m. (MST), MONDAY, JULY 21, 2014 ❍ Entries received between Tuesday, June 24, 2014 and Monday, July 21, 2014 will receive the Member final entry rate of $35 per entry or $60 per Grand Pinnacle entry; or the Non-Member final entry rate of $75 per entry or $150 per Grand Pinnacle entry depending on IFEA Membership status. ELIGIBILITY • Entries must have been produced and / or used for the first time between July 16, 2013 and July 21, 2014. • Entries must be submitted in their original format unless previously approved. For Questions Contact: Nia Hovde, nia@ifea.com. • Payment in full must be received with entries for entries to be deemed eligible. • Entries and entry forms must be submitted in English. • Font size for any written text must not be smaller than 10pt. • To receive the member rate for Pinnacle entries you must be an IFEA member in good standing. • Each entry form submitted must be completed in its entirety in order for items to be judged eligible. • Entry must be received at the IFEA Office by the above dates to be eligible. • Please consider the processing of your credit card or the cashing of your check for your Pinnacle entries, notice that your entries were received and processed. IMPORTANT NOTES • Items submitted are NOT able to be returned. • Judges will not refer to items in other categories, nor will they transfer items already judged in other categories (the number of entries must equal the number of categories entered). • A separate entry form must be submitted for each entry (copy as necessary). • Multiple entries or categories on a single form will not be accepted. • For all entries, please paper clip/bull clip entry form to item. Please do not glue or tape form to item. • Multiple entries within the same notebook/ bound format/ CD/ USB Drive, will not be accepted. Please separate entries. • Entries required to be submitted in a “notebook” (Categories 1, 38-68) means that the entry should be submitted in some sort of bound format in order to keep all the materials together. For example, a 3 ring binder; spiral bound; in a report cover or a bound publication with hard/soft covers. Please do not staple or paper clip your entries together. • UPDATED: For entries required to also be submitted on a disk / thumb drive along with printed copy (Categories 1, 38-68), be sure to label each CD / thumb drive and attach to notebook at front of entry. Submit entry as one (1) pdf or Word doc file. It is also okay to submit copies of all entries on one (1) disk or thumb drive and attach to payment form (instead of one (1) disk/thumb drive for each.) Printed copy must still be present. • When submitting your total entries, please also submit a high resolution copy of your organization or event logo. Please email to nia@ifea.com – subject “Logo for 2014 Pinnacle Entry – and your event/organization name.” A HOW TO GUIDE • All categories are listed on the left side of each page • Entry information required for each category is listed under the 68

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specific category on the left (if applicable). This information is unique to that specific category. • Any supporting questions and supporting material requirements needed for each category or group of categories, is listed on the right side of each page (if applicable.) THE JUDGES The judges are recognized professionals in the areas of graphic design, promotions and public relations; broadcast, print and online media; and special event planning and management. SCORING SYSTEM • Categories 1, 38-68 will be judged using a point system for each individual entry. Each entry is scored separately. Scores will not be combined. • A possible total of 100 points may be awarded to each entry. • Be sure to answer and include all necessary information for each entry. • If a required element within an entry is not applicable to your event, please state so within your entry to avoid being marked down on points or indicate what element you have instead. • The scoring system is not applicable to TV, Radio, Multimedia, Print & some Merchandising categories. • We are unable to provide you with the points awarded for each of your entries. • Failure to meet all requirements or answer / provide all necessary information will result in a deduction of points. THE WINNERS • All finalists for the IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards will be notified by email the last week of August, 2014. Notification will go to the primary IFEA Member in addition to the contact listed on the Awards entry form. • The 2014 IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Award winners will be announced at the 59th Annual IFEA Convention & Expo, Date & Location TBA.. • If you are not present at the Awards Presentation to accept your award(s), they will be mailed to you after the Annual Convention. Expect 3-4 weeks for delivery. If shipping costs for your award exceeds $15 USD, you will be sent an invoice for the shipping charges. • Organizations submitting entries for the Grand Pinnacle category must register at least one person for the 59th Annual IFEA Convention & Expo, Date & Location TBA. or arrange for a representative to accept any award won on your behalf. • Gold winning entries will be on display during the 59th Annual IFEA Convention & Expo. • Winning entries will also be available to view at www.ifea.com shortly after the 59th Annual IFEA Convention & Expo. RELEASE & USAGE • By submitting your entry to the IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Award Competition, you automatically grant the IFEA the right to use any materials and / or photos from your entries for editorial, analytical, promotional or any other purpose without additional compensation or permission. In addition, you acknowledge your entry/ies are not returnable. Your entry into the competition is acknowledgment of these terms. SHIP ENTRIES TO: IFEA Pinnacle Awards Competition International Festivals & Events Association 2603 W Eastover Terrace, Boise, ID 83706, USA Phone: +1-208-433-0950 ext: 3 • Please try to avoid using packing peanuts/popcorn when shipping your entry. • For packing tips, go to www.ifea.com and then Industry Awards / Pinnacle Awards / Packing Tips for Pinnacle Award Entries


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS As you prepare your entries, you will have many questions. To help answer many of your questions, we have posted our most frequently asked questions on the IFEA website at www.ifea.com / Awards / Pinnacle Awards / Pinnacle Award FAQ’s, check back often as we’ll continue to post questions and answers as they come in. If you have any further questions about the IFEA/Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards, please contact Nia Hovde at +1-208-433-0950 Ext 3 or nia@ifea.com. Go to www.ifea.com to find answers to common questions such as: • When you ask for entries in the original format, what does that apply to? • What do you mean when you say, please provide entries in a ‘notebook’ or ‘bound format’? • For the more in depth entries (categories 1, 38-68) do I have to answer or provide information for all the criteria and requirements listed under the category? • Referring to the above question, what if something in a specific category that is required, either does not apply to our event, or we are unable to provide the information required. • Certain entries ask for budget information, however we aren’t able to reveal certain elements of that information as it is not public knowledge. How can I answer the required information if I’m not able to provide it? • On certain entries, it says we can only provide 5 examples of supporting materials . . . how can I possibly only provide 5 examples!? • Why do we need to provide certain entries on disk or thumb drive? • Referring to the above question, am I able to save all of the entries I’m submitting on one disk/thumb drive, instead of saving each individually? • Are we able to enter the same event into multiple categories? • Are we able to enter multiple items (that are different) in the same category, for the same event? • I’m not a member of the IFEA, am I still able to enter? • Can I pay for my entries via a wire transfer? • How are the Pinnacle Award Entries Judged? • Why do you not publish the points awarded for each entry in the list of winning entries? • Who judges the Pinnacle Entries? • Why aren’t we able to know the names of the judges? • It looks like there’s even more requirements for some categories . . what specifically do I need to answer for categories 1, 38-68? • For the above listed categories . . . what order should I list my entry in, in response to the requirements?

• For categories 1, 38-68, that require written information and are also required to be put into a ‘notebook’ or ‘bound format’ be sure to submit the information in that category in the order that it is asked so it’s easier for the judges to compare one entry to another. • When saving your entry to a disk or thumb drive to go along side your individual entry, be sure to save your entry as one document – instead of multiple documents. • When putting together categories 1, 38-68 that require a lot of work to create . . . if you have time, make 2 copies! What better way to keep a record of what you did each year not only at your event, but also for the next year’s Pinnacles! • Remember the eligibility period for the pinnacles. Entries must have been produced and/or used for the first time between July 16, 2013 and July 21, 2014. So if you produced an event during that time, or any materials for your event were produced during that time (even if the actual event was outside of that time frame) it’s eligible! • If you are required to write something for your entry, make sure it is well written and easy to read. • The more organized your entries are, the easier it is to understand your message. • With all entries, guide the judges to what you want them to see. Highlight the important parts. • Don’t overwhelm the judges with too much information. Summarize the statistics and only display your best footage/news clippings. Quantity is not always quality. • On categories 1, 38-68 (categories that have a lot of requirements), be sure to have someone that is not closely tied to your event read through your entry to see if everything makes sense. Sometimes you may be too close to your event and you may not include certain information, since it may be too obvious to you. But it may be a vital piece of information. If your entry makes sense to an outsider to your event, it should make sense to the judges. • Many of the judges may not know anything about your event, so make sure your explanations are clear enough so they feel like they have just attended/participated in your program. • Proof, Proof, Proof!! Yes, we do mark you down for typos! • When in doubt – ASK. If you’re not sure on something, please contact Nia Hovde +1-208-433-0950 ext: 3 or nia@ifea.com. QUESTIONS? • Contact: Nia Hovde, Director of Marketing & Communications at Phone: +1-208-433-0950 ext: 3 or Email: nia@ifea.com • For additional information and FAQ’s, go to www.ifea.com/ Industry Awards / Pinnacle Awards

TIPS AND POINTERS Never participated in the Pinnacle Awards Program before? Looking for some helpful tips and pointers on how to enter? Below are just a few tips to hopefully point you in the right direction. Be sure to also review the Pinnacle FAQ’s and the Pinnacle Packing Tips. • Start Early! • Don’t wait until the deadlines are almost here to get your entries submitted! If you have time to work on your entries early, do so and then get them in early! • We will start accepting entries as soon as you want to start sending them in! • Do not mount any of the merchandise on poster board/foam core/card board etc. It’s much easier for the judges to pick up, look at and perhaps try the items on, if they are standing alone. • Be sure to read and follow all the criteria and requirements for each entry. The criteria and requirements are always being updated, so be sure to review the changes before you start.

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THE GRAND PINNACLE 1) GRAND PINNACLE The Grand Pinnacle is the highest award given by the IFEA in recognition of those Festivals and Events* who have a balance of all the elements necessary to ensure a successful event. (*Of those events who enter and judged within each of the four separate budget categories.) ENTRY INFORMATION: For entry, please provide a detailed description to each section requested within: 1. Introductory Information 2. Additional Requirements 3. Supporting Materials 4. Supporting Questions • Submit entire Grand Pinnacle Entry within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf or word document of your entire entry (as 1 (one) document) on a CD or thumb drive. Place CD either at front of entry, or attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on 1 (one) CD or thumb drive.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed here. • Points will be awarded to the individual sections of your entry, in addition to the overall Judges Criteria points. 1. Introductory Information: (10 points) Within a maximum of 4 pages (total), provide an overview of your event, stating your event’s: a. Event Dates b. Purpose / Mission c. History/Description of Event d. Types of Activities Included Under the Festival / Event Umbrella e. Overall Revenue and Expense Budget f. Estimated Economic Impact g. Attendance Numbers & Demographics h. Volunteer Count & Demographics i. Staffing Numbers and Positions j. Founding / Incorporation Date and Management System (i.e.: 501(c)3 non-profit staff & volunteer board; city managed; profit-making partnership, etc.) 2. Additional Requirements: (50 Points) Include a detailed overview of each of the sections listed below (a-e*) for your festival / event, using no more than two (2) pages for each section. • Make each section a separate tab in entry in order for the judges to clearly identify them. • If your festival/event does not include one or more of the sections listed below, please provide an overview as to why your event does not include that element, or what you provide instead, so as not to lose points. a. Promotional/Marketing Campaign & Media Outreach (Includes but not limited to: What was your overall message/ slogan/image that you projected for your event this year? What was your target population, who received the message, what types of mediums did you utilize and who promoted your message. ) b. Website / Social Media / Multi-Media Program /Campaign c. Overall Sponsorship Program (Provide an overview of your overall sponsorship program – how many sponsors, who are they and what do they sponsor and total sponsorship funds.) d. Critical Component Programs *Provide up to a one (1) page description for each of the following programs (if not applicable, please state as such and/or what your festival/event has in its place.) • Volunteer Program • Green Program 70

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• • • •

Educational Program Children’s Program Food & Beverage Program Entertainment Program (music, artists, theatre, performers etc.) • Merchandise Program • Community Outreach Program • Emergency Preparedness Program e. Descriptions of any other Special Programs unique to your event. 3. Supporting Materials: (20 Points) • Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the festival/event - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area in the 2.) Additional Requirements section (if applicable) (a-e). • Supporting materials may be placed within a specific section of the entry, or at the end. 4. Supporting Questions: (10 points) Please answer the following questions. (Maximum of 1 page per question) a. What did you do to update / change the event from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? ❍ If the event is a new event, please answer the following question instead: • “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the event, and how did you handle them?” b. Please provide measurable results / examples for question (a). c. What makes the event stand out as an internationally recognized event? d. Why should the event win the IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Grand Pinnacle Award? Judging Criteria: (10 points) The Grand Pinnacle Entry will be judged based on the following criteria. Please refer to the Entry Information for further details. The following Judging Criteria is applicable to both the individual entry and the overall event. • Is the entry / event well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / event designed and laid out well? • Is the event creative and / or unique? • Does the entry relay the image of the event? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Does the entry match the purpose / mission for the event? • Have all requirements been met? Additional Notes: • Be sure to answer and provide information for every section and area listed in the entry requirements. Failure to provide information for each section / element will result in a deduction of points. If a required element is not applicable to your event, please state as such and/or what your festival/event has in its place. • Display boards are no longer required with the Grand Pinnacle entry. Your entry will solely be judged on the contents of the notebook submission. • This entry is separate from all other categories and divisions. Judges will not refer to, or transfer items from other categories. • Organizations submitting entries for the Grand Pinnacle category must register at least one person for the 59th Annual IFEA Convention & Expo, Date & Location TBA. or arrange for a representative to accept any award your behalf.


CATEGORIES TELEVISION & RADIO ENTRIES 2) BEST TV PROMOTION (Ad Spot or PSA)

3) BEST FULL LENGTH TV PROMOTION (Local Programming)

4) BEST FULL LENGTH TV PROGRAM (National Promotion / Syndication)

5) BEST EVENT VIDEO (For Sale)

6) BEST RADIO PROMOTION (Ad Spot or PSA)

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 2-7: • All TV/video entries should be encoded for Region 1 or Region 0 DVD capabilities. Submit entry on a DVD or Thumb Drive. Entry should be viewable in Windows Media Player or QuickTime. (Please do not submit Blu-Ray Disks.) • All Radio entries should be submitted on a CD or Thumb Drive (not a DVD) Entry should preferably be submitted as a wave file or MP3 file. • Label DVD / CD / Thumb Drive and attach entry form to case. • Only one video/radio spot per DVD / CD / Thumb Drive. Submit EACH entry SEPARATELY. DO NOT combine multiple entries on DVD / CD / Thumb Drive. • These are standalone items and no written information is required. • Make all DVD’s / CD’s set to Auto Play. Judging Criteria: • Does the entry relay the image of the event? • Is the item creative and / or unique? • Is the message clear? • Is the item organized? • What is the “Usability” factor? • What is the overall impression?

MULTIMEDIA ENTRIES 7) BEST EVENT WEBSITE

(Submit web address only – clearly print website address on entry form under section 3.)

8) BEST ORGANIZATION WEBSITE

(Submit web address only – clearly print website address on entry form under section 3.)

9) BEST EVENT / ORGANIZATION E-NEWSLETTER

(Submit three consecutive issues on a CD or thumb drive, or provide a link to download materials on entry form under Section 3.)

10) BEST MISCELLANEOUS MULTIMEDIA

(Includes, but is not limited to items such as: Screen Savers, Live Web-casts, Electronic Billboards, etc. Submit in format used. Preferable method for Videos is a YouTube link. Only one multimedia item per entry Clearly print or type link on entry form under Section 3 - type on separate sheet of paper if necessary - or submit on Thumb Drive.)

11) BEST SOCIAL MEDIA SITE

(Submit Social Media Site Address – clearly print address on entry form under section 3.)

12) BEST FESTIVAL / EVENT MOBILE APPLICATION

(Submit web address or instructions on how to obtain the App, clearly print address on entry form under Section 3.)

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 7-12: • For categories 7, 8, 11 & 12 site will be reviewed online by judges. • Be sure to make the website link go to exactly where you wish the judges to go first. • Refer to any additional entry information listed next to each category. • These are standalone items and no written information is required. Judging Criteria: • Does the entry / item relay the image of the event? • Is the item creative and / or unique? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / item organized? • What is the “Usability” factor? • What is the overall impression?


CATEGORIES PROMOTIONAL PRINTED ENTRIES 13) BEST EVENT PROGRAM 14) BEST NEWSPAPER INSERT / SUPPLEMENT 15) BEST PROMOTIONAL BROCHURE 16) BEST EVENT / ORGANIZATION NEWSLETTER (Submit three consecutive issues.)

17) BEST MISCELLANEOUS PRINTED MATERIALS (MULTIPLE PAGE)

(Includes but not limited to: direct mail brochures, cookbooks, annual reports, etc. - One item per entry.)

18) BEST MISCELLANEOUS PRINTED MATERIALS (SINGLE PAGE)

(Includes but not limited to direct mail pieces, rack cards, fliers, maps, etc. Only one item per entry. Mounting on Poster board, optional)

19) BEST COMPANY IMAGE PIECES

(Includes but is not limited to: Letterhead, envelopes, logo, etc.). (One item per entry)

20) BEST COVER DESIGN

(Submit cover only – mounted on poster board. Covers of Magazine, Newspaper, Brochures, Programs all acceptable.)

21) BEST SINGLE NEWSPAPER DISPLAY AD (Submit entry mounted on poster board.)

22) BEST SINGLE MAGAZINE DISPLAY AD (Submit ad mounted on poster board.)

23) BEST AD SERIES

(Submit a maximum of 5 ads.) (May be mounted on poster board together or individually.)

24) BEST PROMOTIONAL POSTER

(For posters not for sale at Festival or Event but used for promotional purposes to promote event) (Do not mount. Submit in poster tube.)

25) BEST COMMEMORATIVE POSTER

(For posters specifically for sale at festival or event.) (Do not mount. Submit in poster tube.)

26) BEST EVENT PROMOTIONAL PHOTOGRAPH

(Promotional photograph for your event) (Photo Dimensions: 8 inches x 10 inches. Submit photo mounted on Poster board - 2 inch margins.)

27) BEST OUTDOOR BILLBOARD

(Submit photo or print out of billboard, mounted on poster board.)

28) BEST EVENT INVITATION

(Single or Multiple Page. Do NOT mount this category on

poster board.)

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ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 13-17: • These are stand alone items and no written information is required. • Submit each entry in original format if possible • Submit categories 13-17 with the entry form securely paper clipped/bull clipped to the back. • Do not mount on display board. Judging Criteria • Does the entry relay the image of the event? • Is the item creative and / or unique? • Is the item designed / laid out well? • Is the message clear? • Is the item organized? • Is the item usable / functional? • What is the overall impression? ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 18-28: • Submit categories 18-23, 26-27 each mounted on a single, black display board with a maximum of 2 inch margins. • Submit categories 24-25 each rolled up in a poster mailing tube. Do not fold the poster. Do not mount the poster on poster board. • Only one entry per board. • These are standalone items and no written information is required. Judging Criteria • Does the item / entry relay the image of the event? • Is the item creative and / or unique? • Is the item designed / laid out well? • Is the message clear? • Is the item organized? • Is the item usable / functional? • What is the overall impression?


CATEGORIES EVENT DÉCOR & AMBIANCE ENTRIES 29) BEST STREET BANNER

(Submit photo or printouts of banner only, mounted on poster board.)

30) BEST MISCELLANEOUS ON-SITE DECOR

(Includes but is not limited to: directional signage, stage backdrops, entryways, flags, inflatables, etc.) (Submit photo of decor, mounted on poster board.)

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 29-30: • Submit categories 29-30 each mounted on a single, black display board with a maximum of 2 inch margins. • Only one entry per board. • These are standalone items and no written information is required. Judging Criteria: • Does the item / entry relay the image of the event? • Is the item creative and / or unique? • Is the item designed / laid out well? • Is the message clear? • Is the item organized? • Is the item usable / functional? • What is the overall impression?

MERCHANDISE ENTRIES For merchandise sold at Festival / Event / Organization. 31) BEST T-SHIRT DESIGN

(Does not include Tank Tops, Long-Sleeve T-Shirts or Collared/Polo Shirts)

32) BEST PIN OR BUTTON

(Please mount pin on poster board with 2 inch margins maximum.) (For single pins only, no pin sets.)

33) BEST HAT 34) BEST OTHER MERCHANDISE

(For merchandise other than T-shirts, pins, hats etc. that you have for sale at your festival/event.)

35) BEST MISCELLANEOUS CLOTHING (For clothing items other than t-shirts, hats that are for sale at your festival/event - i.e. - jackets, sweatshirts, long-sleeve t-shirts, polo shirts, tank tops, socks, scarves, etc.)

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 31-37: • Submit actual merchandise items for categories 31- 37 as is. • These are standalone items and no written information is required. • Do not mount merchandise items on poster board – except Best Pin or Button. Judging Criteria: • Does the entry / item relay the image of the event? • Is the item creative and / or unique? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / item organized? • What is the “Usability” factor? • What is the overall impression?

36) BEST NEW MERCHANDISE

(New merchandise to festival/event/organization within the past year.)

37) BEST SPONSOR GIFT

(A gift a festival/event gives to a sponsor of their festival/event.)

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CATEGORIES SPONSORSHIP ENTRIES 38) BEST TARGETED SPONSOR SOLICITATION PROPOSAL

(Actual Sponsorship Proposal that was used to target a specific sponsor for your festival/event.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following using no more than one (1) page per section: a. Introduction and description of main event. b. Name of Sponsor c. Introduction, effectiveness and success of Sponsor solicitation package

2. Supporting Materials: a. Please provide a sponsor solicitation package that was actually used to target a specific sponsor. • Provide in the format used to present to the sponsor and with any other additional materials that were sent with the proposal. (Okay to substitute name of sponsor for generic name for confidentiality, however please make it clear on your entry you are doing this.)

39) BEST INDIVIDUAL SPONSOR FOLLOW-UP REPORT

(Actual Follow-Up Report that was generated for a specific sponsor for your festival/event.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following using no more than one(1) page per section: a. Introduction and description of main event. b. Name of Sponsor c. Introduction and effectiveness of Sponsor follow-up report 2. Supporting Materials: a. Please provide a sponsor follow-up report that was actually sent to a specific sponsor. • Provide in the format used to present to the sponsor and with any other additional materials that were sent with the report. (Okay to substitute name of sponsor for generic name for confidentiality, however please make it clear on your entry you are doing this.)

40) BEST SPONSOR PARTNER

(Entry should highlight a specific sponsor that stands out above all others.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following using no more than one (1) page per section: a. Introduction & description of main event b. Name of Sponsor c. Description of sponsor; level of sponsorship (cash/in-kind); details of benefit package and length of sponsorship/ partnership d. Quantity and quality of support to event by sponsor e. Goals and success of relationships for both event and sponsor f. How the sponsor stands out over all other sponsors. g. Activation of Sponsorship by Sponsor ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORY 40: • Submit category 40 within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.)

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ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 38-39: • Submit category 38-39 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf or word document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or thumb drive. Place CD either at front of entry, or attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or thumb drive.) For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (20 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Materials: (70 points) Please provide materials listed under the specific category to the left. Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. 3. Judging Criteria: (10 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the item / entry well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met? • Would you recommend or support this opportunity if in a position to do so?

• Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf or word document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or thumb drive. Place CD either at front of entry, or attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or thumb drive.) For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (90 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Judging Criteria: (10 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • What is the overall impression? • Have all requirements been met?


CATEGORIES SPONSORSHIP ENTRIES 41) BEST SINGLE NEW SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITY

(New activity / program within an Event created specifically to recruit a new sponsor or created after a new sponsor came on board.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & description of main event b. Name of Opportunity and Sponsor c. Description and purpose of New Sponsorship Opportunity d. Description of the targeted sponsor for the opportunity and why the sponsor was targeted e. Explain the synergy between the event and sponsor f. Overall effectiveness / success of the sponsorship 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

42) BEST SPONSORSHIP PROGRAM FOR INDIVIDUAL SPONSOR

(Activity or program within a Festival or Event created for a specific sponsor.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & description of main event b. Name of Program and Sponsor c. Description and purpose of event/program being sponsored d. Description of sponsor; level of sponsorship (cash/in-kind); details of benefit package and length of sponsorship/ partnership e. Overall effectiveness / success of the program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

43) BEST OVERALL SPONSORSHIP PROGRAM

(Entry should focus on the entire sponsorship program for all sponsors for the entire event.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & description of main event b. Description of overall Sponsorship Program c. List of all current sponsors for event; levels of support; longevity of each d. Available benefit packages and valuation formulas e. Description of sponsor research targeting and sales process f. Description of sponsor service team and steps taken when new agreement is signed. g. Describe current sponsor renewal process & retention rate h. Overall effectiveness / success of the program i. Supporting Materials: Please provide a copy of Sponsor Agreement Sales Packet / Proposal; a copy of Sponsorship Follow Up Report and a sample of Sponsor Agreement 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 41-43: • Submit category 41-43 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf or word document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or thumb drive. Place CD either at front of entry, or attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or thumb drive.) For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (70 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this program from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the program is a new program, please answer the following question instead: “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the program, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program. Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. Please limit your supporting materials to those actually sent / used with sponsor: • Printed materials (brochures / programs etc.) • Promotion / marketing / media materials • Supporting photographs • Measurable results: tangible & intangible 4. Judging Criteria: (10 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the program / entry well organized? • Is the content professional? Is the message clear? • Is the program / entry designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met? • Would you recommend or support this opportunity if in a position to do so?

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CATEGORIES FESTIVAL & EVENT CRITICAL COMPONENT ENTRIES 44) BEST VOLUNTEER PROGRAM

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 44-45:

(For overall Volunteer Programs at an Event/Festival/ Organization)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section, together with applicable examples: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Volunteer Program c. Target audience / attendance / number of participants d. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event e. Volunteer demographics (age, gender, individuals, charities, schools etc.) f. Volunteer job descriptions g. Recruitment methods / materials / applications h. Communication methods / materials i. Training guides / programs / handbooks / materials j. Organization & schedule information / materials k. Volunteer perks / benefits l. Appreciation / recognition methods/ materials m. Retention methods / materials n. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with program and benefits to each (if applicable) o. Overall revenue/expense budget of program p. Overall effectiveness / success of program q. Measurable results: ratio of volunteers to guests; # of volunteers; # of volunteer hours; # of volunteers in database; estimate of the financial value of your volunteers. 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

45) BEST GREEN PROGRAM

(For festivals/events with implemented green/recycling programs at their event.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Green Program c. Target audience / attendance / number of participants d. What “Green” initiatives were used at event (i.e. – recycling; alternative methods of transportation; renewable energy etc.) e. How were initiatives promoted to the public? Include marketing materials. f. Education programs pertaining to green program (for public, sponsors, volunteers etc.) g. How was green program enforced / encouraged, tracked, and staffed? h. Who assisted green program (vendors, volunteers etc.) i. Measurable results – how much was recycled; savings / cost of Green program; carbon footprint reduction j. Non-tangible results: education; awareness; involvement etc. k. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event l. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with program and benefits to each (if applicable) m. Tie-in of program to main event n. Overall revenue/expense budget of program o. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry. 76

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• Submit categories 44 & 45 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf or word document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or thumb drive. Place CD either at front of entry, or attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or thumb drive.) For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (70 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this program from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the program is a new program, please answer the following question instead. • “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the program, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area listed below (if applicable). Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Printed materials (brochures, handbooks, Recruiting materials, evaluation forms, signage, etc.) • Promotional / marketing / media materials • Merchandise materials (photographs accepted) • Information provided to participants / volunteers / sponsors / students / charities etc. • Supporting photographs • Measurable results: tangible & intangible 4. Judging Criteria: (10 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?


FESTIVAL & EVENT CRITICAL COMPONENT ENTRIES 46) BEST EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

(For festivals/events who have a specific educational component built into their programming.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Educational Program c. Target audience / attendance / number of participants d. Provide a detailed description of the education program / curriculum e. Who provided the education and in what setting f. Involvement by local educational institutions and professional education (if any) g. What was the take-away for attendees / participants? h. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event i. Tie-in of program to main event j. Overall revenue/expense budget of program k. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with program and benefits to each (if applicable) l. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

47) BEST CHILDREN’S PROGRAMMING (For festivals/events who have specific programming for Children) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Children’s Program c. Target Audience / main target age group d. Attendance / number of participants e. Activities /entertainment provided f. Local School involvement g. Tie-in of program to main event h. Overall revenue and expense budget of specific program / event i. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with event / program and benefits to each (if applicable) j. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event k. What makes the program unique and creative? l. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

48) BEST COMMUNITY OUTREACH PROGRAM

(Programming done throughout the year to benefit and help include all parts of the community, while enhancing the image and brand of your event/organization throughout the year.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Outreach Program c. Target audience / attendance / number of participants d. Impact program had on the community e. Tie-in of program to main event f. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event g. Overall revenue/expense budget of specific program h. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with program and benefits to each (if applicable) i. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry. Winter 2013

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 46-48: • Submit categories 46, 47, 48 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf or word document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or thumb drive. Place CD either at front of entry, or attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or thumb drive.) For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (70 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this program from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the program is a new program, please answer the following question instead. • “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the program, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area listed below (if applicable). Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Printed materials (brochures, handbooks, Recruiting materials, evaluation forms, signage, etc.) • Promotional / marketing / media materials • Merchandise materials (photographs accepted) • Information provided to participants / volunteers / sponsors / students / charities etc. • Supporting photographs • Measurable results: tangible & intangible 4. Judging Criteria: (10 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?

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FESTIVAL & EVENT CRITICAL COMPONENT ENTRIES 49

BEST EVENT / PROGRAM WITHIN AN EVENT TO BENEFIT A CAUSE

(Entry may include fundraising programs as well as awareness programs.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Event/Program c. Description of selected cause and why/how it was selected d. Target audience / attendance / number of participants e. Tie-in of program to main event f. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event g. Overall revenue/expense budget of specific event/program h. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with event / program and benefits to each (if applicable) i. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

50) BEST EVENT (WITHIN AN EXISTING FESTIVAL) (Entry to highlight a specific event that is held during the course of a larger festival/event.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Event within Festival c. Target audience and attendance / number of participants d. Overall revenue/expense budget of event e. Tie-in of program to main festival f. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event g. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with event and benefits to each (if applicable) h. What makes the event unique & creative? i. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

51) BEST EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS & RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR AN EVENT

(Entry to focus on the overall risk management / emergency preparedness plan for a specific festival/event.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Risk Management Plan c. Target audience / attendance / number of participants d. Overall revenue and expense budget of specific program / event e. Duration of program (start to finish) and years program has been part of event f. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with event / program and benefits to each (if applicable) g. Overall effectiveness / success of program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry. ❍ Please submit a detailed documentation of the security plan used at your event

52) BEST FOOD & BEVERAGE PROGRAM

(Entry to focus on the overall food and beverage opportunities available during the course of a specific festival/event.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) pages to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of Food & Beverage Program c. Number and types of vendors d. Site Plan (i.e.: Food Courts, Crowd Flow etc.) e. Cash Management Process f. Fee Structures g. Alcohol Beverage Training/Control h. Vendor Application Process i. Festival/Event Controlled Products & Services (i.e.: Festival-only controlled product sales, Vendor required product use, etc.) j. Promotional activities to drive business k. Power/Water Access l. Waste Disposal 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 49-52: • Submit categories 49, 50, 51, 52 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf or word document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or thumb drive. Place CD either at front of entry, or attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or thumb drive.) For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (70 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this program from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the program is a new program, please answer the following question instead. ❍ “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the program, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area listed below (if applicable). Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. ❍ Printed materials (brochures, handbooks, Recruiting materials, evaluation forms, signage, etc.) ❍ Promotional / marketing / media materials ❍ Merchandise materials (photographs accepted) ❍ Information provided to participants / volunteers / sponsors / students / charities etc. ❍ Supporting photographs ❍ Measurable results: tangible & intangible 4. Judging Criteria: (10 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?


CATEGORIES FESTIVAL & EVENT CRITICAL COMPONENT ENTRIES 53) BEST NEW EVENT

(For festival or event created from scratch within the past year that does not take place as part of an existing festival/event.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event b. Description and purpose / objective of New Event c. Target audience and attendance / number of participants d. Overall revenue/ expense budget of event e. Duration of program (start to finish) f. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with event and benefits to each (if applicable) g. What makes the event unique & creative? h. Overall effectiveness / success of event 2. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

54) BEST NEW PROMOTION ACTIVITY

(Entry should focus on a specific promotion done by festival/event/vendor/supplier to promote a product, service, event, company, entertainment etc.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction and background of main event/organization b. Description and purpose / objective of Promotion c. Description of what was being promoted (merchandise, event, company, entertainment; etc.) d. What makes this promotion different from any other promotions? e. Target audience for promotion f. Attendance / number of participants (if applicable) g. Tie-in of promotion to main event/organization h. Overall revenue and expense budget of specific promotion i. Duration of promotion (start to finish) j. Description of sponsor / charity / volunteer / school / other group involvement with event/ organization and promotion and benefits to each (if applicable) k. Overall effectiveness / success of promotion 2. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

55) BEST NEW ATTENDEE SERVICE

(Any product or service designed with the intent of enhancing the attendee experience at a festival or event.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) pages to explain each section: a. Description of new product or service b. Goals & objectives of product or service c. Application of product or service at an event d. Overall effectiveness of product or services e. Target market for product or service f. Measurable results: tangible & intangible 2. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 53-56: • Submit categories 53, 54, 55, 56 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf or word document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or thumb drive. Place CD either at front of entry, or attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or thumb drive.) For each entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (80 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area listed below (if applicable). Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Printed materials (brochures, handbooks, signage, etc.) • Promotional / marketing / media materials • Merchandise materials (photographs accepted) • Information provided to participants • Supporting photographs • Measurable results: tangible & intangible 3. Judging Criteria: (10 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?

56) BEST MONEY-MAKING IDEA

(Entry should focus on a specific idea implemented at a festival/event that generated revenue.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & description of main event b. Description of money-making idea c. Target audience (if applicable) d. Attendance / number of participants (if applicable) e. Mediums used to promote idea (if applicable) f. Tie-in of promotion to main event/organization g. Overall revenue and expense budget of specific idea h. Overall effectiveness / success of idea 2. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry. Winter 2013

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CATEGORIES FESTIVAL & EVENT CRITICAL COMPONENT ENTRIES 57) BEST OVERALL MERCHANDISING PROGRAM

(Entry should focus on the entire merchandising program for the entire festival/event/organization.) 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & background of event b. Description of merchandising program c. Overall revenue and expense budget for merchandise lines d. Target market for merchandise program (population / location) e. Marketing efforts tied to merchandise program f. Community support in selling / distributing merchandise g. Measurable results (Including number / variety of items; number of outlets selling items, etc.) h. Overall effectiveness of merchandise program 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry. ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORY 57: • Submit category 57 within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf or word document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or thumb drive. Place CD either at front of entry, or attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or thumb drive.)

58) BEST VENDOR / SUPPLIER

(Entry should highlight a specific vendor or supplier to the festival/event that stands out above all others.) (Festival or Event must submit this entry)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) pages to explain each section: a. Description of vendor / supplier b. How the vendor / supplier stands out over all other vendor / suppliers c. Quantity and quality of service and support to event by Vendor / Supplier d. Length of relationship between vendor and event e. Tangible benefits of relationship to both event and vendor. ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORY 58: • Submit category 58 within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf or word document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or thumb drive. Place CD either at front of entry, or attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or thumb drive.) 80

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For entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (70 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this program from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the program is a new program, please answer the following question instead: “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the program, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please include a sample selection of actual merchandise items available. • Also include photographs of all merchandise items available in your merchandise program. • Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. 4. Judging Criteria: (10 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met? For entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (90 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Judging Criteria: (10 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • What is the overall impression? • Have all requirements been met?


CATEGORIES MEDIA RELATIONS ENTRIES For effective media campaigns that generated news coverage, instead of paid or donated advertising time. 59) BEST PRESS / MEDIA KIT

(For festivals/events/organizations to not only provide actual press/media kit used, but to demonstrate its effectiveness and use.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & background of campaign / event b. Provide actual media kit used to send out for your event c. Target audience / demographics for the media d. Target location (communities / cities / states) for media e. Types of mediums used for media outreach f. Measurable results indicating: • Number of publications / cities / states targeted • Percent of distribution that covered news • Longevity of media coverage • Increase / decrease in media from previous years 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

60) MOST CREATIVE / EFFECTIVE NEWS STUNT (For Festivals/Events/Organizations who generated publicity through a media stunt to promote their event/cause etc.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & background of campaign / event b. A detailed description of the news stunt c. How did the news stunt fit in to the overall media campaign for your event? d. Sponsor / charity involvement (if any) and why e. Was there an increase in media coverage for your event as a result of the stunt? 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

61) BEST MEDIA RELATIONS CAMPAIGN

(Entry should focus on the entire media relations campaign for a specific festival or event.)

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & background of campaign / event b. Purpose / objective of the media relations campaign c. A detailed outline of your entire media relations campaign for your event. d. Target audience / demographics for the media e. Target location (communities / cities / states) for media f. Types of mediums used for media outreach g. Measurable results indicating: ❍ Number of publications / cities / states targeted ❍ Percent of distribution that covered news ❍ Attendance results based on media outreach / campaign ❍ Income results based on media outreach / campaign ❍ Longevity of media coverage ❍ Increase / decrease in media from previous years. h. Overall effectiveness of the campaign 2. Supporting Question - Answer question listed to the right, here 3. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 59-61: • Submit categories 59, 60, 61 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf or word document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or thumb drive. Place CD either at front of entry, or attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or thumb drive.) For entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (70 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (10 points) • What did you do to update / change this promotion from the year before? Were your updates / changes successful? Please provide measurable results / examples. • If the promotion is a new promotion, please answer the following question instead. • “What challenges / obstacles did you foresee / encounter in creating the promotion, and how did you handle them?” 3. Supporting Materials: (10 points) Please also include any necessary supporting materials for the program - limiting materials to no more than 5 examples for each area listed below (if applicable). Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Printed materials (press releases, news clippings, etc.) • Promotional materials • Video / audio documentation (Please limit to 1 example – provide written explanation of further examples) • Supporting photographs 4. Judging Criteria: (10 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / campaign well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / campaign designed and laid out well? • Is the campaign creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?

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CATEGORIES EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS OFFERING EVENT MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS 62) BEST EVENT MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATE DEGREE

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & History of School/University b. Purpose / objective of Event Management Associate Degree c. Date degree/program was founded & time frame the course is offered d. Number of staff members & student to staff ratio e. Number of students enrolled / number graduated f. Tuition costs / Financial assistance offered g. Overall revenue and expense budget of program h. Writing/Speaking/Testing/Research requirements for students i. Practical event experience required (internships/assigned event management etc.) j. Overall effectiveness of degree/program - Alumni success (what are alumni of program doing now?) 2. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

63) BEST EVENT MANAGEMENT BACHELOR DEGREE

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & History of School/University b. Purpose / objective of Event Management Bachelor Degree c. Date degree/program was founded & time frame the course is offered d. Number of staff members & student to staff ratio e. Number of students enrolled / number graduated f. Tuition costs / Financial assistance offered g. Overall revenue and expense budget of program h. Writing/Speaking/Testing/Research requirements for students i. Practical event experience required (internships/assigned event management etc.) j. Overall effectiveness of degree/program - Alumni success (what are alumni of program doing now?) 2. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

64) BEST EVENT MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATION PROGRAM

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & History of School/University b. Purpose / objective of Event Management Certification Program c. Date degree/program was founded & time frame the course is offered d. Number of staff members & student to staff ratio e. Number of students enrolled / number graduated f. Tuition costs / Financial assistance offered g. Overall revenue and expense budget of program h. Writing/Speaking/Testing/Research requirements for students i. Practical event experience required (internships/assigned event management etc.) j. Overall effectiveness of degree/program - Alumni success (what are alumni of program doing now?) 2. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 62-64: • Submit categories 62, 63, 64 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf or word document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or thumb drive. Place CD either at front of entry, or attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or thumb drive.) For entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Materials: (40 points) Please also include any and all of the following Supporting Materials. Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Student recruiting materials • Student application materials • Marketing materials for program • Complete outline and syllabus of course(s) • Reading requirements list for students • Sample testing Materials 3. Judging Criteria: (10 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?


CATEGORIES EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS OFFERING EVENT MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS 65) BEST ONLINE EVENT MANAGEMENT TRAINING PROGRAM 1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & History of School/University b. Purpose / objective of Online Event Management Training Program c. Date degree/program was founded & time frame the course is offered d. Number of staff members & student to staff ratio e. Number of students enrolled / number graduated f. Tuition costs / Financial assistance offered g. Overall revenue and expense budget of program h. Writing/Speaking/Testing/Research requirements for students i. Practical event experience required (internships/assigned event management etc.) j. Overall effectiveness of degree/program - Alumni success (what are alumni of program doing now?) 2. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

66) BEST FESTIVAL & EVENT MANAGEMENT MASTERS PROGRAM

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & History of School/University b. Purpose / objective of Festival & Event Management Masters Program c. Date degree/program was founded & time frame the course is offered d. Number of staff members & student to staff ratio e. Number of students enrolled / number graduated f. Tuition costs / Financial assistance offered g. Overall revenue and expense budget of program h. Writing/Speaking/Testing/Research requirements for students i. Practical event experience required (internships/assigned event management etc.) j. Overall effectiveness of degree/program - Alumni success (what are alumni of program doing now?) 2. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

67) BEST FESTIVAL & EVENT MANAGEMENT PHD PROGRAM

1. Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Introduction & History of School/University b. Purpose / objective of Festival & Event Management PhD Program c. Date degree/program was founded & time frame the course is offered d. Number of staff members & student to staff ratio e. Number of students enrolled / number graduated f. Tuition costs / Financial assistance offered g. Overall revenue and expense budget of program h. Writing/Speaking/Testing/Research requirements for students i. Practical event experience required (internships/assigned event management etc.) j. Overall effectiveness of degree/program - Alumni success (what are alumni of program doing now?) 2. Supporting Materials - Place at the end of the entry.

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORIES 65-67: • Submit categories 65, 66, 67 each within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf or word document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or thumb drive. Place CD either at front of entry, or attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or thumb drive.) For entry, please provide detailed information to the following: 1. Overview Information (50 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Materials: (40 points) Please also include any and all of the following Supporting Materials. • Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry. • Student recruiting materials • Student application materials • Marketing materials for program • Complete outline and syllabus of course(s) • Reading requirements list for students • Sample testing Materials 3. Judging Criteria: (10 points) • Is the entry / program well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / program designed and laid out well? • Is the program creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?


CATEGORIES JUST FOR FUN 68) BEST PROMOTION PUBLICIZING AN IFEA / HAAS & WILKERSON PINNACLE AWARD WIN

ENTRY INFORMATION FOR CATEGORY 68: • Submit category 68 within one (1) notebook (2 or 3 ring binder; spiral bound; report cover; bound publication etc.) • Please submit your entry in the order listed. • In addition to the required printed entry, please also provide a pdf or word document of your entire entry (as one (1) document) on a CD or thumb drive. Place CD either at front of entry, or attach to overall payment form. (Okay to submit all of your Pinnacle entries on one (1) CD or thumb drive.)

Overview Information: Please provide a detailed overview explaining the following, using no more than one (1) page to explain each section: a. Purpose / objective of promotional campaign for awards won b. Years participated in awards program c. Average number of entries submitted / won each year d. Target audience for promotion e. Types of mediums used for promotion f. Measurable results (Indicating number of publications / cities / states targeted) g. Measurable results (Indicating percent of distribution that covered news) h. Overall effectiveness of promotion i. Place supporting materials at the end of the entry

For entry, please provide detailed information to the following:

Supporting Questions: Please answer the following supporting questions, using no more than one (1) page for each question: a. What has winning an IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Award meant to your event? b. How have you used winning an award(s) to your advantage? c. How has winning an award(s) enhanced your presence within your community? d. How has winning an award(s) increased leverage / funding / sponsorship for your event?

4. Judging Criteria: (10 points) No information required. Your entry will also be judged based on the below criteria. • Is the entry / promotion well organized? • Is the content professional? • Is the message clear? • Is the entry / promotion designed and laid out well? • Is the promotion creative and / or unique? • What is the overall impression? • Have all supporting materials and measurable results been provided? • Have all requirements been met?

(No Charge to enter this Category) Were you recognized for your outstanding accomplishments with an IFEA/Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Award last year? Gain further recognition for your award and event by promoting your Pinnacle Win, and then share with us what you did!

Supporting Materials: Please also include any and all of the following supporting materials – limiting it to no more than 5 examples of each: • Promotion materials used to promote award • Media clippings from promotion • Examples of IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Winner logo placement

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1. Overview Information (30 points) Please provide the required information listed under the specific category to the left. 2. Supporting Question: (30 points) Please answer questions listed under specific category to the left. 3. Supporting Materials: (30 points) Please provide materials listed under the specific category to the left. Supporting materials should be placed at the end of the entry.


ENTRY FORM REQUIREMENTS

• Please submit one overall entry form with total payment - list all entries submitted on this form. (Be sure to complete sections 1 & 4.) • Please also submit TWO copies of each individual entry form

2014

AWARDS RELEASE AND USAGE

By submitting your entry to the IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Awards, you automatically grant the IFEA the right to use any materials from your entries for editorial, analytical, promotional or any other purpose without additional compensation. In addition, you acknowledge your entry / ies are not returnable. Your entry into the competition is acknowledgment of these terms.

– one to be attached to each individual entry – and one to be submitted with payment and overall entry form. (Complete sections 1, 2, 3 on each entry form.) Be sure payment information is NOT filled out on these copies. • If one organization is entering items for multiple events produced, please submit a separate payment form / overall entry form for each event to allow for proper credit to be given to that event. • Please be sure to PRINT your organization, event, sponsor or program name clearly and correctly - as this is how it will appear on any award if won. • NEW - Please email a high resolution copy of your organization or event logo to nia@ifea.com - subject “2014 Pinnacle Entry Logo” & Your Event / Logo Name.

Sections 1, 2 and 3 must be completed twice for each entry. One copy attached to each individual entry, and one copy attached to payment form. 1. ENTRANT INFORMATION (Required for each entry) (Tip: Complete Section 1. Then make copies to complete form for each entry.) How you list your organization / event name will be how it is listed on any award won. PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY. Organization: ________________________________________________________________________ Membership #: ____________________________ Contact Person: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Name of Event (if different from organization): ________________________________________________________________________________________ Address (Do not list P.O. Box): ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ City: ____________________________________ State: _____ Zip Code: _____________________ Country: __________________________________ Phone:______________________________________________ E-mail: ____________________________________________________________________ Website: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 2. BUDGET INFORMATION (Required for each entry) Organization’s Event Expense Budget: (USD, include all cash outflows). Each entry category is divided into the budget categories below. Gold, Silver and Bronze Awards will be given in each budget category unless the number of entries warrants budgets to be combined, or as determined by the judges. under $250,000 $250,000 - $749,999 $750,000 - $1.5 million over $1.5 million 3. ENTRY INFORMATION (Required for each entry) Category Name (required): _____________________________________________________________ Category Number (required): ________________ Category Description: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ (Provide brief identifying description for each entry or Name of your specific Program being entered, Sponsor Name, web address etc.) 4. Complete section 4 ONCE. Attach payment for all entries combined. PAYMENT INFORMATION Total Categories Entered: List which categories you are entering and how many of each. This is so we can account for all of your entries when they arrive. (e.g. 1, 2, 2, 3, 5, 7…): ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Entries received with payment by 5:00 p.m. June 23, 2014 (MST) will receive the Member early bird rate of $30 per entry or $50 per Grand Pinnacle Entry; or the Non-Member early bird rate of $60 per entry or $100 per Grand Pinnacle entry, depending on IFEA Membership Status. Entries received between June 24, 2014 and July 21, 2014 will receive the Member final entry rate of $35 per entry or $60 per Grand Pinnacle entry; or the Non-Member final entry rate of $75 per entry or $150 per Grand Pinnacle entry, depending on IFEA Membership Status. Questions: Contact nia@ifea.com.

Early Bird Member Rates (Before June 23, 2014)

Final Entry Member Rates (June 24 - July 21, 2014)

Early Bird Non-Member Rates (Before June 23, 2014)

Final Entry Non-Member Rates (June 24 - July 21, 2014)

Grand Pinnacle:

$50 x _____= $_______

$60 x _____= $_______

$100 x _____= $_______

$150 x _____= $_______

Pinnacle Entries: $30 x _____= $_______ (Categories 2-67) Category #68: $ 0 x _____ = $_______ (Just for Fun Category)

$35 x _____= $_______

$60 x ______= $_______

$75 x ______= $ _______

TOTAL NUMBER OF ENTRIES: ___________________________ TOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED: $ ______________________________________ Check (Make checks payable to IFEA) Visa MasterCard American Express Print Cardholder Name: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Signature: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Credit Card Number: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Expiration Date: _____________________________________________ CVN Code: ______________________(MC / VISA-3 digit code back) (AMX-4 digit code front) DID YOU REMEMBER TO Include your payment for total entries along with 1 overall entry form listing each category number entered Include 2 individual entry forms for each item – one with item, one with payment, do not list payment details on these forms Include each entry (as requested) on a disk or thumb drive Email organization / event logo to nia@ifea.com Review all rules for entry submission – go to: Pinnacle Awards section at www.ifea.com for more info. International Festivals & Events Association • 2603 W Eastover Terrace • Boise, ID 83706 U.S.A. • phone: +1.208.433.0950 • fax: +1.208.433.9812 • web: www.ifea.com


The importance of volunteers to our industry cannot be overestimated. Whether the individual acts as a volunteer administrator of an event or contributes his or her time and resources in support of a larger, multi-event organization with a paid staff, the efforts that are put forth deserve our heartiest congratulations and recognition. It is for that reason that the IFEA/Zambelli Fireworks Volunteer of the Year Award was created. Nominations are currently being accepted for the 2014 IFEA/Zambelli Fireworks Volunteer of the Year Award. The award recognizes those outstanding event volunteers whose unselfish and dedicated service to a member festival or event has made a significant difference in their community and mirrors the commitment to success in our professional ranks. A panel of impartial judges from within the IFEA organization will select the Volunteer of the Year winner from all of the candidates submitted. That individual will be honored at the 59th Annual IFEA Convention & Expo location and date TBD. As the guest of the IFEA and sponsor Zambelli Fireworks, the winner will receive an all expense* paid trip to the convention to accept their award. All participants in the program will be promoted through local and national media releases, available on request. The finalist will be featured in a future issue of “ie� magazine, and each semi-finalist will receive a certificate of recognition. Volunteer nominations submitted for the 2013 Award may be carried over into the 2014 competition with the permission of the nominator. The nominator will have the option to re-write the nomination if desired. Please direct all nomination materials and questions to Nia Hovde, Director of Marketing & Communications at nia@ifea.com or +1-208-433-0950 ext. 3.

* Includes hotel and airfare only. To view a complete list of past winners and their nominations, go to the Industry Honors section on www.ifea.com

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NOMINATION CRITERIA 2014 CALL FOR NOMINATIONS Please submit the following information for your nomination.

A. INDIVIDUAL SUBMITTING NOMINATION INFORMATION: Name • Organization • Address • City • State • Zip • Phone • Fax • Email B. NOMINATION INFORMATION: Name • Address • City • State • Zip • Phone • Fax • Email C. NOMINATION QUESTIONS: Please provide a 2 paragraph response for each of the questions below, indicating which question you are answering. Please include specific examples for each. Points will be awarded for each question. Points awarded are listed below. 1. Explain your volunteer’s significant depth of involvement. (20 points) 2. Show specific examples of your volunteers roles and responsibilities. (10 points) 3. Describe how your volunteer has provided significant enthusiasm, organizational assistance and specific expertise. (10 points) 4. Explain how your volunteer has shown initiative and leadership in his or her efforts. (20 points) 5. Tell how your volunteer has exemplified his or her dependability. (10 points) 6. Describe your volunteer’s positive attitude. (10 points) 7. Describe how your volunteer has made a difference to the festival or event. What impact has your volunteer had on your festival/event? What void would there be without him or her as a volunteer? (20 points) D. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: If your nominee is selected, we will need the following information for marketing the 2014 Volunteer of the Year. Please submit the following with your nomination. (Not required at time of nomination). 1. A photograph of the volunteer you are nominating. 2. A local media list (up to 15 contacts) in order for IFEA to send Press Releases to your media. • The preferred media list submission is in an Excel format. • Please include: Name; Organization; Address; City; State; Zip; Phone; Fax; Email E. ENTRY FORMAT: • Please email your nomination in a Word document. F. SUBMIT ENTRIES TO: Nia Hovde, Director of Marketing & Communications at nia@ifea.com

To be eligible for consideration for the IFEA/Zambelli Fireworks Volunteer of the Year Award, the nominee shall:

• Be a current volunteer of an IFEA member organization • Have provided significant enthusiasm, organizational assistance and specific expertise • Be a volunteer of the nominating festival or event for at least 3 years • Have shown initiative and leadership in his or her efforts • Have a positive attitude • Have exemplified his or her dependability • Have a significant depth of involvement • Have made a difference to the festival or event

G. QUESTIONS: Please contact Nia Hovde, nia@ifea.com, +1-208-433-0950 ext. 3

Nominations should be submitted no later than Monday 5:00 PM (MST) June 9th, 2014

• Have received no remuneration for services directly associated with his or her volunteer duties

* Pixels Per Inch ** Pixels Per Centimeter

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While there can only be one person named as the 2013 “IFEA/Zambelli Fireworks Volunteer of the Year”, we would like to take a moment to recognize all of the deserving individuals who were nominated this year. Each one stands out in their own special way, making it a very difficult decision for the committee to make. The spirit and dedication they have shown has helped to strengthen and shape the events they work with, which in turn, has helped to keep our industry and their communities strong. We invite you to join us in thanking them, and all volunteers, for their much-appreciated efforts.

Al Zitney Nominated by: The Parade Company Detroit, MI – U.S.A.

Dennis Roberts Nominated by: Grapevine CVB Grapevine, TX – U.S.A.

Cordelle Terrell Nominated by: Riverbend Festival Chattanooga, TN – U.S.A.

George & Mary Gonzales Nominated by: Downtown Fort Worth Initiatives, Inc. Fort Worth, TX – U.S.A.

Jennifer May-Dennis Nominated by: San Antonio Highland Games Assoc. San Antonio, TX – U.S.A.

Devin Hansen Nominated by: Wichita Festivals Wichita, KS – U.S.A. Darrell Stewart Nominated by: Fiesta Oyster Bake San Antonio, TX – U.S.A. 88

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Sandy Griffiths Nominated by: Kentucky Derby Festival Louisville, KY – U.S.A. Winter 2013


Presented by a Partnership For Excellence in Event Education.

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THE SCHOOL Quality festivals and events are among the most successful tools available to communities, states, regions, and even countries to increase tourism, create powerful and memorable branding and imaging opportunities, bond people together, encourage positive media coverage, enhance economic impact, and add to the quality of lives for those who live there. On the other hand, a poorly planned, managed and executed event can have a reciprocally opposite effect. Over time, events themselves have changed; from often informal affairs to spectacular productions, requiring new sets of skills, experience, creativity, financing, planning and leadership. As a result, event management has evolved into a business and an industry, with new demands, challenges and expectations every day; from attendees / participants; sponsors; host communities and a plethora of other partners that the success of any event depends on. Presented by two of the most respected professional associations in our industry – the International Festivals & Events Association (IFEA) and the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) – the Event Management School at Oglebay National Training Center in West Virginia was designed around the concept of bringing new and mid-career industry professionals together with some of the most highlyrespected and experienced professionals in the field, for a comprehensive educational and networking opportunity that will cover the critical basics of successful event management and then put students in an applied-knowledge project environment to test and further what they have learned.

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“No other investment is more important for the board of a festival or special event than to assure that their staff is growing in their professional development. The Event Management School at Oglebay provides our industry with one place for new and mid-management level professionals to receive intensive, comprehensive training in the core competencies of event management, conducted by many top professionals in the field. It is the equivalent of a full-brain download for those who want to have a well-rounded, working understanding of our profession.” Bruce L. Erley, CFEE, APR President & CEO Creative Strategies Group

Winter 2013


THE PROGRAM The Event Management School is designed as a two-year continuing education program. Students live on-site at the Oglebay Resort and National Training Center with their professional peers and instructors during the one-week institute each year, adding a unique one-on-one networking opportunity for everyone. Year One Students at the Event Management School follow an intensive, interactive, classroom pathway through 24 hours of topical training, from a clear definition of event management as a profession through to the final and important evaluation phase of an event. Year Two Students take it up a notch in applied workshop settings and a unique hands-on, event concept design, team project experience that is somewhat of a cross between television’s “The Voice”, “The Apprentice”, and a little “Who Wants to be a Millionaire?”, but with an event focus! Event-expert team advisors help to guide event teams through a week of market research, concept creation/design, budgeting reality checks, and presentation stages of an all-new event concept for a randomly assigned city (each with a limiteduse “Lifeline” contact). Teams will present their completed plans/concepts to a panel

As a special reward, Event Management School students will also have the opportunity to meet and hear from the President & CEO of Zambelli Fireworks (The First Family of Fireworks) who will host a special show on our last night to help celebrate a successful week together!

of industry leaders and fellow-students on the last day, who will offer critiques, insights and accolades. Plans/Concepts approved by the expert panel will be offered to the selected cities for consideration in their market.

Additionally, all students enrolled in the program will receive one full year’s access to the IFEA’s professional education on-line webinar series (a $1000 value).

THE REWARDS

WHO SHOULD ATTEND

The Event Management School will bestow an Event Management School Diploma to those successfully completing both years of this intensive continuing education program. For those needing CEU credits, the NRPA will provide 2.0 CEU’s for each completed year. Additionally, for those desiring to ‘raise the bar’ by registering for the IFEA’s professional certification program (separate registration required), successful completion of the twoyear Event Management School will earn you designation as a ‘Certified Festival & Event Associate’ (CFEA), the first phase toward future attainment of your ‘Certified Festival & Event Executive’ (CFEE) designation, which recognizes an industry-focused combination of top-level experience and continued education.

• Current mid-management event staff looking to broaden their knowledge base while enhancing their professional networks. • Parks and Recreation managers and staff who produce and/or work with local events. • Those new to the Event Management field. • Event Management students looking to strengthen their professional resumes. • Key event volunteers looking to expand their capabilities.

INSTRUCTORS

Event Management School instructors are selected by the International Festivals & Events Association (IFEA) from among the top event management professionals in our industry today.


THE CURRICULUM The Event Management School first-year curriculum was created with the goal of providing a strong basic understanding and awareness of the multiple, critical components involved in event planning and management. The second-year curriculum builds upon that first-year knowledge-base by providing more applied workshop-styled opportunities in specific areas, together with a project-based opportunity to help bring the ‘real world’ a little closer to the classroom. NOTE: The Event Management School curriculum is not targeted at the corporate meeting-planning niche of our industry, but rather the outdoor public event sector.

“The Event Management School at Oglebay has created a vital tool in developing festival and event industry professionals. As any event producer can attest, training new staff often amounts to a “sink or swim” option. To have a venue where personnel can learn, interact and network with industry leaders and instructors will increase professionalism and output multiple-fold.” Mike Berry, CFEE President & CEO Kentucky Derby Festival “If you were applying to my organization for a job - and I knew that you had completed the IFEA / NRPA Event Management School program – your resume would rise to the top of the pile.” Jeff Curtis, CEO Portland Rose Festival Foundation

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YEAR ONE CLASSES Strong Foundations: Understanding Event Management and How to Build a Successful and Sustainable Event The better an event is produced, the easier it looks. Most people have no understanding of what is involved in producing successful events. Before you begin, this overview will help you to understand what you are getting into and why it is important…to you and to others. Successful events are far more than an exclamation of “Hey, kids, let’s put on a show!” Proper and knowledgeable event planning and research, understanding your target market, doing a community/city assessment, preparing a feasibility study, learning about city processes, a commitment to quality, and even planning to protect your history from Day One, will all lay the foundation for a successful and sustainable event. Step One: Business Plans A successful event doesn’t start with the fireworks finale. Behind every exciting, fun-filled event is a well-run business, complete with paperwork, planning meetings, legal obligations to be met, and partnerships to be built. Reputations are often based far-more upon the business side of your event than on who your headline

entertainers are. We’ll teach you what you need to be thinking about. Arriving at the Bottom-Line: Event Budgeting and Budget Management Every time there’s a good idea, someone brings up the budget! A realistic and informed budget can set the stage for a less stressful and more profitable event. We’ll teach you how to create and use a budget to guide your success. Putting the ‘Community’ in ‘Community Events’: Building a Strong Volunteer Program Volunteers put the ‘community’ in ‘community events’ and some events have legions of dedicated workers who bring valued skills to the table while holding costs to a minimum. This session will cover critical components of a successful volunteer program, including recruiting, training, management, communications, retention and rewards. The Basics of Sponsorship Sales and Service There are very few events today that can operate without sponsorship support, but successful sponsorship doesn’t just happen. This session will cover the basics

of sponsorship and successful sponsorship sales, including why sponsors sponsor and how to identify and create a valuable menu of sponsorship benefits/assets for your event. Students will learn about the valuable world of mobile-marketing. And, we’ll cover the critical role of sponsor service; the key to renewing and keeping those all-important sponsor partners that events depend on. Food & Beverage Programs A well-run food and beverage program can add to both the event experience for attendees and the bottom-line for the event. This session will cover the components and considerations of a successful on-site food and beverage program. Merchandise Programs From keepsakes to entry tickets; sponsor promotions to retail outlets; on-line and on-site; a successful merchandise program can drive both memories and revenues. This session will cover the components and considerations of a successful merchandise program. Event Administration & Legal Considerations Really? I have to think about that? Despite being a ‘fun’ industry, there are NOTE: All sessions are subject to change.


lots of behind-the-scenes ‘t’s’ to be crossed and ‘i’s’ to be dotted; obligations to be met; risks to be avoided/protected against; staffs and boards to be managed and supported; services to be secured and contracts to be signed. We’ll do our best to help you understand and successfully manage those. Marketing & Media All the planning in the world won’t make for a successful event unless it is properly marketed. This session will talk about how to develop an effective marketing plan and considerations for working with traditional media (television, newspaper and radio… yes, they are still around and still important) as well as today’s new technology options. Social Media Marketing: Understanding the Landscape, Benefits and Challenges It’s a new and quickly changing world, with Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, blogs and many, many more. How do you decide which ones are important and use them as an effective part of your event marketing mix? This session will provide a more indepth look at maximizing new technologies and opportunities. Operations: Vision to Reality The expansive area of ‘Operations’ is where the rubber meets the road and this important session will cover multiple areas that can make or break an event. • Event Infrastructure: The infrastructure for many events is a lot like building a small village where the day before there was NOTE: All sessions are subject to change.

nothing. Stage, lights, sound, tents, vehicles, decorations, bleachers, food delivery, trash pick-up, communications, utilities, parking, et al., we’ll talk about what you may need, where to go get it, and lots of insider-tips to remember in the process. • Attendee & Support Services: Whenever you plan to draw a crowd, you’ve got to be thinking about what their needs may be: information, medical, lost kids, rest areas, ATM’s, restrooms, trash disposal, signage, communications, safety and security plans; accessibility; and much more. We’ll make sure you don’t forget anything. • Programming, Site-Design and Event Flow: When did having fun require so much thinking? Like a theme park, effectively planning your event programming, site layout, service accessibility, etc., can ultimately affect sales; safety; friendly-neighbor relationships; and the overall experience for your attendees. We’ll cover some important, if not critical, considerations that will keep your event flowing smoothly. • Environmental Realities: Events can play an important role through education and as a role model in protecting the environment. We’ll touch on a range of ‘Green Reality’ options that events can consider today. Risk Management: Preparing for the Unexpected and Uncontrollable Preparing for the unexpected and uncontrollable is a specialty of event management professionals; and while it can often go

unnoticed and unused, when needed, these important preparations cannot be valued highly enough. This session will help you to plan for potential problems and proper responses; understanding event insurance needs; and how to develop an emergency communications plan for your event. How’d You Do? Surveys, Evaluations and Economic Impact Studies No event is complete until the last survey and evaluation is in. This is the first step in all future events and this session will teach you how to do it effectively and cost-effectively. Behind-the-Boom: The Creation of a Memorable Fireworks Show There is nothing as spectacular as a highquality fireworks show, but there are many misperceptions as to what that includes. Zambelli Fireworks President & CEO Doug Taylor will help us to understand what goes into the creation of a truly memorable fireworks show and what you need to know when planning your own. Open Forum Discussions Before we end our week together, we’ll open the floor to those questions or topics that may be lingering around the edges and ask our instructors to address them.


YEAR TWO CLASSES The Application of Project Management to Events Events are the end result of countless details, processes, and tasks, all coming successfully together; but how do you manage all of those priorities and make sure nothing falls between the cracks? Project Management is an accountable management method using tools and techniques honed over 50 years of use around the world by governments, corporations, and selected events. This session will set the stage for coordinating everything else that follows and provide an important tool for all those attending. Applied Program and Event Development: Designing and Controlling the Event Experience Like a work of art in progress, students will learn how industry professionals research and stay current with a selected city / event market and go from concept to reality, developing and visualizing an event programming plan, taking into account original goals and visions, target audiences, venues and event site flow, hours of operation, and much more, providing a base from which to begin projecting realistic budget and resource needs, and a road map for making changes along the way. A step beyond planning the event program, the event ‘experience’ for attendees must be also be planned from start to finish, providing for a safe, attractive, fun and easily navigable environment. Whether they are aware of it or not, attendees will be impacted by details covered in this session, such as the following and many others: • Quality and creativity. • Signage and decorations. • Transportation and parking. • Music and ambiance. • Information and services. • Customer service. • Photo stops and character opportunities. • Participant events. • Unexpected ‘moments.’ Applied Budget Development Working from a draft event program plan, and other desired ‘bells and whistles’ that impact the event ‘experience’, students will learn how to develop an event budget, discussing what to include, how/where to research, fair and realistic estimates, the keeping of formula and assumption notes/

records, use of a budget in managing an event throughout the planning and production process, budget reports, tracking expectations and more. Applied Sponsorship Research Before you start selling your event, you have to first do your homework. This session will instruct students on how to conduct sponsor research, where to look, what to look for and how to use what you find. Applied Sponsorship Proposals and Follow-Up Reports “It’s all in the presentation…” or so goes the old (and true) adage. Students in this session will learn about and practice writing sponsorship proposals and follow-up reports; two points-of-criticalimpact with sponsors. Inside Perspective: What Cities Want from Events and How to Strengthen those Partnerships The relationship between cities and events has been evolving (sometimes devolving) for many years. Whether you are creating a new event or continuing to build upon a longexisting one, you must first start from a level of understanding about what cities want from events. Combining your goals with theirs, you can build a lasting and powerful partnership that will provide exponential benefits for everyone. This session will define some of those key goals and how to achieve them. Advanced Risk Management & Contingency Planning The tragedy of the Boston Marathon bombings, together with still recent stage collapse tragedies, airshow crashes, crowd panic incidents, and gang shootings at events serve as stark reminders of the need to plan and prepare for all of the many incidents and possibilities that can / may affect our events on a moment’s notice. This important session will address what keeps us up at night and the steps that we can take to address those concerns through contingency planning and preparation. Behind-the-Boom: The Creation of a Memorable Fireworks Show Before-the-boom there are many site and safety details to be considered and planned for. Year Two students will have the

opportunity for a Behind-the-Scenes visit to the firing site of our Event Management School finale, hosted by Zambelli Fireworks President & CEO Doug Taylor, to help us better understand what goes into the creation of a truly memorable fireworks show and what you need to think about when planning your own. City Event Concept Project The City Event Concept Project will provide a substantial hands-on experience that is somewhat of a cross between television’s “The Voice”, “The Apprentice”, and a little “Who Wants to be a Millionaire?”, but with an event focus. Event expert team advisors will help to guide event teams through a week of market research, concept creation/ design, budget reality checks, and presentation stages of an all-new event concept for a randomly assigned city (each with a limiteduse “Lifeline” contact). Teams will present their completed plans/concepts to a panel of industry leaders and fellow-students on the last day, who will offer critiques, insights and accolades. Plans/Concepts approved by the expert panel will be offered to the selected cities for consideration in their market. During the week, each team (assigned randomly, to reinforce the reality of an event environment) will participate in the following project steps: • Research and Development of Event Concepts to Serve Market Audience, Needs, Venues, and Capabilities • Research & Development of an Event Programming Plan and Expense Budget • Research and Development of an Event Income Budget, Sources and Sales Materials • Team Event Concept Presentations (all team members must play a role in the final presentation) Review of the Event Development Process Reflecting on two years of information download and a week of applied project experience, this session will tie it all together as school instructors and other visiting event professionals answer any burning questions still on the table and provide further direction for professional resources, learning and networking.

NOTE: All sessions are subject to change.


2014 Event Management School Schedule TIME

Sunday January 19

7:00 a.m.

Monday January 20

Tuesday January 21

Wednesday January 22

Thursday January 23

Breakfast

Breakfast

Breakfast

Breakfast

Educational Sessions

Educational Sessions

Educational Sessions

Educational Sessions

Lunch 11:45 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.

Lunch 11:45 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.

Lunch 11:45 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.

Lunch 11:45 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.

Educational Sessions

Educational Sessions

Educational Sessions

Educational Sessions

Free Evening: Oglebay Shops, Zoo and Festival of Lights Tour Open

Dinner and Evening Roundtable Sessions

Free Evening and / or Group Planning Sessions

7:30 a.m. 8:00 a.m. 8:30 a.m. 9:00 a.m. 9:30 a.m.

Educational Sessions

10:00 a.m. 10:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 11:30 a.m. 12:00 p.m. 12:30 p.m. 1:00 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 2:00 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 3:00 p.m.

Educational Sessions

3:30 p.m. Registration

4:00 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 5:00 p.m. Orientation

5:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m. Welcome Reception and Dinner

*Sponsored by

Graduation Reception and Banquet with ZAMBELLI Fireworks Show*


Presented by a Partnership For Excellence in Event Education.

EMAIL, MAIL OR FAX THIS FORM TO: The National Training Center for Public Facility Managers at Oglebay Resort & Conference Center 465 Lodge Drive, Wheeling, West Virginia 26003 Phone: (304) 243-4126 • Fax: (304) 243-4106 E-mail: ntc@oglebay-resort.com

JA N UARY 19- 23, 20 14 GENERAL INFORMATION.

Full Name: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Title: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Name (as you wish it to appear on your badge):__________________________________________________________________________________ Company / Agency: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Mailing Address:____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City: _________________________________________________________________ State / Province: _____________________________________ Zip Code: ____________________________________________________________ Country: ____________________________________________ Phone: _______________________________________________________________ Fax: ________________________________________________ Email: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Arrival Date: __________________________________________________________ Departure Date: ______________________________________ For any special needs of accommodations, please contact Oglebay at (304) 243-4126. 1st Year Student

2nd Year Student

PACKAGE PRICES SINGLE PACKAGE

NRPA / IFEA MEMBER

Tuition Rate

NON-MEMBER

$700.00

$850 .00

Premium Single (Room & Board) (Room & Board package is subject to WV taxes) $1,097.26

$1,097.26

Standard Single (Room & Board (Room & Board package is subject to WV taxes)

$929.26

$929.26

Single Premium Rate (Includes Tuition plus Premium Single Room & Board)

$1,797.26

$1,947.26

Single Standard Rate (Includes Tuition plus Standard Single Room & Board)

$1,629.26

$1,779.26

$160.16

$160.16

Early Arrival Saturday Additional Cost TOTAL amount enclosed: $____________________________

PACKAGE INCLUDES: • 5 Nights Lodging • 4 Buffet Breakfasts • 4 Buffet Lunches • 1 Express Continental on Friday • Sunday Reception & Dinner • Tuesday Reception & Dinner • Thursday Banquet Reception & Dinner • Continous Coffee Breaks • Beverage Tickets

Premium Rooms in the new wing of Wilson Lodge are assigned on a first-come, first-serve basis. Please visit our website at www.oglebay-resort.com for Premium Room descriptions. METHOD OF PAYMENT: A check, purchase order or credit card for the full package amount must accompany this form in order to complete enrollment. When paying with a credit card, the package amount will be charged to your card upon receipt of registration. You will receive confirmation from Oglebay Wilson Lodge. NOTE: The balance must be paid prior to arrival. Check (make check payable to Wheeling Park Commission)

Purchase Order #_____________

VISA

MasterCard

American Express

Discover

Print Cardholder Name: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Credit Card Number:________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Expiration Date: _____________________________________________ CVC Security Number: ________ (MC/Visa-3 digit code back) (AMX-4 digit code front) CANCELLATION POLICY: A cancellation fee of $100 will be charged for cancellation at any time up to 30 days prior to the school; 30 to 7 days prior, 50% will be charged; and with 7 days or less notice, no refund will be issued. FOR MORE INFORMATION: www.NRPA.org 800.626.NRPA (6772) 7-1-1 for speech and hearing impaired

www.IFEA.com +1. 208.433.0950

www.OGLEBAY-RESORT.com/schools 800.624.6988, ext. 4126


2014 IFEA Webinar Series

IFEA is pleased to present our 2014 Webinar Series! Offering online educational sessions hosted by industry leaders and special guests, the IFEA Webinar series covers a wide variety of topics important to your organization’s success. Webinars are easy to attend . . . just view and listen to the presentation online from the comfort of your own computer - without even leaving your desk! No Travel Expense Required. Can’t make the live presentation of the Webinar? All Live webinars are recorded and are available for 7 days following the live presentation to watch at your leisure. What better way to receive great educational information by great presenters while saving both time and travel expenses! Registering for a Webinar: Live Webinars are available for purchase via any of the following methods: • Online at the IFEA Bookstore & Resource Center • Faxing or mailing in the Webinar Registration Form ❍ (See separate brochure/registration form for Webinars on Demand) • Calling the IFEA at +1-208-4330950 ext: 3 Webinar Start Time in Your Time Zone: 7:00 a.m. Hawaii 9:00 a.m. Alaska 10:00 a.m. Pacific 11:00 a.m. Mountain 12:00 p.m. Central 1:00 p.m. Eastern 6:00 p.m. GMT Webinar Length: 60 Minutes Individual Webinar Cost: • $59 - IFEA Members • $59 - Association Alliance Members

• $79 – Festival & Event Ontario Members • $99 - Non-IFEA Members Registration cost is per computer site for as many people as you can sit around your computer. Gather additional staff, volunteers, or board members around your computer so they too can join you for this learning experience at no additional charge! Buy More, Save More Webinars in Bulk Pricing: The more Webinars purchased, the more available for free. May combine Live Webinar Presentations and Pre-Recorded Webinars on Demand to take advantage of this special offer. See separate Webinars On Demand Brochure for On Demand schedule. (Call, Mail or Fax orders only, not available for online purchasing) • BUY 3 Webinars and Receive 1 FREE • BUY 5 Webinars and Receive 2 FREE • BUY 10 Webinars and Receive 5 FREE Questions? Contact: Nia Hovde, Director of Marketing & Communications at: nia@ifea.com

© Copyright 2014. The presentation, materials and content of these Webinars are the intellectual property of the International Festivals & Events Association (IFEA) and the specific presenter for each webinar. They are presented for the educational use of each paying customer to the IFEA. Any reproduction, rebroadcast or reselling of this webinar, or the content contained within, by an outside party, without the expressed written consent of the IFEA is strictly prohibited.

2014 IFEA WEBINAR SCHEDULE THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 2014

Volunteer Programs and Management on a Citywide Scale Christine Nardecchia, Volunteer Administrator City of Dublin, Dublin, OH CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management Skills

THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 2014

Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition! A Review of Hot Legal Topics Facing Festivals and Events Jeff English, CFEE, Senior Vice President of Administration/General Counsel Kentucky Derby Festival, Louisville, Kentucky CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management Skills

THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014

Online Event Marketing: New Tricks, Tools and Techniques to Make Your Event a Success Doug Rasch, Director, Online Marketing Edgeworks Group, Irvine, CA CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 2014

#Whippersnappers: Marketing Your Community Event in Today’s Multi-Generational World Sean King, Director of Marketing & Communications Youth Education in the Arts, Allentown, PA CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

THURSDAY, APRIL 17, 2014

Meeting Your Sponsors CSR Objectives through Sponsorship Platforms Bruce Erley, APR, CFEE, President/CEO Creative Strategies Group, Broomfield, CO CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management Skills

THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 2014

The Best 25 New Ideas for Online Marketing Kendra Wright, President Saffire Events, Austin, TX CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

THURSDAY, MAY 8, 2014

What Could Possibly Go Wrong With That? Taking a Proactive Approach to Event Protection & Liability JD Linn, Producer Andrew Vandepopulier, Producer Haas & Wilkerson Insurance, Kansas City, MO CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management Skills

THURSDAY, MAY 15, 2014

Sponsorship Activation – The Secret of YOUR Success! Gail Alofsin, Director of Corporate Partnerships Newport Harbor Corporation, Newport, RI CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management Skills

THURSDAY, MAY 22, 2014

Beyond Budget Basics: Advanced Financial Management Concepts Mitch Dorger, Principal Dorger Consulting, Pasadena, CA CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management Skills

THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014

The Powerful Returns of Developing (and Continuing) an Educational Program as Part of Your Event Valerie Grudzien, Program Manager 500 Festival, Indianapolis, IN CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2014

Risky Business: Event Planning for Everyday Concerns and Realities Terry Powers, Vice President, Operations 500 Festival, Indianapolis, IN CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management Skills

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2014

Green Events: Expectations & Realities Stephen King, CFEE, Executive Director Des Moines Arts Festival, Des Moines, IA CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management Skills

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2014

Project Management for Festivals & Events Becky Genoways, CFEE, Industry Consultant CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management Skills

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2014

Rock Star Strategies for Sponsorship Success – Part II, Best Practices for Sponsorship Activation and Engagement Stephanie Donoho, CFEE Tourism Specialist, Department of Research and Development County of Hawaii, Hilo, HI CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2014

Working with the Media – Get What You Want by Giving Them What They Want Jeannie McFarland Johnson, Vice President of Communications Creative Strategies Group, Broomfield, CO CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends


Thursday, March 13, 2014 Volunteer Programs and Management on a Citywide Scale Christine Nardecchia, Volunteer Administrator City of Dublin, Dublin, OH CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management Skills

Volunteers put the ‘community’ in ‘community events’ and some events have legions of dedicated workers who bring valued skills to the table while holding costs to a minimum. This session will cover critical components of a successful volunteer program, including recruiting, training, management, communications, retention and rewards. We’ll also address the value and challenges of creating a shared citywide volunteer program. Christine Nardecchia has been dedicated to public service her entire career, having worked in communications, public relations and as a professional Volunteer Services Administrator since 1990. She has overseen programs in the non-profit sector, hospital administration, and in local government. Currently, she is the Volunteer Services Administrator for the City of Dublin, Ohio, where she has led the development of its model, award-winning City-wide volunteer program that has been recognized throughout the country as an innovative and effective way to engage citizens in local government.

Thursday, March 20, 2014 Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition! A Review of Hot Legal Topics Facing Festivals and Events Jeff English, CFEE, Senior Vice President of Administration/General Counsel Kentucky Derby Festival, Louisville, Kentucky

Jeff English is the Senior Vice President and General Counsel for the Kentucky Derby Festival. He works on all legal issues facing the Festival, but also manages the merchandise department and the 501(c)3 Kentucky Derby Festival Foundation. For whatever reason, they also put him in charge of IT. A lawyer running IT - yeah, what could go wrong there? Anyways, he’s been there for 6 years and can’t believe they pay him to do this job. His boss also can’t believe they actually pay him.

Thursday, March 27, 2014 Online Event Marketing: New Tricks, Tools and Techniques to Make Your Event a Success Doug Rasch, Director, Online Marketing Edgeworks Group, Irvine, CA

CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

Discover the newest tricks, tools, and techniques for leveraging the digital space to make your event a success. This webinar will present data and lessons learned from dozens of recent social media, online advertising, and site optimization campaigns, showing you what’s working, and what to ignore in the rapidly changing world of online Event Promotion. Doug Rasch, a decorated US Marine, found that the combination of his academic background in Math, and an early career in managing live theater, provided the odd mix of skills needed in web Marketing. Doug, with professional adverting certifications from Google and Bing, spent five years marketing events and live theater in Southern California, before moving to Edgeworks Group in 2008, where he is currently the Director of Online Marketing. Doug regularly speaks at webinars and conferences across the country, sharing his experiences with SEO, Online Advertising, Social Media Management, Mobile Marketing, Facebook App development, and Website Usability Tracking & Analysis.

Thursday, April 10, 2014 #Whippersnappers: Marketing Your Community Event in Today’s Multi-Generational World Sean King, Director of Marketing & Communications Youth Education in the Arts, Allentown, PA CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

#Whippersnappers is an fast-paced tour through today’s complex world of media and the trends that are affecting millennials and boomers and everyone in between. Learn from three real-world cases of successful and failed strategies and the lessons learned from these experiences. Delve into the mix of traditional and social media, the importance of content, how to generate buzz and the importance of your partners in building an event that people not only want to attend, but want to share with their friends and families. Sean King has been consulting with small businesses and non-profit organizations for over 20 years. Currently, Sean is the Director of Marketing & Communications for Youth Education in the Arts (YEA!) a national non-profit musical youth organization based in Allentown, Pa. which teaches life lessons through music. Sean also serves as the marketing Chairperson for the Hamilton District Main Street program in Allentown. He also blogs at artsmarketingblog.org and you can follow him on Twitter @skingaspire. Sean resides with his wife Natalie and son Haydn in the global crossroads of Fogelsville, PA.

Thursday, April 17, 2014 Meeting Your Sponsors CSR Objectives through Sponsorship Platforms Bruce Erley, APR, CFEE, President/CEO Creative Strategies Group, Broomfield, CO

CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management Skills

CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management Skills

From protesters to open carry firearms to trademarks and music contracts, the legal side of the Festival and Event industry can be a blur if you don’t want to pay $300/hour for an attorney. Kentucky Derby Festival General Counsel Jeff English will try and bring these complicated issues into focus by working through first-hand examples from his own event. There will be plenty of time for Q&A and those burning questions that are on your mind.

There is no denying that many companies need to make the connection between sponsorship and their more philanthropically-driven Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) objectives. They need help from you, the event producers as to how sponsorship can be a highly effective tactic in any CSR portfolio. This session will explore various types of “sponsor” relationships from Advocacy, to Cause-Related Marketing, to Promotional Partnerships, to Fundraising Partnerships

2100 IFEA IFEA’s WEBINAR ie: the business SERIESof international 2013 events

Winter 2013


and how those can be leveraged through your festivals and events. Bruce Erley, CFEE is a 30-year veteran of the event marketing and sponsorship field and is regarded as a leading sponsorship expert for the festivals industry. He founded Creative Strategies Group (CSG) in 1995. Prior to that time, Bruce was the Vice President for Marketing and Sales for the International, educational and cultural organization, Up with People, where he directed sponsor sales, entertainment marketing and merchandising operations. At Creative Strategies Group, Bruce conducts all general consultation, including the development of property audits, sponsorship plans, corporate sponsorship programs and training, as well as directs CSG’s ongoing operations. Erley is widely acclaimed as a top presenter on sponsorship topics for the festivals and events industry.

Thursday, April 24, 2014 The Best 25 New Ideas for Online Marketing Kendra Wright, President Saffire Events, Austin, TX CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

Become an online marketing super star! If you are looking for a session jam packed with practical, usable strategies, then this one is for you! You will learn 25 revolutionary ideas you can take home and implement at your event throughout the year, including contesting, social media in the off season, best mobile practices and more. We’ll also cover recent changes to online platforms so you can ensure your efforts include the most up-todate technology. Your “genius status” awaits! Kendra Wright started her career managing non-profit fundraising events. Then in 1995, as the internet came to being, she began doing online marketing, managing global Internet strategies at a Fortune 1000 technology company. In 1998, Kendra left that company to found, Wright Strategies, working with clients like KEEN Footwear, Jeep, Panasonic, Intel, Nike and Chrysler. Finally in 2009, Kendra launched Saffire Events to deliver software that makes it easy for events and venues to market themselves online. It’s been a wild ride.

Thursday, May 8, 2014 What Could Possibly Go Wrong With That? Taking a Proactive Approach to Event Protection & Liability JD Linn, Producer Andrew Vandepopulier, Producer Haas & Wilkerson Insurance, Kansas City, MO CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management Skills

An insurer’s nightmare, this important session will give specific examples of incidents that are currently trending in the events industry and ways to minimize the chance of one taking place at your event. The session will also show what can be done before your event to protect it from a potentially serious incident. JD Linn - Since obtaining his economics degree from the University of Kansas, J.D. Linn has specialized in protecting the financial assets of festivals from the liability exposures associated with their activities. Andrew Vandepopulier - After graduating from the University of Central Missouri with a degree in Business and Education, Andrew Vandepopulier began working in the disaster and catastrophe claims field for Farmers Insurance. He spent 3 years working around the Midwest handling all types of claims from hail to wildfires. In 2010, Andrew joined Haas & Wilkerson’s Fair and Festival division and has been serving the insurance and risk management needs of the event world ever since.

Thursday, May 15, 2014 Sponsorship Activation – The Secret of YOUR Success! Gail Alofsin, Director of Corporate Partnerships Newport Harbor Corporation, Newport, RI CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management Skills

Sponsorship professionals understand that the “sale begins after the sale.” Ensuring your sponsors success through Activation, Execution, Experiential Marketing – call it what you may – is the linchpin of their experience at your event or venue. This webinar will share successful activations that have embroidered sponsors into the fabric of events. The formula is “simple.” Happy sponsors will return. Elated sponsors become your advocates – and that is the secret of YOUR Success. Gail Lowney Alofsin is the Director of Corporate Partnerships for Newport Harbor Corporation, a leading hospitality company based in Newport, Rhode Winter 2013

Island. From 1988 - 2004, Alofsin served as the Director of Sales, Marketing and Public Relations of the Newport Yachting Center, a division of Newport Harbor Corporation, developing the waterfront event site from one national event to five national events while increasing corporate partnership sales 5700%! Alofsin is a graduate of Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts. In addition to her full time sales and marketing position at Newport Harbor Corporation, Alofsin has served as an adjunct professor at the University of Rhode Island – teaching classes focused on integrated communications for 15 years (30 consecutive semesters).

Thursday, May 22, 2014 Beyond Budget Basics: Advanced Financial Management Concepts Mitch Dorger, Principal Dorger Consulting, Pasadena, CA CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management Skills

Every organization hopefully produces an annual budget. But how accurate is it? Does it accurately forecast costs and revenues? Is it too optimistic or too conservative? How does it deal with uncertainty? Does the organization have the right internal control measures in place to protect the organization? Does the board actively participate in the financial affairs of the organization? This session will explore a variety areas related to organizational finances in order to help managers and board members alike ensure the organization has sustainable revenues, controlled costs, and a bright future. Mitch Dorger brings more than 40 years of work experience to his consulting practice including 20 years as a chief executive officer, most recently with the Pasadena Tournament of Roses. His experience as a CEO was consistently characterized by successful performance improvement programs and high employee morale and achievement. He believes the fundamental goal of leadership is to inspire teamwork and the spirit of continuous improvement. He has recent expertise in the world of non-profit organizations and is well versed in corporate governance, volunteer management, financial planning and management, government relations, and large event management. As a public speaker he has lectured on non-profit organizational management, strategic planning, change management and leadership. He has also served as a keynote speaker for four different festival and event association conventions.

IFEA’s ie: 2013 the business IFEA ofWEBINAR international SERIES events

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 The Powerful Returns of Developing (and Continuing) an Educational Program as Part of Your Event Valerie Grudzien, Program Manager 500 Festival, Indianapolis, IN CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

Since the Program’s inception in 2004, the 500 Festival & Indianapolis 500 Education Program has had nearly 200,000 students participate in its in-class curriculum. Learn what it takes to create an educational program that schools continuously want to be involved in and what it can do for your organization. Valerie Grudzien is the Program Manager at the 500 Festival and is responsible for managing the 500 Festival & Indianapolis 500® Education Program and the 10 educational field trips that Hoosier students attend annually. She is also responsible for the coordination of the Snakepit Ball, a black tie gala on the eve of the Indianapolis 500. In addition, Valerie provides support for the 500 Festival’s Volunteer Program, which oversees more than 7,000 volunteers annually. She is a graduate of Butler University, where she obtained a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Public Relations and Spanish.

Thursday, October 16, 2014 Risky Business: Event Planning for Everyday Concerns and Realities Terry Powers, Vice President, Operations 500 Festival, Indianapolis, IN CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management Skills

From severe weather to responding to a lost child; from emergency plans to golf cart safety; this webinar will help you think about everyday concerns and how to best prepare your event for the unknown. Planning for an emergency situation is vital to an event’s success; but where do we start? Items to be discussed will include weather plans, the safety of your staging and temporary structures, communication processes, theft, waivers, background checks, volunteer training, crowd control, what a good, general safety plan should include and much more. Terry Powers is the Vice President of Operations at the 500 Festival in Indianapolis, IN and is now in his 10th year with the organization. As VP of Operations, Terry is responsible for the planning and production of the 500 Festival’s 50+ events and programs which reach over 500,000 people annually, including

a nationally televised Parade and the nation’s largest half marathon with over 35,000 participants.

Thursday, October 23, 2014 Green Events: Expectations & Realities Stephen King, CFEE, Executive Director Des Moines Arts Festival, Des Moines, IA CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management Skills

We live in a new world, where everyone must play an active and visible role in protecting our natural resources. That said, our events don’t have unlimited resources to aim at every option. We must determine what programs we can pull off most effectively and within reason of our own realities. This important session and open idea forum will discuss the many options available to us from basic to extreme - as you consider your own position in the larger equation. Stephen King, CFEE is the executive director of the Des Moines Arts Festival® in Des Moines, Iowa. Projects throughout his career in events have garnered more than 160 industry awards from the likes of the International Festivals and Events Association and the International Downtown Association. He is currently serving on the board of directors of the International Festivals & Events Association Foundation Board and the National Association of Independent Artists, and a founding member of ZAPPlication™.

Thursday, October 30, 2014 Project Management for Festivals & Events Becky Genoways, CFEE, Industry Consultant CFEE Elective Credit: Leadership/Management Skills

Festivals and event producers apply the fundamental skills of project management in the design, planning, management and execution of each event, every day. While festival and event producers do not need to be project management experts, it is important to incorporate fundamental project management skills and knowledge to manage people, resources and processes efficiently and effectively. Join us as we explore how project management fundamentals can improve your events. Becky Genoways, CFEE is a leading event industry consultant and CFEE educator. Genoways has presented professional training seminars throughout North America, and in the New Zealand and the

4102 IFEA IFEA’s WEBINAR ie: the business SERIESof international 2013 events

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Middle East. She was the former President and CEO of On the Waterfront, Inc., a multiple-event production company located in Illinois. Genoways, a 30-year veteran of the festivals and events industry, is a Certified Festival & Event Executive (CFEE) and currently serves as Chair of the World Board of Directors and a member of the President’s Council of the International Festivals & Events Association.

Thursday, November 6, 2014 Rock Star Strategies for Sponsorship Success – Part II, Best Practices for Sponsorship Activation and Engagement Stephanie Donoho, CFEE Tourism Specialist, Department of Research and Development County of Hawaii, Hilo, HI CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

The greatest songs pay homage to the artists and legends who have come before, creating new works that resonate deeply. Come learn from the best practices of your IFEA peers to develop new ways to engage your sponsors in your event, and help them receive the customer activation they want to achieve. Stephanie Donoho, CFEE, is the Tourism Specialist for the Island of Hawaii. She manages more than $1.5 million in Hawaii Tourism Authority and Hawaii County general funds that are invested annually in tourism marketing and product development, including partnership with dozens of world-class festivals and events. Prior to her service in Hawaii, she was the Executive Director of the Clear Creek County Tourism Bureau in Idaho Springs, Colorado. She has also worked on the fundraising and development teams for Colorado Ballet, the Eleanor Roosevelt Institute for Biomedical Research (both in Denver, Colorado) and for Good Hope School (Frederiksted, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands). She got her start in the industry holding pizza and candy bar sales to support her high school marching band’s efforts to perform at 1984 World’s Fair in New Orleans, Louisiana, and has been an avid events geek ever since.


Thursday, November 13, 2014 Working with the Media – Get What You Want by Giving Them What They Want Jeannie McFarland Johnson, Vice President of Communications Creative Strategies Group, Broomfield, CO CFEE Elective Credit: Current Industry Issues & Trends

The focus of the presentation will be a detailed exploration of alternative revenue

opportunities that media outlets share with events. Events are uniquely positioned to help media outlets generate “NTR” or non-traditional revenue, which is what they need, and in so doing, an event can successfully generate a significant advertising campaign with minimal to no cash investment. There are a variety of ways to accomplish these models and this presentation will teach event directors the secrets to success on this topic. Jeannie McFarland Johnson, Vice President of Communications at Creative Strategies Group, has worked in the event marketing field for more than a dozen years creating dynamic and effective

Webinars On Demand

Looking for a different webinar topic – don’t forget to check out our Webinars OnDemand – previously recorded webinars that are now available for download. For a complete list of available Webinars On Demand, just go to the IFEA Bookstore & Resource Center.

How Webinars Work

IFEA Webinars are Website-enabled seminars that function much like a teleconference. They use your computer’s Website browser to display presentation materials and other applications important to the Webinar topic, with the audio portion of the presentation provided either through your computer speakers or over the phone. Once your registration has been submitted, you will receive an email from the IFEA confirming that you have been registered for the Webinar. The day before the scheduled Webinar, you will receive an email with specific instructions on how to log in for the Webinar. You will receive this email again, the day of the Webinar. Once this information has been received, joining a Webinar is as easy as 1, 2, 3! 1. Log In To The Webinar: To start the Webinar, log in to the specific website address that you received for the Webinar and connect to the presentation. Webinars can be viewed on virtually any computer with a high-speed internet connection. 2. Listening To The Webinar: After you’ve logged in and gained access to the Website, you have two options to listen to the audio portion. You can either dial the telephone number provided to hear the webinar via a conference call, or if you have computer speakers, you may listen via your computer speakers. (The phone number provided will not be an 800 number,

relationships for her clients with all types of media outlets including television stations, radio clusters, newspapers, magazines, outdoor advertising companies and new media digital assets. Her vast experience and broad understanding of the unique needs of the media and event industries have given rise to her strategic hybrid approach to media planning and implementation. She specializes in media sponsorship negotiations, promotionally leveraged media buying and public relations.

so all costs for the call will be incurred by the registrant.) 3. Sit Back and Learn: Once you are logged in, all you need to do is sit back and learn! It’s just like any other seminar, except you’re sitting comfortably at your own desk! Throughout the webinar, you are able to ask questions to the presenter using the online Question/Answer messaging system that is part of the Webinar screen. The Webinar Organizer will view your question and present it to the speaker at the end of the presentation. Along with the Webinar itself, all registered attendees will receive a copy of the presentation used for the webinar prior to the webinar start time in addition to the recorded copy of the webinar after the webinar presentation.

System Requirements For PC-based participants: • Internet Explorer® 7.0 or newer, Mozilla® Firefox® 3.0 or newer or Google™ Chrome™ 5.0 or newer (JavaScript™ and Java™ enabled) • Windows® 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server • Cable modem, DSL, or better Internet connection • Minimum of Pentium® class 1GHz CPU with 512 MB of RAM (recommended) (2 GB of RAM for Windows® Vista) For Mac®-based participants: • Safari™ 3.0 or newer, Firefox® 3.0 or newer or Google™ Chrome™ 5.0 or newer (JavaScript™ and Java™ enabled) • Mac OS® X 10.5 – Leopard® or newer • Intel processor (512 MB of RAM or better recommended) • Cable modem, DSL, or better Internet connection

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IFEA

Webinar Series

Upcoming Live Webinar Presentation Registration Form

REGISTRATION CONTACT INFORMATION Webinar Participant: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Webinar Participant Email: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Organization: ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City, State/Province, Zip Code: ______________________________________________________________________ Phone: _________________________ PURCHASE INFORMATION

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2014 UPCOMING LIVE WEBINARS: To register please make your selection by checking (√) from the webinars below: ❍

Thursday, March 13, 2014 Volunteer Programs and Management on a Citywide Scale Christine Nardecchia, City of Dublin, Dublin, OH

Thursday, April 24, 2014 The Best 25 New Ideas for Online Marketing Kendra Wright, Saffire Events

Thursday, October 16, 2014 Risky Business: Event Planning for Everyday Concerns and Realities Terry Powers, 500 Festival

Thursday, March 20, 2014 Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition! A Review of Hot Legal Topics Facing Festivals and Events Jeff English, CFEE, Kentucky Derby Festival

Thursday, October 23, 2014 Green Events: Expectations & Realities Stephen King, CFEE, Des Moines Arts Festival

Thursday, March 27, 2014 Online Event Marketing: New Tricks, Tools and Techniques to Make Your Event a Success Doug Rasch, Director, Edgeworks Group

Thursday, May 8, 2014 What Could Possibly Go Wrong With That? Taking a Proactive Approach to Event Protection & Liability JD Linn, Producer Andrew Vandepopulier, Haas & Wilkerson Insurance

Thursday, October 30, 2014 Project Management for Festivals & Events Becky Genoways, CFEE, Industry Consultant

Thursday, November 6, 2014 Rock Star Strategies for Sponsorship Success – Part II, Best Practices for Sponsorship Activation and Engagement Stephanie Donoho, CFEE, County of Hawaii

Thursday, November 13, 2014 Working with the Media – Get What You Want by Giving Them What They Want Jeannie McFarland Johnson, Creative Strategies Group

Thursday, April 10, 2014 #Whippersnappers: Marketing Your Community Event in Today’s Multi-Generational World Sean King, Youth Education in the Arts

Thursday, April 17, 2014 Meeting Your Sponsors CSR Objectives through Sponsorship Platforms Bruce Erley, APR, CFEE, Creative Strategies Group

Thursday, May 15, 2014 Sponsorship Activation – The Secret of YOUR Success! Gail Alofsin, Newport Harbor Corporation

Thursday, May 22, 2014 Beyond Budget Basics: Advanced Financial Management Concepts Mitch Dorger, Dorger Consultings

Thursday, June 5, 2014 The Powerful Returns of Developing (and Continuing) an Educational Program as Part of Your Event Valerie Grudzien, 500 Festival

Registration cost is per computer site for as many people as you can sit around your computer. Once your registration has been submitted, you will receive an email from the IFEA confirming that you have been registered for the Webinar. The day before the scheduled Webinar, you will receive an email with specific instructions on how to log in for the Webinar. You will receive this email again, the day of the Webinar. Webinars in Bulk offer is applicable to both Upcoming Live Webinar Presentations and Pre-Recorded Webinars On Demand. Payment must be received in full at time of registration to participate in Webinars. No refunds on webinar registration unless notified 24 hours prior to start of webinar.

Live webinars are recorded and are made available for 7 days following the live presentation.

International Festivals & Events Association • 2603 W Eastover Terrace • Boise, ID 83706 - U.S.A. Questions: Contact Nia Hovde, Director of Marketing & Communication at nia@ifea.com or Phone: +1-208-433-0950 ext: 3, Fax: +1-208-433-9812 • www.ifea.com


YOU’RE INVITED TO IFEA EUROPE’S ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2014 Meet festival managers, city culture and tourism officers, leading festival and event management educators, and your other colleagues in the sector. Join workshops and round-table debates to learn and share best practices in events management. Experience the parades of the NICE CARNIVAL 2014 and watch the launch of the NICE ROCK N’ROLL MARATHON. Enjoy exclusive social programmes; attend Master Classes; get engaged, network - and leave inspired!

Nice, France February 13 - 16, 2014 Info and registration: www.nice2014.eventbrite.com

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BOARD TABLE

Congratulations and Thank You The IFEA’s 58th Annual Convention & Expo this past September in Pittsburgh, PA was filled with inspirational speakers, informative round tables, enlightening panels, innovative new products, and incredible networking opportunities. I hope you were able to join us and participate in the lively exchange of creative ideas, experiences, trends, challenges and best practices, as we looked to the future. If you weren’t able to attend, be sure to put the 2014 convention on your calendar and protect it. Many individuals and organizations were recognized at the convention for their passion, commitment and dedication to the festivals and events profession: The IFEA World Festival and Event City award winners were comprised of exceptional global event cities. This year winners, Nice, Côte d'Azur, France; Boston, Massachusetts, United States; Hwacheon-Gun Gangwon-do, South Korea; Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Rotorua, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand; Salvador, Bahia, Brazil; and Sydney, New South Wales, Australia have worked diligently to provide an environment that fosters successful festivals and events. For many of us, our festivals and events would not be possible without the dedication and commitment of the volunteers. Volunteers are the heart and soul of our festivals and they make significant contributions to each event’s success.

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Each year IFEA honors a volunteer whose service exceeds all expectations and each year the entries are extremely impressive. Congratulations to Christopher Protho, M.Ed. from Music for All in Indianapolis, IN, the 2013 IFEA / Zambelli Fireworks Volunteer of the Year. Each year, IFEA recognizes people who have made a significant contribution to our industry by inducting them into the Hall of Fame. This year Karen Churchard, CFEE was recognized for her extensive achievements and lifelong commitment to the festivals and events profession. She joined the impressive list of individuals who have been honored with one of the highest achievements that is bestowed by the IFEA. Thank you for being an inspiration to all of us. Congratulations to the Certified Festival and Event Executive program graduates, Jeff English, Kentucky Derby Festival; Dave Miller, Sound of Music Festival; Mary Margaret Satterfield, Conway Area Chamber of Commerce; Jenny Wright, The Woodlands Waterway Arts Festival; and Corrine Zawaduk, Shambhala Music Festival. These five individuals have completed a comprehensive educational program that distinguishes them as leaders in our industry who are dedicated to professionalism. The annual IFEA / Haas & Wilkerson Pinnacle Award winners represent the most creative and successful marketing, operations and community outreach programs and materials produced by festivals and events around the world. The winners are too numerous to mention but their level of excellence and creativity embody the best and brightest marketing, promotional and programming efforts from around the globe. The winning entries are posted on the IFEA website and contain great examples and ideas for your market research. My commendation to the CEO and staff of the IFEA, who serve the global members and partners through varied publications, programs and resources and whose efforts have far-reaching impact and effect on the industry. The CEO and staff keep us informed of the current news, practices and trends from around the globe through the Event Insider, ie: the business of international events, and yearround webinars. The Event Management School is entering its third year; New

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Zealand has adopted the CFEE program as the professional certification program for their festival and event professionals; a new Safety and Security Audit program is under development; and the World Festival and Event City Award program (sponsored by VISA) is spawning an IFEA World Festival & Event City Summit. Other IFEA resources like the Economic Impact Studies, Sponsor Summits, Onsite Event Evaluations, and On-line Marketing Audits provide valuable direction for those who engage these services. I would like to recognize and thank IFEA World Board member Bruce Erley, CFEE, APR, who has completed his Board term and has dedicated enormous amounts of time and shared his extensive knowledge and talents with the organization. He will be missed on the Board, but we look forward to his continued and active involvement in the IFEA. As I near the conclusion of my year as the IFEA World Board Chair, I am confident that IFEA continues to make great strides, has weathered the economic storm and is emerging stronger than ever. I have been honored and humbled to serve on the IFEA World Board with a group of visionary festival and event leaders who are dedicated to providing exceptional member resources to support the global IFEA members and partners. It has been a privilege to work with each of them and to serve you, the IFEA, and our global industry. I wish incoming IFEA World Board Chair, Jim Holt, CFEE, President & CEO at Memphis In May International Festival in Memphis, TN the very best in 2014. He is a well-respected industry leader who is extremely dedicated to the IFEA and brings a depth of knowledge and tremendous talents to the position. Serving as the IFEA World Board Chair is an extraordinary experience that yields lifelong friendships and lasting rewards. Thank you for the opportunity to serve the IFEA organization and all of our global members and partners. Wishing you continued success in your festivals and events.

Becky Genoways 2013 IFEA World Board Chair Email: beckhawley@aol.com


FOUNDATION

Fall In Love with Your Communities Again I have been reading the book "for THE LOVE of CITIES" by Peter Kageyama. The book was given to me by the City Manager in the city where I work. His comment earlier this year was that he understood event planners’ goals, but in government it is just too easy to say ‘no’. He then stated, hesitantly - “I know cities need people like you.” As I started reading the book, I wasn't sure I would understand his need for me to read it. The relationship between the two of us is tenuous. The book explores how today there is an end of the love affair individuals have with their cities and communities. Society has created communities not worthy of love. The cities/communities we live in are not designed by their residents to stay in the city center. Think back to the early 80's. We created our freeway systems to leave the city as fast as possible eliminating our main street, our community gathering. Cities today focus on the bottom line. Making cities safe and functional, not comfortable, fun or interesting. People don't love places that are func-

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tional and safe. We love places that we are emotionally connected with. We, event planners, are the co-creators of place. We are the special sauce that makes a significant difference in our communities. We make cities have content. We make people fall back in love with their communities. This year, as the Chair of the IFEA Foundation Board, I have been surrounded by co-creators, whose daily tasks are to get the people to fall in love with their communities again. They don't need the recognition, just the challenge and the go ahead to step outside the box and make their residents fall back in love with their city. After reading "for THE LOVE of CITIES," I figured out what the city manager was trying to tell me … our communities need us - festival and event planners. We need to continue to create fun and love for our cities. Through your generous contributions to the IFEA, be it via the IFEA Foundation’s Annual Live and Silent Auction or the IFEA’s Fund for the Future Campaign, the IFEA will continue to be the top of our game and strive to bring you the best and new practices in our industry. At the IFEA’s 58th Annual Convention this past September in Pittsburgh, PA, many attended and supported the IFEA Foundation’s Auction Night Party at the Hard Rock Café where the IFEA Foundation raised over $40,000! We thank you greatly for your continued support! The IFEA Foundation’s Auction is the only fundraising event the Foundation produces. It takes many people and individuals to create this event and with that being said, I need to acknowledge and thank the following individuals. • First and foremost, thank you to the donors of both the Live and Silent Auction items – big and small. Our donors are members and friends of

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the IFEA and our success is dependent on your generosity and creativity. • Secondly the IFEA Foundation Board of Directors. Thank you for jumping in and doing what was asked of you, to get the job done. Every board member on the Foundation Board had certain tasks to fulfill the night of the auction. From transporting the auction items, organizing the auction tables, selling raffle tickets, following bidders and collecting money, to cleaning up at the end of the event. We had 100% board participation. • Third – Sue Bunday and Bruce Erley, CFEE, APR. Sue, former Chair of the Portland Rose Festival Board of Directors came to Pittsburgh to help with the auction and was instrumental in setting up the silent auction groupings and scripting the Auctioneer. And Bruce jumped in at the last minute to be the Auctioneer. • Next, the Staff at the IFEA! From finding the venue, negotiating the contracts, sending out donation forms, writing and producing the auction booklet, to organizing and maintaining all packages and items, collecting the money, tracking down the payments and shipping the goods to you - Steve, Nia, Beth, Bette, and Craig - Thank You! • And finally, YOU!!!! Thank you for attending the IFEA’s 58th Annual Convention & Expo this past September in Pittsburgh, PA and for supporting the IFEA Foundation and our mission. Thank you for creating fun for the masses to fall in love with their communities again!

Cindy Lerick 2013 IFEA Foundation Board Chair Executive Director/President Cultural Festivals, St. Louis, MO Email: clerick@culturalfestivals.com


IFEA Foundation Legacy Scholarships Supporting and Educating the Festivals & Events Industry Since 1993. Each of the IFEA Foundation Legacy Scholarships below serve a selected audience(s) within our industry, as identified, by providing an annual scholarship to the IFEA Annual Convention & Expo (registration only). We invite you to look through the opportunities, take a moment to learn a little more about the special individuals and groups attached to each, and apply for those that you may qualify for. For more information, go to: www.ifea.com. The Nick Corda Memorial Scholarship Providing support to young/new professionals currently completing their education or with less than three years in the industry. (More Details)

in extra-curricular activities in and outside of campus life and who has a passion for helping others and/or supporting a cause that enhances the quality of life for individuals or the community at large. (More Details) The Bruce & Kathy Skinner Scholarship Providing support to young/new professionals currently completing their education or with less than three years in the industry. (More Details)

The Judy Flanagan Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/ organization whose event involves a parade. (More Details)

The John Stewart Memorial Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual working with technology responsibilities supporting an event(s). (More Details)

The Georgia Festivals & Events Association Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/ organization from Georgia. (More Details)  The Bill & Gretchen Lofthouse Memorial Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/organization currently struggling with short-term economic or start-up challenges. (More Details)

The Tennessee Festival & Event Professionals Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/organization from Tennessee. (More Details)  The Pete Van de Putte Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/organization from Texas. (More Details) 

The Mampre Media International Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual working with media/marketing responsibilities for an event. (More Details)

The Joe & Gloria Vera Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/ organization from Texas. (More Details) 

The Daniel A. Mangeot Memorial Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/organization seeking advanced education and professional certification. This scholarship provides core curriculum registration fees toward the attainment of the IFEA’s Certified Festival & Event Executive (CFEE) designation. (More Details)

The Don E. Whitely Memorial Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/ organization whose event involves a parade. (More Details)

The Mid-Atlantic Festival & Event Professionals Scholarship  Providing support to a deserving individual/ organization within the Mid-Atlantic United States. (More Details)

The Kay Wolf Scholarship Providing support to a deserving individual/ organization from Texas. (More Details)  The George Zambelli, Sr. Memorial Scholarship Providing support to a deserving volunteer who has given their time and energies to their community festival/event. (More Details)

The Richard Nicholls Memorial Scholarship Providing support to a deserving High School senior or College Student with a history of commitment to participating or volunteering in nonprofit events / organizations; someone who is well-rounded

For more information about how you can sponsor an IFEA Foundation Legacy Scholarship, call +1-208-433-0950 or email Schmader@ifea.com. Winter 2013

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MARKETPLACE BANNERS/FLAGS dfest® - DIXIE FLAG EVENT SERVICES TEAM - Producers of all types of flags, banners, decorations, accessories, and custom net street banners. Contact: Pete Van de Putte Jr., CFEE, President; Address: P.O. Box 8618, San Antonio, TX 78208-0618; Phone: 210-227-5039; Fax: 210-227-5920; Email: pete@dixieflag.com; Website: www.dixieflag.com. ENTERTAINMENT/TALENT KENDALL HAVEN - A nationally recognized expert on the structure of stories and on the Eight Essential Elements that form the foundation of all successful narratives. Haven’s acclaimed book, STORY PROOF: The Science Behind the Startling Power of Story presents the first-ever proof that “story structure” is an information delivery system powerhouse, evolutionarily hardwired into human brains. A senior research scientist turned story-teller and story-engineer, Haven assists agencies, organizations, companies, and schools to master the use and power of story. Contact: Kendall Haven, Phone: 707-577-0259; Email: kendallhaven@sbcglobal.net; Website: www.kendallhaven.com RIVER CITY BRASS BAND - We provide primarily American musical culture, across a broad spectrum of the public through the presentation of brass band performances, educational programs and the production of records. Contact: James Gourlay, Address: 500 Grant Street #2720, Pittsburgh PA 15129; Phone: 412-434-7222; Fax 412-235-9015; Email: jamesgourlay1956@mac.com; Website: www.rivercitybrass.org EVENT PRODUCTION PRODUCTION SERVICES INTERNATIONAL - Full service event production company founded to meet the ever-growing demand for superior quality shows. We focus on our clients individual needs on all sized productions. Denver Sales Office Street Address: 2121 S. Hudson St., Denver, CO 80222; Mailing Address P.O. Box 100382 Denver, CO 80250; Phone: 303.757.8400; Fax 303.757.8404; Boise Sales Office Street Address: 5311 Glenwood St., Garden City, ID 8371; Mailing Address: P.O. Box 140243, Garden City, ID 83714; Phone: 208.388.8400; Fax: 208.388.8404; Email: info@psiiusa.com; Website: http://www.psiiusa.com. FINANCIAL VISA / FESTIVALS.COM - Festival Transaction Services, a Festival Media Corporation company, brings true cashless transactions to festivals, fairs and community events through strategic partnerships with Visa and Bank of America Merchant Services (BAMS). Contact: Jim Shanklin; Address: 2033 Sixth Avenue-Ste 810, Seattle WA 98121; Phone: 206-381-5200; Email: jshanklin@festmedia.com

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FIREWORKS ZAMBELLI FIREWORKS INTERNATIONALE – “THE FIRST FAMILY OF FIREWORKS!” America’s leading manufacturer and premier exhibitor of domestic and international firework displays. Spectacular custom-designed indoor and outdoor productions, electronically choreographed to music and lasers. Phone: 800-2450397; Fax: 724-658-8318; Email: zambelli@zambellifireworks.com; Website: www.zambellifireworks.com. INSURANCE HAAS & WILKERSON INSURANCE – With more than fifty years experience in the entertainment industry, Haas & Wilkerson provides insurance programs designed to meet the specific needs of your event. Clients throughout the U.S. include festivals, fairs, parades, carnivals, and more. Contact: Carol Porter, CPCU, Broker; Address: 4300 Shawnee Mission Parkway, Fairway, KS 66205; Phone: 800-821-7703; Fax: 913-676-9293; Email: carol.porter@hwins.com; Website: www.hwins.com. KALIFF INSURANCE - Founded in 1917, Kaliff Insurance provides specialty insurance for festivals, fairs, parades, rodeos, carnivals and more. We insure the serious side of fun! Contact: Bruce Smiley-Kaliff; Address: 1250 NE Loop 410 Ste 920, San Antonio TX 78209; Phone: 210-829-7634 Fax: 210-829-7636; Email: bas@kaliff.com; Website: www.kaliff.com K & K INSURANCE – Serving more than 350,000 events, offering liability, property, and other specialty insurance coverages including parade, fireworks, umbrella, volunteer accident, and Directors and Officers liability. Address: PO Box 2338, Fort Wayne, IN 46801-2338; Call: 1-866-554-4636; Website: KandKinsurance.com. INTERNET POINTSMAP® - PointsMap® is a program that allows you to create a personalized Google® map or custom map for your viewers. Your map is accessible to anyone with an Internet connection - even on a Mobile Phone or iPad®! Beyond finding a specific point, PointsMap® specializes in providing detailed information, directions, videos, pictures and even the ability to "Go Inside!" Address: 1100 Riverfront Pkwy, Chattanooga, TN 37402-2171; Phone: 423-267-7680; Website: www.pointsmap.com QUICKEDGE™ (EDGEWORKS GROUP LLC) - Since 1994 our mission has been to drive more business through your website. We plan, design, build, and market successful websites by integrating customized online strategies including search engine optimization, affiliate marketing, email marketing, and more. If this kind of experience and approach is what you’re looking for, we’d love to hear from you. Address: 26361 Crown Valley Parkway, Suite 203, Mission Viejo CA 92691; Phone: 866-888-7313 x701; Email: info@edgeworksgroup.com; Website: www.edgeworksgroup.com.


Don’t let an accident ruin your day. hwins.com

Independent agent representing ACE Group Programs Division. Most insurance products are underwritten by insurers within the ACE Group of Insurance Companies.

Take a proactive approach instead. Our event experts can help identify your risks and provide creative solutions that protect your organization from accidents. For a comprehensive review of your coverage and exposure, call 1-800-821-7703.


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