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Flying Dutchman Bulletin Nr, 158 May 2012

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012

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St. Petersburg, Florida Lin Robson Lin.Robson@northsails.com Ethan Bixby Ethan.Bixby@northsails.com http://na.northsails.com/StPete.aspx

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012

President’s Letter “ Dear friends,

events is the best way to advertise and promote the FD. As you can see, the Anyway, you ‘ll find on the IFnew IFDCO website designed DCO website a “60° Anniverby our VP-Communication, sary“ chapter with photo’s and Ronald Stalman, is online. I reports soon. think that Ronald, performed a dynamic and eclectic website for Coming back to the top communication and promotion events. With regard to the Vinpurposes of the FD. tage Yachting Games it is very Together with the FD Bulletin, important to have the biggest the Facebook page and the FD number of Countries repreForum, we now have great insented. The current Entry List struments to advertise our misses some Countries and Class!! Thank you, Ronald. their teams. Please do enter the VYG today. The IFDCO calendar About the World Cham2012 has three top events: pionship in Santa Cruz, I wish to European Championship Altea, have a big and strong fleet, with already finished. teams from all over the World. The Vintage Yachting Games in Therefore we announced that July. And the Worlds in Santa every one entering before the Cruz in September. first of June will become the The success of our Class was roundtrip for € 750,-/boat in a six always reached by the number packed container. All further of IFDCO members and the transportation details will be competitors attending to the Top available on the website after events. After the success of the the 1st of June. European Championship in Altea, I now ask you to send your According to the CH, Entries for both other events NSM and AGCM we had in Maltoday. cesine on last July 2011, the Many thanks to the FD topics “IFDCO Restructuring” , Spanish Class and the Club “IFDCO strategy” and “ComNautico Altea for the event they munication” are matters to be organized as best ashore and in discussed. Clear ideas and the Race Area . Personally and planning is needed for the best on behalf of IFDCO I thank very solution for the benefit of our much Stephen Parry, since in Class. Altea, after 20 years he finished In Altea at the Executive Officers his term as VP-Championship meeting the progress of this onand gave his VP to Jan Lechler, going matter is discussed. The appointed on last July in MalCompetitors Forum asked us to cesine; moreover, …congratula- drop a plan. So we will and we tion and good work to Jan. all then discuss the matter again. So, communication and The European Championship was the start the celebra- the meetings will go ahead, as follow: tion of the IFDCO 60° Annivera) Communication to the IFsary and very important to join DCO members about those all together and to promote our issues, by the website. Class. The celebration will go on b) Competitor Forum, National during all the year, and I recSecretary Meeting and ommend you that the attenAGCM in Santa Cruz (Sepdance of great fleets to the

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tember), to update the discussion and to finalize the proposals with regard to the above mentioned topics. I‘m fully aware that the decisions we will be making are very important to the future of our Class. And need the involvement and the commitment of all the Officers and the IFDCO members. Therefore we ask volunteers to join our committees. Personally I believe that IFDCO has a structure that needs to be updated to the present goals of the Class and focused to recruit young sailors in the management. Anyway, the most important tools are “Strategy”, “Team-work” and “Communication”. They are absolutely necessary to ensure a fast and continuous evolution, promotion and growth of our Class . I trust in you and I‘m sure we‘ll be able to reach together the best solutions for the future of FD. I‘m at your disposal and I‘m looking forward to go ahead to join together to promote, advertise ….and dream the future of the FD …… !. Cheers, Alberto”.

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012 Flying Dutchman Bulletin Periodical of the International Flying Dutchman Class Editorial Office: Van Goghstraat 27,

Contents 3 4 5 7 8 10 14 15 24 26 27 28 30 33 37 38 39 40

President’s Letter Editorial Santa Cruz Impressions Boat park news EC report Rudy den Outer interview Stephen Parry interview Class Rule 38 interpretation New BM composite mast JB’s philosophy lessons FD archive files ... Clé memories Paul Hemker Eurocup Winners 2011 Dr. Gizmo Hartmut Wesemüller Showing 60, ....... Next Bulletin Worlds 2012 add

Colofon Issue: Year 60, nr. 158 Alberto Barenghi, Sjors Riemslag, Dr. Gizmo, Jan Lechler, Ronald Stalman, Paul Hemker, Hartmut Wesemüller Printing Sportservice Noord-Holland b.v. Advertisement TEB sail, Pedretti, CST Composites, BM Sails, North Sails US, Yachtservice Bogumil

9718 MP Groningen

The Netherlands

email: vp-communications@sailifdco.com

Editors word, Lot’s of talk a lot of discussing about change and improvement, but no volunteer who wants to help out as: editor, forum- or web- moderator. And this is not only inside IFDCO. Even in the NFDA’s we hear this story more and more often. We see and even understand the problem that you are all willing to do something but don’t know who to ask? And where to start? But, for example, if every crewmember comes up with one event-, trim article or whatsoever item of interest to FD-sailors many Bulletins, Webpages, etc. could be filled almost every day. You only get out of the organisation what you put in!

buy an FD, but your young family requires your time, along with the sailing. Your job promotion and success become a major preoccupation in your 40s and by the time you are in your 50’s you have had 30 years in the class and have a little time to spent contributing the Class. Peter started sailing FDs in 1968 and is in his mid 70’ now with 7 terms as VP. Does anyone know that his term ands this year? Do we foresee what will happen if ..... Peter won’t last forever. The World will still be turning but how about the FD knowledge base. Yeah there’s Paul Hemker or JB but do you know their ages? The Class is in need of volunteers. Please step up as volunteer.

As Peter Hinrichsen always After 60 years we have explains that you start sailing FD’s something to preserve ....... in your mid 20s probably as a crew. Then in your 30s you can afford to

to be continued; see page 7

EUROPEANS 2012; 42 ENTRIES; 9 NATIONS

Editors FDBulletin Louk Nelissen, Ronald Stalman, editors needed Editor FDForum Sjors Riemslag moderators needed

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012

Santa Cruz Worlds 2012

As the summer and vacation will of course the rich history of pass us faster then lightning. We San Francisco. all (could) have extended holidays by going to Santa Cruz. Coming from such a different

getting to the dinghy park early in the morning, because it’s usually quite calm. The haze starts to burn off as the area of the U.S. like Florida, land heats. Around 1100 or a For those who never have been you definitely know you’re in bit later the wind starts to fill there but think of going Lin a unique spot when you drive in from the generally southRobson expressed his feelings southwest over the mountain west direction, building in about the place. to get to Santa Cruz from San strength through the day. Jose. The same environThere are of course factors Santa Cruz Impressions mental features that make that govern how strong the conditions so favorable for sea breeze can get, but the For a long time I was aware growing world class grapes, main driver is hot land/cold of the written history of Santa usually ensures some of the water relationship. I happen Cruz and Monterey Bay, not best sailing conditions possi- to think that when the Worlds just from a sailing standare scheduled we have a point, but the fiction and non ble. You have relatively cold water in the Pacific interactslightly lower median wind fictional pieces. “Cannery ing with the hot, arid land speed to deal with than in say Row”, the famous novel about well inland. the very hottest times of the Monterey and the area, acsummer. But be prepared for counts of what life was like When the area is not overfull on trapezing and raked for residents of Big Sur back cast, the normal scenario is sailing. in the day, the area’s renown as a surfing destination, and this. There is little point in

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012

Santa Cruz Worlds 2012 Monterey Bay is a sanctuary for marine life, with rich diversity. It’s common to sail out of the protected harbor in the company of harbor seals, and don’t be too surprised to see whales and other things you just don’t see every day! Santa Cruz is like San Francisco for sailing, except you don’t have the ship traffic, wild current or other craziness of that famous harbor. What you do get is open water Pacific swell and usually great breeze. When you’ve left it all out on the race course, come in have a glass of world class wine and great food.

Santa Cruz Yacht Club is not a traditional club like St. Francis or St. Petersburg, the clubhouse reminds somewhat of a nice tree house. You’ll immediately recognize that these folks appreciate and love being with high performance dinghy sailors. The club has hosted many big time World Championships in the 505, Melges and other important classes. We are fortunate to have assembled a really first class team of race officials (and I hope not needed) jury members all determined to give a world class race organization on the water.

beautiful and interesting areas of the U.S., with many interesting sights within easy driving. Wine country all along the coast to the north, San Francisco, magical Big Sur, this list is huge. Great music, food, wine, scenery and most importantly world class sailing conditions add up to a very memorable Worlds, we in the U.S. are looking forward to welcoming you all to Santa Cruz. Best, Lin more SC webinfo

www.santacruzharbor.org

Before or after the regatta, you’ll be in one of the most

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012

Boat-park news 60th Anniversary ALTEA. Our President Alberto, VP’s Championship Jan and Stephen and our VP Communication Ronald were not just there for dinner but shared a few words with all present. Speaking of the diner. We thank the whole staff for their hospitality on Tuesday 3rd of April. The food and the wine were excellent. Gines Romero was really emotional when Alberto thanked him during the championship diner for all the work he has done for the FD-class in Spain. A wonderful week to start the season. In the nicest atmosphere and sunny weather.

EXEC meeting ALTEA. With almost every Exec present they had a meeting to discuss all ongoing matters. The minutes will be published on the website.

INT. EVENTS 2012 Next event will be VYG the date is set for 7-15 July on Lake Como, Dervio, Italy. Followed by the Worlds. Santa Cruz 23-30 September. Due to the economical situation numbers are anticipated to be lower as expected.

SPECIAL OFFER The AGCM in Malcesine last year had already set the intercontinental grant per container at €2000. On the website we supported extra financial support for the early entries. Early entry date is set for the 1st of June.

RESTRUCTURING

lated a draft paper while being in Altea. Tom admit’s that he did not keep up with the schedule. But the job is not as easy as it seems when the subcommittee started out. Also the span of people involved interfered with accurate timing. With regard to the modifying of the Foundation rules there is a possibility that the VYG foundation rules could be a interesting guide line. We might benefit from Rudy den Outer his experience and will contact him. The foundation could be facing a tax penalty as well. This needs to be sorted out as well. As soon as possible we will inform you about the progress and the direction Tom is heading.

END OF VP TERM Peter Hinrichsen his term is ending this year. At the EXEC’s meeting we discussed the 3 terms max issue summoned in the Foundation Rules. Peter should be appointed for his 8th terms, again as VP Technical. As we see it for the moment there are only 2 men capable to replace Peter, namely Paul Hemker and John Best both IMs. Also Peter is very willing to continue JB is our chief IM and one of them needs to remain chief measurer. Whom should be our VP Technical after this year.

TECHNICAL VOLUNTEERS

So the class is looking for other sailors who might be interested. VP Championship Volunteers should have a techJan Lechler has been appointed nical background, be interested VP Championship after the in the technicalities of the class AGCM in Malcesine. Stephen rules and measurement as well Parry would assist Jan as much as the history of the class. Ideas needed and feel in the blank ally they should become an FD areas for Jan both for the EuroIM. But that rather limits the peans as for the Worlds. field, so one could commit to Therefore Stephen Parry was becoming an IM after being personally invited to be at the elected. Paul Hemker, who is events. still sailing FD, and JB are IMs At the exec meeting however but we need one of them to reStephen came up with the sugmain chief measurer and do you gestion that there would be little know their ages? need for him in Santa Cruz. Peter has undertaken to help So he saluted all of us at the and pass everything on to his closing ceremony of the Chamsuccessor. pionship. The ISAF knowledge of Stephen The 3 involved now will not last could be eminent for us in the forever!. Do all of you know near future. We asked him to be their ages? the FD-class ISAF liaise which he excepted.

(Stephen shares his thoughts with The scheme was to have a prous on page 14 and 15) posal by the end of February 2012. Tom Greten, the chairman of this subcommittee, has circu-

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to be continued; see page 1

So step up and become a technical volunteer.

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012

European Championship Report Richard Phillips

onship with a second place which enabled them to pull up to fourth place overall.

Altea, Spain - 30 March - 6 April Sunshine - Superb Hospitality - Close Racing - 42 Competitors - 9 Nations - DEN, ESP, GBR, GER, HUN, ITA, NED, SLO, SUI.

A very memorable FD European Championship drew to a close with the Prize giving for the Euro Cup 2011 and the European Championship 2012. There was an exciting video presentation at the Opening Ceremony followed by well chosen words from a representative of each of the competing nations paying tribute to the start of the 60th Anniversary of the FD Class. The hospitality shown by Club Nautico Altea throughout the event was outstanding. An excellent video of the event was shown at the Prize giving which showed how all the many people and local and international organizations contributed to the success of the event. As is traditional in the FD Class, the Club was presented with a half model of an FD. The scheduled 9 races were all sailed, mainly in light winds. A good breeze in brilliant sunshine for the final race ensured that racing finished on a high note. Going into the last race, Szabolics Majthinyi & Andras Domokos (HUN70) had already

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secured the Championship with all their results in the top 5 and winning races 4 and 8. They sportingly sailed the last race finishing in fourth position. They are current FD World Champions having won the 2011 Worlds on Lake Garda which attracted 130 boats from 22 Nations. At the start of the last race in Altea two boats were on equal points in second place so the scene was set for a battle between two other former FD World Champions.

Nicola and Francesco Vespasiani (ITA 4) were overnight leaders on day one. Having won the first race, they maintained good form and won race 5. They were in with a chance of a top 3 position. However, race 9 was their second worst race

and they finished 5th overall.

Gines Romero and Avaro Moreno were the top Spanish team finishing eighth overall with Jorgen & Jacob Boysen their best result being a 3rd in Moeller (DEN 21) had two firsts, the last race. Gines Romero has provided substantial support to a BFD in race 4 and a broken boom resulting in a 13th place in the Spanish FD fleet based in Altea for many years. Race 6. With 20 points overall after discarding these two races Club Nautico Altea has hosted they led at the first mark in the FD Euro Cup events for many final race. True to their normal form they led the fleet to the fin- years and the FD Class looks ish and so won the last race and forward to returning again soon. second position overall. Enno Kramer and Ard Geelkerken (NED 26), sailed consistently well during the Championship. After discarding a 13th and 8th, having won race 7 and finishing 2nd in race 8 they managed to finish 6th in race 9 to secure third place overall. Jorn Borowski and Andreas Berlin (GER 202) won race 6 and finished the Champi-

Full Results and Event information: www.cnaltea.com. Photographs and further information on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ifdco

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012

EC2012 ALTEA PHOTOGRAPH’S

Photo’s provided by ©Richard Phillips www.esailor.co.uk

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012

Vintage Yachting Games ! Since I started sailing FD’s on and off I thought Worlds, Europeans, Eurocup and local events I never heard about the Vintage. I met Rudy den Outer, Chairman of the Vintage Yachting Games Organization for the first time in 2011 during the Guelcher memorial. We talked a little and he told me that in 2012 the Vintage would be sailed at Lake Como. ! Who doesn’t know Dervio and Lake Como! It is one of the venues you always want to spent some time during the season. So my question became how to get there. I found out pretty soon that it would be mission impossible. You have to qualify to attend. The NED-18 crew is not (yet) that good. So I then found out that sailing the Vintage was only for the best FD-sailors in each country.

So the idea was. Why not do• Also the foundation offers a ing it ourselves! place where the organizaIn the Olympic period most of tions of the former Olympic the classes were nagging about classes can seek cooperation the fact that they did not between them on possibilihave influence on the format ties like: Combined Internaof the Olympics and on the setional and National events, lection of the teams. This idea logistics, sharing cost, comcould give the classes the opbined politics and so on, and portunity to do it better. so on •And finally the Vintage Yachting Games Organization has the task to document the heritage of the former Olympic classes. The results of this can be looked at Wikipedia. This is an ongoing task since the former Olympic classes are still developing

What’s the purpose of the event ... ! It also became clear to To realize this event a me in the last couple of weeks that in the FD boat-park a lot of foundation was created with FD-sailors didn’t know the purthe presidents of the participose of the Vintage as well. So pated classes in a supervisory that’s why I met with Rudy to board. This construction is to gain more information about this guarantee that the ownership IFDCO event. remains with the classes and that the classes will be comHow, why and when did it start ... mitted. So the Vintage YachtIt started as a braining Games is an IFDCO event wave in 2006 while following like the World Championship from my Soling the Dragon is. Dutch Championship. It irriThe mission of the foundation tated me that wonderful foris: mer Olympic Classes, like FD, • To realize every four years Tempest, Soling and Dragon an Olympic type of sailing were discontinued for the event for the selected teams Olympics, and no substitute of a class event was offered by ISAF.

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Who can compete ... Like the Olympics … everyone but you have to work for it! The Vintage Yachting Games aims for a starting line of 20 or more boats per class. To realize this, an intelligent guess is made at the beginning of the four year period on how many countries are represented in the class. This gives a number of how many boats per country will be allowed per class. At this moment it is set to 2 for the FD. The National class organizations have the duty to select their representation.

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012

Vintage Yachting Games Also like in the Olympics the teams are not only sailing for their own glory buy to represent their country! Besides the boats per country some wildcards are given.

Countries who are interested to host the event have to place a bid. How does that work and work out for them ... ! Direct after a Vintage Yachting Games countries are teased (via the classes) to bid for the Vintage over 8 years. It’s only the second Vintage For 2016 this was done early Yachting Games is the format 2009. Than later (late 2010) a ‘water’-proof ... formal request for proposals is ! Also the Olympics evolved in their format. From a issued by the Vintage Yachting Games Organization to the complex system of gentlemen countries and class organizasailing in the early days to a nd tions. sailor oriented sport in the 2 th half of the 20 century to maybe an audience spectacle in the future. For the Vintage we aim to be a sailing SPORT oriented event where the level of competition between the countries will be as high as possible. The event will be evolving over the years driven by the class organizaAfter the proposals are in, the tions (sailors). One of the pos- supervisory board selects the sible developments for the next Vintage country. The wider spread classes like FD, date is announced during the Soling and Dragon it might be Vintage and thus available for a possibility to go to one boat the International calendars per country. With the right four years in advance. The votsupport and focus this will give ing process for 2016 is in teams a real long term target process at this moment. Alto work for. But most importhough not all votes are in yet tant the classes must actively the probability for Weymouth give input to these developis very high. Furthermore a ments letter of intent for 2020 from Douanenez (FRA) is already arrived.

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So it looks like we have the interest of major organizers and continuity on that front is guaranteed Is the Vintage interesting for the classes and sailors ... ! From my point of view it is! For the classes it gives exposure to the International sailing world. Do not forget that the former Olympic classes still form the largest cross-section within the International classes and a representation in many countries in all continents. These classes are far from death! And as stated above cooperation between the classes can work beneficial for them especially in cutting cost and improving quality at this time. For the sailors, most events aim for large fleets and good/many social events. The Vintage aims for a large number of countries per class and although there will be good social events the sailing will be paramount. It will give once every four years the best sailors per country the opportunity to battle it out for GOLD. Besides that it will give teams an alternative for an Olympic campaign in a wider range of classes than the Olympics.

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012

Vintage Yachting Games Absolutely! In quality and quantity. In 2008 we had the Europe, O-Jolle, FD, Soling and Dragon involved. For 2012 the 12’ Dinghy, Tempest and 5.5 Metre will participate as well. For 2016 the Yngling will join and probably the class(es) discontinued after this Olympics. Also since the purpose of the event will be more and more communicated the level of competition will rise.

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What should classes do together more than just the sailing the Vintage Yachting Games ... ! As we discussed earlier classes can organize events together. E.g. this year the Soling and FD have both their World championships in the US. Only at different times and different locations! When the calendars are more synchronized in the future the logistics could be easier. Put one Soling in a container together with four FD’s and everybody is happy. E.g. I can imagine me combined Worlds in 2016 for FD, Tempest and Soling at Weymouth just before the Vintage. Also International politics can be discussed among the classes to strengthen their position at ISAF or at National level.

country will represent not only themselves, but also their country. During a Vintage the quality of sailing and race management will be the most important factors. What about sponsorship ... ! Sponsorship will be more difficult to obtain at this moment. In my opinion combined high quality events will lower the risk for the sponsor as well as it will increase the exposure

Where and when will the next VYG be ... ! Officially this will be announced at Lake Como, but there are clear pointers in this interview Famous last words ... ! Do not wait to step into the Vintage Yachting Games. The FD is a class who always embraced new ideas and developments. And that’s why they are still going strong!

A staggering 275% more competitors this year how did this happen ... ! We have tried to communicate the event as much as possible to the classes and the sailors. At this moment there are entries from almost 20 countries and from Australia, Africa, North and South America and Europe.

What kind of competition is the Vintage ... The Vintage is an OlymDo you see further growth ... pic type of event. Where the best teams, per class, per

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012

EC2012 ALTEA PHOTOGRAPH’S

Photo’s provided by ©Richard Phillips www.esailor.co.uk

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012

Interview with Stephen Parry very busy and occupied with sailing besides managing the FD-fleet. This day, during that GCmeeting, with all the matters to discuss there was no time to have a friendly chat. So in Bulletin 157 the editors weren’t able to come up with a story/interview. So we mailed Stephen to start the interview which we will end in Altea. So it’s in 2 parts. We start with the mailconversation: Stephen in the minutes it said that you served 19 years, Alberto wrote 17 years how long where you involved ...

I became VP Champs in 1993 after the Worlds in Cadiz in 1992. I had organized the Abersoch European Championships with Richard Phillips in 1991.

All this years in the same position as V-P Championships ...

YES

Last time I saw Stephen it was Wasn’t there to correct the in Malcesine. It was the day poor interpretation of the after the Worlds. NOR he sent the Italians in the early year. Sadly he He was just in Malcesine on wasn’t there to enjoy the this particular day to sit down moment the biggest Flying and talk for the last time as Dutchman fleet ever was atV-P championship during the tending the Worlds. 2011 AGCM. This event was the farewell he deserved, but .... Stephen wasn’t there the whole week to feel the atAs he had his roll as V-P mosphere. Championship. He also was

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19 years is a very long time, never felt like stepping down ...

Occasionally

When did you start sailing the FD ...

1972

How many FD’s have you owned ...

8 + 1 that was a wreck!

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012

Interview with Stephen Parry How, Why and When did you get involved in the board ...

How did you manage this conflict of interest in your years In 1993, when John Truett (VP ....

Champs) stood down, he continued to help me for about 3 years Is the FD still a class that people are interested in ... Depends where in the world you are.

please to say that our proposal was accepted by Council 39 votes for 0 against.

A lot depends on the proposals and discussions at the AGCM, Being in these organizations but occasionally a decision has conflicts with your FD background doesn’t it ... to be made. Absolutely NOT What do you think on innovation and development regarding to the FD ...

How does the FD survive as an International Class ...

The young and active sailors When I look to event-calendars will understandably want to move more rapidly these areas a see way to much events, do than the more mature sailors. you agree on that ... I think that maybe only World, Care should be taken that not too many owners are alienated European, Eurocup and National Championships should be by too rapid change. posted, but have to be links to What should be the first each countries fixture lists

Maintain its organization and quality of WC and EC. Modernise its Foundation Rules and Byelaws. Promote itself whenever the opportunity arises.

Difficult question because of above, but could include laminated mainsail, free rudder design, wider centerboard, reduce min weight, new rig altogether with fully battened main and jib, masthead kite.

Listen to what people have to say, take advice independently, do not be bullied into agreeing to things that cannot be done or are unrealistic or expensive, be prepared not to sail in every race, make friends with your hosts, learn everything about NOR’s and SI, + all the pitfalls that can catch you out! Enjoy it all.

Which suggestions would you pass to Jan Lechler your sucinnovation/renewal on the FD ... cessor ...

How do you see an ideal eventcalendar ...

See above

FD is an International class should a calendar only have international events ...

See above

IFDCO contradicts and conflicts with the National Class Organizations regarding to event choices, do you agree on that ...

You are now involved in the Olympic and ISAf section for the UK I hear, is that correct ...

I have sat on the ISAF Classes Committee for the last 10+ years representing There are many factors that the FD Class and its interests. have to be taken into account when a venue is chosen, includ- It is very important that the Classes have their voices ing timing, infrastructure, heard. I have recently been on likely attendance numbers, a working party to sort out distribution of events around the regulations regarding continents, proposals etc etc ISAF Classes eligibility and world championships and am

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012

Flying Dutchman Class Rule 38 interpretation FD Class Rule 38 Jib hoist height The introduction of 2:1 halyard systems at the head of the Genoas of some Flying Dutchmen has led to some discussion of the iterpretation of Class rule 38, the 2010 version of which states: 38. When the boat is fully rigged with sails hoisted in racing trim and sheeted for windward sailing, no part of the jib must project forward of or above an imaginary line, drawn from a point on the deck line 5450 mm from the aft side of the transom to a point on the mast below the lower edge of Limit mark (band) number 4, with a tolerance forward of 5 mm. (See diagram). Together with a diagram, a 2012 version of which is shown in figure 1.

Figure 1 Proposed 2012 class rules Appendix E, see Rule 38 added detail top right. !

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012

Flying Dutchman Class Rule 38 interpretation The Flying Dutchman class is unique in that for historical reasons the Genoa is not measured. It is controlled by specifying the positions of the Genoa furler centreline at the deck, the height of the intersection of the Genoa luff with the front of the mast and the position of the Genoa sheet fairlead. Any sail which fits into this triangle is class legal. This unique class rule is often misunderstood by sailors from other classes and its implementation with a 2:1 halyard system possibly needs some explanation. In fact during the technical committee discussions we found some aspects of the rule to be unclear and so have introduced changes in the wording of the rule, which however do not change the rule as implemented since at least 1974 and probably before, see figure 2. In principle class rule 38 would require the FD to be rigged and the Genoa sheeted in, then the boat laid down on its side to check the intersection of the extension of the Genoa luff with the front of the mast, for every Genoa to be used with that mast. This, of course, is not the way the rule is enforced. The class has, at least since 1974 and probably before, assumed that the Genoa halyard is the same or larger diameter than the Genoa luff wire and so if the extension of the front edge of the Genoa halyard intersects the front of the mast below the limit mark i.e. band 4, the the mast is legal. This is illustrated in figure 2. Of course the intersection point depends on the angle the halyard makes with the mast and this has always been taken as 18.4 degrees, the angle the halyard makes with the mast when the mast is vertical. This is checked during regatta inspection with a jig such as that shown in figure 3.

Figure 2 A 1970s illustration of Class Rule 38

Originally the rule required the luff to be behind the imaginary line specified in the rule. At one point a large number of masts were manufactured with protruding Genoa halyard blocks and to accommodate them the 5 mm tolerance was introduced. This tolerance also took care of the extension of the Genoa luff in front of the centreline of the furler and so served a double purpose.

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012

Flying Dutchman Class Rule 38 interpretation

Figure 3 Jig for determining Genoa luff intersection with front face of the mast. The Genoa halyard is held parallel to the edge (i.e. at 18.40 along the red arrow) and no part of the Genoa sail shall be in front of the line on the jig which is at 5 mm from the edge. Modified Rule 38 wording and new Rule 87 During the technical committee discussions of rule 38 some Genoa head points were looked at and it was observed that they extended significantly forward of the luff wire, as illustrated in figure 4. If the halyard leading edge is on the “imaginary line� this Genoa head would technically be illegal. The problem is the diameter of the Genoa head cringle and the lashing to the luff wire thimble. Clearly we do not want this to affect the mast band 4 measurement, so it is proposed to make the wording of rule 38 correspond to the measurement practice by specifying the leading edge of the luff wire rather than the Genoa luff. Although it is unlikely that any sailmaker would build Genoas which then extend significantly infront of their luff wires, just to close this loophole a new rule 87 is introduced to restrict the extension of the Genoa luff to be within 10 mm of the front edge of the luff wire when tensioned. The modified wording, which does not change the rule but brings it into line with the established FD class measurement practice is: 38. When the boat is fully rigged with mast vertical, sails hoisted in racing trim and sheeted for windward sailing, no part of the jib luff wire, excluding cringles, shall project more than 5 mm forward as measured perpendicular to the luff, of an imaginary line drawn from a point on the deck line a maximum 5450 mm from the aft side of the transom to a point on the front of the mast at a maximum 5250 mm above the deck line, that is below the lower edge of Limit mark (band) number 4. (See Appendices D and E) 87. No part of the jib/Genoa shall extend more than 10 mm in front of the forward edge of the luff wire when the luff is tensioned.

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Flying Dutchman Class Rule 38 interpretation A purest would point out that as the mast is raked the angles change and so an FD rig measured vertically might not be legal under the 2010 class rule. This effect is very small even for extreem angles of rake used in practice. However, the mast also bends and this does significantly change the intersection point of the extension of the Genoa luff wire with the mast. This would clearly be impossibly difficult to control, so the rule has been revised to specify that the measurement is made with the mast vertical.

Figure 4 The head of a North FD Genoa showing that this sail head point extends 8 mm in front of the leading edge of the luff wire. !

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Flying Dutchman Class Rule 38 interpretation 2:1 Genoa halyard systems Some Flying Dutchman sailors have recently been rigging their jib halyards with a 2:1 mechanical advantage at the head of the Genoa by dead ending the halyard at the front of the mast, passing it round a block shackled to the swivel at the head of the Genoa, and then around the Genoa halyard block at the front of the mast, as shown in figure 3. This has the advantage of reducing the compression load in the mast and so is an advance that the class should allow. There are in fact two alternative arrangements, i.e. with the halyard dead ended above or below the block. Figures 3 and 4 show a mast with the halyard system modified with a 2:1 system dead ended above the halyard block and what it would be like with the dead end below the block. If you are rigging a brand new mast then you can choose either arrangement, and position the Genoa halyard block accordingly. With the dead end above the block, figure 3, the block has to be significantly below band 4, while the block can even be above band 4 if the dead end is below it. The yellow band in figure 4 shows where the block could be, relative to band 4, and still be class legal. However, when modifying an existing single halyard system, which was just class legal, dead ending the halyard above the halyard block moves the Genoa luff forward by the radius of the floating block and makes the rig illegal, as can be seen in figure 3. The obvious minimalist solution is to dead end the halyard below the block but this has the major disadvantage that it lowers the swivel and so increases the minimum mast rake. If the gooseneck is not at the maximum height permitted (band 2 Maximum 800 mm above band 1) then band 4 could be raised by raising the mast step, which would overcome this problem but require readjustment of the rig. Presently modified masts all seem to be dead ended above the block so that with current Genoa luff lengths the mast can still be brought vertical. However, for this system to be class legal band 4 would have to be where the yellow band is shown in figure 3 so the halyard block has to be lowered. For an existing mast it would be unsound to try and move the block, but a possible solution is to lower the block by cutting off the appropriate length at the heel of the mast. This of course lowers the mainsail and changes all the shrouds, lowers and babystay settings and so should not be undertaken lightly. Furthermore this then lowers the swivel so again limiting the rake of the mast. A solution to this would be to shorten the luff wires in the Genoas but that also has obvious disadvantages. Installations on a new mast, which has not yet been cut to length, are illustrated in figure 7. The illustration shows the halyard block protruding significantly in front of the mast thus requiring it to be below band 4 for a single part halyard. However it can be seen that for the halyard dead ended below the block it can be above band 4 and the Genoa head is essentially at the same height as for the single halyard. In contrast if the block is below the dead end then it has to be well below band 4 and the head of the Genoa is lower. This conclusion does depend on how far the halyard block extends in front of the mast. For a completely recessed halyard block the geometry is the same independent of whether the dead end is above or below the block. It is therefore wise to make a detailed drawing with the proposed block and fittings before deciding on your choice. It is also important to engineer the dead end to be strong enough. The shock loads when falling off a wave and digging in the bow can be very large!

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Flying Dutchman Class Rule 38 interpretation

Figure 5 A 2:1 Genoa halyard system dead ended above the halyard block. The dashed red line shows the 5 mm tolerance and the blue extension of the leading edge of the jib luff wire shows that this rig does not conform to FD class rule 38 by about 6 mm. !

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012

Flying Dutchman Class Rule 38 interpretation

Figure 6 The same 2:1 Genoa halyard system dead ended below the halyard block. The dashed red line shows the 5 mm tolerance and the blue extension of the leading edge of the jib luff wire shows that this rig easily conforms to FD class rule 38. !

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Flying Dutchman Class Rule 38 interpretation

Figure 7 A single part Genoa halyard, a 2:1 Genoa halyard system dead ended below the halyard block, and a 2:1 Genoa halyard system dead ended above the halyard block.

Some keelboat classes are now using floating halyard locks on Genoas and this is a possible next step, as it reduces mast compression even more. An internal lock below the halyard block, similar to those used on small boat main halyards, would bring the system back to a geometry the same as the current 1:1 systems. This of course would require a Genoa furler which could be adjusted up and down, as was used in the 1960s, so all solutions have there design challenges. In conclusion although installing a 2:1 Genoa halyard system will significantly reduce the mast compression and thus allow lighter construction, this modification has to be carefully engineered for the mast to be class legal. If all you want to do is to add a dead end and a floating block, then you have to dead end the halyard below the block and either live with the fact that you cannot rake the mast forward as much as before, raise the mast step or shorten your Genoa luff wires. Dead ending the halyard above the block makes the rig illegal unless you lower the halyard block, or recess it by the radius of the floating block! For a new mast the heel can be cut so that the Genoa halyard block is at the appropriate height and if a protruding block is used the geometry suggests that dead ending below the block allows for more forward mast rake than the alternative. Peter Hinrichsen VP Technical IFDCO

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31 January 2012

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interview with ... two types of tracks on the mast, which contribute differently to the stiffness. What is special about this mast ... As the mast is made from a fairly small tube with a relatively thick wall, it feels robust. Is it just a boom or does it have several configurations when ordered ...

Presently we have only one type of mast to fit all crew weights. DEN 21 and HUN 70 testing masts Engineering and this is also the Jacob Bojsen-Moeller company winding the tube. The new add says BM-carbon mast ready for 2012 season, tell us about it ... In 2010 Jørgen and I got the opportunity to have a FD carbon mast produced in Denmark. We had experience from previous mast projects, so we had a good idea about which bending characteristics we were looking for. Who is the designer ... The laminate has been calculated by engineers at Falck Schmidt Advanced Composite

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Who is the manifacturer ... The tube is then fitted to our specifications by people we trust. (The first masts we have fitted ourselves). What is different about this mast ... The mast is made from a round, tapered section with a glued-on track and it has no joints. We have achieved a substantial difference in stiffness between the lower mast and the top in order to enhance the gust response. This is partly done by having

What will be the price of all the configurations ... The price of a fitted mast is € 2350 (no wires and ropes) Is this free house ... ex. vat and shipping. Is it in stock .... The first batch of masts will be in production in December. If ordered today when can I aspect it delivered ... Delivery in the beginning of 2012.

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EC2012 ALTEA PHOTOGRAPH’S

Photo’s provided by ©Richard Phillips www.esailor.co.uk

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JB’s philosophy lessons You know are chief measurer JB and his thoughts .... This is what some of us received just before Christmas 2011 by mail. And the editors are glad he did sent it. Because now we can introduce a brand new item: JB’s philosophy lessons.

He shook the jar lightly. The pebbles rolled into the open areas between the golf balls. He then asked the students again if the jar was full. They agreed it was.

The professor next picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up We already are viewing everything else. the mailbox every day if a He asked once more if the jar new one is delivered ;-) was full. The students responded with an unanimous "yes." The professor then produced two cups of coffee from under the table. And poured the entire contents into the jar, effectively filling the empty space between the sand. The students laughed.

‘The Mayonnaise Jar and 2 Cups Of Coffee’

"Now," said the professor, as the laughter subsided, "I want you to recognize that this jar represents your life. The golf balls are the important things - God, family, children, health, friends and favorite passions - things that if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full.

A professor stood before his philosophy class and had some items in front of him. When the class began, wordlessly, he picked up a very large and empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with golf balls. He then asked the students if The pebbles are the the jar was full. other things that matter like your job, house, and car. They agreed that it was. The sand is everything else the small stuff. The professor then "If you put the sand picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar. into the jar first," he continued, "there is no room for the pebbles or the golf balls.

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new item

The same goes for life. If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff, you will never have room for the things that are important to you. So... Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness. Play With your children. Take time to get medical checkups. Take your partner out to dinner. Play another 18. There will always be time to clean the house and fix the disposal. "Take care of the golf balls first the things that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand." One of the students raised her hand and inquired what the coffee represented. The professor smiled. "I'm glad you asked". It just goes to show you that no matter how full your life may seem, there's always room for: ‘a couple of cups of coffee with a friend.’

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FD Archive files ...

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012

Paul Hemker’s memories on Cle Clé Jeltes, A personal view As an early builder of FD, I had plenty of contact with Clé as the FD became an Olympic and popular family racing boat in the US. At the time there were three other builders in the US so we could supply the market pretty well. After a couple of years, I started going to an occasional International regatta so I could learn more about the class and the people sailing the boat. It was at that time that I met Clé and found that while he was somewhat formal to start out, he was really interested in spreading the class anywhere as long as the boats measured and sailed well. Clé and I measured at the Buffalo Canoe Club Worlds and then sailed the regatta together. That experience happened again several times and it is interesting that no competitors were particularly concerned about the Measurers sailing in the Worlds even though the top sailors were vying for Olympic berths and were anxious to make sure that no one else had any extra advantage. It was fun to sail with Clé since he was a good crew and was willing to help sort out the boat. I was never as good as he was but he put up with me. One spring our family spent some time touring Europe on a Eurail pass. One of the highlights of the trip was getting off a bus in Loosdrecht and assuming we could find Clé’s house or business. It turned out we had picked the wrong side of the lake so he came around and picked the four of us up in a tiny van along with our luggage. We visited Belship and then spent the night with his nephew Robert

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in his 400-year-old thatched roof house. Also a different experience. Another experience was at the Montreal Olympics with the very elaborate sailing venue at Kingston. The whole experience was very organized by the authorities so Clé and Peter Hinrichsen were challenged to continue the FD tradition of doing measurement Clé’s way. That usually resulted in close checks of the boats and interesting ways of getting around endless required paperwork as well as an innovative way of checking boats for Kevlar since it was forbidden in that Olympiad. We had an electronic front for testing but used good old fashioned observation to check for the Kevlar. It was also the time of Rodney Pattison and some of his interesting techniques for pushing the rules. Again, Clé was really good at making it clear that the boats would meet the letter and spirit of the rules.

time despite problems with some of the sites that felt they should be in charge. With his special technique, he could “convince” the authorities that he really did know how to do the job efficiently using the jigs he had prepared as well as the “official” templates that have now developed a patina of use and a few special clamps that make them much easier to use.

The LA/Long Beach Olympics were interesting since the organizers were really concerned about security. We went through the boats quite carefully and then when we started on the water inspection, the first boat issued to us had a folding chair and about 15 meters of line for an anchor as well as a tiny engine so the fleet would take off and we would try to motor to the weather mark. It became obvious that the fleet would be around the course before we got to the first mark and we then decided to stay at the finish to do We stopped in to visit Clé the inspection as best possible. several times and those who had the opportunity to go to his Several years later we house will always remember the would arrange with Clé to rent a mass of papers all over along van from a facility near his with food in various states of house and he was very thorough preparation as well as “home in giving me a driving test so I improvements” in process. Then understood what the signs there was the garage with so meant and could get around many different bits and pieces of without causing wrecks. FD’s, MG and a variety of other things in place. An overnight My last visit with him was stay was an adventure too since at the facility he spent his last beds were usually used to store years in and it really was sad to parts, Bulletins and any number see how he had aged from the of other things. enthusiastic and gregarious person he had been. He was an Going to regattas always excellent friend who always meant that Clé would have his made the effort to be helpful and pickup loaded with the measunderstanding. urement stuff and you always wondered if it would make the I’m sorry to have lost him. trip. It did and measurement would always get finished in

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FDBULLETIN; NR 158, MAY 2012

Eurocup 2011 Winners races a day and 2 on Sunday the finishing day of the event. We found our Waterloo in the last race. Leading the pack all the way we rounded the downwind mark instead of finishing off as we should have done downwind. Though frustration kept us down for a while. We came with minds at ease to pack and leave. That race showed us that we can have our Warhol moment.

What is there to say when you win the Eurocup trophy. Overviewing the last Class Book we see only Germans and Dutch ending up on top of the Eurocup ranking. Are there only German and Dutch chosen venues on the calendar. Or are these teams the once who do travel the most. Let's find out so the editor has a word with the lads of the NED18.

Skipping Steinhude because Windguru didn't show us reasons to go our season started of that weekend. Windguru didn't look promising either this particular weekend again, so with a little doubt I travelled south-west bound. All n all the weekend was fine and we did OK. The current was a real pain in the ass. And we had our from hero to zero moment (I thought then). The whole atmosphere in the event is great. Thanks to Delta Lloyd For those who don't know the the title sponsor. This year they team here's a brief introduction. made a promotional tour of the Frank Nooijen, helmsman, sail- event for none sailors. Sadly this ing FD's since 1996 Known as was a big minus for the sailors. the container captain. Always If they restore the atmosphere to around when champions needed sailing and sailors it's an event to swim and .... with an feel-experience like Kiel. After New York teaming up with Ronald Stalman, crew, eyeing Kielerwoche Kiel, June 23 - 26 FD's, even before he started Since Frank's debut here last eyeing women, since he was 12 year it will be one of our regular years old. events. Why? The sailing is excellent and so is In 2011 they sailed the NSR, the venue. This year we enKielerwoche, Worlds 2011. Ron- closed a trip into the city. We'll ald also sailed the Achensee do that again next year. Even events in the NED16/18 with after 7-10 hours on the water on Robert de Lange. Let them talk Friday and Saturday. us through their season 2011 Kiel city during this event is like Sail Amsterdam. Tall ships, lot of NSR Scheveningen, June 10 people, bradwurst and beer. The 13 regatta's is, except for Sunday 3

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Worlds Malcesine, June 30 July 9 Holiday at Lake Garda with an event in it. After reading the Sailing Instructions we were annoyed. So we started complaining and Ronald ended up on Saturday and Sunday rewriting them with the 2 Peter's (see Bulletin 157 for Peter H his report). Ronald as editor of the Dutch Bulletin (VH) got familiar with the dissatisfaction of the countries with the IFDCO. So there was sailing and there was politics there. Back to the races. because of the large fleet we had to split. After 6 races you would be either in the Gold or Silverfleet. The first race we ended up inside the first 20 boats. It looked like we still got the Kiel flow. Second race we got caught up in a situation where the AUT39 hit our tiller and it broke. After that we never got it going again. So we ended up 8th in the Silver fleet in the end. The all n all feeling about Malcesine was not to good. The sailing fairness of the venue was not Championship worthy according to my opinion. But we had a lot of fun. The fleet was the biggest ever. So one you should have been in my memory.

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Eurocup 2011 Winners cause Robert was unsatisfied the way they were. So it can happen that you end up ranked topside in the usual boat and 24th by joining another helmsman and boat. Conclusions Sailing the FD-events all over the world is magical. The social Achensee Austria, August 12 15 Ronald : Driving back from Italy I was curious about this event and the venue. So Yvonne and I made a stop at the Achensee. We already were told that it was the little Lake Garda. We got struck by what we saw and the hospitality of the club. So I wanted to go there. Frank couldn't make it so I ended up there sailing the NED16. I thought after Garda nothing could ever come close. But the Achensee event really putted my imagination to the test. Great, great sight. Wonderful club. Great socials in the evening. More of this please. The sailing with Robert went well as if it would have done with Frank. The only real hick-ups we had was the new boat. Everyday we ended up refitting things, be-

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spirit of the class is outstanding. Like you are back in the good old days of your teenager sailing years. Lot of fun and humor going on.

during events and people start traveling more. I sailed 4 events but only my 3 events with Frank counted for me. That's unfair make the system like the Dutch do every year. All attended races count. So there could be a helmsman and a crew winning the trophies without sailing the same boat. In my opinion this award is not only a sailing award but also the milage may come a little in to count. Last thing regarding the events. Eurocup events should always be at least 3 days events. 4 would be my suggestion. That makes it more affordable to put it in one’s agenda.

But Ronald wouldn't be a real Dutchman if he didn't have complaints. But let's not call it a complaint but a suggestion (several). For all 2011 results see IFDCO should plan the next the Forum. years event halfway the ongoing season, so more buzz will come

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EC2012 ALTEA PHOTOGRAPH’S

Photo’s provided by ©Richard Phillips www.esailor.co.uk

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2013 Worlds Announcement

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Dr. Gizmo Busting the slot-effect myth Dr. Gizmo’s Physics Chat Corner Another episode on sail aerodynamics? Yes I’m sorry. It will be my last one on the subject, I promise. I simply cannot end the series without addressing the most profound and persistent misconception in sailing theory: the so called slot effect. You have, no doubt, read about the slot effect it in your favorite sailing books. Countless are the volumes in which this utterly wrong explanation for speed and efficiency of boats with a genoa or a jib with a big overlap, is presented as the holy truth.

Typically these books feature a drawing similar to fig. 1a to aid you in understanding the non-existent effect. The argumentation is usually as follows: air flowing in between the mainsail and the overlapping jib is forced into a slot that becomes narrower as the air proceeds downstream. This means that the air is forced to accelerate in the slot region. Because of Bernoulli’s law, an accelerating fluid experiences a drop in pressure. Voila: because of this acceleration the pressure inside the slot, to leeward of the mainsail, is lower than it would be in the absence of the genoa. In this way the efficiency of the mainsail is boosted by the presence of the overlapping jib. So they say. The situa-

tion is often compared with the Venturi effect depicted in fig. 1b. A Venturi tube is basically a flow channel with a pinched section. The fluid in the tube has to flow faster inside the narrow section. This in turn means that the pressure in the constricted region will be lower. A pressure gauge placed at point 2 in the drawing will give a lower reading than gauges mounted at points 1 and 3. The Venturi effect is real but the analogy with the jibmainsail combination is seriously flawed. As we shall see, the pressure on the leeward side of the mainsail, inside the slot, is in fact higher than it would be in the absence of the genoa, not lower as the Venturi argument would suggest.

Fig.1. a) Wrong explanation of the slot-effect which suggest it analogous to the flow in a Venturi tube (b)

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Dr. Gizmo Of course you all know that the slot effect does not exist. Just looking at the front section of your mainsail when sailing upwind suffices to immediately convince the most ardent believer in the slot effect theory that something is seriously wrong: the mainsail

suffers visibly from a strong backwash that renders the first meter or so of the sail totally pressureless. Often the shape of the sail in that section is inverted, showing a pronounced bulge to windward. Clearly there is not a vestige of the enhancement of the pressure

difference across the sail due to the purported slot effect, quite the contrary. You could say that the mainsail is traveling in the bad air emitted from the genoa. It makes sense to believe that its performance is degraded by the genoa, not enhanced.

Fig.2 Approximate drawing of the circulation flows around jib and mainsail (a) and the total flow around the sails when the circulation pattern is added to the flow pattern of the wind (b)

Let’s look at the flow in the slot area in a bit more detail. In fig. 2 a mainsail and genoa are sketched in an upwind situation. As I have argued several times before in this series, the sails set up a pattern of circulating air. It is this circulation that, when added vectorially to the constant flow field of the impinging wind, gives rise to the lift force that propels the boat. If we were only to consider the circulation around the mainsail (red curve) then we conclude that the flow velocity to leeward of the

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sail is higher than that to windward and hence (form Bernoulli law) the leeward pressure is lower. If we now add the genoa we see that the circulation around this sail actually opposes the circulation flow of the mainsail inside the slot region. Consequently the flow speed there is reduced and the pressure is correspondingly increased. The performance of the mainsail is therefore reduced. If we reverse the reasoning and consider the genoa first then we are led to conclude, by analogous

reasoning, that the pressure to windward of the genoa is in fact lower in the slot region than it would be if there were no mainsail. If this were all there is to it we would have to draw the conclusion that not only does the genoa degrade the mainsail performance but, reciprocally, the mainsail reduces the efficacy of the genoa, a lose-lose situation.

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Dr. Gizmo If the reasoning given above would be the whole story than we could well ask ourselves why even modern sailboats frequently deploy genoa’s with a huge overlap. Just look at the rigging of a Volvo-70, definitely a state of the art modern race machine. The genoa’s used on these boats in light to moderate winds overlap even more extremely with the mainsail than the one used on our FD. It turns out there are several reasons which the two sails collaborate quite nicely. The key point is that the mainsail prevents the genoa from stalling.

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To see what I mean it is useful to make a small diversion to a landing airplane. In landing mode the pilot of the plane is forced to extend the flaps at the back of the wings. What do the flaps do? It turns out that they reduce the tendency of the boundary layer of the air that follows the top of the wing to separate from the surface. Such a disturbance of the smooth flow over this wing is called a stall. If the pilot would retract the flaps while landing the plane would lose lift due to the stall and drop out of the sky. Although the analogy is not perfect, a similar picture applies to our genoa-mainsail combina-

tion, the latter taking on the role of the flaps and therefore stabilizing the flow to leeward of the genoa. We all know this effect. If we depower the mainsail in a gust of wind we better make sure that at least the aft section of the sail, the batten region, remains powered up. If we let go of the sheet too much the boat all but stops in its tracks: The genoa suffers a partial stall and becomes much less efficient. So there you have if; the slot effect is dead and buried. Now go over to the books that line your bookshelves and tear out the pages on sail theory.

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Words Been Spoken The Speech

Given by Hartmut Wesemüller, GER 1777, on the occasion of the opening ceremony of the European Championships 2012 at Altea, Spain

What a gorgeous view! When you look through the huge windows of this auditorium you can see the remarkable mountains in the late sunlight. You must have felt the same when you came down the stairs into this space. And on the other side there is the sea. What a wonderful contrast! We have both in Altea: The mountains and the sea. I admire your Spanish ego which is clearly shown in the impressive video we watched in the beginning of the ceremony. But I can assure you we have a strong ego, too. Good evening everybody. On behalf of the German team I would like to address myself this evening to the entire female part of the FDsailing:

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Dear ladies, wives, girlfriends, daughters, sisters- in- law, etc… etc, and last but not least dear sailing ladies dear Dutchwomen. As the speaker of the Ger-

man team of tonight I would like to thank you that you enabled us - with nearly no blame - to share this extraordinary sport: FD sailing and racing. In the majority you were ashore awaiting the soaked heroes coming into the harbour from their battles, the races. And what is more: You can take the burden of endless discussions among the competitors during the night and even after they had quite a few beers. It could appear as if the battle has not finished yet: False manoeuvres, silly tactics and bad trim, these are the topics ever since. Even during the night when you lie in bed with your partner you can take the enormous snoring coming out of an exhausted body. Then you

might have wished this could have been a result of your favourite sport instead. You do not suffer – as far as I know – and you can stand these miseries. In the name of all FD sailors I thank you very much for your patience! The German team at Altea is small compared to the big number of active German FD sailors. But in comparison to other teams I think we are quite a big one. Even three teams from my club showed up here, they have driven more than 2000 km from their homes to Altea. If you look at our team you can easily discover that our average age is very high. There are quite a few wise and experienced sailors within this group. But there are also some young fellows among us and they know pretty well how to compete successfully. Therefore, dear fellow sailors from Europe we will have strong competition! Finally, I have to tell you that each of us is happy to be here in Spain. We have voluntarily fled the German spring that is said to be cold and windy this year. Dear Club Nautico Altea thank you for this event. We do enjoy very much to be your guests. I wish everybody fair sailing, good winds and good spirits. Thank you.

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Showing 60, it’s all about content www.sailifdco.com Our new website has been introduced and is already updated. The main reason for the format change has been maintenance. Also we think it’s more dynamic maybe even aggressive. The web-crew is happy with it and so are you. BULLETIN 2012 looks to be a promising year for the Bulletin. The editor did get a lot of content. So with the rest of the season to come and already a couple of stories on the bookshelf a second issue this year will be published.

The editor and webmaster copies his words. At this very moment the website and Bulletin are depending on one person in charge. IFDCO, and especially our VP Communication, is not whining about the situation but it is compromising. What happens when our VP C is lacking time or worse ..... We know how much effort it took us to find someone to fill in the gap. But we hope to never get into this situation again.

So once again we ask you to come up with: - stories; - memorabilia; CONTENT - archive files; A interesting website is depend- - and so on and so on. ing on content. So is an interThe more copy we have the esting Bulletin. more we can show our Class to Peter Hinrichsen already spread the outside sailing world. the word: VOLUNTEERS.

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PHOTOGRAPHS We like to show our 60th anniversary with photographs of the 6 decades on the website photo gallery. So if you have photographs from the early days up till now share them with us. ASAP, please. VIDEO/FILM FOOTAGE Yesterday I received an email from Michael Deppe. He represents Sunsetvine. He asked me if we had filmed events in which Rodney Pattison appeared. We ask all FD-sailors with video material to sent it over to us as well. The website has a video gallery as well. Where to sent it to redactie@sailfd.com vp-communication note: large files by wetransfer

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famous last but not least words WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP SANTA CRUZ 23 - 30 September www.fdworlds2012.org

FD Legend ...

EUROCUP EVENTS TO COME NSR-2012, May Kielerwoche, June Achensee, August Torbole, August http://www.sailifdco.com/ events/upcoming/ LATEST NEWS http://www.sailifdco.com/ BULLETIN ONLINE Homepage Documentation

Issue 159 is the next IFDCO-Bulletin - interviews

online till June 2013 www.sailfd.org

- latest news - Worlds 2012 report

CELEBRATING

60 1952 - 2012

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FD BULLETIN NR 158