Orienter New Student Guide 2022

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ORIENTER

NEW STUDENT GUIDE 2022 AN INDIANA DAILY STUDENT SPECIAL PUBLICATION

PRESORT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID Indianapolis, IN PERMIT NO. 279


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IDS AN INDIANA DAILY STUDENT SPECIAL PUBLICATION

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Ethan Moore MANAGING EDITOR Nadia Scharf

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Lawren Elderkin

ORIENTER

DESIGN EDITOR Cailin O’Malley VISUALS EDITOR Izzy Myszak

NEW STUDENT GUIDE

ARTS EDITOR Lexi Lindenmayer BLACK VOICES EDITOR Jaicey Bledsoe

3 IU & Bloomington bus system

15 Best places to find IU apparel

30 History of IU

43 How to avoid roommate conflict

4 Campus safety advice

16 Dining halls explained

32 Coloring page

44 Hoosier game page

5 Learn the IU fight song

18 History of Little 500

46 Music venues in Bloomington

NEWS EDITOR Marissa Meador

20 IU traditions

47 Finding faith

OPINION EDITOR Sean Gilley

24 Languages taught at IU

SPORTS EDITOR Emma Pawlitz

COPY EDITORS Morgan Jones Jocelyn Sweeney Katy Szpak

22 Key IU figures to know

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25 Useful terms 26 Packing checklist

Scenic places on campus

IU arts through the years SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Natalie Ingalls ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Greg Menkedick IU STUDENT MEDIA DIRECTOR Jim Rodenbush

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35 Best study spots

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Restaurants on Fourth Street

8 Basketball players to watch

36 How to prepare for game days

10 IU student media

38 Student life through the years

50 What we wished we knew

40 How to decorate a dorm

52 Organization tips

41 Health resources at IU

53 Free activities on campus

42 Campus through the seasons

54 Student leaders share advice

11 Notable alumni 12 Culture centers 14 Bucket List

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IU sports through the years

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Visit us online idsnews.com Newsroom 812-855-0760 Business Office 812-855-0763 Fax 812-855-8009

Coming to IU Bloomington always felt inevitable for me. My dad graduated from IU and always took my brother and me to football games in Memorial Stadium. It was the easy choice. Regardless of whether you’ve only stepped foot on campus once during a college visit or if you grew up 10 minutes away, come to Bloomington with fresh eyes this fall. Don’t skip over the little things that you’ve become used

to. It’s those small joys that make your first year at IU so memorable. Waking up in your dorm for the first time and hearing the people on your floor moving in the hallway outside, searching the Indiana Memorial Union for the Starbucks and getting lost looking for your class in Ballantine Hall are examples of those seemingly unimportant things that you will look back on and remember with a smile on your face.

The Indiana Daily Student produced the Orienter New Student Guide to make your transition into college life a bit easier. Inside are some tips, tricks and history to let you hit the ground running once you get to campus. The IDS is the student-run newspaper here on campus. We post content daily at idsnews.com and publish a weekly print paper that you can pick up on campus and around Blooming-

ton. Follow us on social media to stay up to date with all things IU. I know how much of a cliche this is, but your first year in college is a time to meet new people, figure out who you are and learn how to be on your own. Cherish that and the rest of your time here at IU. Welcome! All the best, Ethan Moore

Summer 2022 Editor-in-Chief

COVER IDS FILE PHOTO BY ETHAN MOORE | TOP IDS FILE PHOTO BY ETHAN MOORE | 6 ARBUTUS FILE PHOTO | 28 IDS FILE PHOTO | 34 IDS FILE PHOTO BY ETHAN LEVY | 48 IDS FILE PHOTO BY TY VINSON


E D I R S T N E D STU Bloomington Transit

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All buses are equipped with bike racks to hold your bike

For maps and schedules visit: www.bloomingtontransit.com customer@bloomingtontransit.com 336-RIDE (7433)

Routes to most residence halls, off-campus apartments, and shopping complexes

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How to board buses on and off campus Students can travel by Bloomington Transit or campus buses By Meghana Rachamadugu megracha@iu.edu

Campus Bus 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Stop at a bus stop with an IU bus sign. These have “Campus Bus Service” written on them. Track the progress of your ride via Double Maps. Wait for a red bus and board for free. To indicate what stop you want to get off at, pull the stop request cord before the next stop. Exit the bus at your destination. Campus buses go through the residence halls and near academic buildings.

Bloomington Transit 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

SUMMER 2022 | ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE

These say “Bloomington Transit” and have a number and location to show the route the bus will take and the main destination. Track the progress of your ride via Apple Maps, Google Maps or Double Maps. When the bus arrives, show your Crimson Card and board: all for free! Forgot to grab a mask? That’s ok! Bloomington Transit no longer requires masks. Buses also have bike storage upfront to use. To indicate what stop you want to get off at, pull the stop request cord before the next stop. Exit the bus at your destination. Bloomington Transit routes go through the residence halls, off-campus apartments and local shopping complexes.

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Campus safety tips for incoming students By Sean Gilley

spgilley@iu.edu | @spgilley729

College can be an exciting, confusing and sometimes daunting experience, especially for new students. Indiana University has the second highest enrollment in Indiana, according to College Stats. On a campus with so many people and opportunities, you’re bound to have countless great experiences, but some not-so-great ones might come up as well. Here are some tips for new students to have a fun and safe first year experience. Be aware of your surroundings IU has a huge campus. Anytime I have friends or family visit, we spend a lot of our time walking around campus and the surrounding community. For new students, it’s important to get a lay of the land during your first couple of weeks here. Get to know not only where your classes are, but also where other important buildings, like the Student Health Center, the Indiana Memorial Union, and others, are on campus. IU has emergency Blue Light Phones, emergency phones with blue indicator lights, spread across campus. If you feel like you’re being followed, or just feel uneasy and unsafe, you can go to the nearest one, use the button on the front panel to call IUPD and explain the situation. Keep your phone charged and on you Keeping my phone charged is a struggle for me personally. But it’s important that you make an effort to keep it charged throughout the day, just in case you need to call someone or use it in some other capacity in case of an emergency. Another thing new students may want to consider is sharing your location with trusted friends and family, even if it’s just temporarily. I have my friends share their location with me when we’re meeting up on campus or a restaurant off campus, especially later in the evenings. If you aren’t comfortable with doing this, calling or video calling friends while you’re walking somewhere is also super helpful. Stay with trusted friends, especially at night You’ll spend a lot more time walking around campus than you think and, although the scenery can be very enthralling throughout the year, students should understand that there are still risks present while on campus. If you’re able to, find friends to walk to classes, from classes or even around town with. Make sure these are people you know and trust as well. You’ll meet a lot of people during your time at IU, but not all of them will turn out to be your best friends. Just make sure they’re trustworthy enough to at least safely pal around with. Make use of the city and campus busses, or just call an Uber The local bus system is a safe and convenient way to get around campus and the greater Bloomington community. Students can ride buses that’ll take them from the southernmost point on campus all the way to the Stadium on the north side of campus. You can even catch rides out to College Mall and the West side of town. If you prefer not to ride buses, ride services like Uber and Lyft are also options. If you do choose to use a ride service, always be aware of your surroundings and trust your gut. Otherwise, IU Ride is also a popular option for students and staff. Know the resources available to you Many students are often unaware of the number of services available to them. This is especially true for new students who are stepping onto campus for the first time. Services like the Student Health Center, Sexual Violence Support, Student Legal Services and many more departments are available to all students.

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ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


Learn the IU fight song Indiana, Our Indiana, Indiana, we’re all for you! We will fight for the cream and crimson, For the glory of old IU Never daunted, we cannot falter In the battle, we’re tried and true Indiana, Our Indiana, Indiana, we’re all for you!

language requirement?

50 languages each academic year. In Fall 2022, you can take: Akan American Sign Language (ASL) Arabic Bamana Bengali Bosnian/ Croatian/ Serbian Burmese Catalan Chinese Czech Dutch Egyptian (Demotic)

Egyptian (Hieroglyphic) Egyptian (Middle)

Estonian Finnish French German Greek (Classical) Greek (Modern) Haitian Creole Hebrew (Biblical) Hebrew (Modern)

Hindi

Hungarian

Russian

Indonesian

Sanskrit

Italian

Spanish

Japanese

Swahili

Kazakh

Thai

Kinyarwanda

Tibetan

Korean

Turkish

Sorani Kurdish Ukrainian Latin

Urdu

Maya

Uyghur

Mongolian

Uzbek

Norwegian

Vietnamese

Persian

Yiddish

Polish

Yoruba

Portuguese

Zulu

Quechua

• Many of them can fulfill your language requirement • Leverage your major with professional proficiency in a world language • Explore languages taught almost nowhere else in the US • Even more language opportunities are available through the Big Ten Academic Alliance: IU students may take language courses taught at other BTAA universities, enrolled as an IU class and receiving IU credits • IU hosts three federally-funded Language Flagship programs in Arabic, Chinese, and Russian (https://flagship.indiana.edu) ILLUSTRATION BY KATY SZPAK

SUMMER 2022 | ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE

For more language information and resources, as well as a one-minute optional survey with the opportunity of earning a $5 Amazon gift card, visit: https://go.iu.edu/3MVv


Campus arts through the years

IU is home to a vibrant arts community filled with performances and exhibits for students to experience.

1973 Bobby London, Tony Michael, and Ray Shell perform in the play, “The Me Nobody Knows.” ARBUTUS FILE PHOTO

ARBUTUS FILE PHOTO

1996 Sophomore Elizabeth Miller prepares for her role as a Snowflake in “The Nutcracker.” Performance of the ballet is an annual tradition at IU.

IDS FILE PHOTO BY IZZY MYSZAK

2019 Students visit an exhibition in the Eskenazi Museum of Art. The museum’s exhibitions showcase art from its permanent collection and from traveling shows from venues throughout the world.

ARBUTUS FILE PHOTO 1997 David Baker serves as conductor for a student concert. Among his many honors, Baker was named a Living Jazz Legend by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

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IU ARCHIVES

1941 Renowned artist Thomas Hart Benton teaches an art class. Benton’s murals are showcased at IU including in the IU Auditorium, next to the School of Fine Arts.

IDS FILE PHOTO

2014 Students conduct a dress rehearsal of “The Tale of Lady Thi Kinh.” The opera had its world premiere at IU.

ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


How to get involved in recreational sports By Emma Pawlitz

epawlitz@iu.edu | @emmapawlitz

Whether you played sports competitively in high school or just want to find a fun way to get active, intramural and club sports are a great way to get involved on campus. These resources and guidelines can answer any questions you might have about these organizations at IU.

The distinction: It’s important to know the difference between club and intramural sports, as each tends to draw different audiences. Club sports organizations require a larger commitment money and time-wise. There are often required practices every week, and dues to pay for the entire season. With that comes team-issued gear and the opportunity to travel to other schools, usually around the Midwest, to play in tournaments. Club sports are geared towards people who were serious about playing sports in high school and want to keep up with a similarly arduous schedule throughout college. Intramural sports have a much less strict structure and schedule. Unlike club sports, where there is usually only one team on campus, you can form as many different intramural groups as you want. Many teams are composed of members from residence halls, sororities and fraternities, other nonathletic clubs or simply a group of friends.

Intramural teams elect their own leaders, schedule their own practices and compete against each other on campus within a league. How to get involved: The Rec Sports website is a helpful resource when it comes to researching ways to get involved in on-campus athletic organizations. It contains information about how to register a team and join a bracket, along with the intramural rules and guidelines. What to bring: It’s important to prepare for intramural and club sports the same way as you would’ve in high school — pack a solid pair of tennis shoes, cleats or court shoes and bring any extra equipment necessary for your sport, such as rackets or sticks. Balls are available to check out at the Student Recreational Sports Center (SRSC), but it never hurts to bring your own, too. Make sure you pack plenty of athletic clothing for practices and games, towels, refillable water bottles and healthy snacks. What to do when you arrive on campus: RecFest during Welcome Week is a great opportunity to see all of the athletic clubs with which you can get involved. There, you can meet people from club or intramural sports, classes at the SRSC, and other groups like the ballroom dancing club. Talking to the leaders of these groups is the first step in joining a team.

THERE’S A PLACE FOR EVERYONE AT THE JACOBS SCHOOL OF MUSIC! We offer performance and learning opportunities for all students and community members. All IU students are invited to audition for the Singing Hoosiers and the Marching Hundred or sign up for an all-campus ensemble or instrumental lessons. music.indiana.edu/ensembles And, if you are looking for a terrific course, register for a class—ranging from Jazz for Listeners, Music of the Silk Road, and Music for Film, to History of Rock ‘n’ Roll! music.indiana.edu/mgs


Returning IU basketball players to watch By Emma Pawlitz

epawlitz@iu.edu | @emmapawlitz

In today’s landscape of college basketball, players who opt out of the NBA draft after their first two years or choose to ignore the option of the transfer portal are a rarity. These Indiana men’s and women’s basketball players had the option to leave Bloomington, whether it was to play professionally or at a different school, but decided to remain Hoosiers. All of these players were instrumental in the success of their respective teams, so their offseason decisions made for incredible news to the Hoosier faithful. The 2022-2023 basketball season is shaping up to be one for the books for both the men’s and women’s teams. Race Thompson Thompson, who is returning to Indiana in his sixth season with the program, was a vital part of the team’s success last year. Dubbed a “glue guy” by his teammates, fans and members of the media, his consistency, effort and leadership hold the team together. Thompson was second on the team last season in rebounds per game, with 7.5, and field goal percentage, at 53.6%. His average of 11.1 points per game was a career best, and he notched double-figure scoring 23 times during the 2021-2022 campaign. Beyond the numbers, Thompson has an invaluable presence on the court. His hustle plays on defense, patience on offense and smart decisions on both sides of the floor make him an irreplaceable part of the Hoosiers’ puzzle. He has been a team captain since 2020 and is bound to serve as a role model for Indiana’s four incoming freshmen

Xavier Johnson Indiana’s point guard uncertainties were an issue during the first half of the 2021-2022 season, but Johnson’s takeover as the primary facilitator in the latter half sparked a breakout for the fifth-year senior that fans hope will continue into his final year. Johnson’s offensive production exploded at the end of the season – his scoring average went up almost 5 points per game from the beginning of February until the end of the season. Johnson’s confidence is one of his biggest assets, and his improved 3-point shooting, savvy moves around the basket and pesky defense played huge roles in Indiana’s postseason push into March Madness. Given his performance at the end of last season, Johnson is almost guaranteed to start in the point guard position next year, continuing to provide defensive lockdowns and offensive sparks.

IDS FILE PHOTO BY ALEX PAUL

Then-junior guard Xavier Johnson lays in a basket March 17, 2022, at the Moda Center in Portland, Oregon.

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ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


Grace Berger Berger has been Indiana’s most outstanding offensive threat on an incredibly talented and well-balanced squad for the past two years. Her 16.2 points per game helped lead the Hoosiers to the Sweet 16 one year after their first Elite Eight appearance in program history. Berger has many weapons in her arsenal, but her mid-range jumper is one of the most lethal jumpshots in the country — 12.5 of her points per game came from two-point range last season. The AllAmerican Honorable Mention recipient is also a skilled ball handler, sharp passer and lengthy guard defender. The poise and intelligence that Berger exhibits play into her lead-by-example mentality. She has the chance to be the best player on the Big Ten’s strongest team next year.

Mackenzie Holmes Holmes, the only player on this list who has multiple years of eligibility remaining, has distinguished herself as one of the strongest bigs in the conference. Despite sustaining an injury in the second half of the season, she cracked the top-10 watch list for the Lisa Leslie award, an honor presented to the best center in women’s college basketball. Holmes led the team in rebounds and blocks per game with 7.0 and 1.7, respectively, while averaging 15.2 points per game. She scored in double figures 22 out of the 25 games in which she appeared, with a career-high 30-point performance against Ohio State on December 12. Her defense around the basket is crucial to the Hoosiers’ success, and she has become increasingly athletic over the years. Holmes has been a star her entire collegiate career and, paired with Berger and Indiana’s incoming transfers, she can take her team to new heights.

IDS FILE PHOTO BY ALEX PAUL

Then-senior guard Grace Berger shoots a three pointer March 26, 2022, at Total Mortgage Arena in Bridgeport, CT.

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Keeping up: IU student media informs campus, offers hands-on experience

COURTESY PHOTO

Members of IU Student Television record an episode of “The Bloomington Breakfast Club” December 2021. By Ellie Albin

ealbin@iu.edu | @EllieAlbin1

Many student media outlets at IU can give students experience in different areas of media, including writing, editing, photography, broadcast, design and more. Explore some of the student media outlets IU has to offer in the list below. Indiana Daily Student The IDS allows students of all majors to explore different aspects of newspaper production including reporting, editing, sales, social media, advertising, photography, design and digital media. The newspaper publishes a print edition every Thursday, with daily online content on their website. The IDS is also editorially independent from the university.

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Big Ten Network Student U Big Ten Network Student U allows students to create television productions for all IU sporting events. The productions are streamed on BTN+ and BTN TV often rebroadcasts the programs. IU Student Television Students can gain experience as a writer, reporter, editor, production crew member, on-air talent, podcaster and more at IUSTV. This student-run outlet allows students to create content for IU and the Bloomington community. IUSTV content can be viewed on YouTube. SEASON Magazine SEASON covers local and national fashion trends, beauty and art with editorial spreads. In addition to a print publication, SEASON

updates their website with articles and also has a podcast titled “What’s in SEASON?” Arbutus Yearbook This annual 500-page publication is over 110 years old and serves as coverage for a wide variety of news, campus events and student stories from the prior year. Students can work as photographers, writers and designers. The IDS oversees the production of Arbutus. WIUX Pure Student Radio WIUX Pure Student Radio is a studentrun radio station that broadcasts both online and on 99.1 FM. Listeners can tune in to hear music and both local news and local sports coverage. Students are able to work in sports, news, public relations, underwriting or as a DJ.

ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


Notable IU alumni: What they studied and where they are now

By Da’Nasia Pruitt and Sami Sharfin

In its 202-year history, Indiana University has been the home to many famous graduates. Whether they be journalists, musicians, actors, media tycoons, all-star athletes or politicians, IU grads have been making waves since the very beginning. Here’s a few notable alumni who graduated from IU, whether you knew it or not. Mark Cuban Mark Cuban, Dallas Mavericks owner and world-famous entrepreneur, graduated from the Kelley School of Business in 1981. According to Forbes, Cuban co-founded the video portal Broadcast.com and sold it to Yahoo in the late 1990s for $5.7 billion dollars. Cuban is best known for appearing as an investor on the television show “Shark Tank,” where he and a panel of sharks invest in small

start-ups. Cuban has used his money to invest in Indiana University initiatives. In 2015, he invested $5 million to start a sports media technology center located in Assembly Hall, according to IndyStar. The Mark Cuban Center for Sports Media and Technology offers opportunities for students to get hands-on experience in different types of sports media. In 2020, Cuban donated $250,000 to the Indiana Daily Student’s Black Voices section, which was created as a platform for Black and other marginalized students to freely share their experiences and stories. Black Voices started with founding editors Jaclyn Ferguson and Nick Telman.

tures, the author graduated from IU in 1985, double majoring in theater and telecommunications.

Suzanne Collins

Booker T. Jones

Suzanne Collins is best known as the author of the popular “Hunger Games” trilogy. Before writing Katniss Everdeen’s adven-

Booker T. Jones, a musician and producer, graduated from the Jacobs School of Music in 1967 and remains the only alumnus elected

Robert Gates Former CIA Director and Secretary of Defense Robert Gates received a master’s degree in history from IU in 1966. Gates worked under eight different presidents during his career, including Jimmy Carter and George W. Bush. When he retired in June 2011, President Barack Obama awarded him with the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Gates also served as the National President for the Boy Scouts of America and the President of Texas A&M University.

IDS FILE PHOTO BY SCOTT TENEFRANCI

Billionaire businessman Mark Cuban graduated from IU in 1981, earning a bachelor’s degree in management from the Kelley School of Business.

to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. The four-time Grammy Award winner has collaborated with a number of big names in music, including Elton John, Bob Dylan and Willie Nelson. In 2012, Jones received an honorary doctorate degree from IU’s Jacobs School of Music. Kheng Hua Tan During her time at IU, Tan became interested in acting after taking a theater elective. She graduated from the Paul H. O’Neill School of School of Public and Environmental Affairs in 1986 with a bachelor’s degree in mass communications. The Singaporean actress starred in the 2018 film “Crazy Rich Asians” and the martial arts television series “Kung Fu” in 2021.

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The LGBTQ+ Culture Center is located at 705 E. Seventh St. The center partnered with Indiana University Student Government to organize educational programs and social events celebrating LGBTQ+ History Month.

Culture centers provide education, serve as welcoming space By Christy Avery

averycm@iu.edu | @christym_avery

IU’s campus is home to six culture centers, which are inclusive spaces where students can get involved in and learn more about different cultures. Neal-Marshall Black Culture Center The Neal-Marshall Black Culture Center supports the growth and success of Black students, faculty and staff. It provides academic and other resources to help students navigate college. Programming at the NMBCC includes the Freshman Pinning Ceremony, which welcomes first-year students into IU, monthly Mid-Day House Parties to gather and check in with students and Black History Month celebrations. Asian Culture Center Through advocacy, institutional resources and community outreach, the Asian Culture Center strives to promote understanding and acceptance of Asian American and Pacific Islander cultures and issues. The Asian Culture Center offers programs such as AAPI Heritage Month and Lunar New Year celebrations, Asian language learning, discussion programs and an Asian American Film Series. The Center, which celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2018, is located across from the Collins Living-Learning Center, near the corner of 10th Street and Woodlawn Avenue. Jewish Culture Center A newer addition to campus, the Jewish Culture Center focuses on educating the IU community about Jewish culture and supporting Jewish students. The Center provides opportunities for Jewish students to develop leadership skills and connect with Judaism. It was launched in part as a way to combat antisemitism and create a welcoming space.

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Located in the Helene G. Simon Hillel Center, the Jewish Culture Center puts on events and activities such as Shabbat dinner and services, community advocacy initiatives and travel abroad programs to Israel. Included in the Center are a kosher dining hall, a chapel, a library and learning center, and more. First Nations Educational and Cultural Center The First Nations Educational and Cultural Center supports Native American and Indigenous students at IU. Located on Eighth Street, the FNECC offers programs like Native American Heritage Month celebrations, Native film screenings, an annual Powwow and more. The FNECC promotes the “Indigenize Indiana” initiative, which amplifies the voices of Indigenous people and developed a land acknowledgement statement recognizing that IU was built upon land of the Miami, Delaware, Potawatomi and Shawnee people. La Casa/Latino Cultural Center The La Casa/Latino Cultural Center serves Latino students on campus. La Casa offers a weekend Latino Retreat in the fall, puts on monthly Colectiva Dinners and celebrates National Hispanic Heritage Month and Dia de los Muertos. La Casa is located on Seventh Street next to the LGBTQ+ Culture Center. LGBTQ+ Culture Center The LGBTQ+ Culture Center is a safe and welcoming environment dedicated to advocating for students of all genders and sexual orientations. The center, which celebrated its 25th anniversary in 2019, provides counseling, free supplies for safe sex, free HIV/STI testing, an LGBTQ Library, a Gender Affirming Closet where students can access free clothing and more. There are also LGBTQ student groups where students can find community and resources for transitioning at IU. The LGBTQ+ Culture Center is located on Seventh Street across from Dunn Meadow and next to La Casa.

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IU Campus Bucket List Here are some things to do to make the most of your time in Bloomington. Watch “Breaking Away” Attend Hoosier Hysteria Go bowling at the Indiana Memorial Union

Create a rec sports team Watch the squirrels on campus

Hammock in Dunn’s woods

Read the Indiana Daily Student

Visit the Kirkwood Observatory

Have a picnic in Dunn Meadow

Attend the Little 500 races

Snap a photo at Sample Gates

Take a dip in the Campus River

Tailgate a football game

Go to the Biology Building greenhouse

Watch a movie at the IU Cinema

See a show in the IU Auditorium

Visit the culture centers

Watch a game in Assembly Hall

Grab a meal from Kirkwood Avenue

Visit the Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art

Watch the sunrise at Griffy Lake

Shake Herman B Wells statue’s hand Check out the Lilly Library

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Watch the Hoosiers play football at Memorial Stadium

Visit the Rosewell House Grab a cookie at Sugar and Spice Dip your toes in the Showalter Fountain ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


The best places to get IU apparel By Grant Wheeler grawheel@iu.edu

If you’re looking to show your Hoosier pride, you’ll likely want to have some gear that can help. Practically every other store in Bloomington carries something sporting an IU logo, but there are a number of businesses that stand out when it comes to picking up IU merchandise. The easiest place to find it is the IU Bookstore, located inside the Indiana Memorial Union. With its central location on campus, the bookstore is a great place to pick up some attire when visiting for the first time. The bookstore has everything from sports jerseys to hats to pajamas. The clothing is dependable, but it can get somewhat pricey. If you’re looking for something a little easier on the wallet, The Indiana Shop is a great place to start. With locations on both Third Street and Kirkwood Avenue, the store often has clearance items and buy-one-get-one sales on shirts. They have one of the more diverse collections in town, including tote bags and other novelties and accessories. They carry clothing lines for alumni and t-shirts showing individual IU schools like the Jacobs School of Music and Maurer School of Law.

Also on the cheaper end is Tracks on Kirkwood Avenue. Alongside their extensive collection of vinyl records, Tracks carries a large selection of IU and Bloomington clothing, most of which is student designed. Their trendy designs make them one of the most popular clothing stores in town, and their location in the heart of Bloomington certainly doesn’t hurt. If these stores are still out of your price range or you’re looking for something from years past, there are a number of thrift and secondhand stores in Bloomington, at most of which you can find used or vintage IU gear. These stores will definitely be less reliable and consistent than the others, but you can’t beat the price, and every so often you’ll find a discarded gem. The most convenient place for students is the Goodwill on College Mall Road, which has an enormous selection of clothing, almost always including some IU apparel. Another option is Plato’s Closet, also on College Mall Road. You can find IU gear there, but their smaller store means that it’s there less often. Regardless of your price range, there’s always a store that can help you represent the cream and crimson, whether you’re getting the latest merch from the bookstore or shopping vintage.

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Dining halls and meal plans at IU explained By Christina Avery

averycm@iu.edu | @christym_avery

Learning where and how to get food on a college campus is just one of the learning curves students face when coming to IU for the first time. With multiple stores, dining halls and meal plans offered at IU, new students may find it difficult to determine what meal plan to purchase, how to use it and where they can go to eat on campus. IU Dining is offering new meal plans for the 2022-23 school year. These plans are designed to provide easy access to food across campus, and offer a few different options for where a student wishes to eat and how they want to pay. There are three seven-day meal plans: classic, expanded and max. Each plan is a different price. With classic, students get unlimited meal scans at all-you-care-to-eat dining halls. They also get three meal exchanges per week to use at pay-as-you-go locations, and 50 dining dollars per semester to use at these locations. With meal exchanges, students can exchange an all-youcare-to-eat meal scan for a combo meal at Bookmarket Eatery, Campus Cafes, Campus Stores or the Indiana Memorial Union. The classic meal plan costs $3,914 per year. With the seven-day expanded plan, students also get unlimited meal scans at all-you-care-toeat locations, along with four meal exchanges per week and 250 dining dollars per semester. This plan costs $4,429 per year. The seven-day max plan offers unlimited meal scans, five meal exchanges per week and 450 dining dollars per semester. The max plan comes in at $4,944 per year. Another option is the IU five-weekday meal plan, which offers unlimited meal scans, three meal exchanges per week and 200 dining dollars per semester. This plan costs $3,914 per year.

There is also an optional meal scan plan, which includes 100 meal scans or meal exchanges each semester — students can choose how to use their scans. This plan also comes with 150 dining dollars each semester. Any enrolled student may purchase this plan. This plan costs $3,296 per year. All students living in a residence hall or furnished apartment on campus for the first time are required to choose one of the seven-day meal plans or the five-weekday plan when they complete a housing application. When selecting which plan to buy, students may want to consider the cost of the plan with their budget, how much food they need and how often they plan to purchase food from a dining hall. All-you-care-to-eat dining halls allow students to use one scan for unlimited servings of food each time they visit. At pay-as-you-go locations, students can use dining dollars, CrimsonCash or credit cards. They can also use meal exchanges. There are multiple locations to grab food and purchase essentials on campus. Here is a list of options. Eateries There are several dining halls on IU’s campus. All-you-care-to-eat options include Forest Quad, Goodbody Hall, McNutt Quad, Wright Quad and Collins Living-Learning Center. Pay-as-you-go options include Bookmarket Eatery in Wells Library and the Indiana Memorial Union. Campus Cafes For a quick bite or caffeine boost, there are multiple cafes around campus offering a variety of options including quick packaged foods, coffee and pastries, and sandwiches and pizza. All Campus Cafes are pay-as-you-go.

Students line up at Fusion on Tuesday at Woodlands Dining Hall in Forest Quad.

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IDS FILE PHOTO

Campus Cafes can be found in Ballantine Hall, the Biology Building, Eigenmann Hall, the Eskenazi Museum of Art, Hodge Hall, Luddy Hall, the O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs and Wright School of Education. Campus Stores Campus stores are great for grabbing lunch between classes, stocking up on snacks and even shopping for groceries. Similar to convenience stores, these locations offer packaged and frozen foods, produce, baking supplies, school supplies and over-the-counter medications. In some stores, you can find fresh hot food, deli sandwiches and subs, and prepared meals. Campus stores are also pay-as-you-go. Campus stores are located at Briscoe Quad, McNutt Quad, Union Street Center, Willkie Quad and Wright Quad. Indiana Memorial Union The Indiana Memorial Union is a central hub for study spots and student activities. If hunger strikes during a study session or you feel like grabbing dinner with friends, the IMU has plenty of options available. The Indiana Memorial Union is a pay-as-yougo location. Main level: Sugar & Spice Bakery Grab a drink and a pastry at Sugar & Spice. The bakery offers both hot and cold coffees, teas and hot chocolate alongside pastries like donuts and croissants. The Chocolate Moose A Bloomington favorite for ice cream, the Chocolate Moose offers scoops, sundaes, milkshakes and more. It’s located right next to Sugar & Spice on the main level of the IMU.

An RPS employee works Nov. 13, 2018, at Wright Quad.

The Globe The Globe offers a rotating menu of lunch and dinner options from local restaurants, spanning a variety of global cuisines. Lantern If you’re craving Pan-Asian food, you can find dishes such as teriyaki chicken, samosas and Thai wings at Lantern. The Mix In the mood for something refreshing? Try the Mix, a soup and salad bar where you can build your own bowl. Quarry Pie Co. Quarry Pie Co. prepares fresh pizza on-site in fire ovens. Salads, meatballs and cheesy bread are also available. Whitfield Grill With burgers, hot dogs, chicken sandwiches and more, Whitfield Grill offers the flavors of the classic American diner. Union Market Stop in to Union Market to buy pre-packaged, grab-and-go foods like snacks, drinks and sandwiches. The market also offers gift and necessity items. First floor: The Tudor Room For a more traditional sit-down dining experience, head to the Tudor Room, where you’ll be served a meal complete with china, table linens and waiters. Starbucks Pick up your favorite drink right inside the Indiana Memorial Union.

IDS FILE PHOTO BY ALEX DERYN

ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


NEWS FOR YOU, BY YOU & ABOUT YOU. For all things student life, visit idsnews.com.


The history of the Little 500 and everything you need to know ahead of race day

IU ARCHIVES

The Little 500 race in April 1983. Evan Gerike

egerike@iu.edu | @EvanGerike

“The World's Greatest College Weekend” is back. In 2020, the race was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In 2021, the race was held without fans in May instead of its usual April race date. This year, the race is back — and so are all the festivities that go along with it. For all the students who have never experienced a race, here’s a history of Little 500 and everything else you need to know. IU Foundation executive director Howdy Wilcox Jr. started the Little 500 in 1951. Wilcox saw students holding informal bike races around dorms and decided to model a bike race after the Indianapolis 500, a race his father won in 1919. In 1987, four Kappa Alpha Theta sorority members tried to qualify for the Little 500. On their third qualifying attempt, they finished the run and qualified 34th — one position short of making the field. In response, the inaugural women’s race ran in 1988. Both races feature up to 33 teams — there are 22 in the women’s race this year — and teams are made up of up to four undergraduate amateur riders, who complete up to 10 exchanges for the men and five for the women throughout the race. The races have been held at Bill Armstrong

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Stadium’s cinder track every year since 1981 and are put on by the IU Student Foundation. Money raised from the Little 500 goes into an IU Student Foundation scholarship fund that has handed out more than $2 million to undergrads, according to the Little 500 website. KEY TERMS Bike: Each team receives two bikes from the IU Student Foundation for race day. The Schwinn bikes are a single speed, coaster brake, 700c wheeled bike and are not allowed to have any modifications. Exchange: Teams have to switch riders 10 times during the men’s race and five times during the women’s race. Teams can exchange riders using one bike or a full-bike exchange using two bikes. Pole: The team that starts the race in first place. Pits: Selected in order of qualification, each team will have their own pit to set up in. When completing an exchange, the rider getting off the bike must stop by the end of the next pit or receive a penalty. Flags: There are seven flags used throughout the race: green, yellow, red, white, checkered, black (ride on outside of the track) and blue with an orange stripe (bicycle attempting to pass). Pack: A group of riders together, usually in-

cluding the teams near the lead. Draft: A rider will line up behind another biker, reducing air resistance and allowing the rider to draft — putting in less effort to maintain a speed. Sprinter: A team’s fastest rider in short bursts, who will often be tasked with the last lap or two in order to finish the race. Burn: In preparation for an exchange, the current rider will sprint to separate from the pack before they exchange, “burning” their remaining energy. Marking: When a team begins a burn, a second team will mark them to pressure them into an exchange, to prevent the burning team from faking and creating a lead. Set: A period of laps a rider spends on the bike before exchanging. Riders with more stamina may ride longer sets, while sprinters will ride shorter and faster sets. Lapped traffic: Once a team is off the lead lap, they will be directed to the outside of the track as the pack passes them to avoid interfering with the leaders. Yellow jersey: The winning team from the year before wears a yellow jersey on race day. Last year’s winners were Jetblach for the men’s and Delta Gamma for the women’s. Spring Series: A series of four events in the weeks leading up to the race that involve all the riders, including Qualifications, Individual

Time Trials, Miss-N-Out and Team Pursuit. The overall winning team of the Spring Series gets to wear a white bike jersey on race day. Qualifications: Also known as Quals, a team gets four laps to set a fastest time and qualify within the 33-man Little 500 field. The fastest team qualifies on the pole and receives a green jersey to wear on race day. Individual Time Trials: ITTs are also a four-lap event, but are completed individually. Four riders compete at the same time, starting in each corner of the track, to complete four laps first. Miss N Out: Starting in heats of five to eight, the last place rider is eliminated every lap until three riders remain. The three advance to the next round until the final heat of eight. Once three riders are left on the last heat, they begin a one-lap sprint to determine the winner. Team Pursuit: Two teams of four start on opposite ends of the track and chase each other down in a pace line for 15 laps. The teams are timed based on the third rider to cross the finish line. The two fastest teams compete to determine the winner. “Breaking Away”: The 1979 movie about the Little 500 won an Academy Award for best original screenplay. The race team Cutters, who won in 2018 and 2019 and has the most wins in the men’s race with 14, was named after the movie.

ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


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1. 1988 Wilkie Sprint riders celebrate following the finish of the first Women’s Little 500 in 1988.

IDS FILE PHOTO BY CLAYTON MOORE

2. 2013 Matt Green celebrates with fans after winning the Men’s Little 500 race.

IDS FILE PHOTO BY MATT BEGALA

3. 2019 Cutters rider Victor Grossling kisses his partner, Emily Abshire, after winning the 2019 men’s Little 500 on Saturday at Bill Armstrong Stadium.

PHOTOS BY IU ARCHIVES

4. 1992 Senior Courtney Bishop and sophomore Jamie Pinder pick up their jerseys for the 1992 Little 500 race. Bishop and Pinder rode for Major Taylor. The team was named after the Black cycling legend, Major Taylor, from Indianapolis. 5. 1988 The Cutters win the 1988 Little 500 . 6. 1951 A biker rides past the pit area of the track. 7. 2006 Alpha Tau Omega, winners of the 2006 Little 500.

IDS FILE PHOTO BY ALEX PAUL

8. 2022 Melanzana biker Juli Torbik hugs senior Lucy Bailey in a frenzy of celebration after winning the Women’s Little 500 on April 22, 2022, at Bill Armstrong Stadium. Melanzana fans rushed the track after the race was complete to congratulate their team.

SUMMER 2022 | ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE

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Traditions and events you can’t miss out on Fans supporting their teams at the Women’s Little 500 race at the Bill Armstrong Stadium on April 22, 2022, are pictured. Melanzana Cycling placed first in the race. By Lexi Lindenmayer

lindena@iu.edu | @lexilindenmayer

In its 200 years, IU has established many traditions and events to represent the spirit of the University. If you are looking for ways to really feel like a Hoosier, consider trying some of these traditions with you and your friends. IU Dance Marathon One tradition you cannot miss is the IU Dance Marathon, where students dance for 36 hours straight for the benefit of Riley Hospital for Children. However, there is so much more than dancing. The marathon is filled with other activities like a basketball tournament, raves, meeting the Riley families and more. As the second-largest student-run philanthropy in the world, IU Dance Marathon has raised more than $46 million total for Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis. This year, the IUDM 2022 will be held from Oct. 29-31. Little 500 Often referred to as “The Greatest College Weekend,” IU students look forward to Little 500 every year. There are two bike races, one men’s race and one women’s

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IDS FILE PHOTO BY DEEPAK SINGH BHADORIYA

race. Teams of four ride laps around Armstrong Stadium while students and fans cheer them on. Little 500 will be held April 21-22, 2023. Shaking Herman B Wells’ hand From Ernie Pyle in front of Franklin Hall to Hoagy Carmichael by the IU Auditorium, there are countless statues across IU’s campus. The most notable statue is of former IU president Herman B Wells and is associated with a classic IU tradition. If you are stressing about a test and studying doesn’t seem to be enough, consider shaking Herman B Wells’ hand for that extra bit of luck. Showalter Fountain and Eskenazi’s lights Taking a dip in Showalter Fountain is something every student has to do before they graduate, according to tradition. Whether you decide to do it in the warm daylight or in the freezing cold night, it is a must for every student. If you do decide to do it in the evening, walk over to the side of the Eskenazi Museum of Art and prop your feet up against the wall, lit by colorful lights. Snap a picture and post it to your Instagram to really feel like a Hoosier.

IDS FILE PHOTO BY ETHAN LEVY

IU senior Brett Ekenberg reacts as he gets his head shaved at the IU Dance Marathon on Oct. 30, 2021, at the IU Tennis Center. A group of participants lined the stage to get their heads shaved.

ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


OPEN A DOOR TO THE ANCIENT & MODERN Prepare for a global career with the Hamilton Lugar School’s Chinese Flagship Program! In addition to gaining professional proficiency in Chinese, you will:

◆ ◆ ◆ ◆

Add value to your degree Earn scholarships & funding Study & intern in Taiwan Stand out on the job market To learn more and apply, visit chinese.indiana.edu.


Key figures on Bloomington’s campus Each person is heavily involved in student affairs and overall engagement By Meghana Rachamadugu megracha@iu.edu

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RAHUL SHRIVASTAV

PAMELA WHITTEN

JAMES WIMBUSH

PROVOST AND EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF IU BLOOMINGTON

PRESIDENT OF IU BLOOMINGTON

VICE PRESIDENT FOR DIVERSITY, EQUITY, AND MULTICULTURAL AFFAIRS

In this role, Shrivastav makes executive decisions for day-to-day campus operations. He assumed the position on February 15, 2022, and is known to prioritize student learning, according to the Office of the Provost & Executive Vice President website. He has also worked in the President’s Cabinet and the Senior Advisory Group as a Vice President for Instruction at the University of Georgia and years of experience as a professor in speech anatomy, physiology and a range of other topics.

As president of the university, Whitten oversees all eight IU campuses. She became the 19th Indiana University president and the first female president on July 1, 2021. Before this, she worked as a professor at several universities. She also served as the President of Kennesaw State University and the Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs and Provost at the University of Georgia. She said she believes the people are the university’s greatest strength, and she hopes to engage with them even further in her biography section of the school’s website. To contact the Office of the President, call 812-855-4613 or email iupres@indiana.edu.

Under Wimbush, the Office of Diversity, Equity and Multicultural Affairs increased the IU student population of underrepresented minorities to 26.5 percent. This is 2.3 percent more than the state of Indiana’s underrepresented population. Wimbush also worked to increase grants and funding towards research in racial justice, student wellness and minority serving institutions. To contact the Office of the Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs, call 812-855-2739 or email jwimbush@indiana.edu.

DAVE O’GUINN

JOHN WILKERSON

DENISE HAYES

VICE PROVOST FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS AND DEAN OF STUDENTS

ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT FOR INTERNATIONAL SERVICES

ASSISTANT VICE PROVOST FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS AND DIRECTOR OF COUNSELING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES (CAPS)

O’Guinn is a graduate alum from Indiana University and, after working in executive roles at Quinnipiac College and Center College, he returned to the Bloomington campus as the attorney of the Division of Student Affairs. On the Division of Student Affairs website, O’Guinn said he hopes to improve student services and engagement. To reach out to the Provost Office for Student Affairs, call 812-855-8188 or email vpsa@indiana.edu.

Wilkerson has held roles related to international education for more than 15 years and is a current member of the International Association of College Admission Counselors. Previously, he was the Director of International Admissions at the University of Missouri and the Director of Admissions at Columbia College. Students and faculty can call the Office of International Services at 812-855-9086 or email wilkerjh@iu.edu.

Dr. Denise Hayes is an Indiana University alum and returned to campus in June 2018 as the Director for Counseling and Psychological Services. She said she advocates for peer education groups in Greek life and other campus communities on the IU Student Health Center website. Students and faculty can visit CAPS on the fourth floor of the IU Health Center or call 812-855-5711.

ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


ETHAN MOORE | IDS

IU President Pamela Whitten addresses the graduating students May 6, 2022, in Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall. Whitten became president of IU in summer 2021.

have a real hoosier experience

build your resume

IDS FILE PHOTO BY MATT BEGALA

have fun and make friends

Dave O’Guinn, vice provost for student affairs and dean of students, watches as Hooshir sings the opening song, “And You Shall Make Me a Sancutary” at the memoriam gathering Oct. 29, 2018, in the Hillel Center. O’Guinn was one of the speakers at the service honoring the 11 people who were killed at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh.

improve mprove your leadership skills

COURTESY PHOTO

IU Provost Rahul Shrivastav started his new position at IU on Tuesday Feb. 15, 2022. One of his primary focuses is on the university’s research output.

SUMMER 2022 | ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE


80+ Languages Offered at Indiana University By Lawren Elderkin

lelderki@iu.edu | @LawrenElderkin

In today’s interconnected world, learning a different language is almost a neccessity. From languages that are recognized worldwide to less commonly taught languages, Indiana University is the place to go to learn a language. Students can choose from more

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than 80 languages in the College of Arts and Sciences. Languages that are taught reguarly are listed in red while those less frequently taught are listed in gray. Learn more about what languages IU has to offer by visiting college.indiana.edu/academics/languages.

AKAN

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE

ARABIC

AZERBAIJANI

BAMANA

BENGALI

BOSNIAN

CHINESE—MANDARIN

CROATIAN

CZECH

DUTCH

EGYPTIAN—MIDDLE (HIEROGLYPHIC)

ESTONIAN

FINNISH

FRENCH

GERMAN

GREEK (CLASSICAL AND MODERN)

HAITIAN CREOLE

HEBREW (BIBLICAL AND MODERN

HINDI

HUNGARIAN

INDONESIAN

ITALIAN

JAPANESE

KAZAKH

KOREAN

LAKOTA (SIOUX)

LATIN—CLASSICAL

MONGOLIAN

NORWEGIAN

PASHTO

PERSIAN

POLISH

PORTUGUESE

QUECHUA

ROMANIAN

RUSSIAN

SANSKRIT

SERBIAN

SPANISH

SWAHILI

TAJIK

TAMIL

TIBETAN

TURKISH

UKRAINIAN

URDU

UYGHUR

UZBEK

WOLOF

YIDDISH

YORUBA

YUCATEC MAYA

ZULU

AFRIKAANS

ALBANIAN

AMHARIC

BULGARIAN

CANTONESE

CATALAN

DANISH

DARI

GEORGIAN

GUJARATI

LATVIAN

LITHUANIAN

LUGANDA

MACEDONIAN

MIDDLE HIGH GERMAN

NAHUATL

NAVAJO

NORTH AFRICAN ARABIC

OLD CHURCH SLAVONIC

OLD HIGH GERMAN

QUECHUA—INGA

SWETSWANA

SLOVAK

SLOVENE

TURKMEN

XHOSA

ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


Useful Terms

Here are a few key terms that will be useful to know around Bloomington’s campus. You’ll know them all by heart soon enough, but until then, this reference can help. By Lawren Elderkin

lelderki@iu.edu | @LawrenElderkin

A&H The abbreviation A&H stands for courses that meet the Arts and Humanities requirements by the College of Arts and Sciences.

COAS The College of Arts and Sciences is sometimes simply called “the College”.

Academic probation A student is put on academic probation when the cumulative GPA falls below a 2.0.

Crimson Card A crimson card is also your student ID card. It’s used for keycard access, paying for food and using crimson cash.

Bursar The Bursar’s office bills tuition and room and board fees and is located in the Poplars Building W100, 400 E. Seventh St. Canvas This site, canvas.iu.edu, is where you will access any and all class information. You can also download the app for easy access to grades, assignnents, and other class materials. CAPS The Counseling and Psychological Services office is housed in the Health Center at 600 N. Eagleson Ave. Schedule a counseling appointment at 812-855-5711 for free or learn more at healthcenter.indiana.edu.

IMU The Indiana Memorial Union is often referred to as “the Union”. It is located at 900 E. Seventh St. IUSF IU Student Foundation is a nonprofit organization that raised funds for the University. Little Five The Greatest College Week in America, also known as Little 500, is the bicycle race and the week of events surrounding it. MAC The Musical Arts Center, located on

N. Eagleson Avenue, is the site of Jacobs School of Music opera performances and IU ballet department shows. N&M The abbreviation N&M stands for courses that meet the Natural and Mathematical Sciences requirements by COAS. Office hours Scheduled times that your professors offer each week to be available to answer questions you have about their classes are called office hours. One.IU This is IU’s portal to almost everything that you need to access, from class websites to scheduling to accessing your email, one. iu.edu has it all. RPS The division of Residential Programs and Services handles everything related to a student’s living experience, including dorm rooms, meal plans and programming.

S&H The abbreviation N&M stands for courses that meet the Social and Historical Studies requirements by COAS. SAB By joining the Student Athletic Board, students are able to be involved with IU athletics without being athletes. SRSC The Student Recreational Sports Center, located on Law Lane, offers more than 400 workout machines in addition to other programs, club and intramural sports and areas for working out. UD Most IU freshmen are automatically admitted into the University Division and stay here until they are accepted by the school of their major. UITS The University Information Technology Services deals with all things technology-related on campus.

Don’t pay for software! IU students get free access to Microsoft

Visit us at the UITS Tech Fair to learn more August 19 | 9pm to midnight IMU Frangipani Room, part of Late Nite

Need help? Contact the UITS Support Center uits.iu.edu/support


Packing Checklist What you should bring to college

Bedding

Bathroom/ Toiletries/Cleaning Shower gel or bath soap

Air freshener

Paper towels

Deodorant

Shower mat

Pillows

Towels and washrags

Hair grooming tools

Heating pad

Mattress topper

Shower shoes

Lotion

Disinfecting wipes

Alarm

Shower caddy

Toothbrush and toothpaste

First aid kit

Underbed storage

Shower cap

Perfume or cologne

Cleaning products

Comforter or quilts

Tissue and toilet paper

Sheets

COVID-19 Safety and Medical Supplies Masks

Cough drops

Coffee mugs

Hand sanitizer

Tea and throat treatments

Plastic bags

Can opener

Medicine for symptoms

First aid kit

Reusable containers

Canned goods

Mini fridge

Snacks

Microwave

Bowls

School supplies

Utensils

Backpack

Laptop/ tablet

Water bottles

Tote or drawstring bags

Headphones

Plates

Dish soap & dish towel

Notebooks

Flash drive

Cups

Planner or bullet journal

Charger

Pens and pencils

Folders

Stapler

Highlighters

Scissors

Index cards

Tape

Calculator

Misc.

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Kitchen

Umbrella

HDMI cord

Luggage

Speaker

Hammock

Bike/Skateboard

Decor Posters

Bulletin/Dry erase board

Adhesive hooks

Closet organizer

Personal photos

Keurig

Desk lamp

Fairy/LED lights

Fan

Hangers

Rug

Night lights

Bed risers

Extension cords

ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


Cultivate invaluable language skills while connecting with a rich history and culture. To learn more and apply visit arabic.indiana.edu


Hoosier sports through the years There will be many teams and athletes to follow and cheer on during your time at IU and after. Here are a few sports moments in IU’s history.

IU ARCHIVES

1926 Members of the Women’s Athletic Association wear their “I” sweaters. Members were awarded the sweaters after earning points for their participation in a variety of sports including basketball, soccer and baseball.

ARBUTUS FILE PHOTO

1980 Runner Jim Spivey garnered many titles including Big Ten individual cross country championships in 1980 and 1982. He was a three-time All-American and Big Ten Athlete of the Year in 1981 and 1982.

1946 Teammates John Goldsberry, Russell Deal, Robert Ravensberg and George Taliaferro look over a program, the front of which reads, “Hail the Champs!” Taliaferro, the leading rusher and an All-American, led the team to their only undefeated Big Ten Conference championship during his rookie year in 1945. He was the first Black player drafted into the NFL. IU ARCHIVES

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IDS FILE PHOTO

2019 Swimmer Lilly King waves to the crowd in the Counsilman-Billingsley Aquatic Center. Among her accomplishments are two gold medals at the 2016 Summer Olympics and sweeping the breaststroke events at the 2017 and 2019 World Championships.

ARBUTUS FILE PHOTO

1983 Players lift Coach Jerry Yeagley on their shoulders after winning the NCAA Soccer Championship. Since 1982, the Hoosier have won eight NCAA titles.

IDS FILE PHOTO

2018 The IU women’s basketball team huddles and celebrates after winning the WNIT Championship. The game against Virginia Tech was the last game of the Hoosiers’ 23-14 season.

ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


IDS FILE PHOTO

2014 The Hoosiers sing the Indiana fight song after defeating Purdue 23-16, keeping the Old Oaken Bucket in Bloomington for another year. The Bucket game is an annual tradition.

ARBUTUS FILE PHOTO

1951 Men’s Basketball Coach Branch McCracken with Bill Garrett. Garrett was the first Black player on the team. He broke the scoring record during the 1950–51 season for the highest number of points in Big Ten Conference games with a total of 193.

IDS FILE PHOTO

2008 Angel Escobedo celebrates his victory over Minnesota’s Jayson Ness in the 125-pound championship match at the NCAA wrestling national championships. Escobedo is now IU’s coach.

IU ARCHIVES

IDS FILE PHOTO

2013 IU Baseball Coach Tracy Smith signs autographs and talks to fans outside Bart Kaufman Field before the team leaves for Omaha, Nebraska, to compete in the College World Series.

SUMMER 2022 | ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE

1986 Amy Unterbrink winds up to pitch. The softball team won the Big Ten title and advanced to the College World Series. Unterbrink was 33-13 on the season and ended her career with a 96-45 record and 1,089 strikeouts.

1970s Legendary IU swimming coach Doc Counsilman talks with champion swimmer Mark Spitz. Spitz won nine Olympic golds, a silver and a bronze between 1968 and 1972. IU ARCHIVES

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IU ARCHIVES

Researcher Alfred Kinsey, then-president Herman B Wells and George Corner, from the Carnegie Institute, meet in August 1951. Wells was a strong supporter of Kinsey’s controversial research on sexual behavior, and took steps to protect his academic freedom.

HOW IU BECAME THE SCHOOL IT IS TODAY

Trailblazers, researchers and athletes helped to make a name for IU By Marissa Meador

marnmead@iu.edu | @marissa_meador

By educating trailblazers like Marcellus Neal and Frances Marshall, the first Black man and woman to graduate IU respectively, Pulitzer-winning journalist Ernie Pyle and even the creators of Crest toothpaste Joseph Muhler and William Nebergall, IU has made a name for itself as an influential institution across many fields. Indiana University was founded in 1820, originally named “State Seminary.” In 1828, the school was renamed to “Indiana College” before the name “Indiana University” was finally decided in 1838. One of the most consequential presidents in IU’s history was Herman B Wells. During his tenure, which began in 1938, Wells expanded the campus from 137 acres

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to 1,800 acres. He supported the intellectual freedom of IU’s faculty and worked to advance racial equality by desegregating IU’s campus. One of his first successes as president was desegregating the Indiana Memorial Union in the late 1930s, according to the 2001 edition of the Journal of the Indiana University Student Personnel Association. In 1947, professor Alfred Kinsey generated controversy when he established what is now known as the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction. Originally a zoologist studying wasps, Kinsey became interested in human sexuality and conducted 18,000 interviews in order to write a book. Although he received praise for his work, Kinsey also faced criticism, prompting then-IU President Herman B Wells to defend Kinsey on the basis of free speech.

In the 1970s, IU became known nationally for the Little 500 when “Breaking Away”, filmed in Bloomington, won an Oscar. The decade was great for sports, with the Indiana men’s swimming team winning the NCAA championship four times with help from team member Mark Spitz, who later won 7 Olympic gold medals. In 1976, the Indiana men’s basketball team won the NCAA championship after a perfect season, winning the championship again in 1981 and 1987. In 1987, the iconic Sample Gates finished construction, becoming a gateway from Kirkwood Avenue to the edge of campus after nearly a century of failed plans to build an arch-like structure in the location. Today, IU is home to 45,000 students with an endowment of $3.32 billion, a massive evolution from its 10 student enrollment when it began two centuries ago.

ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


IU ARCHIVES

A photograph of Frances Marshall, the first black woman to graduate from IU, taken from page 92 of the 1919 Arbutus yearbook.

DEPARTMENT OF INTERNATIONAL

STUDIES GLOBAL EDUCATION...

Global Development ∙ Peace and Conflict ∙ Global Health and Environment Culture and Politics ∙ Human Rights and International Law Diplomacy, Security, Governance Non-Governmental Organizations Law and the Legal Professions ∙ Foreign Service ∙ Public Relations Media Think Tanks ∙ Business ∙ Municipal, State, and Federal Agencies Political Action Committees ∙ Tourism Performing Arts ∙ Management ∙ Promotion ∙ Museums Film and Recording Industries ∙ Journalism ∙ Education

...GLOBAL CAREERS

IDS FILE PHOTO

The Cutters, an independent team, took the script of the movie “Breaking Away,” and turned it into reality at the 1984 Little 500 bicycle race at Bill Armstrong Stadium, winning the event. They went on to become the winningest team in Little 500 history with 12 championships

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Herman B Wells Coloring Page Color in this illustration of Herman B Wells, the 11th president of IU, during a study break or just for fun. Illustration by Lawren Elderkin lelderki@iu.edu | @LawrenElderkin

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IU’S BEST SIGHTS AND VIEWS

From Dunn Woods to Sample Gates, there’s no shortage of sights to see at IU Bloomington

By Grant Wheeler grawheel@iu.edu

Music students for special concerts. Eskenazi Museum of Art

As any IU student will tell you, the university is home to one of the most beautiful campuses in the country. Whether you’re enjoying the natural campus wonders or admiring the signature limestone architecture, there’s no shortage of extraordinary sights to see at IU. Cox Arboretum Located just south of 10th Street and west of Herman B Wells Library, the Jesse H. and Beulah Chanley Cox Arboretumis home to a stunning array of trees and other plant life, many of which are native to Indiana. It also features the Metz Carillon, a 65-bell tower that can be heard playing everything from Bach to Britney Spears throughout the day and is occasionally played by Jacobs School of

Showalter Fountain on June 14, 2021.

Trees line the walkways in Dunn’s Woods.

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Aside from being a sight to see in its own right, the Eskenazi Museum of Art exhibits permanent collections ranging from 18thcentury European paintings to ancient Sumerian pottery to Gandharan bronze sculptures. Attendees can also visit the museum’s rotating exhibitions, which have recently displayed costumes worn by actress Glenn Close, ancient Roman fashion, and artist Stuart Davis’ “Swing Landscape.” Attendance is always free and the museum can be found just north of Showalter Fountain.

crossed with walking paths and dotted with places to sit and admire the scenery. It’s a great place to take a break from the hustle and bustle of campus life and is especially stunning in spring and autumn. Biology Building Greenhouse If you’ve had enough of the Indiana foliage, take a walk through the greenhouse next to the Biology Building. Home to a bevy of plants from all over the world, the greenhouse is free and open to the public during the week. Featured flora come from deserts and rainforests alike, and even include toxic and carnivorous plants.

Dunn Woods

Showalter Fountain

Those who want to stroll through a forest without leaving campus should look no further than Dunn Woods. The woods are criss-

Located between the Lilly Library, the IU Auditorium, and the Eskenazi Museum is Showalter Fountain. Its location and the

IDS FILE PHOTO BY ETHAN LEVY

IDS FILE PHOTO BY ANNA BROWN

Students walk through the arboretum.

Students walking past the Sample Gates are pictured.

sculpture of the birth of Venus at its center make it one of the most well-known landmarks on campus. Like the Sample Gates, the ideal time to visit is at sunset, as the open west side of the plaza allows a dazzling view down Seventh Street. Sample Gates Perhaps the most iconic spot on campus — and almost certainly the most photographed — the Sample Gates can be found at the intersection of Kirkwood Avenue and Indiana Avenue. Funded by Edson Sample and named for his parents, Louise and Kimsey Sample, the Gates act as a gateway between IU and the Bloomington community, leading into the most historic section of campus, the Old Crescent. Visit during the evening for a brilliant view through the gates of the sunset over Kirkwood Avenue.

IDS FILE PHOTO BY ANNA TIPLICK

IDS FILE PHOTO

ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


The top 7 best spots to study on campus By John Hultquist

jrhultqu@iu.edu | @jrhultqu

Summer has begun, but it is never too early to consider your favorite studying spots around campus. Looking ahead to next year, these spots are where you would most likely find me studying. Here are my favorite Bloomington study spots: The Indiana Memorial Union food court The existent hustle and bustle of college life proves true in the IMU’s basement. IU Dining supplies many options for food, conveniently close to tables students can use for studying and socializing. The IMU allows students a place to study in an environment where one can watch people, run into old friends and focus on getting work done. The Learning Commons on the first floor west tower of Wells Library Most people choose their go-to study spot in the Wells Library. The exterior windows on the upper floors makes me prefer the west tower Learning Commons on the first floor. Whispering and indoor voices are often tolerated by most, and the first floor houses many study rooms stu-

dents can check out for group work and projects. Outside — anywhere on campus An old ratty t-shirt and a bench in the arboretum (or, if you are lucky, a hammock), all provide a space to work in fresh air. No outdoor space is better than the next because we pick the best spots based on weather, work that needs to be done and our daily schedules. My favorite places outside include Dunn Meadow and the Jesse H. and Beulah Cox Arboretum. A local coffee/tea shop This option is not inclusive for the college budget, but perks of studying off of campus include a caffeine kick (if you’re into it) and a scenery change. Popular spots off campus include Soma Coffee House and Juice Bar, Sunny Poke and Tea and Crumble Coffee and Bakery. The Paul O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs In 2017, the O’Neill School received grants to do renovations, including making the graduate center LEED gold certified. The modernized exterior could fascinate anyone and, upon walk-

ILLUSTRATION BY DONYÁ COLLINS

ing into the building, the bright light from floor to ceiling windows allows the sun into the room, whether working on the second or third floor. The natural light is capable of making anyone happy and more inclined to work harder while studying. Your favorite corner of any random classroom building Never underestimate the power of a corner of a room in an IU building. My most productive college hours come from sitting on the floor — back against the wall, propping me up — setting deadlines for myself and a list of wants needing

to be accomplished. Let indecisiveness find your next productive workspace. Your room Honestly, this is my least favorite location. It is hard to regulate dorm room living due to people’s volume out in the hallway and constantly moving around the building. If you have a roommate, you must work in the presence of another student, whom you may or may not get along with. Sometimes that late-night cram session before a large exam or a last-minute paper requires the comfort of your room, though, so it has to remain an option.

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Graduate running back Stephen Carr and junior quarterback Jack Tuttle celebrate Carr’s touchdown Oct. 16, 2021, at Memorial Stadium.

IDS FILE PHOTO BY KAMARON FARVER

How to prepare for IU game days By Ellie Albin

ealbin@iu.edu | @EllieAlbin1

Game days are big at IU: packed parking lots, football tailgates, students walking to the stadiums and, obviously, a sea of cream and crimson spirit wear. But every cheering fan that packs into IU’s stadiums goes into game day with a plan. Review the list below to make sure you’ve checked all the boxes for a perfect day out and about at IU’s biggest sporting venues. Buying tickets: Tickets for the 2022-23 football and basketball seasons are on sale now. To buy a student combo pack –– meaning tickets to seven home football games and up to 16 home men’s basketball games –– the price is $425. This can be charged to a student’s bursar. Football season tickets can also be bought without the basketball combo. The

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price for football season tickets is $105. When arriving at games, students should make sure they have both their tickets and student ID ready to show at the gates. Besides football and men’s basketball, though, all sporting events are free for students with their ID. Finding an outfit: It’s easy to find IU gear on and around campus. With places like the IU Varsity Shop, Tracks, the IMU bookstore, Greetings, The Indiana Shop and T.I.S. College Bookstore just footsteps away from campus, finding cream and crimson jerseys, shirts and other gear is simple. It’s important to dress accordingly for different seasons, too. Shorts, tank tops, sunscreen and sunglasses are vital to surviving the heat of the first few football games, but jackets and pants quickly become necessary once October rolls around. And, if you plan on waiting in line outside Assembly Hall to

grab the best general admission seats during basketball season, hats and heavy coats help with the multi-hour wait. Game food: While many people like to tailgate before games, there are many options in Bloomington if you’d rather dine-in somewhere. Restaurants such as BuffaLouie’s –– whose walls are covered in IU memorabilia –– Mother Bear’s Pizza or Nick’s English Hut offer food good enough to fuel you up for any big game. Traffic and parking: Traffic can get pretty hectic on game days at IU, especially during football and basketball seasons. It is recommended that you buy a parking pass from the IU Athletics Ticket Offices prior to your arrival at IU’s sporting venues. The IU Athletics Ticket Offices also recommends buying a seasonal parking pass for games at Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall. If

paying for parking at a single game, though, it should be noted that only cash is accepted at the gate. In addition to planning in advance, be patient when waiting in traffic. Police are often directing traffic outside the stadiums, so pay attention to their signals and wait your turn. Permitted items: Most of the rules at Memorial Stadium are standard when compared to stadiums across the nation. However, you may not know that they have a clear bag policy, meaning you can only bring in clear plastic bags, a one-gallon freezer bag or a clutch with or without a handle. Items such as backpacks, computer bags, camera cases and more are prohibited. Assembly Hall follows these same guidelines. With this info in mind, you’re bound to have a great time at any IU sporting event and soak in the whole experience.

ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


Tailgating necessities for football season By Garrett Newman ganewman@iu.edu

ILLUSTRATIONS BY CAILIN O’MALLEY

In fall, the leaves begin to turn, the weather enters its most pleasant phase — and football returns, electrifying the college sports atmosphere. For some, a tailgate can be as little as a radio playing the game and a nice day grilling outside. For others, though, it has become a way of life, something that requires constant fine-tuning to achieve the best gameday experience. This fall, make sure that the tailgate you attend has these football season necessities. Pop-Up Tent: If you’ve been in Indiana before, you know that the weather flip-flops on a whim. The ever-

changing climate doesn’t stop for football season, where it will go from 93 degrees of blazing sun to a cool downpour in the span of a half an hour. A pop-up tent will save you a great deal of inconvenience at the tailgate by eliminating any risk of bad weather that could negatively affect your gameday experience. Bluetooth Speakers: Nothing is worse than waking up early, camping out in the tailgate fields, finally getting to your spot and realizing that you forgot a speaker. The bluetooth speaker is the heart of any good tailgate – it is responsible for broadcasting

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the music or game coverage to your entire party. Depending on how many screens you’ve included in your setup, some people may not be able to watch the game. Having a speaker ensures everyone is included, there will never be a dull moment. Portable Power Station: A portable power station is incredibly helpful when it comes to keeping phones and other devices charged and ready to go. Many of these offer various outlets and ports, allowing anyone to take advantage of them no matter the phone brand. A portable power station is also a lifesaver

if you need to plug in a television to catch the beginning of College Gameday or SportsCenter. Cooler: A good cooler is crucial to a successful tailgate and is arguably the most important item on this list. No matter what beverages you choose to pack, ice cold is always better than lukewarm. If the cooler is large enough, you can store perishable food items inside of it as well. Ice is convenient to buy at gas stations and grocery stores: just stop at Kroger or Marathon before the day of the game, and you’ll be all set for Saturdays this fall.

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Student life through the years

You’ll study a lot, but there’s much more to being a Hoosier. Here are some experiences of those who came before you.

2013 Students reach for packets of brightly-colored powder during a Holi celebration in the Collins Living-Learning Center courtyard. Holi is a Hindu festival that celebrates the beginning of spring.

ARBUTUS FILE PHOTO

IDS FILE PHOTO BY AMELIA CHONG

1976 Now, students register for classes online. But for many years, students waited in line to sign up for classes in person.

IU ARCHIVES

1942 Members of IU’s Women’s Auxiliary Training Corps (WATC) salute Col. Raymond Shoemaker. The group was created to train women for future roles in the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) or the Naval Auxiliary Women Appointed for Volunteer Services (WAVES). during World War II.

1973 Students frolic in the rain in the Campus River that runs through IU’s campus. ARBUTUS FILE PHOTO

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ARBUTUS FILE PHOTO

2007 Senior Shannon Shields and Cesalie Black, whose brother is a patient at Riley Hospital for Children, dance to raise money during the Dance Marathon. Students participate in the annual event on the IU campus.

ARBUTUS FILE PHOTO

2018 Senior Zixuan Wang plays the Pipa, a four-stringed Chinese musical instrument that sometimes called the Chinese lute during an event organized by Chinese Calligraphy Club at the Mathers Museum.

IU ARCHIVES

1910 Arthur “Cotton” Berndt is the only IU athlete to have captained three different teams — baseball, basketball and football. He was inducted into the IU Athletic Hall of Fame in 1997.

ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


IU ARCHIVES

1965 Little 500 Festival Queen Cassandra Lee Kamp poses with a phone in 1965. Before cell phones, landline phones were the only way for students to make calls

ARBUTUS FILE PHOTO

1988 Cheers ring out during the annual commencement ceremony in Memorial Stadium on a sunny day in 1988.

IDS FILE PHOTO BY TORI KRZYSTON

2021 IU junior and President of The Mask Project at IU Arianna Smith finishes making a mask by sewing pleats in the fabric Oct. 22, 2021, at the College Mall. Smith established The Mask Project at IU to help the Bloomington Mask Drive with its goal of protecting the Bloomington community. “I knew that I wanted to try to help out,” Smith said. “I thought ‘I should just start an organization to connect students with the same mission.’” IDS FILE PHOTO

2011 Fans storm the court after IU beat the no. 1-ranked Kentucky Wildcats at Assembly Hall in Bloomington Dec. 10, 2011.

ARBUTUS FILE PHOTO

1996 Members of the African American Dance Company perform a piece choreographed by director Iris Rosa called “Spiritual Suite.”

SUMMER 2022 | ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE

IDS FILE PHOTO BY CONNOR WOLLENSAK

2010 The fundraising total for the 2010 IU Dance Marathon (IUDM), the 20th anniversary, was $1,602,713.20.

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How to decorate your dorm room IDS FILE PHOTO BY AVERY ANTILL

A dorm room is pictured on March 6, 2022. By Tory Basile vlbasile@iu.edu

There’s nothing that says “home sweet home” quite like the cold embrace of white cinderblock walls and suspiciously-stained carpet. When moving into a college dorm room, it can feel overwhelming trying to make the space your own. Here are a few tips on how to make your dorm room feel less dreary and more personal. Comfortable Bedding and Seating Bedding isn’t just important for decorating your dorm room: it’s the most essential part of making your space feel cozy. When you’re coming back after a long day, you’ll want an inviting bed for your after-class naps. Students can choose colorful duvet covers and throw pillows to brighten up their beds. Many students get foam toppers for

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their mattresses to make them more comfortable. Aside from bedding, you may choose to get additional seating for when their friends visit — bean bags, floor pillows and cushions are popular choices to combine function with decor. Start With Wall Art Posters, prints and art of any kind are some of the easiest and most versatile ways to decorate your dorm room. Whether you want to keep it simple with a poster or two or create an entire collage, wall art can add a personal touch to an otherwise plain space. When choosing art for a dorm room, many students consider specific color schemes, their favorite movies, musicians and athletes, or pictures of their friends and family. There are several websites — like Redbubble, Society6 and Etsy — that allow

you to directly support an artist when you purchase their poster. Other sites, like AllPosters.com, have thousands of options for sale. If you’re looking to decorate on a budget, there are online resources like Unsplash and the Met Museum Collection offer free, printable artwork for you to download. Lighten Up the Room As charming as we all know harsh overhead lighting is, adding other light sources to your dorm room can make it feel much cozier. Hanging fairy lights are an easy choice for students looking to give their room a soft, cozy glow. LED strip lights are another everpopular option, and can change color to suit whatever mood you may be feeling. If you’re looking to get creative, there are all kinds of novelty string lights online. Hanging lanterns, butterflies, footballs, fla-

mingos — the options are endless. Rugs! Depending on whether your dorm room has carpet or not, you may want to consider adding a rug. Even if it’s carpeted, you may want one if your carpet looks particularly beat up. Area rugs are helpful when trying to cover a larger space. Target and Rugs.com have several inexpensive rugs that are perfect for dorm rooms. Storage — Function and Decor Storage is essential when you’re living in a small space like a dorm room. Luckily, storage options can also serve as decor. Some students use multi-purpose storage ottomans, while others use hanging shelves or jewelry organizers. There are many storage methods that act as decor while also helping you organize your limited space.

ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


Mental and physical health resources at IU The Student Health Center provides free and low-cost care options.

By Marissa Meador marnmead@iu.edu

College can be time-consuming and stressful. However, the Student Health Center is a useful resource on campus to stay healthy and treat unexpected or chronic health issues. Physical Health At the Student Health Center’s medical clinic, students can receive care for illness and injury. Routine appointments, including physical therapy and optometry, are also offered. For athletes, the clinic offers sports counseling and physicals. Specialists treat sports injuries and conduct concussionrelated neurocognitive testing. For general fitness purposes, the clinic offers nutritional guidance and help with weight gain or loss. For those struggling with addiction, IU offers tobacco and vaping cessation tools, including nicotine replacement therapy, for free. General substance use intervention care is also offered. The Student Health Center also has a pharmacy where students can pick up pre-

scription and over-the-counter medications. A list of services and costs is available on the health center website. Mental Health IU students receive two free counseling sessions with Counseling and Psychological Services per semester. Students can schedule virtual or in-person sessions and can reserve private rooms in the Student Health Center during virtual appointments. Counseling and Psychological Services offer counselors proficient in English, Mandarin and Spanish, with drop-in and by-appointment sessions at culture centers across campus through the Let’s Talk program. IU also has a team of counselors trained in LGBTQ issues, including genderaffirming care, and offers hormone therapy at the Student Health Center. Other resources include access to the mental health assessment app WellTrack, virtual and prerecorded workshops, couples counseling, psychiatric care, mental illness assessments and eating disorder support. Group counseling is another IU re-

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source. Support groups deal with a variety of subjects, ranging from grief and loss to chronic illness support. Other groups work on skills like managing emotions and anxiety. Depending on the group, counseling is either free or pay-per-session For advice on specifi c mental health issues, check out the “health answers” section of their site. Sexual Health IU off e rs sexually transmitted infection testing, HIV prevention care for high risk patients and HPV vaccinations. Th e Student Health Center also off ers gynecological health services, including birth control options. Pregnancy testing and care is available as well. Th e Student Health Center, in collaboration with IU Student Government and the Residence Halls Association, sponsor a program that delivers safe sex supplies for free. Counseling and Psychological Services provides sexual assault crisis services, including individual or group therapy, referIDS FILE PHOTO BY KATHARINE KHAMHAENGWONG rals for medical care and assistance The Counseling and Psychological Services offices are located on the fourth floor of the IU Health when reporting sexual assault. Center.

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Campus through the seasons IU is known for its lush scenery. It’s ranked among the most beautiful college campuses in the country. Here’s a sneak peek at the seasons to come. IDS FILE PHOTO BY JAMES BROSHER WINTER Student battle in a snow ball fight in Dunn Meadow in 2009. IU canceled classes that year due to snow. Average high temperatures during the winter months are in the upper 30s and lows are in the 20s, but they go lower — and can feel much lower with a wind chill. It’s important to wear hats, gloves and layers of clothes for long walks through campus.

IDS FILE PHOTO FALL Senior Wanda Krieger and her friend Rachel Baszynski walk down Seventh Street in October 2014. Temperatures can vary substantially during the autumn months from highs in the 60s-70s and lows in the 40s-50s.

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ARBUTUS FILE PHOTO SUMMER There are an estimated 12,000 trees on the IU campus that create a beautiful and changing backdrop for students out for a walk during the warm weather months. Summer in Bloomington can be hot and humid with average highs in the 80s. Average lows are in the 60s.

IDS FILE PHOTO BY SARAH ZYGMUNTOWSKI SPRING A group of graduates pose in their caps May 2, 2019 outside Bryan Hall. The group met their freshman year in the Kelley Living Learning Center. During March, April and May, high temperatures can range from the 50s to the 70s.

ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


Here’s how to avoid unnecessary problems with roommates By Olivia Franklin

orfrankl@iu.edu | @Livvvvv_5

Many students worry who they are going to room with when moving into college, and how that roommate experience will go. Make sure you talk to your roommate before you live with them Students can either room with someone they know from high school, meet someone online to room with or choose randomly, like I did. No matter which one, you should get to know your roommate before you actually move in and lay out some ground rules. Before I actually moved in with my roommate, we emailed and texted about how we planned to set up our room, how we would handle sharing snacks and other things. I did not have a bad experience with my freshman year roommate, but at times it was awkward. At the beginning of the year we somewhat talked about our boundaries but as the year progressed we did not tell each other when things would bother us, so tension would build up a little bit. I feel like if we had communicated more then things would not have been as bad. Do not let your living situation ruin a relationship Whether you know the person before you

live with them or not, you should never let the living situation ruin the relationship. Last year I lived with four of my close friends, most of whom I met during my freshman year. I love all of them — but it was not a great living experience. We did not communicate our boundaries and expectations at the beginning of the year, so we all got frustrated pretty fast. We had a house meeting over what bothered us and, though it did help a little bit, it was too far overdue to fix everything. Since roommates are a huge reason why a living situation can be good or bad, you should talk to people about their lifestyle before you decide to live with them. Believe me — it’s not worth it to ruin a friendship. If you do decide to live with your friends or someone you already know, make sure you communicate well and respect their boundaries. The worst thing you can do is ignore the problem and let it grow into something that could ruin the relationship. Respect your roommates’ boundaries This year I lived with three girls that I already knew, so I knew we would get along. We decided to have a roommate meeting as soon as possible, which quickly assured me this living situation was going to be better than in the past.

ILLUSTRATION BY JUNO MARTIN

This was probably my favorite year of college so far. My roommates and I all had good relationships, and we hung out all the time outside of the house. If any of us had a problem, we communicated it to the others, and the problem was fixed every time. Whenever someone wanted the dishes done, we all made sure to hand-wash our dishes or make sure they were put in the dishwasher. We also all had different shelves in the pantry and in the fridge, so we didn’t take each other’s food. Overall, being respectful

of others and asking before doing something was always our go-to. For my college experience, I think that my roommates each year definitely had an effect on whether I was social and how well I did in my classes. My best advice is: if you are looking for a roommate, make sure you know them for a little bit beforehand so you can get an understanding of who they are as a person. You do not want to have a bad year because of who you are living with.

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ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022 Down:

2. Mathers, 4. Greenhouse, 6. Basketball, 10. Eskenazi

Across:

1. Bloomington, 3. Sample Gates, 5. Little Five, 7. Union, 8. Hoosiers, 9. Kelley, 11. Wylie, 12. Tailgate, 13. Indiana

Help the Little 500 bike find the finish line, and test your knowledge with a crossword!

HOOSIER GAMES


1

2

Down: 2. IU Museum on Indiana Avenue

3

4

4. Jordan Hall _____________ 6. __________ is played in Assembly Hall 5

10. Museum that lights up

6

Across:

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1. A city in Monroe County 3. Located between Franklin Hall and Bryan Hall

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5. The biggest college weekend 7. Intersection of Seventh Street and Woodlawn Avenue 8. We are the _________

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9. IU alum considered the modern founder of Steak ‘n Shake

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11. One of the two orange-red brick buildings on the Bloomington campus 12. Social gathering typically involving cars and trucks 13. A midwest state

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Then-junior Ollie Grcich sings as a part of the band Street Pennies on Feb. 16, 2022, at The Bluebird Nightclub. Grcich is also a co-president for the Bloomington Delta Music Club.

IDS FILE PHOTO BY ETHAN LEVY

Bloomington’s music venue options

Bloomington celebrates every genre, including punk, country and indie By Taylor Satoski

tsatoski@iu.edu | @taylorsatoski

Bloomington’s music community includes everyone, from people who enjoy listening to music to the artists who create and play it. Genres range from punk to classical and country to indie. While the Bloomington house show community is vibrant and thriving, venues also provide musicians with stages to perform covers or original music. Blockhouse Bar, open Tuesday through Saturday, puts on open mics where artists are able to support one another and form longlasting relationships. The venue hosts many shows, from local bands to touring artists.

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They also hold honky-tonks after open mics on Tuesdays and feature call-and-response jazz on Wednesdays. Open seven days a week, The Back Door is a dedicated LGBTQ space in Bloomington. Sundays are karaoke nights and, on Mondays, everything is half price. Wednesdays give drag performers an open stage to show off their talent. After shows on Friday and Saturday nights, DJs perform sets. On the first Thursday of every month, the venue offers free and confidential gonorrhea, chlamydia and HIV testing. The Bluebird, a rock bar, features different touring acts, local musicians and cover bands. The walls of the bar and performance

areas showcase popular artists who have performed on their stage, including Koko Taylor, Jimmy Eat World and Morgan Wallen. The walls of the musician’s backroom are lined with signatures, notes and stickers from past musicians. The Bishop Bar, open seven days a week, is half bar and half designated performance space. They occasionally hold 18+ nights, but most are 21+. The performance space leaves room for a dance floor, while booths are in the back. The Bishop Bar typically showcases indie artists. The Orbit Room, an underground bar open Tuesday through Saturday, is known for their arcade and hot dogs. They have karaoke

nights on Tuesdays, and hold many performances by artists across different genres of music. Tuesdays at the Orbit Room also mean free team trivia nights with Bloomington Pub Quiz. The Buskirk-Chumley Theater on Kirkwood Avenue has featured artists such as Five For Fighting and Matt Kearney. It’s also a hotspot for theater, dance, film screenings, festivals and stand up comedy. Whether you’re wanting to perform at a venue or listen to your favorite music, Bloomington has everything you need. You can find country artists, rock musicians, dubstep and many other genres of music in this community.

ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


Finding Faith in Bloomington By Christy Avery

averycm@iu.edu | @christym_avery

There are many religious organizations in Bloomington where people of all beliefs can practice their faith and find community. Here is a sample of what’s offered. A more extensive list can be found at the IDS religious services directory at guides.idsnews.com/religious. Baptist | ubcbloomington.org University Baptist Church 3740 E. Third St. Buddhist (Tibetan) | tmbcc.org Tibetan Mongolian Buddhist Cultural

Center and Kumbum Chamtse Ling Monastery 3655 S. Snoddy Rd. Catholic | hoosiercatholic.org St. Paul Catholic Center 1413 E. 17th St. Episcopal | ecm.so.indiana.edu Episcopal Campus Ministry at IU 719 E. Seventh St. Islamic | icob.org Islamic Center of Bloomington 1925 E. Atwater Ave. Jewish | bethshalom-bjc.org

Congregation Beth Shalom 3750 E. Third St. Baha’i | bloomingtoninbahais.org Baha’i Association of Indiana University 424 S. College Mall Rd. Lutheran | lcmiu.net Rose House Lutheran Campus Ministry at IU 314 S. Rose Ave. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints | lds.org Bloomington Institute of Religion 333 S. Highland Ave.

A Canterbury House sign is seen Nov. 14, 2021, at 719 E. Seventh St. Canterbury House is an Episcopal Campus Ministry located on IU’s campus.

Are you interested in an opportunity to experience real research in a supportive, collaborative environment? Our annual ÄÆ» Æ µ Ä ¤ÆÊ ŬÆÊÐďå Æ ¶ Ê »¶ ďå Æ ß»µ ¶ Ð 'W ±»»µ¤¶ л¶ ߤТ Ó±Ðå µ ¶Ð»ÆÊ ß¢» conduct research that actively engages students ߤТ »µÄÓФ¶ ¶ ij»Æ technology. We invite you to apply now!

Deadline for Application: August 1, 2022 To learn more and apply, visit our ß Ê¤Ð go.iu.edu/2FPp

Korean Methodist Church | iukumc.net Korean United Methodist Church 1924 E. Third St. Nondenominational | citychurchbloomington.org City Church for All Nations 1200 N. Russell Rd. Mennonite | bloomingtonmenno.org Mennonite Fellowship of Bloomington 2420 E. Third St. Unitarian | uubloomington.org Unitarian Universalist Church and Campus Ministry 2120 N. Fee Ln.

IDS FILE PHOTO BY MALLOREY DAUNHAUER


A guide to eating on Fourth Street Fourth Street contains international restaurants serving a variety of authentic food.

Taste of India is located at 316 E. Fourth St. in downtown Bloomington. The restaurant serves Indian cuisine from north and south India and has a daily lunch buffet from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. By Lexi Lindenmayer

that will satisfy your cravings.

Fourth Street contains an array of international restaurants, serving incredible, authentic food beloved by students, townies and visitors alike. Read this guide to start on your culinary journey.

Burma Garden Serving Burmese cuisine, Burma Garden offers traditional dishes such as tea leaf salad, fish soup with rice noodles and coconut noodle soup with chicken.

Anatolia

Dat’s Cajun

Anatolia offers delicious dishes of Turkish and Mediterranean cuisine. Order some of the local favorites like the beef doner kebab or the shepherd’s salad with a hot cup of Turkish tea.

Dat’s Cajun serves a wide menu of musttry Cajun and Creole dishes. From favorites like Drunken Chicken and the Datwich to spicier options like etouffee and the Voodoo chicken, there is something for everyone to enjoy.

lindena@iu.edu | @lexilindenmayer

Anyetsang’s Little Tibet As Bloomington’s one and only Tibetan restaurant, Little Tibet does not disappoint. The restaurant serves dumplings and Tibetian specials, along with a variety of Indian and Thai dishes. On top of that, you can enjoy your meal on their garden patio. Btown Gyros If you are craving some Greek food, Btown Gyros has you covered. Specializing in Greek cuisine, the restaurant serves gyros, falafel, pita and hummus, baba ganoush, and other Mediterranean dishes

48

IDS FILE PHOTO BY TY VINSON

IDS FILE PHOTO BY MADDIE LUCIA

Anatolia Restaurant is a Turkish restaurant on Fourth Street. It’s one of many international food options in Bloomington.

Do Asian Fusion Restaurant While they primarily focus on Korean food, Do Asian Fusion Restaurant specializes in infusing elements of many asian cuisines into their dishes. Their fun decorations and colorful lights combined with the inventive food makes the restaurant a musttry. Indian Garden Restaurant Indian Garden Restaurant’s menu features nearly 100 Indian dishes to keep you coming back for more. The restaurant is

Little Tibet restaurant is located on Fourth Street.

IDS FILE PHOTO

ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


best known for its modern take of classic dishes as well as its promise of using quality, fresh ingredients. Korea Restaurant Korea Restaurant serves all types of authentic Korean dishes such as sushi rolls, noodle and rice entrees, soups and stews, stir-fries, and many others. Try sitting outside while dining to truly experience the restaurant’s authentic atmosphere. My Thai Downtown Considering a Thai restaurant? Well, look no further than My Thai Downtown. Try their house specials of shrimp tempura, vegetable tempura and cucumber salad, or the Thai clear soup. Siam House As a Bloomington favorite, Siam House is the perfect place to try all types of Thai food. They offer everything from noodle entrees to fried rice dishes to a variety of curry options. Taste of India While the menu features primarily Northern Indian cuisine, Taste of India also serves Southern Indian cuisine. The restaurant offers a lunch buffet seven days a week from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. with dinner hours going from 4 to 10 p.m.

IDS FILE PHOTO

Siam House is a favorite among IU students.

Your college experience, captured in one book. The new friends you meet, the teams you cheer for, the concerts you attend, these are the moments at Indiana University that define who you are for years to come. The Arbutus yearbook covers it all. It is your IU experience, captured in one book. Look for information about portrait sessions and purchasing the yearbook this fall. More information can be found at iuyearbook.com


What we wish we knew

IDS editors share what they wish they knew at the beginning of their college careers “Join a lot of clubs and organizations, and once you figure out what you like, don’t be afraid to drop the ones you don’t love as much.”

“Your opinions and views will change, but that doesn’t mean you have to become a completely different person.”

Natalie Ingalls

Emma Pawlitz

Social Media Editor

Sports Editor

“Freshman year is a time for personal growth, so don’t feel pressured to adapt immediately or rush to do a million things. Take things as they come — you have four years to figure things out.”

“Don’t be hesitant to join clubs or try something completely new. Everyone else here is also just trying to figure it out.” Sean Gilley Opinion Editor

Marissa Meador News Editor

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“You don’t need to know exactly what you want to do yet. It’s easy to feel trapped in whatever path you decided for yourself when you applied, but college is a fantastic opportunity to explore. There’s plenty of time to discover new interests and continue developing your identity.”

“I wish I’d known that college would be so much better if I put myself out there and tried new things. My first year of college, I pretty much kept to the same things I did in high school and didn’t branch out at all. I got much more involved my sophomore year and, because I did so, I found a ton of new interests and communities of people that I care about.”

Cailin O’Malley

Nadia Scharf

Design Editor

Managing Editor

ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022



Organization tips for freshmen and new students

ILLUSTRATION BY CAILIN O’MALLEY

By Carter DeJong

cadejong@iu.edu | @dejong_carter

For most people, university involves much more studying and coursework than high school. These effective organization techniques can help you succeed. Canvas Canvas is an invaluable tool that almost all professors at IU use. It allows students to see their grades, check when assignments are due, view feedback from professors and see syllabi and other files for each class. As a student, you’ll want to download the Canvas app for your phone. Canvas is very intuitive and does most of the organizational

52

work for you. The mobile app provides you with a to-do list where you can find all your assignments in order of when they are due. Canvas also puts all of your assignments into a calendar. Aside from these features, Canvas also allows you to create “what if” scenarios for your grades. You can input hypothetical scores for assignments and tests to see how well you need to do on it to get the grade you want. This is especially useful if you are struggling in a class late in the semester— you can check final exam grades to make sure you pass. Notes You are obviously going to be taking a lot

of notes, no matter what your major is. In college, while some professors want you to use paper and pen to take notes, most won’t care. Taking notes on your laptop or tablet means you won’t have to carry multiple notebooks with you everywhere. Most people can type faster than they can write, so you will have more time to focus on what the instructor is saying instead of trying to write it all down. Digitizing your notes also means you can access them from anywhere. You can read over your notes while you are walking around campus or even use text to speech for your phone to read them to you.

Making a list Even though Canvas creates a to-do list and a calendar for you, it can be helpful to create a list of your assignments and post it somewhere around your work space. This will serve as a reminder every time you’re nearby it. The last few weeks of the semester can be overwhelming and you may feel like you have so much to do. To take things one step at a time, I love making a list of all my assignments a couple weeks before the end of each semester. It feels much more manageable, and you get the satisfaction of crossing off each assignment when you turn it in.

ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


Free things to do on IU’s campus By Lexi Lindenmayer

lindena@iu.edu | @lexilindenmayer

College can be fun, but it can also be expensive. From those much needed Pizza X orders to that tailgating outfit you just had to have, the charges start to add up. When finding fun things to do around campus, consider these activities before you decide to reach for your wallet. Visit an art gallery or museum Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art is a three-story museum located on Seventh Street next to the IU Auditorium. This museum offers multiple exhibits on each of its three levels, displaying art from different cultures and regions across the world. Take a stroll through this exhilarating museum and experience the wonders of ancient Greek pottery, paintings by Pablo Picasso, Jackson Pollock, Claude Monet, Renaissance panels and so many more artworks.

camp. Just find two trees close enough together and hang up your hammock. Then, prepare to people-watch as students crowd the trails or maybe take a nap to the calming noises of the water. Spend some time at IU Late Nite events IU Late Nite is a student-centered community dedicated to offering free, exciting entertainment and events for students every Friday. Held at the Indiana Memorial Union, the group offers a fun lineup of activities, which have included karaoke, crafts, haunted houses, dances, game nights and so much more. Whether it’s breaking plates for stress relief or attending a drag show, Late Nite has it all planned and ready for your enjoyment.

Attend a comedy show IU is home to a variety of comedy groups. The seven groups on campus are Awkward Silence Comedy, Backdoor Comedy, Boy in the Bubble Comedy, Full Frontal Comedy, Ladies Night, Midnight Snack Comedy and the University tWits. These groups, specializing in different combinations of sketch comedy, improv and stand up, will conduct free shows for anyone and everyone to attend. Pick a group, follow their season and bring along some friends for a night of laughter. Hammock around campus As soon as the temperature hits 60 degrees, be prepared for campus to come alive with students taking up every inch of green lawn space and outdoor seating. Relaxing in a hammock around campus is a great way to take advantage of the warm weather. Right outside the Indiana Memorial Union along Campus River is an ideal spot to set up

IDS FILE PHOTO BY ETHAN LEVY

The Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art is pictured on Sept. 9, 2021, located at 1133 E. Seventh St.

STUDEN T O PERATED & UN IVERSIT Y F UN DED

FREE and SAFE rides for students within Bloomington city limits

iuride.indiana.edu Download the

mobile app to request a ride.


IU Student Leaders Share Advice Here is some advice from people who have been in your shoes.

Kyle Seibert

Dana Wilson

IU Student Body President

IU Black Student Union President

“My advice to the class of 2026 is this: remember to breathe! During your time at IU, you will experience your highest highs and your lowest lows. Trust me when I say you don’t need to have everything figured out right now — taking the time to simply breathe and remind yourself of this fact is so important. This journey is a marathon, not a sprint, and taking a few minutes here and there to catch your breath, refocus, and remember your time at Indiana University will make your experience here at IU so much more worthwhile.”

“If I could give any advice to the incoming freshmen, it would be two things. Get to know your instructors and get involved! So many classes I’ve been in these two years, and I can tell you that getting to know your instructor will take you a long way. If they see you making an effort they will pull strings for you, that they might not pull for others. Being involved is so important! So many students go to class and go to their dorms. It was so important for me to not be just a number at IU, so I took on so many opportunities. You’ll find people who are just like you, and it’ll make college way more fun!”

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ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE | SUMMER 2022


Karen Cheng Asian American Association President “My best piece of advice is to join a student organization at IU, because it is one of the best ways to make meaningful friends and potentially gain leadership experience. As a freshman, I didn’t find my true friends until months after the fall semester started when I joined the Asian student organizations on campus, like Asian American Association, Alpha Kappa Delta Phi and Vietnamese Student Association. Finding that club that relates to your passions will bring you closer to like-minded individuals so you feel more welcomed at this large university. I can’t even describe how having a strong social support system elevates your mental health and college experience. Be open-minded and willing to meet new people. Overall, to get started in joining one of 750+ clubs, be sure to check out the Involvement Fair at the beginning of each semester, beinvolved.indiana.edu, or the Instagram pages of the organizations you’re interested in!”

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IU Jacobs School of Music..................................................... 7

IU Office of First Year Experience (FYE)................................. 51

IU Student Foundation (IUSF).............................................. 23

IU Office of Overseas Studies................................................ 53

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IU School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering............ 35

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IU Slavic Languages & Literatures Dept................................. 37 IU Student Foundation (IUSF).............................................. 23

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IU University Information Technology Services (UITS)............. 25

Arbutus Yearbook................................................................. 49 Atwater Eye Care Center (IU Optometry)................................. 45

Dining

Indiana Daily Student (IDS)................................... 17,33,43,55

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IU African Studies Program.................................................. 53

IU Dining............................................................................ 15

IU Arabic Flagship Center..................................................... 27 IU Center for Language Technology (CeLT)............................... 5

Donation Services

IU Center of Excellence for Women & Technology ............. 11, 47

BioLife Plasma Services....................................................... 43

IU Chinese Flagship Center.................................................. 21 IU Credit Union............................................. Inside Front Cover

Employment Opportunities

IU Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences.......................... 37

Indiana Daily Student (IDS)............................................. 43,55

IU Dept. of Theatre, Drama, and Contemporary Dance............. 47

IU Office of First Year Experience (FYE)................................. 51

IU Dining............................................................................ 15

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IU Fleet Services................................................................. 53

IU Student Foundation (IUSF).............................................. 23

IU India Studies Program..................................................... 45

IU University Information Technology Services (UITS)............. 25

Online Services Indiana Daily Student (IDS)................................... 17,33,43,55 IU University Information Technology Services (UITS)............. 25

Student Resources IU Office of First Year Experience (FYE)................................. 51 IU Office of Overseas Studies................................................ 53 IU University Information Technology Services (UITS)............. 25

Transportation Services Bloomington Transit............................................................... 2 Catch-A-Ride Express Bus Service......................................... 35 IU Fleet Services................................................................. 53 Go Express Travel.......................................... Inside Back Cover

IU International Studies Program.......................................... 31

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