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Monday, July 9, 2018 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

COURTESY PHOTO

Michael Bayler, a second-year M.F.A. actor, rehearses as George Gibbs in the 2018 IU Summer Theatre production of “Our Town.” The show runs until July 28.

‘Our Town’ is in town Everyday American life is celebrated in IU Theatre’s new production. By Christine Fernando ctfernan@iu.edu

With just a 16-member cast and a minimal set of only a few tables and chairs, the Wells-Metz Theatre will transform into the charming town of Grover’s Corners for the play “Our Town.” The production, which runs from July 6 to 28, will celebrate the play’s 80th anniversary this year. The play, set in the early 1900s and written by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Thornton Wilder, follows the lives and stories of the citizens of Grover’s Corners in three acts: “Daily Life,” “Love and Marriage” and “Death and Eternity.” “It’s a great American play about the experience of everyday life, love and

death,” Director Dale McFadden said. “It has some serious reflections about the infinite, the fact that death is a part of living and the dead help us to remember how we should live our own lives.” As the play opens, the town doctor, Dr. Gibbs, returns from a successful childbirth, which contrasts with the focus on death in the final act. “It comes full circle,” Jay Hemphill, who plays Dr. Gibbs, said. “I think it’s really representative of the circle of life.” The plot of the first act is simple, even mundane, Hemphill said, but they reflect people’s everyday lives. Hemphill said the act explores the struggles, pain and questions people pose about how they should live life and if they are making the right choices. “It’s just life, and life can be mun-

dane,” Hemphill said. “Life and death occurs, and then there’s the everyday stuff in between.” For George, the main character and 16-year-old son of Dr. Gibbs, the first act is a turning point, said Michael Bayler, the actor playing George. Bayler said his character is just beginning to make his own decisions and be responsible, something he said would be especially relatable to high school- and college-aged audience members. “He’s moving from being in his own bubble to experiencing more about what’s happening in the world around him,” Bayler said. The second act considers love and marriage when George falls in love with, and eventually marries, another Grover’s Corners resident, Emily. While he

said many people read George and Emily’s relationship as sappy, Bayler sees it as pure and honest in how his character finds someone to whom he can reveal his thoughts without fear of judgment. People in different stages of life will see something different in the relationship, Bayler said. Some may see a layer of hope. Others may see reason to enjoy the present, rather than being preoccupied with the past or future. Still others, Bayler said, will see a sense of anxiety as two young people make a decision that will affect the rest of their lives. “You see doubt and uncertainty before the wedding, which is just as real and honest as the prettier part of falling in love,” Bayler said. SEE TOWN, PAGE 3

Gallery highlights art across the nation From IDS reports

MATT BEGALA | IDS

Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill introduces Mike Pence at the Donald Trump rally May 10, in Elkhart, Indiana. On July 2, Hill was faced with allegations by four different women that he had inappropriately touched them at a party on March 15.

State leaders call for Curtis Hill to resign By Dominick Jean drjean@imail.iu.edu | @Domino_Jean

Top Indiana Republicans have called for Attorney General Curtis Hill to resign or face removal after four different women accused him of sexually harassing them March 15. In addition, the formerly anonymous lawmaker who reported Hill had grabbed her buttocks has come forward as Mara Candelaria Reardon, a state representative from Munster, Indiana. “As I continue to deal with the harm perpetrated by Indiana’s top law enforcement official, I must also deal with the reality that there is no process by which Curtis Hill, an independently elected official, can be held accountable,” Reardon said in a letter to the IndyStar. The independent law firm, Taft Stettinius & Hollister, which investigated Reardon’s claims, quotes an unattributed source in the internal memo it produced who said Hill came up to Reardon, slid his hands down her back and “grabbed a

handful of ass.” At that point she told him to back off, only to have him grab her buttocks again. The representative again told him to back off. Indiana Democrats were some of the first to ask for Hill to resign, but the Republicans have now joined in that same request. Governor Eric Holcomb, House Speaker Brian Bosma, R-Indianapolis, and Senate President David Long, R-Fort Wayne, all issued statements asking for Hill to resign in the wake of these allegations. Holcomb said there is no place for sexual harassment within the Indiana GOP and he supports a thorough investigation. “Four women had the courage to step forward to report sexual harassment by the Indiana Attorney General,” Holcomb said in the release. “The findings of the recent legislative report are disturbing and, at a minimum, show a violation of the state’s zero tolerance sexual harassment policy.” Bosma and Long were both clear that while Hill was not an

employee of theirs and they cannot terminate his employment, he should resign at once due to these allegations. Top Republican women in the state joined Holcomb in calling for Hill’s resignation. Lt. Governor Susan Crouch and Indiana Secretary of State Connie Lawson, two of the highest ranked Republican women in the state, were among the first to release statements. “Indiana deserves a safe work environment, which extends beyond the workplace,” Lawson said. “I am disappointed that I must make such a call, but Attorney General Hill should resign. Our state leaders are held to a higher standard and must behave in such a manner.” Lawson, along with Treasurer Kelly Mitchell and Auditor Tera Klutz, are the only women running for statewide elected positions in 2018 and all of them are Republicans. On July 3, Hill said he would not resign. He said Hoosiers elected him attorney general by a large

margin, and he will continue to honor his commitment to Indiana. Holcomb, even though he is the governor, is not able to force Hill to resign, since Hill’s position is a separately-elected executive position within the state government. The Indiana Constitution, while it does not permit recall elections under any circumstance, does allow for an elected official to be impeached either by the state legislature or a circuit court for committing a crime. An elected official could also be removed because he does not comply with a specific requirement of the Constitution. Some of those requirements according to the Indiana Constitution are: not being convicted of a felony, not being habitually drunk and living in the election district. Hill, if he chooses to not resign, could face possible impeachment by the House of Representatives and be tried by the Senate or impeached by a joint resolution by the entire General Assembly.

Echoing the wandering philosophy of author Jack Kerouac’s “On the Road,” Sharon and Jessica Bussert bought an RV in 2014. After grabbing their cat and dog, the couple spent the next three years journeying across the United States, taking photographs. By Hand Gallery, located at 101 W. Kirkwood Ave., No. 109, opened On the Road, a gallery presenting the Busserts’ photography from the trip, on July 6. The gallery will be on display until Aug. 31, and is free to the general public. Starting and ending in Brown County, the couple explored national and state parks, and stopped at various towns on their journey to the West Coast. “Fog House” and “Waterfall at Strahl Lake,” two photographs taken in Indiana, depict natural vistas within the state. Others highlight stops from their journey. Some stops from their journey highlighted in the photogaphy include Yosemite National Park, the Oregon Coast, the Colombia River Gorge in Oregon, Northern California, the Nevada desert and Glacier National Park in the Rocky Mountains of Montana. The couple shot their photographs with modern digital cameras and a 70-year-old large format, using an ice fishing tent as a mobile darkroom for their photography. They also experimented with different photographic processes, such as tintypes, ambrotypes and pinhole photography. All of the images were chemically processed and printed to Kodak archival papers and are available for purchase. Prints are available dry-mounted or traditional matting and framing. Clark Gudas


Indiana Daily Student

2

NEWS

Monday, July 9, 2018 idsnews.com

Editor Dominick Jean news@idsnews.com

EMILY ISAACMAN | IDS

Ken Ray, senior landscape architect for Toole Design Group, presents a preliminary transportation plan for Bloomington in January 2018 at City Hall. The group has been working with Bloomington on their transportation plan and has released the final draft which will be presented July 12.

Bloomington releases transportation plan By Matt Rasnic mrasnic@iu.edu | @Matt_Rasnic

The City has released a final draft of the Bloomington Transportation Plan. Several reasons for changes to the city's current structure include: public health concerns, access to food options, recreational activities and walkable neighborhoods. From 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. July 12 at City Hall there will be a public reviewing of the plan, at which residents can give input on the plan. Bloomington has been

working with Toole Design Group, a consulting firm headquartered in Silver Spring, Maryland, to create a plan for expanding and maintaining Bloomington's transportation needs, according to the city's website. Part of the need for an updated plan was also the high population density of Bloomington. The plan emphasizes increasing public transportation, pedestrian walkways and bicycle friendliness and decreasing individual automobile use. According to city data,

walking, public transit and bicycling, along with shared commuting, has significantly increased since 2010, with bicycling experiencing the greatest change of around 70 percent. An increase was also seen for Monroe County in the same categories and during the same time period. One of the more drastic remodeling ideas is a redesign of Kirkwood Avenue extending from Indiana Avenue to Walnut Street. Kirkwood Avenue would become what's called a shared

street. The new curbless street design will prioritize nonmotorized traffic like pedestrians and bicyclists, and help slow speeds in the area. The transportation plan notes street parking is optional on shared streets. It's unclear if Kirkwood Avenue will lose any street parking at this time. The Indiana Daily Student reached out to the Bloomington Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator Beth Rosenbarger on Friday for comment, but she was unavailable for comment at that time.

Currently, Walnut and Third streets as well as College and Atwater avenues are all one-way streets, but the final draft of the plan restores two-way traffic on these streets. Also included in the final draft of the transportation plan is an expansion of the B-Line Trail. The plan suggests expanding the trail's level of safety and comfort onto Seventh Street would benefit the IU and local residential communities. "The B-Line Trail is the backbone of Bloomington’s active transportation

network," according to the draft plan. "It is widely popular for both transportation and recreation and it has spurred economic development along its corridor. In order to extend these benefits throughout the city, this Plan recommends prioritizing connected, high-comfort routes and extending the B-Line to the northwest." The entire Bloomington Transportation Plan is available for download on the city's website. Dominick Jean contributed reporting.

Merchandise stolen from Urban Outfitters located on Kirkwood Avenue By Cameron Drummond cpdrummo@iu.edu | @cdrummond97

Items valued between $300 and $400 were reported stolen Friday afternoon from Urban Outfitters at 530 E. Kirkwood Ave., according to Bloomington Police Department Sgt. Robert Skelton. The suspects were described by Skelton as two females in their 20s, who are both approximately 5 foot, 5 inches tall with short hair. Skelton said the two women entered the store carrying bags as they shopped around, but store employees noticed the bags becoming more full as the

COURTESY PHOTO

Laury Flint was appointed IU Police Chief in 2013.

IUPD’s Laury Flint gives safety tips By Cameron Drummond cpdrummo@iu.edu | @cdrummond97

It's important you feel safe and are safe during your time here at IU. The IU Police Department operates on campus with a fleet of 13 vehicles and 40 full-time officers, in addition to around 60 part-time officers and cadets. The Indiana Daily Student spoke with IUPD Chief Laury Flint to learn more about the department and how students should stay safe. Q: What is IUPD? A: We are a police department, so 24/7, 365, we will respond. We have the typical emergency line, 911, we have an administrative line for non-emergencies if they have a question (812855-4111). I would want them to know that, regardless of where they came from, we are a University police department. Our population is mainly between the ages of 18 and 22, and the challenges that presents, we understand that. We also understand that a lot of people are on their own for the first time without any parental supervision or guidance, and we know that they're going to

make mistakes. We are not here to make arrests and fill quotas. We have no quotas. Basically, what we're here for is to make sure they safely get from point A when they arrive to point B when they leave campus to go out in the real world. Q: What are the most important safety options for freshmen to know since they will be living on campus for the first time? A: Probably our most common crime on campus is theft. Theft is a crime of opportunity and when you have a lot of people in a condensed area, and electronics have gotten smaller over the years, so very easy to pick up and conceal. I think the important thing to remember is to keep your things with you. Make sure — you and your roommate — when the room is empty, the door is locked. Q: What are the most important resources from IUPD freshmen should know about? A: We offer a lot of classes, a lot of training. Probably one that’s pretty popular right now is our active aggressor training. We would like to encourage

people to look at that, but if there are any questions or they want something a little more in-depth, we’d be more than willing to come in and do training for active aggressor. We also have self-defense classes, anywhere from one hour to the 12-hour rape aggression defense class. We offer an array of classes. We want to be a resource for them. If they have questions, feel free to approach us. We have live-in officers at most of the dormitories. Q: What are the blue lights? A: The blue lights are scattered around campus, we try to have some coordination with this being in or near areas that are a little more remote, but there are a lot of them that are in frequented areas, too. All you have to do is press the large red button and it rings directly to 911. Our officers will respond and our response time in an emergency typical averages less than three minutes. We can get to places really fast. If you press the red button, you don’t even have to say anything, the location rings directly to 911 and we’ll respond. You can also make phone calls

from those and it doesn’t cost you any money. Q: What is the safe ride program? A: The safe ride program is offered from oncampus to on-campus locations and off-campus to on-campus locations and vice-versa during specific hours, which goes into the wee hours of the morning. It’s free and there’s always a male and a female driverpassenger combination that will pick you up. Q: Do you have any advice or guidance for ways for freshmen to stay safe? A: We understand that they are 18- to 22-yearolds, typically unsupervised for the first time in their lives, making their own decisions, and some of those decisions are not going to be good ones. We understand that. But staying in control and taking care of each other. The Culture of Care is a huge student initiative on campus and it’s taken very seriously. If you could take care of each other, and if it gets to the point where you can’t take care of someone, do the right thing and make the phone call.

women shopped. The two women also said no when asked if they wanted to use the changing room, according to Skelton. When they exited the store, the security alarm went off. One of the women then took off a tube top she had been wearing and threw it back inside the store, claiming she forgot she was wearing it, Skelton said. Store employees asked to check the women's bags, but they wouldn't return to the store once they went outside, Skelton said. The employees also were not sure which items were taken.

Person shatters glass door, steals car and items from street department By Dominick Jean drjean@imail.iu.edu | @Domino_Jean

Someone broke into the Bloomington Street Department early July 5 by shattering the glass front door. A supervisor arrived on scene that morning and immediately called police before going inside, Bloomington Police said. Police arrived at the Street Department building at 1981 S. Henderson St. and investigated the scene, but found no sign of the suspect. BPD Sgt. Dana Cole said officers found a box of keys which had been rummaged through and, as employees arrived, they checked

to see if any of the Street Department vehicles were missing. A 2015 white, Chevrolet Colorado pickup truck was found to be stolen. Other items stolen from the Street Department: -A Thirty-One lunchbox which had tuna, protein shakes and condiments inside. -A 64-ounce container of orange juice. -A Gatorade water jug was also missing from the back of one truck. Cole said police are working on obtaining video footage from the scene.

Cameron Drummond Editor-in-Chief Murphy Wheeler Managing Editor

Vol. 151, No. 37 © 2018

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The Indiana Daily Student publishes Mondays and Thursdays throughout the year while University classes are in session. Part of IU Student Media, the IDS is a self-supporting auxiliary University enterprise. Founded on Feb. 22, 1867, the IDS is chartered by the IU Board of Trustees, with the editor-in-chief as final content authority. The IDS welcomes reader feedback, letters to the editor and online comments. Advertising policies are availale on the current rate card. Readers are entitled to single copies. Taking multiple copies may constitute theft of IU property, subject to prosecution. Paid subscriptions are entered through third-class postage (USPS No. 261960) at Bloomington, IN 47405.

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Monday, July 9, 2018 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

COURTESY PHOTO

From left to right, Karen Janes Woditsch, Marya Grandy, Jimmy Hogan, Glynnis Kunkle-Ruiz, Max Weinberg, Katie Swaney, Matthew Weidenbener and Justin Smusz rehearse for the 2018 IU Summer Theatre production of “Our Town.” Marya Grandy and Karen Janes Woditsch are appearing in the show courtesy of Actors’ Equity Association.

» TOWN

in the final act.” For Bayler, whose mother died last December, the character’s death carries a heavier weight, and the scene in which he reacts to death is one of his most difficult. During this scene, Bayler said he never tells himself to act sad. “The scene isn’t as simple as that,” he said. “There’s times where there’s fear and anger and all sorts of emotions that need to be felt, so you just have to step onto the stage and let yourself be affected by the

the play. While the play does not have a definitive answer about what comes after death, McFadden said it isn’t afraid to explore death in an intriguing, yet engaging, way that is difficult to put into words. “We are never able to realize every moment in the great experience of being alive, but we do the best we can,” McFadden said. “And the mystery of death and the beyond is a question we cannot answer, but it’s a part of a larger process, and that’s what the play is saying

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

While it shows this anxiety, Hemphill said the play still stresses living life in pairs without forcing a perspective on marriage. “People say marriage is sanctified, but the play says it doesn’t know about all of that,” he said. “It just knows people should be with people.” In the final act, a main character’s death sets up what McFadden describes as the most poetic part of

moment.” In the final act, the dead begin to speak to one another as they watch the living. Bayler said the words of the dead tell audience members that they should appreciate every moment of life. They also remind him of a piece of advice he heard after his mother died — to just take life one day at a time. As a dead character watches living ones grieve, she says, “They don’t understand, do they?” McFadden said she is

speaking to the living and expressing it is impossible to fully understand life while living it. “And they don’t understand that even the biggest sufferings of life will at some point disappear,” he said. One challenge of the play is to give each interaction among the characters enough weight to create a communal love in the town, McFadden said. “To create that feeling of love, you can’t just rush through those conversations and moments between the people in the

town,” McFadden said. Hemphill said he sees the early 1900s town as nostalgic, but the play isn’t the dusty old classic people may assume it is. Instead, Bayler said the play transcends time and captures the beauty and struggle of life. “The trap that people fall into with this play is thinking about it as a look at how things were in that time,” Bayler said. “But it’s more than that. It’s a piece that speaks to us and how we as human beings operate even today.”

IU to hire Justin Parker as new assistant baseball coach In a Twitter post from Kendall Rogers of d1baseball.com on Thursday, it was reported former Central Florida and Wright State pitching coach Justin Parker will be joining new

Horoscope Cancer (June 21-July 22) — Today is a 6 — Peaceful meditation inspires a vision. Trust your heart to lead you with Venus in Virgo. Study a passion. Writing, publishing and recording projects flow easier. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Today is a 9 — Teamwork gets productive. Reinforce lines of communication. Gather new income, with Venus in Virgo. This month can get profitable. Squirrel away some for later.

During Parker’s time in Orlando, the Central Florida pitching staff was among the best in the nation. In 2017, the group posted an ERA of 3.00, the fifth-best mark in the nation, while a pair of pitchers collected 10 wins each, which was tied for

IU Coach Jeff Mercer in Bloomington. Parker will take over as IU’s assistant coach and pitching coach, the role previously filled by Kyle Bunn, who joined Middle Tennessee State’s coaching staff earlier this week.

From IDS reports

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Today is a 9 — You’re irresistible with Venus in your sign. Try a new style and shine. Take advantage of the attention to ask for what you want. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Today is a 7 — Finish old jobs and rest with Venus in Virgo. Savor peaceful imagining. Allow yourself quiet time for dreams and fantasies. Consider what your spirit loves.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Today is an 8 — Group activities flower with Venus in Virgo. You’re especially popular. Social activities benefit your career. Enjoy the public spotlight and use it for a good cause. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — Today is an 8 — Collaborate with your partner when opportunity sparks. Take on more responsibility with Venus in Virgo for several weeks. Watch for career advances with rising influence.

BLISS

HARRY BLISS

13th-most in the country. Last season, the Golden Knights had another good season on the mound. They recorded an ERA of 3.32 as a team and struck out 556 batters in 509 innings. They also limited opponents to a batting average of .216 on

the season. In each of the last four seasons, dating back to Parker’s time at Wright State, his pitching staff has recorded a sub-4.00 ERA. Parker has also sent seven pitchers to join the professional ranks in his time

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Today is an 8 — It’s easier to get out and explore this month with Venus in Virgo. Chart your itinerary. Travel, studies and research offer abundant rewards.

Aries (March 21-April 19) — Today is an 8 — There’s interesting creative work coming in for several weeks with Venus entering Virgo. Aim for mastery and artistry. Add a feminine touch.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Today is an 8 — Enjoy time with family and friends. Find a sweet deal. Monitor shared finances with Venus in Virgo. Increase your assets and savings.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Today is a 9 — Keep generating income. Artistic efforts work in your favor. You’re especially lucky in love with Venus in Virgo this month. Create something beautiful.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) — Today is an 8 — Partnerships flow with greater ease with Venus in Virgo. Compromise, and support each other. Get in tune with your feminine side. Collaborate.

Crossword

as a coach. Like Mercer, Parker is an Indiana native who played and then coached at Wright State. The pitching coach is from Fort Wayne, Indiana. Auston Matricardi Gemini (May 21-June 20) — Today is a 9 — Put your confidence to work. Your home can become your love nest. Focus on home and family with Venus in Virgo. Household beautification projects flower.

© 2018 By Nancy Black Distributed by Tribune Media Services, INC. All Rights Reserved

L.A. Times Daily Crossword 21 22 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 36 37 39 40 41 42 44 45

Publish your comic on this page.

48

The IDS is accepting applications for student comic strips for the summer and fall 2018 semesters. Email five samples and a brief description of your idea to adviser@indiana.edu by July 31. Submissions will be reviewed and selections will be made by the editor-in-chief. Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

su do ku

ACROSS

Difficulty Rating: How to play: Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 grid contains the digits 1 through 9, without repeating a number in any one row, column or 3x3 grid.

Answer to previous puzzle

© Puzzles by Pappocom

1 Driver with a meter 6 Ships, to captains 10 Fraternal letters seen under antlers 14 City near Orlando 15 Mani mate 16 Classify in order of importance 17 Former TWArival 18 Hulk’s emotion 19 Sommer of Hollywood 20 Self-inking device for check endorsements 23 Stubble spot 24 Ankle pic 25 Coins-for-bills device 31 Most loyal 33 Poet Ogden 34 Put coins in, as a parking meter 35 Goes public with 36 Say further 37 Not timid 38 “Are You the One?” network 39 In __: as originally placed 41 Entirely 43 Interval before late fees apply 46 Western treaty gp.

47 What some eyeglasses lack 48 On occasion ... and how 20-, 25- and 43-Across go? 55 Airline known for tight security 56 Saint Laurent of fashion 57 Kidney-related 58 Sonic Dash game publisher 59 “__ we forget” 60 Ernie Banks’ nickname 61 Tens and twenties 62 Biblical twin 63 Etsy transaction, e.g.

DOWN 1 Body cam wearing law enforcers 2 Berry promoted as a superfood 3 Explosion sound 4 Scalds briefly in water, as tomatoes 5 Steinway competitors 6 Got out of jail 7 Catch wind of 8 Slight advantage 9 Midday snoozes 10 A mint may freshen it 11 Front of the hand 12 Like a GI doing dishes 13 Barely manage, with “out”

49 50 51 52 53 54 55

Sunroof coloring Dash gauge Like winding roads Turn out to be Steamed up “Too rich for my blood” “Little” Dickens girl Drain phenomenon Pipe tobacco packer Grammy winner Coolidge Public defender, for one: Abbr. Ardent fans Line on Levi’s Fashionable Habeas corpus, e.g. Boyfriend’s ultimatum Dough in a wallet 1974 hit with a Spanish title meaning “You are” Cause of a dog’s excessive scratching Tattered cloths Currier’s colleague Walled land formation Machu Picchu dweller Treat roughly Hamburg’s river PC “Oops!” key

Look for the crossword daily in the comics section of the Indiana Daily Student. Find the solution for the daily crossword here. Answer to previous puzzle


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Sarge Rentals, Fall 2018. sargerentals.com 812-330-1501

Available august

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Black Futon. Comes from pet free home. $65, obo. dawars@indiana.edu

WALK To campus 3-4 bedrooms

Clothing Nike Vapor Untouchable Pro men’s football cleats. Size 8, Never worn. $40. s.e.mosier1@gmail.com

Antique bedside lamp: $30. Beige rug: $55. dawars@indiana.edu

Comfortable house w/ 2 BR, 1 BA, hdwd. floors, window treatments, W/D hookup, central air, gas heat. Close to Campus and B-Line trail. 1 blk. off bus line near CVS, IU Credit Union, Lucky’s Market. $750/mo. $700 damage deposit. Small pet policy avail. 812-360-9915

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3 brown wooden chairs: $15 each. Green wooden bookshelf: $35. dawars@indiana.edu

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Textbooks Physiology P215 Lab Workbook. Used. Has notes in it. $10. aclaymil@iu.edu

Furniture 2 lightly used Japanesestyle room dividers. 6 ft long: $40. 14 ft. long: $70. gr2@iu.edu

Close to IU. 2 houses for rent. 1) 5 BR, 3 BA, 902 E. 14th St., $2450/ mo., 3 blks. to Geology & SPEA, off-street prkg. 2) 4 BR, 2 BA, 900 E. 14th St., $1600/mo. 3 blks. to Geology and SPEA, approved for 5 occupants. 812-327-7881

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Leather Portfolio. Useful for networking. Great cond. $20. heemkim@iu.edu

505

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1 BR. On-site pkg./laundry. 5 blks. to Info/Bus. 812-333-9579 or leasinginfo@ grantprops.com

Now hiring hosts and servers. Apply online: grazieitaliano.com

Tripod w/ phone and GoPro mount. Comes w/ box, good cond. $10. yuwbai@indiana.edu

509 N. Lincoln, 4 BR, 2 BA. 2 kit., priv. backyard, $2000/mo. + util. & dep. 812-606-1562 or txt

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Apt. Unfurnished 1 BR, on-site pkg./ laundry. 1 blk. to Opt., Math, Chem. & Law. 812-333-9579 or leasinginfo@ grantprops.com

Nikon D3100 SLR Camera. Gently used, great cond. $200. samritt@indiana.edu

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Only 1 left! Very nice large, 2 BR downtown/ Campus. On-site parking. W/D. 812-333-9579 or leasinginfo@ grantprops.com

Barely worn size 9 Ugg boots in great condition. $100 anquest@indiana.edu

Graphing calculator, TI-84+ silver edition. $45. 812-834-5144

4 & 5 Bedroom Houses

Misc. for Sale 12 pc. dinnerware set w/4 dinner & salad plates, bowls + 12 pc silverware. $15 yafwang@hotmail.com

Epson Printer/Fax/ Scanner. Like new cond. With ink. $40. dawars@indiana.edu

PAVILION

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Electronics 47’’ Vizio flat screen TV in good cond. $195. edwarali@iu.edu

313 North Clark 3 BR, 1 BA, fenced in backyard. ALL UTILS. INCLUD. $2100/mo. www.iurent.com 812-360-2628

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Rooms for rent, next to Opt. on Atwater. On-site pkg./laundry. Utilities incl. 812-333-9579 or leasinginfo@ grantprops.com

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Indiana Daily Student

SPORTS

Monday, July 9, 2018 idsnews.com

Editor Murphy Wheeler sports@idsnews.com

5

BASEBALL

BOBBY GODDIN | IDS

Then-sophomore outfielder Matt Gorski rounds third base against Cincinnati on March 6 at Bart Kaufman Field. Gorski is playing for the Harwich Mariners in the Cape Cod summer baseball league this summer.

Hoosiers excel in summer baseball leagues By Auston Matricardi amatrica@iu.edu | @a_mat24

Since the conclusion of the 2018 regular season, many members of the IU baseball program have spread across the country to play summer baseball. In leagues from New England to the South to the Midwest, multiple Hoosiers are looking to improve their games and possibly catch the eye of pro scouts. Most of the players in summer ball this year are ones who fans should be familiar with, but there are a few that have yet to take the field in Bloomington due to redshirting in 2018. The trio of Lane Miller, Tyler Van Pelt and Gavin Napier are playing summer ball close to campus. Napier has been playing for the Dubois County Bombers of the Ohio Valley League. The Austin, Indiana, native has seen action in 12 games, recording 35 at bats and a batting average of .286. Napier’s .458 on base percentage is one of the best on the team, and he’s hit a home run, too. Fellow redshirts Miller and Van Pelt have spent their summers with the Terre Haute Rex of the Prospect League.

Miller particularly has been impressive. The righthander out of Boonville, Indiana, owns a 3-0 record, a 2.12 ERA and a 0.98 WHIP across nearly 30 innings on the mound in six games. He’s struck out 23 batters and walked only 13. Van Pelt’s summer has been a bag of mixed results. The Bloomington High School South alumnus is hitting just .186 across 70 at-bats in 21 games, but he’s driven in 10 runs, drawn nine walks and stolen four bases. A bright spot for the summer came June 17, when Van Pelt went 2-4 with a walk, a stolen base and a pair of runs batted in. IU’s strong freshman class from last season has been in action as well. Utilityman Drew Ashley has been in Terre Haute with the aforementioned Miller and Van Pelt. The Chandler, Indiana, native has hit .300 in 40 at-bats across 12 games, adding on nine walks to boost his on base percentage to .442. Despite only three extra base hits for Ashley, he’s driven in five runs. He’s also stolen five bases. Another member of IU’s impactful freshman class, infielder Cole Barr, has been

playing in the Perfect Game Collegiate Baseball League. The Yorktown, Indiana, native has hit .264 in 53 at-bats for the Amsterdam Mohawks, posting an on base percentage of .426. Evansville, Indiana, native Elijah Dunham has had a solid performance in the New England Collegiate Baseball League this summer. He’s posted a .317 batting average in 82 at-bats on the season, getting on base at a .385 clip. Despite not hitting a home run all season for the cream and crimson, Dunham has hit three for the Plymouth Pilgrims. He’s also driven in 11 runs and stolen three bases. The lefty primarily played first base in his first season as a Hoosier, but this summer he’s also seen time in the outfield. IU also has representation in the Great Lakes Summer Collegiate League, as infielder Caleb Balgaard has been playing for the Lake Erie Monarchs this summer. The Michigan native is hitting .318 with six extra base hits including a home run in 60 at-bats. The rising sophomore has also driven in eight runs for the Monarchs after not seeing the field as a freshman with the Hoosiers.

The Hoosiers also have a handful of players in the Northwoods League this summer. The freshman duo of Tommy Sommer and Sam Crail are playing for the Kalamazoo Growlers, while Justin Walker, Pat Loeffler and Cade Bunnell have been suiting up for the Rockford Rivets. On Friday, Sommer got his first start for Kalamazoo, going seven innings and giving up four runs to get the win against Green Bay. Before that, he had only worked out of the bullpen. The lefthander from Carmel, Indiana, has had a good summer for the Growlers, pitching to a 4-0 record and a 2.89 ERA. Sommer’s Kalamazoo teammate Sam Crail has also been performing well this summer. The outfielder has hit .310 across 17 games, driving in nine runs and stealing five bases. He has nine extra base hits thus far, including a triple and a home run. Across the Northwoods League, Justin Walker is having an up-and-down summer at the plate. The switchhitter is hitting only .200 for Rockford, but he’s driven in 11 runs and stolen five bases. His strikeout-to-walk

ratio isn’t exactly what fans would like to see, either, as he’s struck out 20 times while drawing nine walks. After not seeing any game action with IU in 2018, infielder Pat Loeffler has gotten extensive playing time for the Rivets this summer. The Illinois native is hitting just .205 on the season, but he’s still been productive at the plate. Loeffler has driven in 17 runs which leads all Rockford hitters. He’s also hit a pair of home runs and drawn 15 walks. Another player looking to build some momentum heading into fall ball is Cade Bunnell. In his first season as a Hoosier after transferring from Madison Junior College, he only saw 14 at bats, making three starts for the cream and crimson. Since joining the Rivets, he’s gotten more extensive playing time. He’s hitting .263 with a pair of home runs. He’s driven in nine runs and drawn seven walks. Bunnell has also seen time on the mound for the Rivets. He’s given up a pair of runs in four innings and struck out six batters. The Hoosiers also have a few players competing in the prestigious Cape Cod League this summer, with

Cal Krueger and Matt Gorski getting the most playing time of the group as members of the Harwich Mariners. Krueger has been solid outside of his first outing of the summer. In that outing, the righthander gave up five runs in just under three innings, but he’s given up just two runs total since. Krueger has worked mainly out of the bullpen, but he’s made two starts for Harwich so far. The Jasper, Indiana, native has struck out 11 batters in over 13 innings. Krueger’s Harwich teammate, Gorski, has been solid this summer, hitting .271 thus far. The outfielder has driven in a trio of runs, but has struck out in nearly half of his at-bats which is uncharacteristic for him. This is just a start for many of these players. With all of the recent coaching developments in Bloomington and with a number of players from the 2018 season turning pro, the rest of this summer and upcoming fall will be crucial for many of these players. There are multiple lineup spots up for grabs as well as a place in the pitching rotation to fill and bullpen innings to be earned.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Hoosiers add Hardwood Showcase to 2018-19 men’s basketball season schedule From IDS reports

The IU men's basketball team has added four more games to its 2018-19 nonconference schedule. According to a report from Jon Rothstein via Twitter on Monday, it was announced the Hoosiers would be joining together with Arkansas for a new event called the Hardwood Showcase. The setup of the event will feature a home and home series with the Razorbacks, with the Hoosiers playing at Arkansas at Bud Walton Arena this year on Nov. 18, and at home at Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall for the 2019-20 season. The Hardwood Showcase will also give IU three home nonconference games in 2018-19. This year, those games will be against Montana State, University of California at Davis and the University of Texas at Arlington. While the Hoosiers will play Arkansas in 2019-20, they will still have home nonconference games against three of the four remaining teams in the event between Montana State, Texas A&M University-

Corpus Christi, UC-Davis and UT-Arlington. Arkansas could pose a tough test for IU on the road. Last season, the Razorbacks had a successful season in which they went 23-12 overall and 10-8 in SEC conference play. They would go on to make the semifinals of the SEC tournament, where they were defeated by twoseed Tennessee. They would also make the NCAA Tournament as a seven-seed, but were subsequently bounced in the first round by 10-seed Butler. Meanwhile, UC-Davis finished 22-11 in 2018, while UT-Arlington wound up 21-13 and Montana State finished 13-19 in 2017-18. These will be the newest additions to an already impressive nonconference schedule for IU in 2018-19 which features home games against Marquette on Nov. 11 and Louisville on Dec. 8, an away game at Duke on Nov. 27 and a neutral site game against Butler at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis on Dec. 15. Murphy Wheeler

EVAN DE STEFANO | IDS

Then-freshman forward Justin Smith follows through after dunking the ball during the Hoosiers’ game against the Iowa Hawkeyes on Feb. 17 in Carver-Hawkeye Arena in Iowa City, Iowa. The Hoosiers announced they will play four games as part of the Hardwood Classic in 2018-19 against Arkansas, Montana State, University of California at Davis and University of Texas at Arlington.


Indiana Daily Student

6

ARTS

Monday, July 9, 2018 idsnews.com

Editor Christine Fernando and Clark Gudas arts@idsnews.com

Recalling IU’s first resident artist

Arts contest deadline extended

By Lauren Fazekas lfazekas@iu.edu

Located just 11 miles from Bloomington in Brown County is the T.C. Steele State Historic Site. Here resides the 211 acre home of IU’s first artist in residence, Theodore Clement Steele. The Indiana Daily Student phoned Cate Whetzel, the historic site’s program developer, to talk about Indiana’s most famous Impressionist-era artist and what he contributed to Indiana, as well as to IU. Indiana Daily Student: Can you give me a brief background of who T.C. Steele was? Cate Whetzel: T.C. Steele is probably the leading American Impressionist painter from Indiana, during his lifetime from 1847 to 1926. Of course there are other members of the Hoosier group who are equally important, but T.C. Steele stands out as a leader. He is also, by the time he died in 1926, the leading portrait painter in the state of Indiana. So he paints the Indiana Governors, he paints Benjamin Harrison — the only president from Indiana — and other luminaries at IU and really in the Midwest. He was nationally and internationally famous during his life. Was he always in Indiana? Yeah, he really lived most of his life in Indiana. He did go to the Royal Academy of Munich for his education, and that was basically between 1881 and 1886. He’s in Germany because he can’t get an education in fine arts in the United States. There are no art schools in the country that can train an artist to the master level, so it’s kind of a big deal. When he dies, of course, there are institutions that can train American artists, so American artists no longer have to go abroad for their education, which is really huge. Yes, so he’s in Germany, but for the most part he traveled, to the West Coast in 1902 and 1903, then he was up in Vermont and Tennessee, but those places were not permanent homes for him. His permanent home, really, is always Indiana. Why did he choose the property in Brown County? Wasn’t it 211 acres of forests? Not exactly, it wasn’t forests. Brown Country was farm land, so this is a subsistence farming community. In fact, the ridges were

From IDS reports

Young people in the Bloomington area are invited to submit artwork for the Bicentennial Arts Contest, which showcases a minority or underrepresented person or organization from the community’s history, as part of the City of Bloomington and Monroe County Bicentennial Celebration. The contest was created by a group representing the Bloomington Commission on the Status of Children and Youth, the Commission on the Status of Black Males, the Commission on the Status of Women, the Human Rights Commission, the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Celebration Commission and the Bloomington Arts Commission. Representatives of the Monroe County Bicentennial Planning Committee also joined the group. “This is a diverse community with a proud history of inclusion, so we wanted to create a contest that highlighted that inclusiveness and allowed youth in the area to explore it using their creative talents,” Julie Warren, with the Commission on the Status of Children and Youth, said in a press release from the Office of the Mayor. Art subjects should be people from underrepresented populations — such as racial, religious or ethnic minorities, people from the LGBT community, people with disabilities, those who are economically disadvantaged and anyone who has been overlooked. Participants should research the person or organization by using local resources such as the Monroe County Public Library and the Monroe County History Center. The contest deadline has been extended to 5 p.m. July 13, and is open to any schoolaged person who lives in Monroe County. There will be winners chosen from grades K to 2, 3 to 6, 7 to 8 and 9 to 12. A range of arts — drawings, sculptures, plays, videos and more — are accepted. Participants can submit entries in person to the Community and Family Resources Department at City Hall, or by email to b-artscontest@ bloomington.in.gov. Official guidelines and research resources are available on the Bloomington website.

COURTESY PHOTO

“Opalescent morning” by Theodore Clement Steele. The painting hangs in the Indiana Memorial Union. Steele was IU’s first artist in residence and a leading painter of American Impressionism.

deforested and we didn’t have any state parks and we didn’t have any national forests, you know, state forests, none of that stuff in Indiana in 1907, which is when the Steeles come here. T.C. Steele comes here, marries a second time in 1907. His first wife dies of tuberculosis in 1899 and he’s absolutely grief-stricken, so he mourns her, and about seven years later, he remarries. He marries Selma Neubacher, who is much younger than he is, but she’s a professional woman and she’s an educator and artist, an administrator. She spends her life in pursuit of her own education and career in the arts. She was the one who left us all of these 211 acres and the 350 paintings. The buildings and their contents, it was all Selma’s doing, she indeed left a gift to the people of Indiana. They chose Belmont, I think, this area specifically, because it is a blank slate for him. When he marries his first wife in 1870, and she dies at the end of 1899 and was the mother of the painter’s three children, she is like a soulmate. She’s his first and best critic, she is essentially the inspiration for a lot of the work he does. With her death, of course, it’s very difficult for T.C. Steele to be in places where he was with her. So when he marries again, he and Selma come to a place where there

are no memories and they’re going to make a new life and that’s what this place is. How many years did they live on the property? This house was supposed to be a summer home only, but they loved living here despite a number of challenges, and it became a three-season home, so they were here spring, summer, fall. They moved in 1907, and T.C. Steele lived here much of the year, from basically 1907 to 1926. So he and Selma were here for 19 years together. She was here for 19 years after him. They called their home “The House of the Singing Wind.” T.C. Steele was mostly painting landscapes on the Brown County property correct? Yeah, landscapes were what he loved. He loved landscapes and he loved American landscapes. He was an advocate for the American landscape, and in the late 1880s to 1890s, nobody in this country was really interested in paintings of Indiana or of the Midwest. Nobody wants to see it, nobody wants to buy it, but T.C. Steele is painting them and he’s doing it because he thinks it is important. Even though they don’t make any money for him, he paid the bills with portraits and we know that T.C. Steele is basically a middleclass person. He depends

on the sale of his paintings to pay the bills, which then is a job. So even as one of the most famous and celebrated painters in Indiana, he still has to sell a number of paintings a year in order to pay his mortgage. At the end of his life in the 1920s, is when American landscapes are selling. So he formed the Art Colony of the Midwest? Sort of, kind of indirectly. So when T.C. Steele moves here in 1907, he’s so famous that the eyes of the art world turn to Brown County. Because when these paintings start appearing in Indianapolis and Chicago, other artists are like, “That’s Brown County? That’s beautiful, we had no idea.” So other artists begin arriving, they start coming down to visit. And then many of them decide to stay. They rent space in Nashville, Indiana, there’s even a joke that Chicago annexed Nashville, because there’s so many Chicago artists living and working in Nashville. He’s not considered a founder of the Art Colony of the Midwest because he never lived in Nashville. That was not his goal, but he was considered the “Dean” of the Art Colony of the Midwest. He was kind of this benevolent figure, this established famous artist who really drew other artists here, kind of like a magnet. Was T.C. Steele an artist in

residence at IU? Yes he was, absolutely. He was the first artist in residence at IU. The position was created for him. William Lowe Bryan did that. And William Lowe Bryan, the president of the University, said to the board of trustees the arts were as important to the University as scholarship. I mean you think about someone saying that to the Board of Trustees at IU in the 1920s and it’s huge. So they give him a very healthy stipend, a good amount of money, they give him a studio in Franklin Hall which was then the library, and invite him to paint the campus, and they give him like a doctor of laws. He is given all of these accolades because T.C. Steele is a rock star in the 1920s. He’s not going to come and grade your sketch, he’s too big for that. What he’s going to do, though, is he’s going to be available to IU students. So students can go into the studio and watch him work, they can talk to him. And so they’ve got a distinguished professional mentor available if they want to take advantage of that connection and if they don’t, T.C. Steele’s there, he’s painting the campus. Many of those paintings show IU, the IU of the 1920s. For people who are interested in the history of the campus, that’s pretty important.

Hannah Reed

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IDS Personalized News Updates

Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors

St. Mark’s United Methodist Church 100 N. State Rd. 46 Bypass 812-332-5788 smumc.church Sunday Morning Schedule 9:00: Breakfast 9:15: Adult Sunday School Classes 9:30: Celebration! Children’s & Family Worship 10:30: Sanctuary Worship 10:30 Children & Youth Sunday School Classes

An inclusive community bringing Christ-like love, healing and hope to all. Jimmy Moore, Pastor Mary Beth Morgan, Pastor

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Indiana Daily Student

OPINION

Monday, July 9, 2018 idsnews.com

Editor Hannah Reed opinion@idsnews.com

7

SIDE WITH SMITH

ILLUSTRATION BY ANNE ANDERSON | IDS

Supreme Court pick cannot be undermined by Trump Ethan Smith is a junior in political science and philosophy. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy announced June 27 he will be retiring at the end of July. Kennedy’s retirement prompted President Donald Trump to nominate a replacement for him, making this the president’s second replacement on the Supreme Court after the death of Justice Antonin Scalia in 2016. Scalia was one of the greatest minds in American history, which made the replacement of him with Justice Neil Gorsuch a notable moment in history. However, the replacement of Kennedy will mean much more for the future of this country. As the court stands now, there are four fairly-consistently conservative justices and four more obviously liberal justices. Justice Kennedy, however, has landed himself somewhere in the middle. He served as the usual swing vote for the court — sometimes siding with the conservatives, but often also siding with the liberal justices on the court. For instance, he sided with the conservative bloc

in cases such as the recent Trump v. Hawaii (2018), which upheld the president’s travel ban, and again in National Institute of Family and Life Advocates v. Becerra (2018), which struck down a California law that required pregnancy centers to tell women about abortion availability. However, he has sided with the liberal bloc on the court in landmark decisions such as Obergefell v. Hodges (2015), protecting the right to same-sex marriage, and in Planned Parenthood v. Casey (1992), preserving Roe v. Wade (1973) to ensure women’s rights to receive abortions. Kennedy’s implicit position as a swing voter cannot be underestimated or overlooked. He, in essence, protected the court from party politics. It has not simply been a court that sided with one political party or another, but rather a court which upheld the constitution to the highest degree, separating itself from politics. This is not to undermine the other great minds on the court, but the difference is that their decisions have almost exclusively fallen to predictable sides of the political

divide. This is why President Trump shouldn’t focus on his personal agenda, selfindulgence or desire for a re-election, but rather focus on nominating someone with the same creed, dignity and passion for justice as Kennedy. The justices of the Supreme Court are doublyindirectly elected to their offices — they are nominated by the president, who is indirectly elected via the electoral college. This is aimed to keep them away from politics and populist motives and focus on upholding the constitution. Furthermore, they are elected to terms for life in order to ensure they do not make decisions with political motives for re-election. Alexander Hamilton wrote the court exists to uphold and secure a “steady, upright and impartial administration of the laws,” which is only possible when the court dissociates itself from political interests and focuses on more objective standards. During President Trump’s campaign in 2016, as an attempt to gain votes from evangelicals and deeplyrooted conservatives, he

pledged to appoint a pro-life justice in hopes of overturning the court’s decision in Roe v. Wade — a decision which has been upheld in law for over 40 years and reassured in Planned Parenthood v. Casey nearly 30 years ago. By doing this, he is completely disregarding the original intent of the Supreme Court and overreaching his powers as executive. President Trump is now pushing his personal political agendas by trying to appoint justices for the sole purpose of rewriting law into his favor. After repeated proof of constitutionality, abortion is legal in this country, and the only way to reverse that decision is to appoint a justice with motivations outside of upholding the constitution. Our president should not subscribe to the late trend of blindly following a political party for the money or perceived power, and we cannot sit by idly in a state of dead dogma by not doing anything about it. We must look past the history of oppression, and push forward to equality and recognize autonomy. We are not a homogeneous people; we are autonomous

beings with the ability and right to make decisions for ourselves. Justice Kennedy recognized that “at the heart of liberty is the right to define one’s own concept of existence, of meaning, of the universe and of the mystery of human life.” He lays out the groundwork to say it is not our job to instill a common morality, but rather we must find it for ourselves. Thus — as I see it — the reversal of Roe would be a direct obstruction of justice, furthermore making the president’s motives fundamentally unjust. Appointing a justice to the highest court of appeals for a tenure of life — to affect many generations to come — with hopes that don’t seem to extend further than overturning Roe would be an blatant abuse of power, undermining the trust of the American people. President Trump needs to find someone who can equate the progress Kennedy left on this nation. Congress must not use the same motivations as Trump when accepting his nomination. We need to be an active check on the court after one is appointed.

Scott Pruitt was an ethical lapse, fight for replacement is gold for Democrats By Tribune News Service

Republicans who secretly wished for an opening at the top of the Environmental Protection Agency got it Thursday, when ethically-challenged EPA Administrator Scott “Security Detail” Pruitt tendered his resignation. But this one may fall into the category of “be careful what you wish for.” Pruitt became the subject of multiple internal investigations and external scandals, thanks to such questionable moves as spending outrageous sums on bodyguards to fend off nonexistent death threats, ordering a rule-busting $43,000 soundproof phone booth to be built in his office and using an EPA employee to help him seek a Chick-fil-A franchise for his wife. This kind of personal misconduct cast a pall over his far-right agenda at the EPA, which reversed Obama administration initiatives on air and water pollution, climate change and other threats. Had Pruitt stuck to cozying up to executives for polluters regulated by his agency, he’d probably still be running the EPA today. That’s not the sort of sketchy behavior that gets

PHOTO COURTESY OF TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Former EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt speaks on June 2, 2017, during a briefing in the Brady Briefing Room at the White House.

you in trouble with many deregulatory Republicans in Washington. But no, he went much, much further — for example, by accepting an implausibly-sweet deal on a Capitol Hill condo from the wife of an energy

industry lobbyist. Now, President Donald Trump has the chance to nominate someone ethically upstanding to run the EPA into irrelevance. No more taint of venality — just a hopelessly cramped reading of federal environmen-

tal statutes and a whole lot of faith in the free market to keep industry from externalizing the costs of its toxic operations. Assuming the president can find such a person to finish the work Pruitt started, environmentalists might

grow nostalgic for the days when the administration’s policies on climate change, clean air and clean water were associated with a human ethical lapse. But there’s a bright side of Pruitt’s departure for those who want environmental

laws enforced and climate change taken seriously. Like the battle over Trump’s next Supreme Court nominee, the fight over Pruitt’s replacement could energize voters who oppose the administration’s environmental policies. If the EPA job remains open on Election Day, the next Senate is likely to decide who replaces Pruitt. If Democrats pick up three seats — admittedly unlikely, given the states with senators running for election — they’ll hold the fate of Trump’s nominee in their hands. Unless Trump moves with the sort of alacrity to replace Pruitt that he has to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, the November election will clearly be a referendum on environmental protection. While there are plenty of other issues out there, a vacancy at the EPA subject to Senate confirmation would present the kind of stark, binary choice for voters that political activists dream about. Look forward to lots of 30-second ads featuring smokestacks belching out black clouds and pipes dumping sludge into rivers.


the care and services you need to stay healthy at idsnews.com/health

Health Spotlight

The Center for Dental Wellness J. Blue Davis, DDS Mon. - Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 2909 Buick Cadillac Blvd. 812-339-3427 dentalwellness.com A privately owned, people-oriented practice located next to the College Mall. Dr. Davis provides cosmetic, restorative, family and emergency dentistry in a comfortable, relaxed atmosphere with a caring, knowledgeable and experienced staff. We use Cerec technology, allowing us to make restorations in one visit. Dr. Davis is a provider for Invisalign, Zoom! and Under Armour Performance Mouth Guards. Also offering other advanced services. We look forward to getting to know you and take care of you and your entire family with the goal of improving your smile and dental health.

Oral/Dental Care

Oral/Dental Care

Optometry

Chiropractic

Behavioral/Mentall

L. Figen M.D. Psychiatry

• Eye Exams • Contact Lens Exams • IU Student & Employee insurance

Matthew L. Rasche, D.D.S., M.S.D.

provider

Certified, American Board of Pediatric Dentistry

Southern Indiana Pediatric Dentistry with Dr. Matt Rasche specializes in providing comprehensive dental care for infants, children and adolescents, including those with special needs. We provide quality dental care and an exceptional experience for each patient. We welcome new patients! All insurance plans and private pay accepted. Our office is located near College Mall in Bloomington, at 828 Auto Mall Road in Bloomington. 812-333-KIDS. Call today!

Welcome IU Students and Staff! We strive to provide you with the highest-quality care in a relaxed and attentive atmosphere. WE OFFER: • I.V. Sedation • Wisdom Tooth Removal • Dental Implants Make your appointment today!

Mon. - Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Fri.: By appointment 828 Auto Mall Road 812-333-KIDS (5437) sipediatricdentistry.com

J. Blue Davis, D.D.S.

David J. Howell, D.D.S. Timothy A. Pliske, D.D.S. Mon. - Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Fri.: 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.

2911 E. Covenanter Drive 812-333-2614 IndianaOralSurgery.com

The Center for Dental Wellness A privately owned, peopleoriented practice located next to the College Mall. Dr. Davis provides cosmetic, restorative, family and emergency dentistry in a comfortable, relaxed atmosphere with a caring, knowledgeable and experienced staff. We use Cerec technology, allowing us to make restorations in one visit. Dr. Davis is a provider for Invisalign, Zoom! and Under Armour Performance Mouth Guards. Also offering other advanced services. We look forward to getting to know you and take care of you and your entire family with the goal of improving your smile and dental health. Mon. - Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 2909 Buick Cadillac Blvd. 812-339-3427 dentalwellness.com

Jackson Creek Dental

Mon. - Fri.: 7 a. m. - 5 p.m. 1124 S. College Mall Rd. 812-336-5525 jcdsmiles.com

Our Designer Frames and Sunglasses include: Nautica Flexon Nike Ray-Ban Bebe Calvin Klein Lacoste

Nine West Burberry Coach Anne Klein Vogue Prada Ralph Lauren

2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS!

Mon. - Wed.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. (Closed 1-2 p.m. for lunch) Thu.: 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. 409 S. Dunn St. 812-339-6272 campusfamilydental.com

Mon.-Tue., Thu.-Fri.: 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. Mon., Wed., Thurs.: 9 a.m. - noon, 2-7 p.m. Tue., Fri.: 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Bloomington

1710 W. Third St. 812-336-BACK bloomingtonchiropractor.com

413 W. Howe St. 812-334-2394 lindafigen@gmail.com

Physicians

1105 S. College Mall Road Located just Left of Kroger and Plato’s Closet Ellettsville Mon. - Fri.: 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. 812-876-2020 4719 West State Road 46 Located across from True Value Hardware

Dr. Gregory Velligan, Crystal Lynn, Shanna Yarnell, Krista Sears, Brandi Mosier, Ejay Rippy & Julie Waymire Campus Family Dental is the preferred choice for dental care among many IU students and professors. We will work with your schedule to provide the highest quality of general dentistry services. We pride ourselves in our professionalism and hightech equipment to make your appointments as comfortable and efficient as possible. Enjoy the convenience of walking to our office. We are located near the southeast corner of campus and accept many forms of insurance.

Gentle, effective pain relief helping students reduce back and neck pain, stress, headaches, migraines, carpal tunnel, shoulder pain, nerve pain, whiplash injury, sports injury and TMJ. Our office is well equipped with the most modern equipment and student friendly staff. Special Discounts for IU Students. We accept all insurance plans. Give us a call today!

Tue. - Fri.: 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sat.: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 812-333-2020

HoosierEyeDoctor.com

Ryan D. Tschetter, D.D.S. Jackson Creek Dental is a privately owned dental practice conveniently located on South College Mall Road. Most insurances accepted, including the Indiana University Aetna and Cigna Insurance plans as well as the Aetna Graduate Student plan, and IU Fellowship Anthem. Dr. Tschetter offers state of the art dental technology such as Zoom whitening, same day crown appointments, and Invisalign. Dr. Tschetter also provides restorative, cosmetic and emergency care. We pride ourselves in giving the best care to our patients while offering a pleasant yet professional atmosphere.

• 24-hour Emergency Service (call 812-340-3937)

Dr. Andrew Pitcher Dr. Crystal Gray

Dr. Figen treats patients in a quiet and confidential setting, near campus. She has 40 years experience helping students, using both psychotherapy and medication. She sees people with adjustment problems, family problems, stress, anxiety, panic, depression and eating disorders. At this time Dr. Figen is not treating people with ADD. She does not bill insurance companies, but will give you a receipt which you can send to your insurance company for reimbursement.

Dr. Brandy Deckard, O.D., F.A.A.O. Dr. Derek Bailey, O.D. Precision Eye Group specializes in comprehensive vision health. We offer examinations and treatment for a wide array of eye diseases, conditions, and problems, with advanced diagnostic and vision care technologies. We help our patients achieve and maintain good eye health for life. You can shop our wide variety of designer frames including Ray-Ban, Barton Perreira, Tom Ford, Burberry, Kate Spade and many more! Schedule your appointment now by calling the office or online at our website, and see your world with the best vision possible.

Dr. Mary Ann Bough Office Manager: Mary Baker Chiropractic Assistants: Melinda Chandler, Whitney Scherschel, Denice Stonier, Jennifer Wilson Discover Chiropractic for the entire family! We are a stateof-the-art chiropractic facility using computerized analysis and adjustment techniques. We specialize in gentle “no-TwistTurn” adjusting of infants to seniors! We are close to campus and near major bus routes. New patients are welcome and most insurance plans accepted. Call today and find out how you and your family can stay naturally healthy with chiropractic care. Mon., Wed., Fri.: 8:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. Tue.: 1 - 6 p.m. 3901 Hagan St., Suite C 812-336-7552 Emergency: 812-219-4927 drmaryann.com

Brian Logue, M.D. Eric Smith, M.D. Dave Elkins, P.A.C. Board certified physicians with over 70 years combined experience. Services include: kidney stones, urinary tract infections, urinary incontinence, prostate problems, same day emergency appointments, vasectomy. Mon. - Wed.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Thu.: 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. Fri.: 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. 2907 McIntire Drive 812-332-8765 summiturology.com Or visit us at our other location. Dr. Warren L. Gray 2200 John R. Wooden Drive Suite 207 Martinsville, IN 46151 765-342-8427

Mon. - Fri.: 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sat.: 9 a.m. - noon 322 S. Woodscrest Drive 812-332-2020 precisioneye.com

Timothy J. Devitt, D.M.D.

We provide a full scope of oral surgery procedures in a caring and comfortable manner. Our services include dental implants, IV sedation and wisdom teeth removal. We’re a provider for most insurance plans, including IU and Medicaid. No referral necessary Conveniently located on S. College Mall Road, across from Kroger and Five Guys.

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Mon. - Fri.: 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

the IDS every Monday for your directory of local health care services, or go online anytime at idsnews.com/health

1116 S. College Mall Rd. 812-332-2204 oralsurgeryofbloomington.com

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Monday, July 9, 2018  

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The Indiana Daily Student is an independent student newspaper covering Indiana University, IU sports and the city of Bloomington, Indiana.