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The IDS will not publish during spring break but will resume March 18. Stay informed at idsnews.com. Thursday, March 7, 2019

IDS Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

Little 500 break prep page 7

New name for SPEA By Lexi Haskell ldhaskel@iu.edu | @lexi_haskell

IU’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs, known to students as SPEA, has been renamed after former secretary of the U.S. Treasury Paul H. O’Neill in honor of his career and $30 million gift to the school. The school was ranked the top public affairs graduate program by U.S. News and World Report in 2018, and O'Neill's gift is intended to maintain that success. It will start the Paul H. O’Neill Center on Leadership in Public service, a dean’s initiatives fund, a scholarship program, a fellowship program and a variety of new professor and faculty positions, according to an IU press release. “My hope is that the school remains a place of excellence where future leaders can combine passion with action and develop the confidence they need to engage with society's greatest challenges and opportunities,” O’Neill said in the press release. O’Neill, who served under President George W. Bush from January 2001 to December 2002, received his Master of Public Administration from IU in 1966. He started working at the Veterans Administration, now the Department of Veterans Affairs, in 1961 before coming to IU, and through the government’s Education for Public Management program started attending the university, according to the press release. After IU, O’Neill worked various private, public and nonprofit jobs, at the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, International Paper Co., RAND Corp. and Alcoa. He also co-founded the Pittsburgh Regional Healthcare Initiative, a nonprofit to address regional health care problems, before he was appointed Secretary of Treasury. SPEA officially became the Paul H. O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs on March 4 after the Board of Trustees approved the change Dec. 7. A formal ceremony is being planned for later in the year, according to the press release.

Program comes to IU for fourth year

‘They’ve got my back’ Senior Dylan Harris has been training with his fraternity, Pi Kappa Alpha, for two years. This could be the first year he rides in the Little 500. By Christine Stephenson cistephe@iu.edu | @cistephenson23

For senior Dylan Harris, biking is best understood on what he calls Firehouse Hill. It’s a long, winding road right off Old State Road 37 by the Bloomington Township Fire Department. When it was still warm outside, Harris and his three teammates on Pi Kappa Alpha’s Little 500 bike team would ride along the road for endurance workouts. The road sits on a steep incline, Harris said. Once he thinks he’s coming up to the top, he turns the corner, and there’s another stretch of road. It feels like it’ll never end, but finally reaching the top is worth it. “It’s an ass-kicker,” he said. “But once you hit the top and go back down, you can get zipping at like 15 miles an hour.” After more than two years of training, this could be the first year Harris will be competing in IU’s Little 500 race if his team qualifies. His journey to get this far has been difficult but rewarding, he said — a bit like riding on firehouse hill. * * * On a typical day, Harris is very busy. Sometimes he is at Wells Library, working at University Information Technology Services. Other times he is at the

COLIN KULPA | IDS

Above Dylan Harris, Pike’s senior captain for the Little 500, stands March 5 outside Herman B Wells Library. This year’s men’s Little 500, which will be April 13, will be Harris’ first as a competitor. Top Dylan Harris, senior captain of the Pike Little 500 team, stands with other riders on the team. Harris will be competing in his first Little 500.

Kelley School of Business, where he is finishing up his supply chain management major, or sitting at his office hours at Pike, where he lends an ear as mental health chair of his fraternity. But once he gets the chance, he is biking. On an ideal day, he and his three teammates train for a few hours a day. Although this will be his first time competing, Harris’ history with biking travels back several years.

Senior Blake Jackson, Harris’ teammate, said the two have been friends since high school. When Jackson worked at Summit City Bicycles and Fitness, a bike shop in Fort Wayne, Indiana, Harris would sometimes visit. By about his third visit, Harris bought a bike. “He got attached to it,” Jackson said. SEE PIKE, PAGE 6

By Julia Locanto jlocanto@iu.edu | @julialocanto

IU is holding the 2019 Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders for the fourth year in a row. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, the six-week leadership program will begin in mid-June. “It’s a really impactful program,” director of the fellowship Teshome Alemneh said. “These are young leaders that are becoming future leaders.” After applying for the grant in 2016, IU has been holding the civic engagement section of the fellowship since 2016. Vice President for International Affairs Hannah Buxbaum said the application process for the grant gets competitive because many universities sign up. The Office of International Development leads the fellowship. The program works with emerging leaders from Sub-Saharan Africa doing civic engagement work in their home countries. It assists them with academics, leadership skills and professional networking and job opportunities. Buxbaum said the variety of leadSEE MANDELA, PAGE 6

WIUX Culture Shock lineup announced By Abby Malala Abbridge@iu.edu | @abbymalala

The 33rd annual Culture Shock Music Festival, hosted by WIUX, will take place April 20 at Dunn Meadow. Saba, a Chicago-born rapper whose music is a fusion of hip-hop and jazz influences, is set to headline the festival. Saba first gained widespread attention after appearing on Chance the Rapper’s “Acid Rap” mixtape on the track “Everybody’s Something.” Saba and Chance performed the track on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” in 2015. Saba also performed an NPR Tiny Desk concert in October 2018. Other acts to perform include Lala Lala, the musical project by singer-songwriter Lillie West and Black Belt Eagle Scout, another project by a solo artist, Katherine Paul. SHAED, a pop trio based in Washington, D.C., will perform right before Saba. Psychedelic rock group Boa, Chicago-based rock band The Slaps, the rock band Chives out

IDS FILE PHOTO

Emily Kempf of Lala Lala performs in 2017 at the Bishop bar. The band will be performing at this year’s Culture Shock Music Festival.

of Indianapolis, Indianapolis rappers Willis & Diop, singer-songwriter Allison Victoria and IU junior Katie O’Neill, who performs under the stage name ktfaithful, are also set to perform. DJ sets will be performed by

Bloomington-based DJ MADDØG, members of the IU Music Production Club and on-campus DJ group VD Collective. WIUX announced the lineup via Facebook and Instagram at 6 p.m. March 5. WIUX directors and staff

bit out of cupcakes with the names of the acts written on pieces of paper inside. The lineup was originally supposed to be announced in February, but the announcement was finally made Tuesday.


Indiana Daily Student

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NEWS

Thursday, March 7, 2019 idsnews.com

Editors Caroline Anders, Lexi Haskell and Emily Isaacman news@idsnews.com

Push for signs on campus leash law begins By Alex Hardgrave ahardgra@iu.edu | @a_hardgrave

Bumpkin the squirrel was injured Feb. 23 by a professor’s loose dog in Dunn’s Woods, according to Instagram posts from the @squirrels_at_iu Instagram page, sparking the organization to start a petition for a leash law sign in the area. Emily Jones, the page’s founder, said she found out about the injured squirrel after receiving messages and video from students who saw Bumpkin get hurt. Jones said he looked like he was having a seizure in one video and when she found him, some of his fur had been ripped out. “I doubted he was going to make it,” Jones said. An updated Instagram post written Feb. 25 by a member of the organization, Morgan Sears, said they determined Bumpkin would make a full recovery. Jones said this close call was “the last straw” for animals getting hurt and started a petition to help protect animals at IU by enforcing leash laws and putting up a sign in Dunn’s Woods. As of Tuesday evening, it had 1,891 signatures. The petition is encouraging the Office of Insurance, Loss Control & Claims to put a “dog must be leashed” sign in Dunn’s Woods and clarify the leash laws. The petition said dogs have attacked squirrels, box turtles, rabbits and other animals in the woods.

ALEX DERYN | IDS

A squirrel holds a nut Jan. 31 in front of Franklin Hall.

Jones said she hopes to get 2,000 signatures and then contact IU Office of Insurance, Loss Control & Claims about the sign. IU Police Department Capt. Craig Munroe said Indiana has no leash laws, but IU has an “Animals in Buildings” policy which says animals need to be restrained actively at all times. Dangerous animals are banned, and owners are responsible for all dam-

ages and injuries caused by the animal, according to the policy. Under the City of Bloomington’s Code of Ordinances, all animals, except for some exceptions with cats, must be kept under restraint. Restraint is defined as a leash, lead or fencing around a property. Munroe said even though IU’s policy is set out for animals in buildings, IUPD would intervene if they saw

issues with animals outside of buildings on campus. Also, they could call Bloomington Animal Care and Control if needed. The petition said IUPD rarely writes tickets for owners with off-leash dogs. Munroe said IUPD doesn’t write tickets in these situations, but they help enforce the policy by asking people to leash their animals. The owner of the dog who

hurt Bumpkin, an IU professor, responded to the club’s concerns in an email. The professor defended the dog, who is a service animal. @ squirrels_at_iu posted the professor’s email on its account, but it has since been deleted. Jones said it was taken down because many people were commenting about not interfering with nature and accusing her of being a dog-

hater. She said she loves dogs, but her issue is that she does not think dogs are natural predators of squirrels. Jones also said it is the organization’s policy to not interfere with nature if they see a natural predator hunting a squirrel. “If it were a hawk, I wouldn’t be mad because that’s just natural,” Jones said.

City, county to meet on center By Lilly St. Angelo lstangel@iu.edu | @lilly_st_ang

The city and county will have a public forum to discuss the expansion of the Monroe Convention Center from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Wednesday at the convention center. The public can give input and ask questions, according to a press release from the city. Architects from Convergence Design and Schmidt Associates, who will be designing the expansion, will meet with more than 300 stakeholders – including

event planners, IU representatives, business leaders and neighborhood associations – over the course of three days this week. Their Wednesday meetings will include the public forum. In April, the project’s design team will have open house sessions from April 1618 to allow the public to see the designs in progress and provide feedback. In addition to the public forum, updates about the expansion process, community engagement and points of contact can be found at the convention center blog.

CLAIRE LIVINGSTON | IDS

Former IU classmates Michael McHugh and Daniel Jones sit on top of a car March 5 on 10th Street. McHugh and Jones started their own company, Nomad Rides, which hires student drivers to give rides to other students.

Trash room caught Student drivers propel Nomad Rides fire Sunday

By Kaitlin Edquist kedquist@iu.edu | @kaitlinedquist

Nomad Rides, a Bloomington-based ride sharing service, employs only IU students as its drivers. It acts as a student-focused alternative to services such as Uber and Lyft. The service was originally created, with the same purpose, as an app called BTown Rides in spring 2018. Then it evolved into Hoosier Rides and now carries the name Nomad Rides. Users pay a $5 flat rate to ride anywhere within the IU campus and a surrounding perimeter. Outside the fixed perimeter, users are charged per minute and mile. Co-founders and former IU classmates Daniel Jones and Michael McHugh said they created Nomad Rides to allow riders to pay less and drivers to earn more.

Riders use cash or Venmo to pay their drivers directly. Where services such as Uber and Lyft collect commission fees from each ride, Nomad Rides allows drivers to keep 100 percent of the fares, McHugh said. In its first year, Nomad Rides has been downloaded by about 2,000 users. As the service expands, Jones and McHugh said they hope to continue to develop the app by allowing Android users to download it and introducing advertisements and small in-car vending machines to generate revenue. Only IU students are allowed to drive for Nomad Rides. The service currently employs about 70 drivers, and about 20 of those drivers are active weekly, McHugh said. Sophomore and driver Rachel Rhodes said she ini-

tially began driving for Nomad Rides in January 2018 because she quit her job and needed a way to make money on a flexible schedule, since the drivers create their own hours. But the community-based nature of the job quickly became her favorite part. “I see some of the same people every night or every other night, and they remember my name and I remember their name,” she said. “And we just pick up with the same conversation.” She said by allowing students to drive students, Nomad Rides gives its drivers a rare opportunity to connect with their IU peers. “They get to drive for us and break out of their shell socially and meet all these people that they wouldn’t have gotten to meet before,” McHugh said.

Although they are no longer IU students, Jones and McHugh also serve as Nomad Rides drivers. Jones said this is important to develop relationships with the users and to understand what they like and dislike about the app. “At the end of the night we add all these things we learned and we code it into the app,” he said. “So it’s just constant integration and feedback that you just can’t replace.” McHugh, Jones and Rhodes said the the student connections between drivers and riders are what set Nomad Rides apart from its larger alternatives. “I think it really brings the IU student community together,” Rhodes said. “The connections and relationships are rare and nothing like you can get from other apps.”

By Joey Bowling jobowl@iu.edu | @jwbowling08

Caroline Dresselhuys was getting ready for bed Sunday night when the fire alarm started blaring. In her confusion, the freshman received a text from her resident assistant telling everyone to evacuate. This wasn’t a drill. She and her floor filed out of Harper Residence Hall in Foster Quadrangle just before midnight, unsure of what was going on. They saw firefighters enter the building. The firefighters spent the

CORRECTION In the March 4 edition of the Indiana Daily Student, an article titled “Everyone has to start somewhere” improperly said Kappa Alpha Theta is looking to be the first team in Little 500 history to win three straight titles, but it would be the first women’s team in race history to do so. The IDS regrets this error.

Police offer spring break safety tips By Alex Hardgrave ahardgra@iu.edu | @a_hardgrave

As students think about finishing midterms, packing and getting out of town for some much-needed rest and relaxation, Bloomington Police Department Lt. Ryan Pedigo and IU Police Department Capt. Craig Munroe have some tips for students preparing to leave Bloomington for an extended period of time.

Protecting your home 1. Lock your doors. It seems obvious, but if you are rushing, it could be easily overlooked. Also make sure your windows are locked. 2. Put your lights on a timer so it looks like someone is there. You can buy one at Target for $5.19. If you can’t buy a timer, leave a light on that doesn’t get hot. 3. If your neighbors are staying, tell them to keep an eye out for unusual activity. 4. Close your curtains so

your valuables are not easily seen. 5. Unplug electronics. It will save power and keep them from short circuiting. 6. If you live in a dorm and have a bike, you are allowed to bring the bike into your room and leave it there while you’re gone. 7. If you leave your car, make sure to leave it somewhere well-lit and make sure its doors are locked and windows are rolled up. 8. Do not post on social

media that you are leaving or how long you will be gone. Protecting yourself 1. Be wary when using apps like Tinder to meet up with people. 2. Don’t go anywhere by yourself. 3. Don’t drink too much so you can stay alert to bad situations. 4. If you do drink, have someone in your group stay sober so they can take care of others.

next hour tending to a fire on the second floor trash room. Just after 1 a.m., Dresselhuys and the rest of the Harper Residence Hall reentered the building. Two trash cans were scorched and melted, and the trash room sustained significant smoke damage. No student belongings or rooms were damaged. Dresselhuys said someone told her their friend threw a blunt in a trash can to start the fire, but Bloomington Fire Department Sgt. Bryan Hutchinson said the cause of the fire is currently unknown.

Matt Rasnic Editor-in-Chief Jesse Naranjo and Lydia Gerike Managing Editors

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IU studies ‘grade surprise’ phenomenon By Christine Stephenson cistephe@iu.edu | @cistephenson23

When Libby Gress started as an undergraduate at IU, she sometimes felt lost in what she wanted to do and what to expect from classes. Part of her wanted to study cognitive science, her major at the time. Part of her wanted to go to law school. Part of her just wanted to get the required math classes out of the way. As a freshman, she had to take MATH-M 119: Brief Survey of Calculus 1 as a freshman. She said she studied hard and regularly attended her professor’s office hours. Her professor told her she was prepared for exams. She planned on getting an A, or at least a B. But that didn’t happen. “I’d chalk it up to performance anxiety at the end,” she said. “It turns out math wasn’t my forte.” Gress is one of many students who have experienced what IU researchers call “grade surprise.” Grade surprise happens when a student receives a different grade in a class than they were expecting. IU is one of a dozen universities to receive a grant from the Association of American Universities to improve undergraduate education in STEM fields. IU will study the effects of grade surprise and how to help students better prepare and communicate with professors. The grant provides $20,000 over two years. The research includes a group of large general education courses at IU and their

COURTESY PHOTO

Jennifer Meta Robinson, middle, is a professor in the Department of Anthropology. Robinson is the project evaluator for an IU study that analyzes the effects of grade surprise and how to help students better prepare and communicate with professors.

respective faculty members and students. The faculty members plan to analyze GPA and SAT data and responses from frequent student surveys. Jennifer Meta Robinson, a professor in the Department of Anthropology and the project evaluator for the study, said she has often seen her own students experience grade surprise. “It can be, ‘Wow I got a better grade than I expected,’” she said. “Or it can be, ‘Darn, I thought I would do better.’” Robinson said the Association wants universities to research STEM majors spe-

cifically, but IU is expanding to other classes because grade surprise affects all majors. The study includes Robinson’s interpersonal communication class, a social and historical general education creditand other introductory STEM courses in fields such as chemistry and computer science. The study targets these courses because they are composed of mostly freshmen and sophomores. Robinson said she suspects these students experience grade surprise most because they are still adjusting from high school. “Everyone has a little un-

certainty when they start a course, but I think it’s especially hard for first-year students,” she said. Robinson said she and other faculty members hope to discover whether certain courses give students particular trouble. Informatics student Anna Heine said she has heard many students have trouble with finite, which is often required. Her roommate ultimately retook the class at a community college, she said. But not all students have had the same experience. When the time came for Gress to take MATH- M 118:

Finite Mathematics, she was worried after her experience with calculus. But she started attending office hours right away, she said, and had conversations with her professor about her life instead of just her grades. She ended with an A in the class. Gress is now a graduate student studying humancomputer interaction at IU. She said she was only able to get where she is now from the help of her professors. Robinson said professors can play a significant role in their students’ success. She said she wants to give students opportunities to provide feedback through-

out the semester, beginning right after the first exam or significant assignment. After the research is conducted, Robinson said, the faculty members want to share their findings with all students so they can know what to expect going into certain courses or declaring a major. Then students will know how to better prepare and can feel less alone if they are struggling in a course, she said. “You know, this is hard. This is college,” she said. “Some students think they’re the only ones, but this way maybe people will feel less like outliers.”

Junior, IUSG Chief of Staff running for president By Jenna Williams jnw9@iu.edu | @jnwilliams18

Isabel Mishkin was born in Chicago. The city, not the suburbs. Matt Stein loves swimming and is a member of Alpha Epsilon Pi. The two juniors have teamed up to run for IU student body president and vice president. Mishkin is the current chief of staff for IU Student Government, and Stein is the chief of Diversity and Inclusion. Their campaign team, Vision, is the intersection between student values and expertise, Mishkin said. “It comes from our desire to incorporate students all across campus into every aspect of decision-making that they would like to be a part of,” Stein said. “We represent that in our policy platform.” This is shown in their Equity and Inclusion Policy which includes an initiative for a Middle and Near Eastern Culture Center and a Wells Library International Flag Display, he said. “When students are coming in to come in and work and better themselves through their education, they can be reminded that this is their home,” Stein said. “No matter where you come from, you’re accepted here.” The second half of the team’s campaign is about bringing expertise to the

COURTESY PHOTO AND JUNHUI WU | IDS

Juniors Isabel Mishkin and Matt Stein have teamed up to run for IU student body president and vice president. Their campaign team is called Vision.

table. Part of this policy includes the implementation of a monthly IUSG town hall. The team’s policies focus on a desire to understand the wants and needs of students, she said. The campaign started formally after Halloween, Mishkin said. “We hit the ground running,” Stein said. “The second

we got back to campus in January, we immediately started reaching out to leaders we thought would advocate for students and we reached out to different interest groups asking what can Vision do on behalf of you to make this a more equitable and inclusive place for every single person who is here.’” The campaign is focused on working for students, Stein said.

“I get things done,” Mishkin said. “I believe in not allowing time and space to corrupt a vision for what we have for how to improve life for students.” The pair believes they can work together to advocate and empower students, Mishkin said. “Matt is one of the most caring and driven people I have met in my life,” Mishkin said. “He is relentlessly

in love with this university and is the kind of caring human being that this organization needs and that I think the students need,” she said. Vision’s desire to lead stems from a love of the school and its students, she said. “I believe that I have the experience, the knowledge, the skillset and the demeanor to effectively relay the

student concern to administrators,” Mishkin said. She said she wants to be student body president first and foremost for the students. “I want to be student body president because I think students should always come first,” she said. “I know students should always come first.” Elections are March 27 and 28.

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Indiana Daily Student

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SPORTS

Thursday, March 7, 2019 idsnews.com

Editors Matt Cohen and Will Coleman sports@idsnews.com

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Grace Withrow cherishes being a part of IU By Dylan Wallace dswallac@iu.edu | @Dwall_1

Inside a glass frame was a white IU jersey with the crimson number “5” and “Indiana” emblazoned across the chest. Up came IU senior guard Grace Withrow, her mom on her right and dad on her left, as she was applauded by the 5,857 fans in attendance for IU’s final game of the regular season against Purdue on Sunday. Withrow stood next to her framed jersey and smiled for a picture. It was a moment she never thought she’d experience in her time at IU. Withrow grew up in Valparaiso, Indiana, and played basketball at Valparaiso High School, scoring over 1,000 points and averaging 15 points per game in her four-year career as a Viking. She had some offers from mid-major schools but ultimately wanted to go to a big school and have a Big Ten experience. “If that meant I couldn’t play basketball, that was OK,” Withrow said. Withrow committed to IU and began her freshman year in the fall of 2015. She said she had fun and school was great in her first two years, but it felt like something was missing. In her junior year, she worked at Varsity Properties on Dunn Street, and one day her boss came in and told her she heard the IU women’s basketball team was holding tryouts and that Withrow should go since she always talks about how she misses the game. Withrow still played basketball here and there at IU’s recreational centers and even played on an intramural team. She played on a co-ed team with her older brother, and her team got to play in the championship game in Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall, which she thought was so cool. With an opportunity to play inside Assembly Hall as part of the IU women’s basketball team, Withrow knew she needed to get serious. She worked out for two weeks before the tryout and would get shots up at her boss’s house, which had a half-court in it. The tryout consisted

BOBBY GODDIN | IDS

Senior guard Grace Withrow hugs head coach Teri Moren March 3 during the Senior Day game against Purdue in Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall. Withrow scored IU’s final point of the game on a free throw.

of six or seven other girls in addition to “the black squad,” which is the women’s team’s male practice squad. No members from the Hoosiers’ actual roster were present at the tryout. Withrow waited around to hear if she had made the team and on the Sunday before the first official practice, she got the call that she would officially be a member of the roster. “I didn’t know anybody’s name or anything and I just kind of showed up at practice in The Hall,” Withrow said. “It was just like we hit the ground running and that was it. It was a lot to take in at first, but it was a good challenge and it was a lot of fun.” From last season’s shaky start to the seven-game conference win streak to the WNIT Championship, Withrow was there every step of the way and enjoyed every moment of it. Although she only played six minutes all season and attempted just one field goal, her teammates never treated her any differently than the ones that played 38

minutes and scored over 10 points per game. “I remember coming in and being terrified because they didn’t have to respect me, they didn’t have to be nice to me, they didn’t owe me anything,” Withrow said. “But ever since literally I got here, they have treated me just like everybody else.” After the season ended, she was asked if she wanted to return for her senior year. Withrow didn’t have to think twice about it, but what happened next, she never saw coming. After summer workouts before this season began, the coaching staff surprised the walk-on Withrow with a scholarship. “It’s just an added on benefit to the already amazing opportunity of being on the team,” Withrow said. “I think the gesture of giving me a scholarship meant a lot more than the scholarship itself. I mean, money is money, but the fact that they thought of me and saw me as deserving means a lot.” Withrow’s constant celebrations from the bench any

time one of her teammates would score were finally reciprocated to her Nov. 18, 2018. With 25 seconds left and IU up 23 over University of North Florida, freshman guard Grace Berger inbounded from the baseline, and Withrow came around a screen set by sophomore forward Linsey Marchese. The screen freed her up as Berger threw her the ball near the right corner, a few feet inside the 3-point arc, Withrow caught the ball and pulled up. As her shot trajected toward the hoop, the whole IU bench rose to its feet, followed by the netting of the nylon and the eruption from her teammates and the crowd. Withrow trotted back on defense with a big smile on her face. She had just scored her first collegiate points. “We wanted that more for her than anything,” junior guard Ali Patberg said after the game. The shot came two days before Withrow’s birthday as well, so the team was even more excited about that. Patberg and company

NATIONAL SPORTS COLUMN

often refer to her as one of the most selfless people they know. It’s not the only points Withrow has scored this season either. More recently, on Feb. 26, against Northwestern, IU was down 23, and Withrow came into the game with 1:04 left. In her few minutes played, she ran the floor hard and hit a 3-pointer as time expired. It was one of IU’s worst outings of the season, but Patberg said Withrow’s effort is what the rest of the team should have been doing. “The way she played was how we’re supposed to play,” Patberg said. “I think that represents who she is. We get the opportunity to play all the time and we have to make the most of it just like she did.” It’s the embodiment of what Withrow is all about. Whether the team is winning or losing, she is always keeping a positive energy. She knew her team was better than what it showed that night. “Our loss against Northwestern was not the best but

that isn’t who we are,” Withrow said. “We are a really good basketball team.” That really good team Withrow referred to showed up Sunday as IU trounced Purdue 73-51. Although the game moved the Hoosiers into the 10 seed for the Big Ten Tournament and kept their NCAA Tournament hopes alive, Patberg and sophomore guard Bendu Yeaney said it was more about celebrating their seniors — Withrow and Kym Royster. Chants of “We want Withrow” broke out late in the fourth quarter, and with 1:50 to go, IU up 26, the fans got their wish. In what could potentially be her final minutes on the floor as a Hoosier, Withrow cut into the middle of the zone, caught a pass and got fouled. She stepped to the line and missed the first free throw and the crowd became anxious. Withrow made the second one as the crowd exploded and her teammates held up the number one signifying her one point on the day, her Senior Day. With 25 seconds left, IU Coach Teri Moren called a timeout so she could sub Withrow out and let the Assembly Hall crowd give her one more standing ovation. “You’re always hoping when you go into a game like this that you have an opportunity to take your seniors out and allow the crowd to give them those ovations,” Moren said. “It’s a great moment.” After the game, fans and players stayed on the court to watch two video packages that honored Withrow and Royster. In Withrow’s, she thanked her friends, family, teammates and coaches for the opportunity and support. In the video’s conclusion, Withrow set an Adidas IU basketball down at midcourt of Assembly Hall, took her left hand and hit it against the crimson “5” and “Indiana” emblazoned across the chest of her white IU jersey and said the following: “Indiana has taught me to take a step back, see the bigger picture and do everything out of love because at the end of the day, nothing worth living for is ever just about you.”

WOMEN’S SWIM AND DIVE

Brown not a good fit for top franchises Thirteen Hoosiers qualify for national championship Dan Black is a senior in journalism.

The 2019 NFL Scouting Combine has quickly passed us by with plenty of future NFL stars set to jump onto the scene. The league’s new year begins next week and with it, the start of free agency. Big names will be on the market looking for new homes, such as Super Bowl 52 MVP Nick Foles and former Pittsburgh Steelers running back Le’Veon Bell, among others. It also signals the beginning of trades being made, and the biggest name being made available is Bell’s exteammate, Antonio Brown Brown made headlines with his displeasure in the Steelers organization at the end of a disappointing season that saw the team miss the playoffs on the final day of the season. Brown criticized the organization, specifically quarterback Ben Roethlisberger. It all culminated with the seven-time Pro Bowler tweeting that he enjoyed his nine years in Pittsburgh but was ready to move on. His criticisms of Roethlisberger included the quarterback having a sense of betterment than the rest of his teammates. He also recently stated that he only wants guaranteed money – something hard to come by in the NFL – in his next contract, along with saying in an interview that he no longer even really needs football.

By Matt Cohen mdc1@iu.edu | @Matt_Cohen_

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiverAntonio Brown celebrates a touchdown against the Baltimore Ravens on Nov. 4 at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore.

This situation shares paralells with Terrell Owens circa 2004-2005. Owens was coming off an incredible season with the Philadelphia Eagles where he was a major contributor in getting the team to its first Super Bowl since 1981. Philadelphia fell short to the New England Patriots despite Owens totaling 122 receiving yards and playing through a tough leg injury. That spring, Owens made comments about his displeasure with quarterback Donovan McNabb, leading to the beginning of his end with the team. This could be the fate

of any team that goes after Brown in the trade market. The gaudy numbers and past success could make owners believe that a trade would be worth it if they can just fix his attitude, which is easier said than done. Brown is 31 years old. Most people do not change their attitudes at that point in their life, especially one with such a history of success at the highest level. The market right now is not favorable for Brown. It is reported that the Washington Redskins, Oakland Raiders and Tennessee Titans are the three front-runners for the wide receiver. A

trend is setting for Brown, and it is not good. Teams that are well-run and competitive are staying away from him, while struggling teams are looking to take a chance on him. There is also the trend that all of these teams’ quarterbacks are not nearly as talented as Roethlisberger. Brown’s intentions are clear: money over wins. Brown has dug himself into a mess that he will struggle to climb out of, unless he looks in the mirror and changes himself before changing teams. drblack@iu.edu

13 swimmers on the IU women’s swim and dive team have qualified for the Mar. 20-23 national championship meet in Austin, Texas. The 13 swimmers in the most qualified for an individual team out of the Big Ten, and the third highest total in the nation. Seniors Bailey Andison, Christie Jensen, Lilly King, and Laura Morley, juniors Cassy Jernberg and Shelby Koontz, sophomores Josie Grote and Bailey Kovac as well as freshman Mackenize Looze, Noelle Peplowski, Christin Rockway, Morgan Scott and Maggie Wallace make up the contingent of IU swimmers that have qualified. King will compete in both the 100- and 200-yard breaststroke, as she goes for her seventh and eigth individual national championship, completing the career sweep of the two breaststroke events. King has the fastest time in the nation for both events. Peplowski will also swim both the 100- and 200-yard breaststoke, along with Andison, Kovac and Morley. Andison, Jensen, King and Looze will all compete in the 200-yard invidiual medley. Andison and Looze will also swim in the 400-yard individual medley, along with Rockway and Grote.

Andison has the nation’s sixth-fastest time in the 200yard individual medley and the fifth fastest in the 400. Jensen and Koontz will each compete in the 100-yard butterfly. Jernberg and Wallace will each swim in the 1,650-yard freestyle, and Jernberg will also be in the 500-yard freestyle. Lastly, Scott will swim in the 100-yard backstroke. IU has also qualified for four relays, the 200- and 400yard medley relay, as well as the 200- and 400-yard freestyle relay. IU swimmers have eight total NCAA A cut times, which automatically qualified those swimmers for the national championships, while the remainder of the swimmers had NCAA B cuts, receiving invites to Austin. IU swimmers have A cuts in the 100- and 200-yard breaststroke as well as the 200- and 400-yard individual medley. The final four A cuts all come from the four relay events IU qualified for. With a large group of swimmers going to Austin, and diving qualifying still yet to take place, IU is in position to finish in the top 10 at the national championships for a fourth straight year, something the team has never done before. The highest ever finish for the IU women is seventh, a result that came in 2016.


NEWS

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Thursday, March 7, 2019 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

Hamilton is running again. Let’s look back. By Lilly St. Angelo lstangel@iu.edu | @lilly_st_ang

When Mayor John Hamilton was sworn into office in 2016, he pledged to work for wage growth, affordable housing, the betterment of public education, government efficiency, more transparency and more engagement. Three years later, Hamilton reflects on the struggle to make a city work for all types of people. “You think every day, ‘Well, how do we make this place better every day for a few more people?’” Hamilton said. “It’s not a job you leave at the office.” City council president Dave Rollo said he’d describe the mayor as ambitious. Hamilton has been at the head of many changes to Bloomington over the past three years. From his “String of Pearls” projects, to the new armored vehicle, to annexation and the lawsuit that followed, Hamilton’s term in office has been a time of growth and controversy. Transparency: too much or too little? In order to fulfill his goal to improve government transparency, Hamilton created B-Clear, a website that currently has 173 data sets of public information. The data ranges from pothole reports to gun usage by the Bloomington Police Department and is updated multiple times a month. “My basic view is that government belongs to the people and that the people now own that information,” Hamilton said. “It is not my information, it is not the city government’s information, it’s the public’s information.” However, Hamilton’s transparency has been controversial. The city made a website in 2017 called Bloomington Revealed to address issues including the opioid crisis and homelessness. Most data sets on this site have not been updated since 2017. The website initially included a data set that showed the locations of overdose deaths in Monroe County. Amanda Barge, now Hamilton’s opponent in the Democratic primary, posted on Facebook criticizing the city for posting the locations of overdose deaths, saying the data shamed people with addictions and singled them out as “other.” The information regarding specific locations of overdose deaths was removed from the website. All data on the site was public information. William Ellis, Republican Party chair of Monroe County, said he supports for transparency in governance but

TY VINSON | IDS

Bloomington Mayor John Hamilton speaks during the State of the City Address on Feb. 21 at the Buskirk-Chumley Theater.

did not consider publishing the overdose information transparency. “Transparency is what the government is doing,” Ellis said. “Not what people do in private.” Bloomington Council member Stephen Volan also said he thought publishing the overdose data was a mistake. He said he thought the city was being over-eager in being transparent and did not think about privacy. Hamilton remains firm in his belief that publishing the information was important to solving the opioid crisis. “Anyone who’s had an arrest report published in the newspaper says they wish there wasn’t so much transparency, but those are public records,” Hamilton said. Annexation Hamilton proposed an annexation in February 2017 of 10,000 acres outside of Bloomington’s current city limits, adding an additional 15,000 people who would pay city taxes and receive city services. It was an ambitious plan. Annexations are not typically this large. “After years of not annexing, Mayor Hamilton decided to annex everything we ever wanted to annex,” Volan said. Although he approved of the annexation at the time, Volan said in hindsight, he thinks the planned annexation was too big. Regardless, Hamilton’s plan was shot down in April 2017 when state legislators

made a last-minute change to the state’s budget bill, temporarily barring cities’ annexation plans. Bloomington was the only city affected. In May, Bloomington sued Gov. Eric Holcomb for passing the bill. “They singled out Bloomington as a state legislature to stop us from doing the very normal, regular process of annexation,” Hamilton said. Ellis disagreed with Hamilton’s move to annex the large swath of land in 2017 because certain people who lived on the land being annexed did not want to be a part of the city. “If you really want to be transparent you say, ‘We’re thinking about doing this, what do you think?’” Ellis said. “But they didn’t.” Volan and Rollo both said, however, the state’s actions to disrupt the process of annexations were inappropriate. “I think they overstepped,” Rollo said. “They fashioned this legislation just for Bloomington.” The lawsuit is ongoing. Public Safety During Hamilton’s term, the Bloomington Police Department acquired state and national accreditation by the Indiana Law Enforcement Accreditation Commission and the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies. The accreditations recognized the BPD’s excellence in public safety, commitment to communityand im-

plementation of contemporary practices. The mayor has replaced several fire engines and police cars as well as approved the purchase of the Bearcat, a controversial armored vehicle. The vehicle has been used three times since it arrived in July, according to public records on B Clear. Hamilton said use of the armored vehicle is also reported every month at a public meeting. The purchase garnered significant attention at city council meetings, public comment sessions, and public protests organized by the Bloomington chapter of Black Lives Matter. Both Volan and Ellis said the city’s purchase of the vehicle was one of the least transparent decisions made during the Hamilton administration because of the abrupt announcement of the purchase with no prior warning to the public. Ellis said while he wants Bloomington’s police to have the equipment they need, he thinks the purchase of the vehicle has actually hurt police and community relations. “They did not realize how much of a controversy it would create,” Volan said. Hamilton said he feels responsible for police officer and civilian safety. “Those vehicles have been misused in some places,” Hamilton said. “They are a symbol of police excess, of racial conflict, and it is our job in Bloomington not to misuse them and to be sure

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we use them for fair, appropriate public safety and that’s my commitment.” His “String of Pearls” There are four projects Hamilton worked on during his term that he proudly refers to as his “String of Pearls.” The city began development in March 2018 on the Trades District, an area around City Hall where the city envisions tech companies planting their roots and providing new jobs. There will also be residential buildings. The district will be a Certified Technology Park, a designation from the state that lets the businesses keep up to $5 million of local and state tax revenue as well have the opportunity for state grant funding. Ellis said he thinks the Trades District is one of the highlights of Hamilton’s terms because of the jobs in the tech sector it will create. The purchase of the IU Health Bloomington Hospital site is another prideful moment for Hamilton . The city purchased the property worth $16 million for $6.5 million. “It’s just an unparalleled opportunity right downtown to have 24 acres to redevelop,” Hamilton said. Another of Hamilton’s projects, the expansion of the Monroe Convention Center, is now beginning its first phase of planning. It came at the cost of adopting the Food and Beverage Tax, a 1 percent tax on prepared food and beverages. The tax

will fund the expansion and was protested and disliked by many, including Ellis. Bloomington City Council member Stephen Volan said he sees the value in expanding the convention center. “It’s not like we don’t know how to bring big events to town,” Volan said. “We just don’t have the facilities to brig groups here.” While there has been disagreement in how the city and county will decide on what hotel will be put in near the convention center, Hamilton said he is confident the city and county will work it out. Switchyard Park, opening this November, is the last of the mayor’s projects. Near where Grimes Lane and the B-Line Trail intersect, the park will have a pavilion, a stage with a lawn that can accomodate 5,000 to 8,000 people. It will also have community gardens, sports courts, a play area with water features, a playground, a skate park and a dog park. The area used to be a regional hub for trains until the early 2000s. Affordable housing and the future Hamilton’s main goal for his second term, if he wins, is affordable housing. Over the past three years under Hamilton, the city supported the addition of 600 bedrooms of affordable housing to Bloomington, which includes housing for middle-income residents, the homeless and seniors on Medicaid. Rollo said Hamilton has done more to support affordable housing than any mayor in the past. Volan said he thinks Hamilton has made a concerted effort. “It will not be a successful Bloomington, in my view, if we lose the middle class, the working folks, the nurses, the school teachers, the police officers, the healthcare attendants, the IT specialists,” Hamilton said. “They need to be able to live in Bloomington.” The problem of accommodating for people of all walks of life is a problem faced by many successful cities today, Hamilton said. Ellis said he thinks the city has too many restrictions for developers who build housing. “If they let people build housing, there will be enough affordable housing,” Ellis said. Hamilton said his role as mayor is also to look to the future and think about people who aren’t here yet. “We’ve always changed,” Hamilton said. “If we stop changing then that’s not a recipe for future success. We have to change well, change smart.”

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» PIKE

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 The two started training their sophomore years. But about two months later, Harris crashed. He was on a 37mile ride to his grandparents’ house in Fort Wayne, and a car veered too close. He clipped the curb and broke his wrist. “It was a challenge getting back on the bike after that,” he said. When he was ready to compete again, he got an offer to study abroad in Sydney, Australia, for a semester his junior year. He had to miss Little 500 again. “I told the boys, ‘You know I love you guys — I really want to ride in it — but Sydney, Australia,’” he said. “And they were like, ‘Nope, we get it.’” After six months abroad, Harris returned to IU this past fall and started training again. Now the team is kicking it into gear, he said, with endurance rides, sprint workouts, exchange techniques and foam rollers. The men’s race is April 13. Everyone wants to win, Harris said. Or, at least, Pike would like to be in the top half of the pack, he said — maybe 10th or 15th place. Regardless, Harris is proud of his team for training hard and working well together, he said. “It’s going to be an electric atmosphere,” Harris said. * * * Throughout college, Harris has openly identified as gay. When he started fraternity recruitment, he decided he was going to be open and honest about his sexuality. “I didn’t know how I’d go about it,” he said. “But the one thing that was constant the entire time was I just wanted to be my real self. I’m not going to sit there and be somebody fake.”

» MANDELA

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 ers IU sees is amazing. “I love hearing about the work that they are doing in their jobs at home,” Buxbaum said. “The forms of different civic engagement that they are involved in at home is across the board.” The fellowship includes 700 leaders at 27 institutions around America this year. After the six weeks, they will meet in Washington, D.C. for networking and discussions. Seventy participants will advance to the following four-week section of the program, which includes further professional training at numerous organizations and government agencies. Leslie Bozeman, academic director of IUPUI's component of the fellowship, said the fellows get to spend about two weeks in India-

COLIN KULPA | IDS

Top Pike Little 500 team captain Dylan Harris practices Mar. 6 in the garage of his house. Above Dylan Harris rides Mar. 6 at the Pike Little 500 team’s indoor practice session. Harris, the captain of the team, is openly gay.

When he took interest in Pike, Harris said he knew he could rely on them for support and wouldn’t be treated poorly. Harris said he has renapolis, where faculty helps them get settled in America. “The fellows have stated that the program helps them to better understand their roles as leaders,” Bozeman said. “They learn how to identify their strengths and present their ideas.” Along with professional opportunities, the fellowship at IU allows participants to experience events such as the Bloomington Farmers Market, Fourth of July parade and other events displaying cultures and traditions. They will also meet with faculty members and Bloomington citizens to mingle and participate in community service, academic sessions and often receive an American family dinner. Alemneh said one the main program’s objectives is to help the fellows interact with Americans. “They learn about the

ceived nothing but support from his brothers, and especially his teammates. “They’re my boys,” Harris said. “I know they’ve got my back and I’ve got theirs.”

* * * After the chaos of the race settles and graduation rolls around, Harris plans

on moving down to Fort Myers, Florida, where he has landed a sales job. He and Jackson will be living in different states, he said, but he will still be close

with his teammates. He will bring his bike and likely join a cycling club. And he will look back on the best parts of IU, riding along firehouse hill.

PHOTO COURTESY OF IU OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

Mandela Washington fellows group together for a photo at IU-Purdue University Indianapolis. The 2019 Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders will be at IU for the fourth time.

American experience and cultures and traditions,” Alemneh said. “They also establish networking for future collaborations and connections.” The nationwide fellowship offers two other tracks in business and public man-

agement. Alemneh said around 40,000 to 50,000 fellows apply each year, and the U.S. Department of State places them at an institution with the track they are most interested in or best fit for. IU’s civic engagement

track heavily focuses on community service. Alemneh said what the fellows learn in America is transferred back to their home countries. “We here in Bloomington can contribute to changing lives in Africa,” Alemneh said.

“The fellows are young leaders, and when they go back to their respective communities they’re always talking about IU and what they learned about community service. They apply it in their countries to help change lives.”

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Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com | Thursday, March 7, 2019

FEATURE Editors Matt Cohen and Will Coleman sports@idsnews.com

Spring break is no break for Little 500 teams With Qualifications set for the weekend after spring break, riders can’t afford to take a rest By Dylan Wallace dswallac@iu.edu | @Dwall_1

The Little 500 is only a few weeks away, and the track opened up for riders just a few weeks ago. As spring break sets in as a week of relaxation for IU students, that’s not the case for Little 500 riders. This week isn’t a time to take off so close to the race. The time to taper isn’t quite here yet, so riders take advantage of the week off to spend more time training in a multitude of ways. Team trips The Cru Cycling women's team is using break as an opportunity to take a team trip. Some of the riders are going home the first weekend but are returning back to Bloomington by Monday. Their schedule reads: two-a-day practices Monday and Tuesday, morning practice Wednesday and then traveling to North Carolina. The five members are staying in Asheville, North Carolina, from Wednesday to Saturday, March 13-16. “We’re going to bike wherever we find a road,” senior Carlie Etter said. Asheville is a city in western North Carolina near the Blue Ridge Mountains, so in terms of a training spot, Cru Cycling will get something out of it. “It’ll definitely be hillier than it is here, so that’s exciting,” sophomore Hannah Castlow said. This isn’t the team’s first experience in North Carolina, either. The same five women took a trip in the fall to Wilmington, North Carolina, as part of a hurricane relief trip. But, unlike the trip in the fall that consisted of demolition and sleeping on the floors of churches, Cru Cycling will be staying in AirBnB’s and training on bikes. “We just like to spend time together, so we’re just going to hang out with one another and kind of get away from Bloomington,” Etter said. Road races The IU Cycling Club puts on a two-day event called the Candy Stripe Classic, which will take place March 9 and 10 this year. Last year was the first time since 1994 that the cycling club put on an event in Bloomington, so this is the Classic’s second consecutive year. On March 10, riders will compete in the Team Time Trial. These time trials will be a

5.6-mile race through the trails and hills of the Morgan-Monroe State Forest. After the trials, there will be a road race in the same location. The road race is a 14-mile loop and the distance of the race will depend on the respective tiers. Based on experience and talent, the tiers are divided into four — A, B, C and D, with A being the top tier. The next day will be the criterium, which will be raced in the parking lot of Memorial Stadium. It will be a 0.8-mile loop, and instead of going for distance, riders will race for a specific amount of time. All the races range from 30 to 70 minutes depending on the riders' paces.

“You learn a lot about yourself physically and mentally when you’re pushing yourself to certain extremes. It’s such a game-changer knowing where you’re going to find yourself in a race before you’re actually racing.” Celine Oberholzer, Little 500 cyclist

The eight members of Gray Goat intend on participating in this event. Then, the next weekend, the team will travel to Louisville, Kentucky, to compete in a similar event called the Cardinal Omnium. “It’ll be like two weekends of pretty hard racing with the middle of the week, of course, just going really hard in training,” sophomore Jake Richards said.

The six members from RideOn will also be participating in the Candy Stripe Classic. “I actually encouraged the team to do this race because I think it’s really valuable to get race experience before finding yourself in Little 5,” senior Celine Oberholzer said. “You learn a lot about yourself physically and mentally when you’re pushing yourself to certain extremes. It’s such a game-changer knowing where you’re going to find yourself in a race before you’re actually racing.” After the race, RideOn will practice in twoa-days Monday and Tuesday, then get the week off to go home and spend time with family. As for Oberholzer, she’s going to Oklahoma from March 15-17 to compete in the Land Run 100 on March 16, which is advertised as, “A solo, self-supported, non-stop, 100-mile-long bicycling endurance challenge on the gravel and dirt roads surrounding the site of the Oklahoma Land Run of 1889.” “That’s like pretty unusual,” Oberholzer said. “Most people don’t do that.” Staying put Since the track is open March 11-15, most teams use that opportunity to use it as often as possible. Unlike during school weeks where track times are allotted to either the men or the women, spring break offers unlimited track time from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. to whoever wants to use it. Acacia’s Little 500 team is going to take full advantage of this. “Our plan is pretty much just staying in Bloomington and getting as much track time as possible,” junior Brisco Wood said. With Quals being the weekend after spring break, Wood said Acacia is going to be focusing a lot on perfecting its bike exchanges, as well as increasing its endurance and practicing packriding. Since Acacia has six members on the roster and only four can race, Wood also said they will be doing one-lap time trials that week to finalize the four members who will ride at Quals. Riders are urged to be careful, though, as no IC-EMS staff will be present during spring break, so bikers are in charge of their own safety and medical treatment. No matter what each respective team decides to do over break, all will be present March 23 for the highly anticipated beginning of the spring series in qualifications COURTESY PHOTOS

Top left Before traveling to Louisville, Kentucky, to compete in an event called the Cardinal Omnium, Gray Goat will participate March 9 and 10 in the Candy Stripe Classic. Top middle Six members from RideOn will be participating March 9 and 10 in the Candy Stripe Classic. Top right IU students Abel Duran, Michael Schmahl and Kurtis Greer ride their bikes around the track at Bill Armstrong Stadium. Bottom left The Cru Cycling women’s team is using spring break as an opportunity to take a team trip March 13-16 to Asheville, North Carolina. Bottom middle The IU Cycling Club will put on a two-day event March 9 and 10 called the Candy Stripe Classic. Bottom right Six members from RideOn will be participating March 9 and 10 in the Candy Stripe Classic.


Indiana Daily Student

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ARTS

Thursday, March 7, 2019 idsnews.com

Editors Annie Aguiar and Joe Schroeder arts@idsnews.com

Andromedaughter brings cosmic jive to scene By Abby Malala abbridge@iu.edu | @abbymalala

Self-described “cosmic jive” local rock band Andromedaughter was formed two weeks before its first performance. Now, the band is part of an upcoming wave of women-centered bands in Bloomington. Andromedaughter will perform on March 7 at Collins Living-Learning Center in the Cheshire Café. Guitarist and singer Sara Warner formed Andromedaughter with bassist and singer Leslie Lopez last October, and the band eventually added guitarist and singer Nona Anderson and drummer Blake McKean. All four are IU students, and Warner, Lopez and Anderson are women. Warner and Lopez said they were considering cosmic names for the band and were inspired by the name of the Andromeda Galaxy. They added “daughter” at the end to emphasize their feminine flair, and Andromedaughter was born. Warner also said they liked the association of “andro” with “androgynous,” emphasizing the band’s queerness. It’s also worth noting that Andromeda, the name of a

Greek goddess, means “ruler of men.” Members of the band said the music touches a lot on heartbreak and falling in love. Musical inspirations for the band include the indie rocker Mitski, singer-songwriter Courtney Barnett and Nai Palm of the neo-soul band Hiatus Kaiyote. Andromedaughter is currently recording three songs with Megan Searl, an audio engineering senior at the Jacobs School of Music. The members of the band hope to release these songs within the next few months. Warner and Lopez have both been involved in Jacobs in the past as well. Warner was studying opera for a short time and Lopez was once in a vocal jazz ensemble. Warner said she appreciates classical music but wanted more creative freedom. The band also commented on the changing landscape and soundscape of the local music scene in Bloomington. Warner said she, among many others in the music scene, has been noticing crowds are getting larger and larger and that house shows seem more like social events than concerts these

days. Lopez also said that even though house show audiences have always been mostly comprised of young women, that demographic often hasn’t been equally represented on stage. “I wish it wasn’t a factor in us being a band, but it is,” Warner said. “These communities have been completely marginalized, and thus anytime they occupy a space it is something to celebrate.” Andromedaughter recently performed at the Fem’ & Funky show, a performance dedicated to women and other marginalized communities that raised money for Middle Way House, a domestic violence and sexual assault support center. “This is a scene that I love and that I want to preserve,” Lopez said. Warner, Lopez and Anderson all agree they are more than happy to be part of the recent wave of girl groups in Bloomington. Anderson also said anyone wanting to try to become a performer in the house show scene shouldn’t be intimidated. “There’s nothing stopping anyone from doing it,” Anderson said.

COURTESY OF MARISA PLUMMER

Andromedaughter will perform March 7 in the Cheshire Café in Collins Living-Learning Center.

ASTROLOGY COLUMN

Mercury is in retrograde this month. What does that even mean? Kathryn de la Rosa is a senior in theater and journalism.

Mercury will go retrograde for almost all of March. Astrology’s re-entry into pop culture has made Mercury retrograde an instant Twitter trend as amateur astrologists use it as an excuse for mistakes and see it as a harbinger of doom. But what Mercury retrograde actually is gets lost in all this panic. A planetary retrograde is when a planet appears to spin backwards from our Earth-centric point of view. Astronomers call it “apparent retrograde motion” because planets don’t actually reverse their direction of orbit. It’s an optical illusion caused by planets moving at different speeds. When a planet retrogrades, its astrological function is thrown off balance.

We lived through Venus retrograde last fall, a nearly two-month struggle with romance and self-love. I was born during a Mars retrograde and I’ve never confronted anyone in my life. Mercury retrogrades this Tuesday through March 28. Since Mercury rules communication, this month is difficult for making plans and maintaining contact. It’s not the greatest transit to loom over spring break or the slog of springtime job applications. I’ve heard astrologers specifically point to technology during Mercury retrograde — shattered phone screens, undelivered emails, data loss and all manner of 21st century horrors. Mercury isn’t here to help anyone working with fine details. This month, quadruple check your calendar. Hit “save” more often than you think you should.

time for putting your foot in your mouth and unintentionally offending others, which can go both ways. If you perceive someone as attacking you, consider that both their expression and your reception are not their sharpest this month. Be patient with yourself and sensitive to those around you. You can’t blame Mercury retrograde for everything. Take care and take responsibility.

ILLUSTRATION BY KATHRYN DE LA ROSA | IDS

Mercury, the left symbol, retrogrades, or appears to orbit backward, three to four times a year. Mercury will retrograde in Pisces from March 5 to 28.

While all of this amounts to a month of external, practical nuisances, Mercury also rules intellect. The ways we process information can suffer during

Mercury retrograde. If your brain feels scrambled or you struggle to articulate your thoughts, be patient with yourself. This transit is a prime

Transits for March 3-9 New moon in Pisces, March 6: The perfect alignment of the sun and moon marks the beginning of a new lunar cycle and an opportunity to set goals. This new moon fits snugly into the start of Mercury retrograde, so take a second to set the foundations you need in order to make it through the month. But because it’s in Pisces, this isn’t a time for practical tasks.

Prioritize your spirit. Sun conjunct Neptune, March 6: Since it’s a new moon — when the sun and moon sit on top of each other in the same degree — consider this a triple conjunction of the sun, moon and Neptune all in Pisces. Neptune is Pisces’ ruling planet. It’s the planet of intuition, fantasy and anxiety that isn’t too concerned with the physical plane. This conjunction can make entering Mercury retrograde feel like a fever dream. Sun sextile Saturn, March 8: Saturn rules structure, self-discipline and staying organized. With Saturn favorably aspected to the sun, this is a good time to sober up from the whack Pisces energy of the week and check back in on reality. Bust out the planner you’ve neglected. Make a master list of emails to send. krdelaro@iu.edu

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Methodist

Non-Denominational

First United Methodist Church - Jubilee

Sherwood Oaks Christian Church

219 E. Fourth St. 812-332-6396

2700 E. Rogers Rd. 812-334-0206

fumcb.org Facebook: jubileebloomington.org Instagram: jubileebloomington Email: jubilee@fumcb.org

socc.org/cya facebook.com/socc.cya Twitter: @socc_cya Instagram: socc_cya

Contemporary: 9:30 a.m. & 11 a.m.

Wednesday: 7:30 p.m. @ Bloomington Sandwhich Company (118 E. Kirkwood Ave.)

Being in Bloomington, we love our college students, and think they are a great addition to the Sherwood Oaks Family. Wether an undergraduate or graduate student... from in-state, out of state, to our international community... Come join us as we strive to love God and love others better. Jeremy Earle, College Minister

Mark Fenstermacher, Lead Pastor Markus Dickinson, Campus Director

Connexion / Evangelical Community Church

Inter-Denominational

eccbloomington.org • cxiu.org Facebook: Connexion ECC Twitter: @connexionecc

111 S. Kimble Dr. 812-269-8975

Sunday: 9 a.m. & 11 a.m. Redeemer is a gospel-centered community on mission. Our vision is to see the gospel of Jesus Christ transform everything: our lives, our church, our city, and our world. We want to be instruments of gospel change in Bloomington and beyond. Chris Jones, Lead Pastor

Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Connexion: Sundays, 6 p.m. Connexion is the university ministry of ECC. We’re all about connecting students to the church in order to grow together in our faith. We meet weekly for worship, teaching, and fellowship as well as periodically for service projects, social events and more. Bob Whitaker, Senior Pastor Dan Waugh, Pastor of Adult Ministries

Nazarene

The Salvation Army

First Church of the Nazarene 700 W. Howe St. (across from the Building Trades Park) 812-332-2461 • www.b1naz.org bfcn@sbcglobal.net Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday Small Groups : 9:30 a.m., 4 p.m. & 6 p.m.

111 N. Rogers St. 812-336-4310 • bloomingtonsa.org

Sunday: Sunday School, 10 a.m. Worship Service, 11:00 a.m. Bible Study, 3 p.m. The Salvation Army, an international movement, is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church. Its message is based on the Bible. Its ministry is motivated by the love of God. Its mission is to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ and meet human needs in His name without discrimination.

Mennonite Mennonite Fellowship of Bloomington 2420 E. Third St. 812-646-2441 bloomingtonmenno.org • Facebook

Gordon Hoag, Captain Cindy Hoag, Captain

City Church For All Nations 1200 N. Russell Rd. 812-336-5958

citychurchbloomington.org Instagram • Twitter • Facebook @citychurchbtown

Sunday: 5 p.m. A welcoming, inclusive congregation providing a place of healing and hope as we journey together in the Spirit of Christ. Gathering for worship Sundays 5 p.m. in the Roger Williams room, First United Church. As people of God's peace, we seek to embody the Kingdom of God. John Sauder mfbjohn@gmail.com

Saturday: 5:30 p.m. Sunday: 9:30 a.m., 11 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. We are a movement of all races and backgrounds, coming together to love people, build family, and lead to destiny. Join us at one of our weekend worship experiences, and visit our young adults ministry, 1Life at 7 p.m. on Mondays. David Norris, Pastor Sumer Norris, Pastor

Episcopal (Anglican) Canterbury House Episcopal (Anglican) Campus Ministry at IU 719 E. Seventh St. 812-334-7971 • 812-361-7954

Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors

St. Mark’s United Methodist Church 100 N. State Rd. 46 Bypass 812-332-5788

Sacramental Schedule: Weekly services Sundays: Holy Eucharist with hymns, followed by

smumc.church

dinner 4 p.m. at Canterbury House

2nd & 4th Wednesdays: 7 p.m. Taizé Chants & Prayers at Canterbury House

Sunday Morning Schedule 9:00: Breakfast 9:15: Adult Sunday School Classes 10:30: Sanctuary Worship 10:30: Children & Youth Sunday School Classes

Episcopal (Anglican) Campus Ministry is a safe and welcoming home for all people. We are a blend of young and old, women and men, gay and straight, ethnicities from different cultures and countries, students, faculty, staff and friends. The worshipping congregation is the Canterbury Fellowship. The mission of the Fellowship is to restore all people to unity with God and each other in Christ. We pray, worship and proclaim the Gospel. We also promote justice, equality, inclusion, peace, love critical thinking and acting as agents of change in our world.

An inclusive community bringing Christ-like love, healing and hope to all.

Mother Linda C. Johnson+, University Chaplain Ricardo Bello Gomez, Communications Director Josefina Carcamo, Latino/a and Community Outreach Intern Rex Hinkle, Luiz Lopes, Nathan Stang, Music Ministers

7821 W. State Road 46 812-876-6072 • lifewaybaptistchurch.org Facebook • LifewayEllettsville

Jimmy Moore, Pastor Mary Beth Morgan, Pastor

Independent Baptist Lifeway Baptist Church

College & Career Sunday Meeting: 9 a.m. Sunday

Sunday Worship: 10 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wednesday Night Bible Study: 7 p.m.

PC (USA) United Presbyterian Church 1701 E. Second St. 812-332-1850 • upcbloomington.org

Email: upcbloomington@gmail.com Sunday: Pastor's Class: 8:45 a.m. Worship: 10 a.m. Fellowship: 11 a.m.

Tuesday: Bible Study: 12:15 p.m. Book Study/Discussion: 6 p.m. We are a diverse, inclusive people of God. Social justice, a welcoming spirit and focusing on Christ are integral to our congregation. We are students and non-students, native and non-native English speakers, young and old, who come together to worship in the name of Christ and to enjoy fellowship. John Napoli, Pastor Melanie Mathis-McBride, Education Director

Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday Small Groups: 9:30 a.m., 4 p.m. & 6 p.m.

Christian (Disciples of Christ)

Presbyterian (USA)

First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

First Presbyterian Church

205 E. Kirkwood Ave. 812-332-4459 • fccbloomington.org

Sunday: 10 a.m. As God has welcomed us, we welcome you. With all our differences – in age, ability and physical condition, in race, cultural background and economic status, in sexual orientation, gender identity and family structure – God has received each one with loving kindness, patience and joy. All that we are together and all that we hope to be is made more perfect as the richness of varied lives meets the mystery of God’s unifying Spirit, and we become the Body of Christ. Helen Hempfling, Pastor

Lifeway Baptist Church exists to bring glory to God by making disciples, maturing believers and multiplying ministry. Matthew 28:19-20

Barnabas Christian Ministry Small Groups: Cedar Hall 2nd Floor Common Area, 7 - 8 p.m., meetings start Thursday, Sept. 6. We will meet every other Thursday during the school year.

Callout Meeting: Aug. 30, IMU Redbud Room Steven VonBokern, Senior Pastor Rosh Dhanawade, IU Coordinator 302-561-0108, barnabas@indiana.edu barnabas.so.indiana.edu * Free transportation provided. Please call if you need a ride to church.

221 E. Sixth St. (Sixth and Lincoln) 812-332-1514 • fpcbloomington.org

Worship Times: Sunday: 9 a.m., 11 a.m.

Christian Ed: Sunday: 9:50 - 10:45 a.m.

Summer Worship Times: Sunday: 10 a.m. We are a community of seekers and disciples in Christ committed to hospitality and outreach for all God’s children. Come join us for meaningful worship, thoughtful spiritual study and stimulating fellowship. Ukirk at IU is a Presbyterian affiliated group open to all students. Andrew Kort, Pastor Kim Adams, Associate Pastor Grant Farmer, Interim Music Director Christopher Young, Organist

Orthodox Christian All Saints Orthodox Christian Church 6004 S. Fairfax Rd. 812-824-3600

www.allsaintsbloomington.org Email:frpeterjon@allsaintsbloomington.org Wednesday: Vespers 6 p.m. Saturday: Great Vespers 5 p.m. Sunday: Matins 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy 10 a.m. Come experience the sacred rhythm and rituals of the timeless Christian faith, a faith with a future, yet ancient and tested. Living the traditional worship of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit; as a sacred community of people striving to manifest the kingdom, on earth as it is in heaven. We, together with the saints throughout history, learn to live the love and compassion of Christ. Come and see, and put your roots down deep. Rev. Fr. Peter Jon Gillquist, Pastor Howard & Rhonda Webb, College Coordinators Church Van Pickup on Sundays - Call 314-681-8893

Cooperative Baptist

Catholic St. Paul Catholic Center 1413 E. 17th St. 812-339-5561 • hoosiercatholic.org

Facebook: Hoosiercatholic Twitter: @hoosiercatholic Weekend Mass Times Saturday Vigil: 4:30 p.m. Sunday: 8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. (Spanish), 5:30 p.m., 9 p.m. (During Academic Year) Korean Mass 1st & 3rd Saturdays, 6 p.m.

Weekday Mass Times Monday - Saturday: 12:15 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday: 9 p.m. St. Paul Catholic Center is a diverse community rooted in the saving compassion of Jesus Christ, energized by His Sacraments, and nourished by the liturgical life of His Church. Fr. John Meany, O.P., Pastor Fr. Patrick Hyde, O.P. Associate Pastor & Campus Minister Fr. Joseph Minuth, O.P., Associate Pastor

University Baptist Church 3740 E. Third St. 812-339-1404

Unitarian Universalist

ubcbloomington.org facebook.com/ubcbloomington

Unitarian Universalist Church of Bloomington

United Methodist

indiana.edu/~canterby canterby@indiana.edu • facebook.com/ecmatiu

Tuesdays: 6 p.m. Bible Study at Canterbury House

700 W. Howe St. (across from the Building Trades Park) 812-332-2461 • www.b1naz.org bfcn@sbcglobal.net

Facebook: SABloomington Twitter: @SABtown

Thursday: We are Wesleyan in our beliefs, and welcome all to worship with us. We are dedicated to training others through discipleship as well as ministering through small groups. We welcome all races and cultures and would love to get to know you. Dr James Hicks, Lead Pastor

Dr James Hicks, Lead Pastor

503 S. High St. 812-332-0502

Redeemer Community Church redeemerbloomington.org facebook.com/RedeemerBtown @RedeemerBtown on Twitter & Instagram

We are Wesleyan in our beliefs, and welcome all to worship with us. We are dedicated to training others through discipleship as well as ministering through small groups. We welcome all races and cultures and would love to get to know you.

Traditional: 8 a.m.

Sunday: The Open Door, 11:15 a.m. @ The Buskirk-Chumley Theater (114 E. Kirkwood Ave.)

Jubilee is a supportive and accepting community for college students and young adults from all backgrounds looking to grow in their faith and do life together. Meet every Wednesday night for opportunities through small groups, hangouts, mission trips, events, service projects, and more. Many attend the contemporary Open Door service.

First Church of the Nazarene

Sunday: 9:30 a.m. (Bible study) 10:45 a.m. (worship) If you are exploring faith, looking for a church home, or returning after time away, Welcome! We aim to be a safe place to "sort it out" for those who are questioning, and a place to pray, grow, and serve for followers of Jesus. All are welcome - yes, LBGTQ too. Rev. Annette Hill Briggs, Pastor Rob Drummond, Music Minister

Lutheran (LCMS) University Lutheran Church & Student Center 607 E. Seventh St. (Corner of 7th & Fess) 812-336-5387 • indianalutheran.com

facebook.com/ULutheranIU @ULutheranIU on twitter Sunday: Bible Class, 9:15 a.m. Divine Service, 10:30 a.m. The Best Meal You'll Have All Week, 6 p.m. Tuesday & Friday: Service of Morning Prayer, 8 a.m. Wednesday: Second Best Meal, 6 p.m. Midweek Service, 7 p.m. LCMS U Student Fellowship, 7:30 p.m. Thursday: Graduate Study/Fellowship, 7 p.m. University Lutheran Church (U.Lu) is the home of LCMS U at Indiana, the campus ministry of the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Students, on-campus location, and our Student Center create a hub for daily, genuine Christ-centered community that receives God's gifts of life, salvation, and the forgiveness of sins through Jesus Christ. Rev. Richard Woelmer, Campus Pastor

2120 N. Fee Lane 812-332-3695

www.uublomington.org www.facebook.com/uubloomington Sundays: 9:15 a.m. & 11:15 a.m. We are a dynamic congregation working towards a more just world through social justice. We draw inspiration from world religions and diverse spiritual traditions. Our vision is "Seeking the Spirit, Building Community, Changing the World." A LGBTQA+ Welcoming Congregation and a certified Green Sanctuary. Reverend Mary Ann Macklin, Senior Minister Reverend Scott McNeill, Associate Minister

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Latter-day Saint Student Association (L.D.S.S.A) 333 S. Highland Ave. 812-334-3432

studentview.Ids.org/Home. aspx/Home/60431 Facebook: Bloomington Institute and YSA Society lds.org Monday - Friday: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. We have an Institute of Religion adjacent to campus at 333 S. Highland Ave. (behind T.I.S. bookstore). We offer a variety of religious classes and activities. We strive to create an atmosphere where college students and local young single adults can come to play games, relax, study, and associate with others who value spirituality. Sunday worship services for young single students are held at 2411 E. Second St. a 11:30 a.m. We invite all to discover more about Jesus Christ from both ancient scripture and from modern prophets of God. During the week join us at the institute, and on Sunday at the Young Single Adult Church. Robert Tibbs, Institute Director


Indiana Daily Student

10

OPINION

Thursday, March 7, 2019 idsnews.com

Editors Evan Carnes and Ally Melnik opinion@idsnews.com

EDITORIAL BOARD

Indiana needs to create concise hate crimes legislation A renewed fervor has mounted once more following the brutal killing of an innocent Muslim man in Indianapolis. The issue at hand is that of hate crimes, or more appropriately, how Indiana legislators struggle to define and combat them. Indiana needs to work harder to produce effective, direct legislation to protect targeted populations. The state’s most recent effort combating the matter was Senate Bill 12, which was stripped of its protections for specific minority groups, including race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity and disability two days

before the Senate voted on it. It passed 39-10 on Feb. 22 and served as a weakened answer to those who called for it. Sen. Aaron Freeman, R-Indianapolis, drafted the amendment to generalize the language, saying it “covers everyone.” This intentional disregard of an opportunity to craft a specific bill in the wake of an innocent man’s death is damaging to all Hoosiers. The entire purpose of a hate crimes bill is to define what offense fall in this category and the explicit groups who suffer from them. States that have passed similarly ambiguous pieces

of legislation include Georgia and Utah. Georgia saw its proposal thrown out by the Georgia Supreme Court in 2000 because it was “unconstitutionally vague.” It, joined by Indiana and three other states, still have no hate crimes law in effect. Utah, on the other hand, made its bill law, and there have been no convictions for hate crimes in the 20 years since. Luckily, its Senate has recently voted to fortify the bill, lengthening convictions for crimes targeted toward certain demographics. If there is no definitive phrasing to protect minority

groups, we’ll simply fall into a chasm of inability like these states. Hoosiers are making a push for a concise bill, but their lawmakers aren’t. According to Indy Politics, 60 percent of Indiana residents want a clear hate crimes bill to be law. Indiana Forward is a bipartisan, statewide campaign for hate crimes legislation that is composed of numerous faiths, nonprofits and other various entities. This group has been appealing to lawmakers in Indianapolis on this subject since January. If legislators wish to appease the majority of this

IAN’S IDEAS

state’s residents who are fighting for a bias crimes law, they’ll have to begin by noting which groups are most targeted. From January 2016 through September 2018, Bloomington alone experienced 14 anti-black hate crimes. Students have also heightened their vocal nature on the matter. Bloomington protesters marched against hate in November as a gesture to legislators, as well as a tribute to those killed in the Tree of Life Synagogue shooting in Pittsburg. In the time since, the climate of discrimination has only worsened. Regardless of the state’s in-

effective pursuits to this point, Hoosiers have made it clear how they feel. This is a change that has to come quickly and clearly. Some quality examples of areas with clearly outlined bias crimes legislation are California, Hawaii and even Washington D.C. While a bit different demographically, Indiana can begin to better protect its citizens by devising a similar plan of action. Much of the division that builds between different groups is due to a lack of communication and understanding. By neglecting to clarify Senate Bill 12, we’re expanding the divide.

FULL OF FULFORD

Women could now be eligible for the draft Ian Nowlin is a freshman in international studies.

A federal district court in Texas ruled that an all-male draft was unconstitutional. This decision comes during a time when there is extreme controversy surrounding who should be allowed to serve in the military, namely people who identify as transgender. The district court ruling puts pressure on Congress to expand the draft and make military service more equitable or eliminate the Selective Service System all together. It has been consistently proven that women can function at similar levels in nearly all roles as men. Therefore, women should be eligible for the draft and so should everyone else who meets the physical and mental health requirements. This case has overturned Rostker v. Goldberg, which ruled in 1981 that Congress had a reasonable basis to exclude women from the draft because combat positions were off-limits to women at the time. However, more than four decades later in 2015, the Department of Defense lifted all gender-based restrictions and allowed women to serve in combat positions on and off the front lines. Given that women’s opportunities in the military have expanded dramatically since 1981, there is no longer a reasonable basis to exclude women from being eligible from the draft. This decision also has repercussions for college students. Male students applying for federal aid to pay for college are most affected by Selective Service. FAFSA requires all males to register through the Selective Service

ALEX DERYN | IDS

People often use Twitter for news. People can now receive notifications for current events and stories.

Our endless news cycle is destructive to student mental health Gillian Fulford is a sophomore in journalism, political science and sustainability. IDS FILE PHOTO

System in order to receive any kind of aid. The court decision did not go into this aspect of the draft, but it could potentially mean women would be held to meet the same draft requirements as men when applying for student aid. Furthermore, the relevancy and necessity of the Selective Service System and the draft itself are becoming more questionable and should be eliminated. Former President Richard Nixon ended the draft in 1973 in an effort to de-escalate the raging war in Vietnam that had already taken the lives of many young men. In response to Russian escalation of the Cold War, former President Jimmy Carter instated the Selective Service System in 1980 to identify a population of young men to be drafted in case of a national emergency. Still, the likelihood of the Selective Service System actu-

ally being used to implement a draft is very low. The U.S. military benefits greatly from an all-volunteer military because it is composed of people who want to be there, and has greater career opportunities attached to it, which allows someone to be in the Army Reserve while still pursuing their own career within or outside the U.S. military. Additionally, the Selective Service was intended to only be used in the case of a national emergency, but President Trump’s recent declaration of a national emergency at the southern border has demonstrated the requirements for a national emergency are broad and could be abused to enact the draft. The powers given to the president in Article II of the Constitution as commanderin-chief grant him control of the military. However, it is the duty of Congress to raise and

support armies. Therefore, it is unlikely that the president would unilaterally enact a draft despite the fact that war powers have drastically shifted to the executive branch in recent years. Even though conscription is within the power of Congress, there’s a small chance they would enact a draft given its sheer political unpopularity. Realistically, this court decision will probably be appealed by the government and will not go into force for perhaps a few years. An 11-member commission appointed by Congress is tasked with studying the issue and is due to report its findings next year. If the Selective Service System is to be preserved, then expanding it to include women would be a historic step in symbolizing that one should be able to serve their country regardless of gender, past or present.

HENLEY’S HOT TAKES

IU should replicate NASA’s female appreciation Carson Henly is a sophomore in media.

NASA’s Independent Verification and Validation Facility has been renamed the Katherine Johnson Verification and Validation Facility after one of the real women depicted in the 2016 film, “Hidden Figures.” NASA’s rededication has set an excellent example for IU to follow. Katherine Johnson handcalculated the math behind missions for NASA in a time when computers were new and less trusted than today. Johnson finds her greatest contribution to space exploration to be her calculations to aid in the synchronization of Project Apollo’s Lunar Lander and the Command and Service module, which orbited the moon. Early astronaut John Glenn notably requested her trajectory calculations before embarking on his successful Friendship 7 mission. Jim Bridenstine, administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration told CNN, “I am thrilled we are honoring Katherine Johnson in this way as she is a true American icon who overcame incredible obstacles and inspired so many.” The rededication of the center not only honors

COLIN KULPA | IDS

IU President Michael McRobbie looks up from the podium at the 2018 State of the University address Oct. 16.

Johnson herself, but serves as a means of representation for women of color. Dedications to white men are so commonplace in our world, it’s easy to let them become the default in our minds. But the plethora of facilities, centers, halls and foundations dedicated to white men does not mean they are more accomplished or deserving, merely that we live in a society where they have benefited greatly from systematic advantages. White men still overwhelmingly make decisions, like whose name goes on what, so it makes sense that we

see the names of white men wherever we look. But this comes at a cost.When those who are often underrepresented see people who look like them being celebrated for their successes, they see that their own success is possible, too. Representation matters, and IU should be doing more to provide it. “There’s this body of research and a term known as ‘symbolic annihilation,’ which is the idea that if you don’t see people like you in the media you consume, you must somehow be unimportant,” Nicole Martins,

an associate professor in the Media School told HuffPost. IU would do well to follow NASA’s example and rededicate popular facilities to women and people of color. The name of a former segregationist was removed from the Intramural Center, which is a great start. Many have advocated that the Intramural Center be rededicated to honor Bill Garrett, the first black basketball player in the Big Ten. Garrett led IU to second place in 1951’s national rankings and was named IU’s most valuable player for the season. In 2017, anonymous slips of paper scattered in Jordan Hall urged the hashtag #renameJordan, as its namesake, former IU President David Starr Jordan was an advocate of eugenics and forced sterilization. IU would do well to rededicate facilities like these, with names symbolic of bigotry, to distinguished alumni and IU figures of color. Facilities like Morrison Hall and the Neal-Marshall Black Culture Center honor the first woman, first black man and first black woman to attend IU, but students deserve more. Women and people of color deserve more names than those who first attended and to be reminded that attending IU is only their beginning.

The 24-hour news cycle is exhausting, and keeping up with it can be bad for your health. While it’s tempting to stay in the loop, sometimes you need to take a break. A 2018 poll from the Pew Research Center shows that about seven in 10 Americans have “news fatigue.” Roughly 68 percent of Americans are left feeling like there’s too much news to keep up with, creating exhaustion during high-profile coverage, like elections. These studies prove that a majority of us feel overwhelmed — it’s not a rare occurrence. The feeling for this toll has a name — compassion fatigue. Compassion fatigue is a state of indifference toward suffering caused by repeated exposure to traumatic situations. While traditionally associated with care-giving professionals, such as nurses, compassion fatigue can impact anyone in a position where they consistently feel empathy toward others in distress. This is especially true if a high-profile story has traumatizing aspects similar to trauma you’ve been through, like stories during the #MeToo movement. These stories are important, but depressing. The attention given to them is necessary, but seeing them everywhere is draining. It’s easy to see how people can feel overwhelmed. It seems like every year there’s more to keep up on, and with the world’s information

brought to us via push notification, it’s hard to stay away. Being bombarded with information about the president’s latest scandal or yet another school shooting can really take a toll on you. But the news cycle doesn’t stop and it can’t — our fast-paced world needs fast-paced coverage. The real challenge is staying informed without losing your will to care in a world full of daunting notifications about upsetting stories. It’s possible, but how do you do it? The most basic solution is limiting your firsthand exposure to news media. I’m not saying you should forego looking at the news completely, but if you find the news is exhausting you, try putting an actual time limit on how long you can look at news sites and apps — there are browser extensions and apps specifically for this, like AppDetox for Android or Screen Time settings for iOS. Register the emotions you feel when you’re exposed to the news. If you read or watch news and feel anxious, with no accompanying motivation to change what upset you, think about completely unplugging for a little. Take the time that you may have previously spent obsessing over the news and find something you like to do, even if you aren’t good at it. But remember to take some time to actually enjoy your hobbies and take them at your own pace. Being connected can be exhausting. Take time to stay informed, but walk away before you forget how to experience the outside world.

A NOTE FROM THE EDITORIAL BOARD The Editorial Board is made up of the Opinion section editors and other managing and senior editors. Each editorial topic is selected and discussed by the Board until we reach a consensus, and an Opinion

editor volunteers to write the article. The opinions expressed by the Editorial Board do not necessarily represent the opinions of the IDS news staff, student body, faculty or staff members or the Board of Trustees.

SPRING 2019 EDITORIAL BOARD Caroline Anders, Matt Begala, Hannah Boufford, Evan Carnes, Lydia Gerike, Jesse Naranjo, Matt Rasnic

LETTER TO THE EDITOR POLICY The IDS encourages and accepts letters to be printed from IU students, faculty and staff and the public. Letters should not exceed 350 words and may be edited for length and style. Submissions must include the person’s name, address and telephone number for verification.

Letters without those requirements will not be considered for publication. Letters can be mailed or dropped off at the IDS, 601 E. Kirkwood Ave. Bloomington, IN 47405. Send submissions via e-mail to letters@idsnews. com. Call the IDS with questions at 812-855-0760.


ARTS

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Thursday, March 7, 2019 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

FASHION COLUMN

Six trends to embrace for the spring season

Gather showcases youth art in gallery By Niharika Alasapuri nalasapu@iu.edu

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY TY VINSON

Jordan Olson is a junior in fashion design.

Although it may still be snowing in Bloomington, spring is here and warmer weather is slowly approaching. It’s time to put away the Canada Goose jackets and plan for styles that reflect the spirit of spring. I have created a personal list of six predicted trends for men entering the spring season. Faded denim jeans You can literally lighten up this season with a pair of faded denim jeans. With spring comes life and color. Veering away from the dark shades of fall and winter will help you stand out among a crowd of people who have not yet made the switch. These light-wash jeans are set to dominate the fashion game this spring.

Track Jackets When I say track jackets, I do not mean track suits. Track suits were popular in the 1980s, and they should stay in the 1980s, loose sets of warm clothing that consisted of matching sweatshirts or light jackets and pants. I do, however, enjoy the track jacket from the suit on its own. Track jackets can be comfortably worn under a sports jacket, over a basic T-shirt or even over an Oxford shirt and tie. Knit Polos Dressing up for class can be uncomfortable if you are going to be on campus all day. A great business casual option for daily wear is the knit polo shirt. These sporty polos have a vintage quality while also creating a modern and contemporary look for the wearer.

Horoscope

Windbreaker Jacket Windbreakers, windbreakers, windbreakers. I am a huge fan of the windbreaker jacket. Not only are windbreakers great for their traditional color blocking and vintage look, but they provide excellent protection from the elements. They are durable against the wind, rain and any other unpredictable weather we’re sure to have this season. Chino Pants I was not always a fan of chino pants, but I have recently taken a liking to them. Chino pants are a casual pant that can also work as a business casual option. The chino pant traditionally comes in a khaki color, but now blue, red, teal and other color options are gaining traction. Chino pants come in all cuts. My personal

favorite style is the slim version, but the tapered fit also works if you don’t want to go as skinny. Duffel Bags I have saved the absolute best for last. I am a huge fan of any kind of bag as an accessory. I own many kinds of bags but the duffel style is my favorite. Duffel bags are a great addition to an active lifestyle. They’re designed to carry large amounts of items, so they’re made of a fabric that can stretch when you really need to stuff the bag. Not only are duffel bags great for the long haul, but they also provide the opportunity to stand out among the crowd with endless styles and color schemes available.

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) — Today is a 9 — The next two days could get lucrative. An older person offers valuable instruction; take note. Your ideas are attracting attention. Stay in communication.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Today is a 7 — Take time off to recharge from a recent flurry of activity. Consider what is in the past and what lies ahead. Envision longterm possibilities, and imagine steps to take.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) — Today is an 8 — Professional opportunities are worth pursuing. Show up on time and prepared. Don't overextend or push too hard. Listen and observe. Watch for perfect timing.

Aries (March 21-April 19) — Today is a 9 — You're getting stronger today and tomorrow. Assert your wishes now. Keep steadily pushing a personal dream forward. Everything you're learning will be useful later.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) — Today is an 8 — Strengthen team foundations by showing up. Share practical resources and valuable talents. Support each other through a challenge. Together, you're a powerful force.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Today is an 8 — Expand your boundaries. Keep an open mind for how others do things. Listen to someone who has been there and done that. Keep your agreements and deadlines.

BLISS

HARRY BLISS

Bloomington retail gift store Gather is showcasing artwork from two youth artists in its gallery in honor of Youth Art Month, which is recognized nationally in March. According to the store’s website, it sells the independent works of more than 250 artists, crafters and makers from the Midwest and beyond. “Gather is about creating a community around art and the process of art — supporting the makers that create, and illustrating that creation,” the store’s website reads. The gallery will display the work of a high school student from the Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship, which

jorolson@iu.edu

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Today is an 8 — Keep building for the future. Handle financial responsibilities, and make plans for growth. Let others know what you're up to and what you need. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Today is a 9 — Collaboration saves time and money. Untangle miscommunications immediately. Let go of outdated assumptions. Check multiple perspectives. Together, you get farther than either would solo.

TY VINSON | IDS

Bloomington retail gift store Gather is showcasing artwork in a gallery in honor of Youth Art Month, which is recognized nationally in March. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Today is an 8 — Focus on your work and health through tomorrow. Physical routines and practices build strength over time. Nurture yourself with beauty and delicious flavors. Rest deeply.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Today is a 7 — Domestic matters are on your mind. Family comes first today and tomorrow. Handle chores and repairs. Clean and organize your rooms to support your crew.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — Today is a 7 — Have fun with people you adore. You're especially lucky in love for a few days. Charms and enchantments fly. Enjoy the dance. Send smoldering glances.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Today is a 9 — Express creative ideas through art, writing, images or music. Articulate the story clearly. You're especially clever at getting to the heart of the matter.

© 2019 By Nancy Black Distributed by Tribune Media Services, INC. All Rights Reserved

Crossword

L.A. Times Daily Crossword

Publish your comic on this page. The IDS is accepting applications for student comic strips for the spring and summer 2019 semesters. Email five samples and a brief description of your idea to adviser@indiana.edu by March 31. Submissions will be reviewed and selections will be made by the editor-in-chief.

su do ku

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

ACROSS

Difficulty Rating: How to play: Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 grid contains the digits 1 through 9, without repeating a number in any one row, column or 3x3 grid.

Answer to previous puzzle

has been judged by art teacher and Gather artist Cassidy Young, who is known for her Bloomington restaurant postcard scenes. “Gather is excited to once again host youth artists from our community,” Gather owner Talia Halliday said in an email. The work of a second grader from Bloomington Montessori School will also be displayed in the gallery. “His work has graced the walls of Gather before, and is sure to again," Halliday said in an email. " His work is mostly pencil, detailed, and showcases his most intense interests at the moment, which are of course, ever-changing, as any good second grader." The works will be on display for the entire month of March.

1 4 10 14 15 16 17 18 20 22 23 24 26 30 32 34 37 38 41 42 43 44 46 48 52

Cleared (of) Tote bag material Down-to-earth Chemical suffix Even though Wrinkly hybrid fruit Teacher on call John D. Rockefeller’s company Cutlery collection Moo __ gai pan Record Umbrella part Grace word Bilingual “Sesame Street” Muppet Bath sponges Most babbling Bunk Woodland goat-man Arraignment answers Kitchen pests Racing Unsers Preparation period German mathematician Bernhard Softening Calf-length skirts

53 56 57 59 61

65 66 67 68 69 70 71

61-Across kingpin __ Fring Subtle shade Glass lip Speed trap equipment #3 on Rolling Stone’s 100 Greatest TV Shows of All Time (as of 2016) ... and a hint to what the black squares are doing in four rows of this puzzle Check out “Star Trek” race Mariner’s patron __ Lingus Pineapple center “Mercy me!” Genetic material

9 Antlered animal 10 Ballet great Nureyev 11 Psychoanalysis subject 12 Actor Mahershala __ 13 Rapper __ Jon 19 High-tech worker 21 Affect 25 Pasture cry 27 Pull down 28 Opportunity 29 Former Air France jets 31 Colorado snowboarding mecca 33 “Cotton Comes to Harlem” director Davis 35 Urban Dictionary content 36 Iraq War weapon: Abbr. 38 One to grow on 39 Et __: and others 40 Hand-me-down 42 Group at Asgard 44 Corneareshaping surgery 45 One facing charges? 47 Desert illusion 49 Ready to roll 50 Vietnamese-American poker star Scotty 51 Biological subdivisions 54 Implored 55 Black 58 Japanese soup 60 Lady of Spain 61 Eng. channel 62 Pal of Piglet 63 Goof up 64 Extreme

Look for the crossword daily in the comics section of the Indiana Daily Student. Find the solution for the daily crossword here. Answer to previous puzzle

DOWN 1 2 3 4

One who agrees to a dare “Got me” Ledger entries Italian city whose Royal Palace has been used as a set in two “Star Wars” films 5 Hgts. 6 Net or Knick 7 Starbucks order 8 Give a leg up

© Puzzles by Pappocom

BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!

TIM RICKARD


Indiana Daily Student

Locally owned roofing company looking for motivated, physically fit workers for summer of 2019 (May 13-Aug 23). Outside work on or near Campus, no experience needed, starting pay $15/hr. Send resume or inquiries to Betty at: steves@bluemarble.net LOOKING FOR SUMMER WORK? Full-time positions avail. at Nature’s Way Inc. Call: 812.876.7888 or email: victoria@naturesway.net for more information.

dunnstreetresidences@gmail.com

OMEGA BUILDING 3 BR, 2 1/2 BA: $2,250. 2 BR, 1 1/2 BA: $1,580-$1,650. WD, DW, A/C. Omega Properties 812-333-0995 omegabloomington.com Prime location: 2 BR apt. (from $655) & 3 BR twnhs. (from $825). Hdwd. floors, quiet. 812-333-5598 colonialeastapartments.com

Grant Properties 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 Bedroom Outstanding locations near campus at great prices Leasing now 2019-2020 Call Today 812-333-9579 grantprops.com The Flats on Kirkwood 425 E. Kirkwood Avail. for lease: Also three 3 BR/2 BA units. Washer/dryer in units. Call 812.378.1864.

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HOUSING Apt. Unfurnished 3BR/2BA on Atwater next to Optometry. Avail. Aug., 2019. 812-333-9579 or

Unfurnished apartment, avail. Aug. 1 block South of Otometry School. Off-street parking. 812-325-0848

3rd & Grant, 1 BR, $300/mo. + utils. No pets. Call 9 a.m.- 3 p.m. 812-879-4566

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leasinginfo@grantprops.com

Houses

Large 1 BR/1 BA. Perfect for sharing. On Atwater -1 blk. to Law & Optometry. Prkg./laundry. 812-333-9579 or leasinginfo@grantprops.com

***Now leasing 19-20*** HPIU.COM Houses & apts. 1-7 bedrooms. Close to Campus. 812-333-4748 No pets please.

Large 1, 2 & 4 BR apartments & townhouses avail. NOW! Close to Campus & Stadium. 812-334-2646

**Avail. August!** 203 S. Clark 313 N. Clark ALL UTILS. INCLUDED www.iurent.com 812-360-2628

310 N. Dunn 5 BR, 2 BA, new kit, WD, DW, AC. $3,750 per month. 812-333-0995 omegabloomington.com

PAVILION AVAILABLE NOW 1 to 2 blocks from Campus pavprop.com 812-333-2332

AVAIL. NOW! 5 BR/2 BA house on Hunter near Optometry. For 3-5 ppl. Prkg., W/D, front porch. Utils. incl. Recently renovated. 812-333-9579 leasinginfo@grantprops.com

Sublet Apt. Furnished

55”, 4K TV, brand new w/ remote and box. $350. nebhatt@indiana.edu

Series 2 Apple Watch w/box, charger, bumper cases and bands. $200. jwelford@iu.edu

Nike Vapor Untouchable Pro men’s football cleats. Size 8, Never worn. $40. s.e.mosier1@gmail.com

TRANSPORTATION

2006 Chyrsler 300 Hemi V8. 137K miles, well maintained. $5,900. guoliang@iu.edu

Turtle Beach Stealth 600 wireless headset. Great condition. $80. ajkaylor@iu.edu Vintage suitcase turntable with Bluetooth & USB. $45, obo. egetz@indiana.edu

Sublet Houses

2008 Nissan Sentra, white, excellent cond., 135K miles. $4,400. tuho@iu.edu

Furniture Ashley wooden Queen sleigh bed frame. Good condition. $80. aaalkuba@iu.edu

Sublet Rooms/Rmmte.

2010 silver Hyundai Sonata, 149K miles, clean title. $4,750, obo. stowle@indiana.edu

Black wooden desk for sale. Contact for details. $20, neg. bfang@iu.edu

Avail. Summer 2019: 1 BR of 2 BR top floor apt. in Evolve. Amenities incl. apirovan@iu.edu

Acura MDX 2005 Touring Sport Utility, AWD. 177K miles. $3,900. daviscd@indiana.edu

Fluidity Ballet Barr, like new, hardly used. Portable. $125, obo. glwhicks@indiana.edu Queen size mattress w/ pillows and blankets. 1 yr of use, great cond. $120. lee2065@iu.edu

IU Student Rentals Houses and Townhomes 2 to 6 bedrooms $395-625 a bedroom

www.arbutusprops.com LiveByTheStadium.com 301 E. 19th Street 5 BR, 2 BA

Twin XL mattress w/ bed frame, one year old. $200. tforburg@indiana.edu

MERCHANDISE Computers HP OMEN 15 15.6” gaming laptop, used but excellent cond. $699. zhezhou@iu.edu Lenovo gaming laptop, Y50-70, ultra HD, 4K display. $1,200. rsuparma@iu.edu

Misc. for Sale 12 pc. dinnerware set w/ 4 dinner & salad plates, bowls, & silverware. $15. yafwang@hotmail.com Adidas EQT men’s shoes, size 10, off-white, barely worn. $50,obo. mattlane@indiana.edu

Automobiles 1999 Toyota Avalon XL, 239K miles, okay cond. $1,500, obo. chaouli@indiana.edu

Shure brand microphone, stand and cable. Model SM57. $75. maddalva@iu.edu

leasinginfo@grantprops.com

Black 2008 Nissan Sentra, 55K miles. Good condition + etc. $7,000. rholyn@indiana.edu

Bicycles 2008 Trek 2 series model 2.3 bike. 20.5 in. or 52 cm. $450 specsorff@gmail.com 27 gear black TREK bike. Hardly used, comes w/ helmet, lights, lock. $475. vpradhan@iu.edu

SUMMER JOBS AVAILABLE

SEASONAL JOBS Available NOW!

APPLY NOW

Do you have Food & Beverage experience? Are you looking for a great summer job in a family-friendly setting? Look no further! gearing up for another summer season and is seeking servers, bartenders, hosts, cooks, kitchen prep and utility positions. Requirements: • Ability t to stand on your feet for long periods of time • Ability t to at least 30 pounds • Able to work in a fast-paced environment x ble to work nights, weekends and alll summer holidays • Flexi • Must have a natural smile • Must display a positive and Can-Do attitude • Experience preferred. If you’re not afraid of work that can be financially rewarding and you are a team player, apply now at Fourwinds Lakeside Inn & Marina 9301 S. Fairfax Rd. - Bloomington, IN 47401

Lenovo Yoga700-14, good cond. Chinese language system. $510. xz68@iu.edu

Subleases avail now!! Negotiable rent and terms. 812-333-9579 or

LiveByTheStadium.com 1385 N. Lincoln Street 5 BR, 2.5 BA

Clothing

iPad Air 2, like new, only used a few times. $300 for iPad, $15 for case. keeminni@indiana.edu

Sublet Apt. Unfurn.

**Spring sublet avail. CHEAP! Lg., 3 BR/ 2 BA houses. $900/mo. Dntwn. & near campus. Call/text: 812-327-0948.

Zilla 28080 enclosed critter cage with door. Ideal home for pets. $50, obo. wang12@iu.edu

Bose Companion 5 computer speaker system, great cond. $250. dk14@iu.edu

leasinginfo@grantprops.com

LiveByTheStadium.com 1336 N. Washington St. 4 BR, 2 BA

435

55” Samsung 4K Ultra HD Smart TV. Model #: Samsung UN55KU6270 $400,obo 847-951-8991 465

Stonetop to IU. Atw Ave $550 mo. Wifi + utils. Avail Aug. W/D onsite. 812-361-6154 call/text

Studio sublet avail. now! 1 blk. South of Campus. 812-333-9579 or

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

4 BR avail., Aug., 2019. 717 Eastside Dr. $1500 for 3 people, $1800 for 4 people. Costley & Co. 812-336-6246 costleycompany.com

Rooms/Roommates

1 BR Tenth & College Apt Renovated, $1200/mo. Prking includ., avail. Jan. Contact: 630-396-0627.

1 – 5 Bed Apts/Houses

Vintage board games. Incl., Sorry, Life, Clue, Monopoly, and Scabble. $100 for all. jtitzer@iu.edu

55” LG 4K Ultra HD Smart TV. Model #: LG55UH6030. $400, obo. 847-951-8991

Avail. now- July ‘19: 1 BR in 4 BR apt. w/ 3 male rmmtes. in Deluxe at the Monroe. Utils. & internet incl. Reduced rate $434/mo. 317-557-7394 345

Aver’s Pizza Now Hiring. Bloomington’s Original Gourmet Pizza To Go, Since 1995. Managers, Servers, Delivery Driver, Cooks & Dishwashers. Apply Online: averspizza.wyckwyre.com

50” LG 4K Ultra HD Smart TV. Model #: LG50UH5530. $350, obo. 847-951-8991

1 BR in 2 BR apt. Incl. indiv. bathroom, applns., TV, W/D. $890/mo. neg. neimarkn@gmail.com

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220

General Employment

3 BR, 1 BA. Close to Campus. $950/2 person, $1050/3 person. + util. Avail. 8/20. 812-824-9735

360

New 1 BR avail. Fall! Prime location (17th and Dunn) near stadium and dntwn. Newly renovated! Incl.: 24-hr maintenance, in-unit W/D, A/C, faux wood blinds, built-in desk work stations, stainless steel applns., free WiFi, free cable, free water, sewer, & trash. $750/mo. Contact: 651-428-6052.

Valparaiso, IN children’s Camp Lawrence looking for counselors & lifeguards, 6 wks. 219-736-8931 or email: nwicyo@comcast.net

410

210

Camp Staff

1-5 BR. Close to Campus. Avail. immediately. Call: 812-339-2859.

340

cunderwo@homefinder.org

Riot 15.5’ EvasiOn flatwater touring kayak. Great cond. $800. rellenso@iu.edu

505

Houses

Misc. for Sale Handmade oriental rug, very good condition. $200. mbinmaya@indiana.edu

40” LG HD LED TV w/ wall mount. Great cond. $200,obo. 847-951-8991 yunho@indiana.edu

Prime 3-8 BR. W/D. Aug. ‘19 1 blk from Campus on Atw. Ave. $700/BR 812-361-6154

**AVAIL. May/Aug. 1-6 BR houses, Close to Campus/dntwn Call/text 812-327-0948

EMPLOYMENT

32” 720p Toshiba TV, great cond., works perfectly. $85, obo. basermer@iu.edu

Newly remodeled, lg., 5 BR, 3 BA home. South of Campus. Lg. living rm. w/ built-in bay windows and hdwd. floors. Plenty of prkg., low utils., just $2000/mo. Call Gil @ 574-340-1844. E-mail: gilbertcoty@yahoo.com

ONLINE POSTING: All classified line ads are posted online at idsnews.com/classifieds at no additional charge.

Electronics

520

Apt. Unfurnished

Houses

420

310

REFUNDS: If you cancel your ad before the final run date, the IDS will refund the difference in price. A minimum of one day will be charged.

PAYMENT: All advertising is done on a cash in advance basis unless credit has been established. The IDS accepts Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, cash, check or money order.

COPY ERRORS: The IDS must be notified of errors before 3 p.m. the date of the first publication of your ad. The IDS is only responsible for errors published on the first insertion date. The IDS will rerun your ad 1 day when notified before 3 p.m. of the first insertion date.

435

HOUSING ADS: All advertised housing is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act. Refer to idsnews.com for more info.

COPY CHANGES: Ad copy can be changed at no additional charge when the same number of lines are maintained. If the total number of lines changes, a new ad will be started at the first day rate.

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AD ACCEPTANCE: All advertising is subject to approval by the IDS.

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CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING POLICIES

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CLASSIFIEDS

Thursday, March 7, 2019 idsnews.com

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To place an ad: go online, call 812-855-0763 or stop by Franklin Hall 130 from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday - Friday. Full advertising policies are available online. idsnews.com/classifieds

Now Leasing for August 2019 and 2020 1, 2, 3, 4, & 5 BR Houses, Townhouses, and Apartments Quality campus locations

“Everywhere you want to be!”

339-2859

Office: 14th & Walnut www.elkinsapts.com

Fourwinds Lakeside Inn & Marina is seeking friendly, service-oriented individuals for our Paradise Boat Rental Operation. What’s better than a job on the lake, taking reservations, pumping gas, assisting in maintaining a fleet of 50+ boats, providing genuine customer service...and you get to work outside!

Requirements: • Ability to stand on your feet for long periods of time • Ability to lift at least 30 pounds • Able to work in a fast-paced environment • Flexible to work nights, weekends and all summer holidays • Must have a natural smile • Must display a positive and Can-Do attitude • Experience not necessary; we will train the right individuals If you’re not afraid of work that can be financially rewarding and you are a team player, apply now at Fourwinds Lakeside Inn & Marina 9301 S. Fairfax Rd. Bloomington, IN 47401

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The Indiana Daily Student is an independent student newspaper covering Indiana University, IU sports and the city of Bloomington, Indiana.

Thursday, March 7, 2019  

The Indiana Daily Student is an independent student newspaper covering Indiana University, IU sports and the city of Bloomington, Indiana.

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