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Thursday, May 16, 2019 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

IU baseball falls 8-7 to No. 9 Louisville By Matt Cohen mdc1@iu.edu | @Matt_Cohen_

ALEX DERYN | IDS

The honor guard brings the casket to the front of the church May 15 in St. Luke’s Methodist Church. Within the casket laid former Sen. Richard Lugar.

Former Indiana Sen. Richard Lugar’s funeral honored his political accomplishments and Hoosier values. By Emily Isaacman eisaacma@iu.edu | @emilyisaacman

INDIANAPOLIS — Former Indiana Sen. Richard Lugar was honored in a funeral service Wednesday that brought several leaders from Washington to praise the accomplished statesman’s character. The service at St. Luke’s United Methodist Church in Indianapolis, which Lugar’s family helped found, concluded a two-day tribute that began at the Indiana Statehouse Tuesday. Lugar died April 28 of complications from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, a neurological disorder. He was 87. Vice President Mike Pence, U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts and Indiana Sens. Todd Young and Mike Braun were among the Washington figures who paid respects. "Richard Lugar lived a great American life,” Pence said. Tributes from men Lugar worked beside recognized most of the room was likely familiar with his landmark political achievements. They celebrated Lugar’s Hoosier values, passion for running and Eagle Scout beginnings that shaped his reputation for bipartisan cooperation.   “It was the way he led his life I always wished I could emulate,” former Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels said. Lugar was born in Indianapolis. He was mayor of his hometown from 1968 to 1975 before serving six terms as a U.S. Senator, the longest for a Congress member from Indiana. His close connections to the state continued throughout his life. Lugar taught at IU since 2013, and in fall 2018 the Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies was renamed in his and former Indiana Rep. Lee Hamilton’s honor. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell attributed Lugar’s success to his Indiana upbringing. He remembered Lugar as gracious, generous and polite — a man for whom a new argyle sweater meant “jazzing things up.” Former Democratic Georgia Sen. Sam Nunn described viewing Lugar as bold and strategic throughout their diplomatic visits together. Nunn and Lugar crafted the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program, known as the Nunn-Lugar Program, to dismantle weapons of mass destruction after the Soviet Union collapsed. Nunn said Lugar displayed a brand of cooperation often misunderstood in politics today. Lugar saw he could work across party lines without compromising his principles.

IDS FILE PHOTO

Former Indiana Sen. Richard Lugar at the Lilly Library when it was announced Jan. 24, 2013, that he would become a faculty member at IU's School of Global and International Studies.

“His intellect and backbone were paired with a modesty and kindness not always associated with politics.”

SEE BASEBALL, PAGE 4

Mike Pence, Vice President of the United States

IU wins Governor's Cup over Purdue

“It was the way he led his life I always wished I could emulate.” Mitch Daniels, former Indiana governor

By Dylan Wallace

“He looked carefully at the facts, and he let the facts lead him to his conclusions.”

dswallac@iu.edu | @Dwall_1

Sam Nunn, former Democratic Georgia Senator

“He looked carefully at the facts, and he let the facts lead him to his conclusions,” Nunn said. Pence called Lugar a “true American statesman” who never stopped running, referencing both Lugar’s passion and extensive career. Lugar started as an Eagle Scout, ranked first in his class at Denison University in Ohio and was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University before serving in public office. Pence commended Lugar’s work during his time as mayor to transform Indianapolis from “Indiana-no-place” to a dynamic capital city. He called Lugar’s death, which came about a month after the death of former Indiana Sen. Birch Bayh, an end of an era. “His intellect and backbone were paired with a modesty and kindness not always associated with politics,” he said. Lugar is survived by his wife Char, four sons, 13 grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren.

In a game that took nearly five hours, it was a moment that lasted less than a second which proved the deciding factor. University of Louisville freshman Alex Binelas hit a ground ball to IU baseball senior Cade Bunnell. Bunnell turned to throw to second in an attempt to turn a double play. After screams of “Four!” instantly rang around Bart Kaufman Field, Bunnell turned back toward the plate. The hesitation, if even for just a fleeting moment, allowed Louisville to score the winning run.  Louisville junior Tyler Fitzgerald raced home to put his team ahead for good in the 12th inning as No. 9 Louisville beat No. 25 IU 8-7 in Bloomington.  The Cardinals started the scoring quickly and appeared to be cruising to a blowout win.  Louisville had four hits in the second inning, leading to two runs. In the third inning, Binelas made the Hoosiers pay for a throwing error made by IU junior Scotty Bradley. Binelas hit a three-run home run over the picnic tables beyond the wall in right field, increasing Louisville’s lead to 5-0.  Louisville added another run in the top of the fourth inning to increase its lead to six. In the bottom of the inning, though, IU junior Matt Gorski turned the game on its head.  Gorski kicked off a rally as he hit a triple to lead off the bottom of the fourth inning. Senior Matt Lloyd drove Gorksi in with a ground-rule double for IU’s first run. Sophomore Elijah Dunham followed Lloyd’s double with a double of his own to drive in the Hoosier senior.  Dunham was able to score on a wild pitch before IU scored two more runs in the inning as both Gorski and senior Wyatt Cross walked with the bases loaded.  After a 57-minute fourth inning, IU had flipped the game and trailed by just one.  IU freshman Braydon Tucker hadn’t pitched since February against Butler University, but he provided IU with two scoreless innings of relief. He escaped a sixth inning, bases loaded jam with a double play to keep IU within one run.  After IU sophomore Connor Manous allowed a Louisville run in the top of the seventh, IU responded in the bottom of the inning, completing its comeback.  Sophomore Cole Barr had an RBI single through the left side of the infield to close the gap to one again. Sophomore Sam Crail tied the game as he hit a fly ball into foul territory that was caught by Binelas, who running away from

PHOTOS BY ALEX DERYN | IDS

TOP Vice President Mike Pence speaks about Sen. Richard Lugar on May 15 in St. Luke’s Methodist Church. “He was a working senator. He always put Indiana first,” he said. MIDDLE Organist Dr. Heather Hinton plays May 15 in St. Luke’s Methodist Church. Hinton played the organ during Senator Richard Lugar’s funeral. BOTTOM Dr. Robert E. Fuguay Jr. speaks to the audience May 15 in St. Luke’s Methodist Church. When discussing Senator Richard Lugar’s life, he said, “Life is worth living.”

IU won the Governor's Cup for the 2018-19 athletic season after both the men's and women's teams finished as runners-up at the track and field Big Ten Championship on Sunday. The Hoosiers bested the Boilermakers by a final margin of 10.5-9.5. The Governor’s Cup is a yearly competition that was created in 2001 that measures head-to-head competitions between both schools’ men’s and women’s athletic programs. After each head-to-head event, the winner will be given one point. If the respective sports play twice in a season, then each victory will be given a half of a point. This season, IU received points from women’s cross-country, men’s and women’s swimming and diving, men’s tennis, women’s basketball, baseball, softball and men’s and women’s track and field in both indoor and outdoor competition. Before Jan. 26, IU only had one point from women’s cross-country and trailed Purdue 6-1. IU closed out the season by winning 9.5 points compared to Purdue’s 3.5 to gain bragging rights for this year’s athletic programs. With the win this year, IU is now 9-7-2 all-time against Purdue in the Governor’s Cup.


Indiana Daily Student

2

NEWS

Thursday, May 16, 2019 idsnews.com

Editor Emily Isaacman news@idsnews.com

Curtis Hill speaks to Grassroots Conservatives By Emily Isaacman eisaacma@iu.edu | @emilyisaacman

Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill spoke to a predominantly older crowd at the Monroe County Public Library Monday night, addressing a range of conservative issues while failing to address allegations of sexual misconduct that have put him under intense scrutiny during past year in office. People from Crawfordsville, Indianapolis, Martinsville, and Owen and Washington Counties listened to Hill , the featured speaker for a monthly Grassroots Conservatives meeting. The Bloomington group started in 2012 and supports conservative issues such as limited government, individual freedom and economic freedom, Robert Hall, leader of Grassroots Conservatives, said. “I believe in freedom, and my job is to defend freedom,” Hill said. Hill geared his speech and his responses to questions submitted by audience members to the nearly 60 older people in the crowd. He answered one question about how to handle calls from unknown numbers — he advised not to answer them — and spoke at length about being dumbfounded by people’s obsession with Facebook. “Social media has really eroded our system of justice and accountability,” he said. Hill said he agrees with

ALEX DERYN | IDS

Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill speaks during a Grassroots Conservatives meeting May 13 in the Monroe County Public Library. “You’re here because you believe in America,” he said.

President Donald Trump about the media. “Fake news is real,” Hill said. He talked about his disbelief that other states, particularly New York, had legalized abortion. He blamed

grassroots Republicans like those in the crowd. “We waved the white flag,” he said. “That’s on us.” Neither Hill’s speech nor his answers to questions addressed allegations he inappropriately touched four

women during a legislative party at an Indianapolis bar in March 2018. Several party leaders, including Gov. Eric Holcomb, called on Hill to resign in summer 2018 after the allegations surfaced. While Special Prosecu-

More states test strict abortion bans By Sandhya Raman Tribune News Service | CQ-Roll Call

WASHINGTON — Advocates are preparing for a legal battle after Alabama passed the strictest abortion bill in the country late Tuesday, part of a growing national push by abortion opponents to test whether the courts will curb constitutional protections for the procedure. Alabama’s move, which would essentially ban abortion in most cases, could open the door to restrictions in other states — even though they will all likely be challenged in court. Other states are already pursuing and defending laws to ban abortion after six weeks of pregnancy. “This is not just about Alabama. We are seeing these extreme bills being introduced across the country,” said Planned Parenthood President Leana Wen in a call with reporters Wednesday. “These extreme bans banning abortions at six weeks or earlier, before women even know we’re pregnant, is happening in 16 states.” Alabama’s bill, which Wen called the most extreme abortion ban since the landmark Roe v. Wade case guaranteed a national right to abortion in 1973, would go farther than the approach taken in many other red states. The legislation would ban abortion at any stage of pregnancy, unless needed to save the life of the woman, and has no exceptions for rape or incest. Abortion providers who violate these terms could be charged with a felony and punished for up to 99 years in prison. “Doctors would be scared to provide needed medical treatment because we’d be worried that by doing what’s needed for our patients we could go to prison for a lifetime,” said Wen, who is also a trained emergency room physician. Alabamians already face many barriers to abortion, including a 48-hour waiting period and mandated counseling. Half of the patients in Alabama and two other states served by Planned Parenthood Southeast travel over 100 miles to reach a clinic, said Staci Fox, who heads the group’s advocacy arm. The American Civil Liberties Union has already signaled it will challenge the Alabama bill in court if

tor Dan Sigler announced in October he did not have enough evidence to file criminal charges, the Indiana Supreme Court Disciplinary Commission filed an administrative complaint in March.

Libertarian-leaning Republican and former Indiana Republican Convention delegate Greg Knott said he was surprised the allegations were not addressed throughout the one-and-a-half hour session. The investigation has changed his opinion of Hill. “I think he probably should’ve talked about that if he wants Republican votes at the convention,” Knott said. Knott submitted two questions: one about CBD and the other about the allegations. He wanted to ask Hill: “As a father, how would you feel if a man put hands on your daughter the way these woman claim that you put hands on them?” Hall, who moderated the event, said this was one of three or four questions he wasn’t able ask due to time. He saw Knott submitted two cards. He chose the CBD question and called the other one “nasty.” William Ellis, Monroe County Republican Party chairman, said bringing Hill here was crucial for local conservatives who are often afraid to put stickers on their cars or hold political functions at businesses. “The perception is we’re very, very blue,” he said. Hill encouraged the audience to mobilize at the city and county levels to enact change. “This is the place where you can actually make a difference,” he said.

Child says woman picks up 2-year-old By Emily Isaacman eisaacma@iu.edu | @emilyisaacman

A man and woman allegedly picked up a 2-year-old girl they did not know while she was playing outside with siblings Monday evening, Bloomington Police Department Lt. John Kovach said. The girl’s mother told police her three children were playing outside their apartment on West Allen Street. The oldest child, age 10, said a white man and white woman they did not know ap-

proached them. The woman held out her arms to the 2-year-old. “Come here,” she said. The 10-year-old yelled to put the girl down, and the woman did. The man and woman walked away. BPD was unable to locate anyone else in the area, Kovach said. The man was described as wearing a black hat, gray shirt and gray sweatpants. The woman was described as having blond curly hair and a pink shirt.

Man uses fake $100 at Village Pantry By Emily Isaacman eisaacma@iu.edu | @emilyisaacman

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Dr. Leana Wen, president of Planned Parenthood, speaks with staff at a clinic in San Jose, California.

Republican Gov. Kay Ivey, who opposes abortion, signs it. The ACLU and Planned Parenthood also filed suit Wednesday in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Ohio over Ohio’s six-week abortion law. This year, four states have already passed bans after six weeks of pregnancy, and Missouri is expected to pass its own ban by Friday when the legislative session ends. The state legislature there is considering an omnibus abortion bill that would combine a number of restrictions. Elizabeth Watson, a staff attorney with the ACLU Reproductive Freedom Project, on a separate press call, called the Ohio bill part of the growing “concerted national effort to limit abortion.” “Let this be a warning to the anti-abortion politicians in Ohio and across the country: if you attack our right to abortion, we will always be here to defend it,” said Watson. Ohio legislators, whose previous Republican governor vetoed two versions of abortion bans after six weeks, moved quickly on approving restrictions under its new, more conservative governor Mike DeWine. Restrictions on funding for abortion in public programs are common, but the legislature is currently considering a bill that would

ban even private insurance coverage of abortion — which, if passed, could pave a steeper path for women seeking the procedure in Ohio. Doctors and advocacy groups criticized the bill last week for including language that would require the re-implantation of ectopic pregnancies that occur when a fertilized egg is attached outside of the uterus — which is not a medically recognized procedure. “What was considered too extreme for state politicians just a few years ago is becoming law in a few states,” said Wen. Anti-abortion groups see an opening for further policies like Alabama’s bill and are ready to fight in the courts with the goal of winning a Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade. The Supreme Court on Monday overturned, 5-4, an unrelated 40-year-old precedent over the ability of individuals to sue a state in another state court, which could hint that the high court is more open to reviewing rulings decided decades ago like Roe. Susan B. Anthony List is among the many antiabortion groups hoping for a challenge to rise to the Supreme Court. The group pushed for the confirmation of Justice Brett Kavanaugh last year after swing vote Justice Anthony Kennedy announced his retire-

ment. “It is clearer than ever that Roe is far from being settled law in the eyes and hearts of the American people, and this is increasingly reflected in state legislatures. The American people want a fresh debate and a new direction, achieved by consensus and built on love for both mothers and babies,” said SBA List’s Marjorie Dannenfelser in a statement. “The time is coming for the Supreme Court to let that debate go forward.” Catherine Glenn Foster, the president and CEO of American United for Life, a legal advocacy group that opposes abortion, said Alabama has “created the opportunity to implement new, comprehensive policies to ensure the most life-affirming outcomes for both the mother and the child throughout life.” Next week, U.S. District Judge Carlton W. Reeves for the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi will hear oral arguments in a hearing over whether to grant a preliminary injunction over the state’s six-week abortion ban. The Center for Reproductive Rights filed suit on behalf of the state’s only abortion provider — Jackson Women’s Health Organization — after the legislation was enacted in March. The ban is slated to take effect in July.

A man purchased chocolate milk and other items with a fake $100 bill at Village Pantry on East Winslow Road, Bloomington Police Department Sgt. Dana Cole said. A Village Pantry attendant told police early Sunday morning a man attempted to make a purchase with a $100 bill with Chinese writing on it. “Don’t be a little bitch,” the suspect told the attendant. Cole said the attendant feared he might be injured, so he completed the transaction: TruMoo chocolate milk, Nesquik chocolate milk and other items that couldn’t be made out from the receipt.

The purchase amounted to $13.51. Cole said the man is not connected to an Indianapolis man BPD arrested last week for a series of counterfeit $100 bills. The attendant told police he thought the suspect lived in an apartment complex nearby. The suspect, who is a frequent customer, walked out of Village Pantry after buying the items. Surveillance footage showed the suspect to be a white or Hispanic male with black hair and a black goatee, Cole said. He wore a blue hooded sweatshirt, blue jeans and a gray flat bill hat.

CORRECTION In the May 13 version of the Indiana Daily Student, Maggie Bott’s name was mispelled. A photo caption misidentified the amount of time Lindsey Badger has

worked for the Middle Way House. She has worked for the Middle Way House since this fall. The IDS regrets these errors.

Annie Aguiar Editor-in-Chief Kara Williams Managing Editors

Vol. 152, No. 22 © 2019

www.idsnews.com Newsroom: 812-855-0760 Business Office: 812-855-0763 Fax: 812-855-8009

Matthew Brookshire Circulation Manager Greg Menkedick Advertising Director

The Indiana Daily Student publishes Mondays and Thursdays throughout the year while University classes are in session. Part of IU Student Media, the IDS is a self-supporting auxiliary University enterprise. Founded on Feb. 22, 1867, the IDS is chartered by the IU Board of Trustees, with the editor-in-chief as final content authority. The IDS welcomes reader feedback, letters to the editor and online comments. Advertising policies are availale on the current rate card. Readers are entitled to single copies. Taking multiple copies may constitute theft of IU property, subject to prosecution. Paid subscriptions are entered through third-class postage (USPS No. 261960) at Bloomington, IN 47405.

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Indiana Daily Student

OPINION

Editor Abby Malala opinion@idsnews.com

Thursday, May 16, 2019 idsnews.com

3

CZECHING IN WITH ZACK

Schools need to provide more LGBTQ representation in sex education ZACKARY SWOBODA is a sophomore in sports media.

Growing up gay, I never had an experience through my school’s sex education classes that represented my sexual orientation. I often sat through sex education class disinterested and confused as to why there was no material other than heterosexual sex education. I could not relate to any of the material being presented to me. I was not the only one who sat through class feeling this way. Many LGBTQ students have had similar experiences throughout high school. LGBTQ students are disproportionately affected by current sex education standards. As of 2015, at least 1.3 million high school students

identify as lesbian, gay or bisexual. The Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network is an organization that fights for LGBTQ students’ rights to equal education within schools. According to its report, fewer than 20% of high schools incorporate nonheterosexual sex education. If LGBTQ students are not being taught how to have safe sex, they are inevitably put at much higher risks than their heterosexual peers. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention indicates that students of sexual orientation minorities are more likely to have mental health issues as well as more

likely to contract sexually transmitted diseases. Since there are increased risks for sexual and mental health issues in this student group, it would make sense to start including comprehensive materials for LGBTQ students. I would have felt more accepted if my school would have included sex education that had some tailored information toward same-sex relationships. Inclusion in sex education would lead LGBTQ students to feel more accepted and to be more intelligent about sexually transmitted diseases and safe sex practices.

ing s t u dents about safe sex whatsoever, let alone safe sex for same-sex couples. Public support could start leading to changes. According to the Human Rights Campaign, 85% of interviewed parents agreed that high school sex education should include talking about same-sex relationships, This large percentage of parents supporting inclusive sex education is a step in the right direction. California has also taken steps in this direction recently. According to the

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY MADELYN POWERS | IDS

Instead, I felt isolated from my heterosexual peers since I could not relate to the educational material. Sex education is in dire need of reform due to a lack of consistency across standards. “Sex education is only legally mandated in 22 states plus the District of Columbia. Of these, only 12 mandate teaching about contraception, and only 7 require that the information be medically accurate,” according to the Center for American Progress. With such wide variation of what is expected, sex education is not accurately teach-

Mercury News, the California Board of Education decided to make its statewide sex education framework inclusive of LGBTQ students in accordance with the California Healthy Youth Act. Although there was opposition to the inclusion of same-sex couples, California still voted to change California’s sexual education regulation. However, it does not force schools to use the framework’s texts. Sex education laws nationwide have not followed suit yet, but hopefully this recent change of California’s law will influence a change in federal law. Every student deserves inclusive education, and it’s time to finally have sex education include the LGBTQ student population. zswoboda@iu.edu

POLITICAL POWERS

ILLUSTRATION BY MADELYN POWERS | IDS


Thursday, May 16, 2019 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

4

IDS FILE PHOTOS

A LOOK BACK AT RICHARD LUGAR AT INDIANA UNIVERSITY IN RECENT YEARS LEFT Sen. Richard Lugar, R-Ind, gives the keynote address at the IU School of Law graduation ceremony May 3, 2008, at the IU Auditorium. TOP Lugar shakes hands with IU President Michael McRobbie on Jan 24. 2013, at the Lilly Library. BOTTOM Lugar sings the Beta Theta Pi fraternity song following a speech he gave at the Beta house. Lugar, a Beta alumnus of Ohio’s Denison University, was invited to speak at the fraternity’s initiation of new members.

» BASEBALL

tying run. IU had tied the game, but it would never take the lead. For the second straight game, the score was tied in the seventh. For the sec-

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 the infield. The momentum carrying Binelas away from the play allowed Dunham to tag up and score the game-

Horoscope Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Today is an 8 — Support your partner and be supported. Strengthen your collaboration by keeping your side of the bargain. Share results and new tricks. Coordinate and strategize. Gemini (May 21-June 20) — Today is an 8 — Focus on immediate actions to handle urgencies. Clean up the mess later. Communications issued now go the distance with long-lasting results. Take care of business.

ond straight game, that remained the score into extra innings. Though unlike IU’s loss Sunday against Michigan, it took one inning longer for a breakthrough.

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Cancer (June 21-July 22) — Today is a 7 — Set duties and responsibilities aside for a bit, and go have fun. Plan an adventure with someone beloved. Devote yourself to the pursuit of happiness. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Today is a 7 — The gentle approach works best at home with family. Make improvements after figuring out what's wanted and needed. It's a good time to talk.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Today is an 8 — Edit communications carefully. Impracticalities and foundational weakness become apparent. Once the message is polished and approvals are complete, share it far and wide. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Today is a 9 — Move quickly to catch a profitable windfall. Compute expenses, and provide excellent service. Emotions could affect your workplace. Adapt to changes. Find a hidden opportunity.

BLISS

HARRY BLISS

But in both games, IU was on the losing end. With the loss, IU drops its second straight game and falls to 33-19 overall. The loss had no effect on

IU’s chase of a Big Ten title. IU finishes the regular season 19-12 in nonconference play and 6-5 in midweek games. IU will resume its push

for a Big Ten title at 6:05 p.m. Thursday at Bart Kaufman Field against Rutgers. Senior Pauly Milto is the anticipated starting pitcher for the Hoosiers.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Today is an 8 — Use your power responsibly. You don't want to run over anyone. Keep a diplomatic tone as you advance a personal project. Communications go further than expected.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Today is a 7 — Resolve structural breakdowns with teams and committees. Confer with allies, and keep communication channels open. Replace something volatile with something secure. Stay cool.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) — Today is a 7 — Get adventurous. Get out and explore a curious subject. Can you mix business with pleasure? Enjoy classes, conferences and workshops. Learn new tricks, and share them.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — Today is a 6 — Peaceful settings soothe your spirit. You're especially sensitive. Alternate between physical exercise and quiet reverie. Consider the words of elders and ancestors. Rest and think.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Today is an 8 — Consider professional assignments and opportunities. A challenge or competition requires dedication. Begin a testing period. Focus and winning is entirely possible. Get team support.

Aries (March 21-April 19) — Today is a 9 — Manage practical expenses and payments with shared accounts. Study the matter, and update financial plans. Discuss priorities, and make sure you're on the same page. © 2019 By Nancy Black Distributed by Tribune Media Services, INC. All Rights Reserved

Crossword

L.A. Times Daily Crossword 32 33 34 35 36

Kosovo neighbor: Abbr. Surfeit How-to presentation Bearing Prominent New York City feature 37 Give a little 38 Not post42 Short dogs, for short 44 Like some scarves 45 Works out 46 Last family to keep a White House cow 48 Dangerous virus 49 Lennon love song 50 Twist 51 Fleet 54 Heated state 55 Large green moth 56 One may be choked back 57 Dedicatee of 49-Down 58 __ alone: not to mention

Publish your comic on this page. The IDS is accepting applications for student comic strips for the summer & fall 2019 semesters. Email five samples and a brief description of your idea to adviser@indiana.edu by May 30. Submissions will be reviewed and selections will be made by the editor-in-chief. Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

su do ku

ACROSS

Difficulty Rating: How to play: Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 grid contains the digits 1 through 9, without repeating a number in any one row, column or 3x3 grid.

Answer to previous puzzle

© Puzzles by Pappocom

1 Expert in Islamic law 6 Classroom tools 12 Nation partly in the Arctic Circle 14 Left 15 “I didn’t lie!” 16 Select, as a jury 17 Classic 1818 novel 19 Otoscope target 20 Unnamed character in 17-Across 24 In a calculating way 27 Antipoverty agcy. 28 Actor Stephen 29 Prefix with plus 31 Reduce in status 35 Author of 17-Across 37 Slapstick reaction 39 Borrow, but not really 40 “__ you serious?” 41 Talk and talk 43 Namely 47 1974 portrayer of 17-Across 52 “__ scale of 1 to 10 ... ” 53 1931 portrayer of 20-Across 56 King in 1 Kings 59 Shoulder piece

60 61 62 63

Like some rural bridges July 4, 1776, notables Green field? Campus figures

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 18 21 22 23 25 26 30

Kind of heart valve Easily led astray Rich dessert Something to do Map box “Did my heart love till now?” speaker Detach, as a dress pattern Isn’t straight Big stretch Deeply regret Mo. town High winds Honolulu-born singer Go back for a second helping A dandelion’s are called blowballs Fox NFL analyst Aikman “Ick!” Fled Future JD’s exam Mongolian tent Shaggy rug from 12-Across

Look for the crossword daily in the comics section of the Indiana Daily Student. Find the solution for the daily crossword here. Answer to previous puzzle


5

Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com | Thursday, May 16, 2019

INDIANA Editors Emily Isaacman news@idsnews.com

G L O B E T Rthrough O theTHoosier T IstateN G Many cities and towns in Indiana are named after other locations that stretch from one state over to the other side of the planet MICHIGAN CITY EAST CHICAGO GOSHEN NEW VALPARAISO

By Annie Aguiar aguiara@iu.edu | @annabelaguiar

Anyone who has driven through the state of Indiana has probably seen the names: Brazil. Versailles. Warsaw. While naming cities and towns after other locations isn’t an Indiana-specific phenomenon, there do seem to be more than in other states. While there isn’t one consistent reason why this happens, a couple explanations exist. Homesick settlers Many of the cities and towns named for other locations come from the pre-Indiana home of the settlers. One example is the city of Berne, Indiana.  According to the city’s website, a group of devout Mennonites immigrated to the area from Switzerland in 1852; their Swiss origins explains the name of both Berne and the nearby town of Geneva, Indiana.  But it’s not just those who traveled thousands of miles who named their new homes after their old ones.  The Putnam County website details the naming of the city of Greencastle, Indiana. The town was founded in 1821 by Ephraim Dukes on a land grant. He named it after his hometown — Greencastle, Pennsylvania.

CHICAGO LOWELL

TOPEKA

LIGONIER

BREMEN

LA PAZ

HEBRON

SYRACUSE

PLYMOUTH

ANGOLA*

MIDDLEBURY

ROME CITY CORUNNA ALBION WATERLOO AVILLA

WARSAW

BOURBON

CHURUBUSCO

MENTONE MONTEREY

ROCHESTER

AKRON

MOUNT AYR

ROANOKE

MOROCCO

ZANESVILLE

DENVER

PERU

MONTICELLO

GALVESTON

MONTPELIER

CADIZ

LADOGA

DUBLIN

AVON

GREENCASTLE BRAZIL

BROOKLYN

NEW PALESTINE

HAGERSTOWN CHARLOTTESVILLE CAMBRIDGE BOSTON

CARTHAGE

LAUREL

TRAFALGAR

STAUNTON

LOSANTVILLE

NEW CASTLE

GREENSBORO

PITTSBORO MECCA

PORTLAND DUNKIRK

ARCADIA

LEBANON

CAYUGA

GENEVA

ALBANY

ATLANTA DARLINGTON

BERNE

VERA CRUZ

FRANKFORT

ALAMO

WEST LEBANON

MOUNT ETNA

BUNKER HILL

DELPHI

Pious pioneers Biblical roots can be found for some of the names repurposed from other locations for Indiana towns and cities. The city of Goshen, Indiana, is named after the Land of Goshen, the region of Egypt given to the Hebrews in the Book of Genesis. The West Bank city of Hebron is the second-holiest city in Judaism after Jerusalem, and it’s also the namesake for Hebron, Indiana. Commemoration of battles While Bunker Hill, Indiana, is obviously named after the legendary Revolutionary War battle, commemorating wartime events also explains some of the state’s more unexpected city and town names. Saltillo, Indiana, is named for Saltillo, Mexico, the location of a battle in the MexicanAmerican War. The name of the town of Trafalgar, Indiana, commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar, an 1805 conflict in the Napoleonic Wars.  

BRISTOL

GREENSBURG

EDINBURGH

MILLHOUSEN MILAN

WORTHINGTON

MEROM

VERSAILLES

CARLISLE

VERNON

AUSTIN

VINCENNES ORLEANS

SALTILLO

LITTLE YORK

SALEM

*Whether or not the city is named for the African country or for the town of Angola, New York, is debated.

WEST BADEN SPRINGS PALMYRA HOLLAND

MARENGO

CYNTHIANA ELBERFELD

VEVAY

NEW ALBANY

UTICA NEW AMSTERDAM

DARMSTADT

MOUNT VERNON

ROME

GRAPHIC BY ANNIE AGUIAR


Indiana Daily Student

6

SPORTS

Thursday, May 16, 2019 idsnews.com

Editor Dylan Wallace sports@idsnews.com

BASEBALL

Different paths baseball needs to become Big Ten regular season champs ByMatt Cohen mdc1@iu.edu | @Matt_Cohen_

After a series victory over Michigan last weekend, IU baseball has put itself right back in the hunt for a Big Ten title. To have any shot to catch Michigan in the standings, it had to at least win two of the three games last weekend in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and IU did just that. IU wasn’t able to capitalize on a chance to sweep Michigan with its loss Sunday. That loss put IU 1.5 games behind Michigan in the standings instead of 0.5 games ahead. With three games left to play in the Big Ten, the odds are not in IU’s favor, but it is certainly within striking distance. Though IU isn’t far behind Michigan in the standings, it will need help to win the Big Ten title. Both Michigan and IU will open its respective final

series of the season Thursday. Michigan will travel to Lincoln, Nebraska to face Nebraska, while IU will stay in Bloomington to play Rutgers. Based on the Ratings Percentage Index, IU does appear to have the weaker final opponent. Rutgers is ranked No. 176 as of Monday, while Nebraska is ranked No. 38. Below are the different possible outcomes for IU against Rutgers, and what would have to happen for IU to win the Big Ten title given each result. Rutgers comes to Bloomington and sweeps IU There is no route to winning the Big Ten title if Rutgers wins all three games against IU. IU wins one of three games against Rutgers There is still no route to a Big Ten title if IU wins just one of the three games.

IU wins two of three games against Rutgers. Here’s where things get interesting, and confusing. If IU wins two of three, and Michigan is swept by Nebraska, IU could win the Big Ten — the word could is important, more on that later. IU’s 16-8 conference record would be 0.5 games better than Michigan’s 15-8 record in this scenario. Nebraska would have to sweep Michigan if IU only wins two of three against Rutgers. Michigan could clinch the Big Ten as early as Thursday if it were to win and IU lose the series opening game. Even if Michigan lost its Friday and Saturday games and IU were to win them both, Michigan would have a 0.5 game edge in the final standings. In short, if IU wins the series, but doesn’t sweep Rutgers, Michigan would have to get swept for IU to win the Big

Ten. While IU would need Michigan to get swept to have a chance in this scenario, the Wolverines aren’t the only team IU would need to be concerned about. If Nebraska sweeps Michigan, it too would have the same 16-8 record in the Big Ten. In this scenario, IU would still win the Big Ten based on the third tiebreaker, RPI, as both IU and Nebraska would have the same record against common Big Ten opponents and didn’t play each other this season. If Minnesota sweeps its series against Northwestern, it also would be 16-8, but would lose the tiebreaker with series losses head-tohead against both IU and Nebraska. Then throw Illinois into the mix. If it sweeps Michigan State this weekend, it too would be 16-8. If Nebraska, Illinois and Minnesota all sweep, along with IU going

2-1, there would be a four way tie atop the Big Ten. Illinois would win any tiebreaker as it has series wins over IU, Nebraska and Minnesota. IU sweeps Rutgers. IU has swept three teams this season. Two of those three have better RPI rankings than Rutgers. Rutgers has been swept four times this season. Three of those four teams have a worse RPI ranking than IU. To win the Big Ten title, IU’s best route is to sweep Rutgers. As long as Nebraska wins the series against Michigan — whether that be via sweep or just winning two out of three games — IU would win the Big Ten title if it sweeps Rutgers. If Michigan loses two of three games against Nebraska, its Big Ten record would drop to 16-7, while IU would improve to 17-7 with a sweep of Rutgers.

In addition, if IU sweeps Rutgers, none of the other teams still in contention — Illinois, Nebraska or Minnesota — would have the ability to overtake IU. There are still five teams with a chance to win the Big Ten — Michigan, IU, Illinois, Nebraska and Minnesota. If Michigan wins its series against Nebraska it will lock up a Big Ten title. The Wolverines control their own destiny. But if Michigan slips up, IU certainly has a chance.

PHOTOS BY ALEX DERYN & ANNA TIPLICK | IDS

Top left Junior infielder Matt Gorski swings his bat May 14 at Bart Kaufman Field. Top right Sophomore infielder Cole Barr reaches for the ball May 14 at Bart Kaufman Field. Bottom left The IU dugout watches an IU at-bat during the game against Indiana State University on April 10 at Bart Kaufman Field. Bottom right Senior utility Matt Lloyd walks back to the dugout May 14 at Bart Kaufman Field.

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219 E. Fourth St. 812-332-6396

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Wednesday: 7:30 p.m. @ Bloomington Sandwhich Company (118 E. Kirkwood Ave.)

Being in Bloomington, we love our college students, and think they are a great addition to the Sherwood Oaks Family. Wether an undergraduate or graduate student... from in-state, out of state, to our international community... Come join us as we strive to love God and love others better. Jeremy Earle, College Minister

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eccbloomington.org • cxiu.org Facebook: Connexion ECC Twitter: @connexionecc

111 S. Kimble Dr. 812-269-8975

Sunday: 10 a.m. Redeemer is a gospel-centered community on mission. Our vision is to see the gospel of Jesus Christ transform everything: our lives, our church, our city, and our world. We want to be instruments of gospel change in Bloomington and beyond. Chris Jones, Lead Pastor

Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Connexion: Sundays, 6 p.m. Connexion is the university ministry of ECC. We’re all about connecting students to the church in order to grow together in our faith. We meet weekly for worship, teaching, and fellowship as well as periodically for service projects, social events and more. Bob Whitaker, Senior Pastor Dan Waugh, Pastor of Adult Ministries

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First Church of the Nazarene 700 W. Howe St. (across from the Building Trades Park) 812-332-2461 • www.b1naz.org bfcn@sbcglobal.net Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday Small Groups : 9:30 a.m., 4 p.m. & 6 p.m.

111 N. Rogers St. 812-336-4310 • bloomingtonsa.org

Sunday: Sunday School, 10 a.m. Worship Service, 11:00 a.m. Bible Study, 3 p.m. The Salvation Army, an international movement, is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church. Its message is based on the Bible. Its ministry is motivated by the love of God. Its mission is to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ and meet human needs in His name without discrimination.

Mennonite Mennonite Fellowship of Bloomington 2420 E. Third St. 812-646-2441 bloomingtonmenno.org • Facebook

Gordon Hoag, Captain Cindy Hoag, Captain

City Church For All Nations 1200 N. Russell Rd. 812-336-5958

citychurchbloomington.org Instagram • Twitter • Facebook @citychurchbtown

Sunday: 5 p.m. A welcoming, inclusive congregation providing a place of healing and hope as we journey together in the Spirit of Christ. Gathering for worship Sundays 5 p.m. in the Roger Williams room, First United Church. As people of God's peace, we seek to embody the Kingdom of God. John Sauder mfbjohn@gmail.com

Saturday: 5:30 p.m. Sunday: 9:30 a.m., 11 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. We are a movement of all races and backgrounds, coming together to love people, build family, and lead to destiny. Join us at one of our weekend worship experiences, and visit our young adults ministry, 1Life at 7 p.m. on Mondays. David Norris, Pastor Sumer Norris, Pastor

Episcopal (Anglican) Canterbury House Episcopal (Anglican) Campus Ministry at IU 719 E. Seventh St. 812-334-7971 • 812-361-7954

Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors

St. Mark’s United Methodist Church 100 N. State Rd. 46 Bypass 812-332-5788

Sacramental Schedule: Weekly services Sundays: Holy Eucharist with hymns, followed by

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dinner 4 p.m. at Canterbury House

2nd & 4th Wednesdays: 7 p.m. Taizé Chants & Prayers at Canterbury House

Sunday Morning Schedule 9:00: Breakfast 9:15: Adult Sunday School Classes 10:30: Sanctuary Worship 10:30: Children & Youth Sunday School Classes

Episcopal (Anglican) Campus Ministry is a safe and welcoming home for all people. We are a blend of young and old, women and men, gay and straight, ethnicities from different cultures and countries, students, faculty, staff and friends. The worshipping congregation is the Canterbury Fellowship. The mission of the Fellowship is to restore all people to unity with God and each other in Christ. We pray, worship and proclaim the Gospel. We also promote justice, equality, inclusion, peace, love critical thinking and acting as agents of change in our world.

An inclusive community bringing Christ-like love, healing and hope to all.

Mother Linda C. Johnson+, University Chaplain Ricardo Bello Gomez, Communications Director Josefina Carcamo, Latino/a and Community Outreach Intern Rex Hinkle, Luiz Lopes, Nathan Stang, Music Ministers

7821 W. State Road 46 812-876-6072 • lifewaybaptistchurch.org Facebook • LifewayEllettsville

Jimmy Moore, Pastor Mary Beth Morgan, Pastor

Independent Baptist Lifeway Baptist Church

College & Career Sunday Meeting: 9 a.m. Sunday

Sunday Worship: 10 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wednesday Night Bible Study: 7 p.m.

PC (USA) United Presbyterian Church 1701 E. Second St. 812-332-1850 • upcbloomington.org

Email: upcbloomington@gmail.com Sunday: Pastor's Class: 8:45 a.m. Worship: 10 a.m. Fellowship: 11 a.m.

Tuesday: Bible Study: 12:15 p.m. Book Study/Discussion: 6 p.m. We are a diverse, inclusive people of God. Social justice, a welcoming spirit and focusing on Christ are integral to our congregation. We are students and non-students, native and non-native English speakers, young and old, who come together to worship in the name of Christ and to enjoy fellowship. John Napoli, Pastor Melanie Mathis-McBride, Education Director

Fr. Patrick Hyde, O.P. Associate Pastor & Campus Minister

St. Paul Catholic Center is a diverse community rooted in the saving compassion of Jesus Christ, energized by His Sacraments, and nourished by the liturgical life of His Church.

Fr. Joseph Minuth, O.P., Associate Pastor

Christian (Disciples of Christ)

Presbyterian (USA)

First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

First Presbyterian Church

205 E. Kirkwood Ave. 812-332-4459 • fccbloomington.org

Sunday: 10 a.m. As God has welcomed us, we welcome you. With all our differences – in age, ability and physical condition, in race, cultural background and economic status, in sexual orientation, gender identity and family structure – God has received each one with loving kindness, patience and joy. All that we are together and all that we hope to be is made more perfect as the richness of varied lives meets the mystery of God’s unifying Spirit, and we become the Body of Christ. Helen Hempfling, Pastor

Lifeway Baptist Church exists to bring glory to God by making disciples, maturing believers and multiplying ministry. Matthew 28:19-20

Barnabas Christian Ministry Small Groups: Cedar Hall 2nd Floor Common Area, 7 - 8 p.m., meetings start Thursday, Sept. 6. We will meet every other Thursday during the school year.

Callout Meeting: Aug. 30, IMU Redbud Room Steven VonBokern, Senior Pastor Rosh Dhanawade, IU Coordinator 302-561-0108, barnabas@indiana.edu barnabas.so.indiana.edu * Free transportation provided. Please call if you need a ride to church.

221 E. Sixth St. (Sixth and Lincoln) 812-332-1514 • fpcbloomington.org

Worship Times: Sunday: 9 a.m., 11 a.m.

Christian Ed: Sunday: 9:50 - 10:45 a.m.

Summer Worship Times: Sunday: 10 a.m. We are a community of seekers and disciples in Christ committed to hospitality and outreach for all God’s children. Come join us for meaningful worship, thoughtful spiritual study and stimulating fellowship. Ukirk at IU is a Presbyterian affiliated group open to all students. Andrew Kort, Pastor Kim Adams, Associate Pastor Grant Farmer, Music Director Christopher Young, Organist

Orthodox Christian All Saints Orthodox Christian Church 6004 S. Fairfax Rd. 812-824-3600

www.allsaintsbloomington.org Email:frpeterjon@allsaintsbloomington.org Wednesday: Vespers 6 p.m. Saturday: Great Vespers 5 p.m. Sunday: Matins 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy 10 a.m. Come experience the sacred rhythm and rituals of the timeless Christian faith, a faith with a future, yet ancient and tested. Living the traditional worship of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit; as a sacred community of people striving to manifest the kingdom, on earth as it is in heaven. We, together with the saints throughout history, learn to live the love and compassion of Christ. Come and see, and put your roots down deep. Rev. Fr. Peter Jon Gillquist, Pastor Howard & Rhonda Webb, College Coordinators Church Van Pickup on Sundays - Call 314-681-8893

Cooperative Baptist

Catholic St. Paul Catholic Center 1413 E. 17th St. 812-339-5561 • hoosiercatholic.org

Facebook: Hoosiercatholic Twitter: @hoosiercatholic Weekend Mass Times Saturday Vigil: 4:30 p.m. Sunday: 8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. (Spanish), 5:30 p.m., 9 p.m. (During Academic Year) Korean Mass 1st & 3rd Saturdays, 6 p.m.

Weekday Mass Times Monday - Saturday: 12:15 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday: 9 p.m. St. Paul Catholic Center is a diverse community rooted in the saving compassion of Jesus Christ, energized by His Sacraments, and nourished by the liturgical life of His Church. Fr. John Meany, O.P., Pastor Fr. Patrick Hyde, O.P. Associate Pastor & Campus Minister Fr. Joseph Minuth, O.P., Associate Pastor

University Baptist Church 3740 E. Third St. 812-339-1404

Unitarian Universalist

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Tuesdays: 6 p.m. Bible Study at Canterbury House

Fr. John Meany, O.P., Pastor

Facebook: SABloomington Twitter: @SABtown

Thursday: We are Wesleyan in our beliefs, and welcome all to worship with us. We are dedicated to training others through discipleship as well as ministering through small groups. We welcome all races and cultures and would love to get to know you. Dr James Hicks, Lead Pastor

1413 E. 17th St. 812-339-5561 • hoosiercatholic.org Facebook: Hoosiercatholic Twitter: @hoosiercatholic

Weekday Mass Times Monday - Saturday: 12:15 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday: 9 p.m.

503 S. High St. 812-332-0502

Redeemer Community Church redeemerbloomington.org facebook.com/RedeemerBtown @RedeemerBtown on Twitter & Instagram

Weekend Mass Times Saturday Vigil: 4:30 p.m. Sunday: 8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. (Spanish), 5:30 p.m., 9 p.m. (During Academic Year) Korean Mass 1st & 3rd Saturdays, 6 p.m.

Traditional: 8 a.m.

Sunday: The Open Door, 11:15 a.m. @ The Buskirk-Chumley Theater (114 E. Kirkwood Ave.)

Jubilee is a supportive and accepting community for college students and young adults from all backgrounds looking to grow in their faith and do life together. Meet every Wednesday night for opportunities through small groups, hangouts, mission trips, events, service projects, and more. Many attend the contemporary Open Door service.

St. Paul Catholic Center

Sunday: 9:30 a.m. (Bible study) 10:45 a.m. (worship) If you are exploring faith, looking for a church home, or returning after time away, Welcome! We aim to be a safe place to "sort it out" for those who are questioning, and a place to pray, grow, and serve for followers of Jesus. All are welcome - yes, LBGTQ too. Rev. Annette Hill Briggs, Pastor Rob Drummond, Music Minister

Lutheran (LCMS) University Lutheran Church & Student Center 607 E. Seventh St. (Corner of 7th & Fess) 812-336-5387 • indianalutheran.com

facebook.com/ULutheranIU @ULutheranIU on twitter Sunday: Bible Class, 9:15 a.m. Divine Service, 10:30 a.m. The Best Meal You'll Have All Week, 6 p.m. Tuesday & Friday: Service of Morning Prayer, 8 a.m. Wednesday: Second Best Meal, 6 p.m. Midweek Service, 7 p.m. LCMS U Student Fellowship, 7:30 p.m. Thursday: Graduate Study/Fellowship, 7 p.m. University Lutheran Church (U.Lu) is the home of LCMS U at Indiana, the campus ministry of the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Students, on-campus location, and our Student Center create a hub for daily, genuine Christ-centered community that receives God's gifts of life, salvation, and the forgiveness of sins through Jesus Christ. Rev. Richard Woelmer, Campus Pastor

2120 N. Fee Lane 812-332-3695

www.uublomington.org www.facebook.com/uubloomington Sundays: 9:15 a.m. & 11:15 a.m. We are a dynamic congregation working towards a more just world through social justice. We draw inspiration from world religions and diverse spiritual traditions. Our vision is "Seeking the Spirit, Building Community, Changing the World." A LGBTQA+ Welcoming Congregation and a certified Green Sanctuary. Reverend Mary Ann Macklin, Senior Minister Reverend Scott McNeill, Associate Minister

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Latter-day Saint Student Association (L.D.S.S.A) 333 S. Highland Ave. 812-334-3432

studentview.Ids.org/Home. aspx/Home/60431 Facebook: Bloomington Institute and YSA Society lds.org Monday - Friday: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. We have an Institute of Religion adjacent to campus at 333 S. Highland Ave. (behind T.I.S. bookstore). We offer a variety of religious classes and activities. We strive to create an atmosphere where college students and local young single adults can come to play games, relax, study, and associate with others who value spirituality. Sunday worship services for young single students are held at 2411 E. Second St. a 11:30 a.m. We invite all to discover more about Jesus Christ from both ancient scripture and from modern prophets of God. During the week join us at the institute, and on Sunday at the Young Single Adult Church. Robert Tibbs, Institute Director


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Two-person loveseat for $10, obo. Contact: haywoodp@indiana.edu

Insignia 3.0 cubic feet compact mini fridge/freezer. $130. Call 516-660-2237.

Wooden, hand made table. Must be picked up by May 4th. $100. rcogen@iu.edu

Electronics 2018 iPad Mini 4, almost new, good condition. $320. tuho@iu.edu

6 foot Ladder, brand new. $30. cablec@iu.edu

Magnavox 39” Class 1080p LED HD TV, good cond. Works great. $90. cnachman@indiana.edu

Like-New Lenovo Yoga 730, only used 4 months, great cond. $630. zhou18@iu.edu

Furniture Air hockey table, good cond. 6 paddles, 4 pucks. $100, obo. sendiaz@indiana.edu Black desk chair with arms and desk. $20. cc70@indiana.edu Black leather reclining futon, good cond. Pickup only. $45. aolovich@indiana.edu

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Tall, brown wood clothes chest. Good cond. $40. scherian@iu.edu

Hoover Spirit vacuum, $20. Very good condition. ymao@indiana.edu

3 BR, 2 BA house for rent. $1425/mo + utils. Avail. mid Aug. 101 N Roosevelt. Refs., deposit, lease required. Text or email: 812-325-8969 or

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Honeywell 450 sq. ft. portable air conditioner. Digital & remote control, $360. 516-660-2237

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

3 BR, 1 BA. Close to Campus. $800/2 person, $900/3 person. + util. Avail. 8/20. 812-824-9735

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Cuisinart Panini Press and Grill. Good cond. $15, obo. sunyou@iu.edu

1 to 2 blocks from Campus

Women’s size 8.5 Columbia hiking boots. Never worn. $60. 812-322-0808

New hammock with stand, never used. $60. udjoshi@iu.edu

Black microwave, works perfectly. $30. bonaiti@iu.edu

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Clothing Nike Vapor Untouchable Pro men’s football cleats. Size 8, Never worn. $30. s.e.mosier1@gmail.com

Lightly used twin mattress with free cover. Pick up only. $50. jose2@indiana.edu

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Vintage board games. Incl., Sorry, Life, Clue, Monopoly, and Scabble. $75 for all. jtitzer@iu.edu

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Indiana Daily Student

Automobiles 2013 Toyota Camry XLE $9,999. Excellent cond. 1 owner; garaged; 164K sparky1tartan@msn.com

2013 Volkswagen CC Sport. 35K miles. Excellent cond. $13,500. jamlconn@indiana.edu

FOR SALE. PORSCHE CAYMAN GTS 2015 Cayman in agate gray, very low miles. Loaded with options. The best and last of the six cylinder Caymans. Fast and beautiful. Best performance and design. $71,425. 812-322-3535

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Dark blue IKEA couch, good cond. Used for 2 years. $100. rajicg@indiana.edu Dark wood desk with chair included: $50. cmeinzer@iu.edu Decently sized white desk in good cond. $50. kratner@indiana.edu

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Wednesday, May 16, 2019.  

The Indiana Daily Student is an independent student newspaper covering Indiana University, IU sports and the city of Bloomington, Indiana.

Wednesday, May 16, 2019.  

The Indiana Daily Student is an independent student newspaper covering Indiana University, IU sports and the city of Bloomington, Indiana.

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