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Thursday, November 7, 2019

IDS Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

Basketball Guide inside FOOTBALL

Penix Jr. out for rest of season By William Coleman wicolema@iu.edu | @WColeman08

LYDIA GERIKE | IDS

Mayor John Hamilton, center, and Ron Smith shake hands while talking with Sue Sgambelluri on Tuesday night at the election watch party for the Monroe County Democrats. Smith won the election for Bloomington City Council District 3, and Sgambelluri won the District 2 race.

CITY COUNCIL ELECTION RESULTS

SGAMBELLURI, SMITH WIN Democrats Sue Sgambelluri and Ron Smith won the only two contested elections in the county. Sgambelluri won District 2 and Smith won District 3. By Lydia Gerike lgerike@iu.edu | @lydiagerike

Unofficial Tuesday night results for Bloomington’s only two contested elections show Democratic candidates Sue Sgambelluri and Ron Smith won the District 2 and 3 seats, respectively, for Bloomington City Council. Results for District 2 reported Sgambelluri with 365 votes over Republican Andrew Guenther, who earned 218 votes. In District 3, Smith’s results reported 448 votes. Independent candidate Nick Kappas came in with 425 votes. Marty Spechler, another independent candidate, had 95 votes. About 40 local Democrats including unopposed candidates, supporters and party officers gathered after polls closed to watch the results come in at the Monroe County Democratic Party headquarters downtown with a spread including pizza, La Croix and beer from Upland Brewing Co. All results were reported around 7:15 p.m., just over an hour after polls closed, and the Democrats shouted and applauded when Sgambelluri and Smith were announced the winners. Smith, the only one of the two candidates who had arrived by this point, gave

Charity erases $2.2 million in local medical debt By Claire Peters clapete@iu.edu | @claire_peterss

munity members alike can participate in art therapy led by Lauren Daugherty, arts -based wellness

For families struggling with crushing medical debt, help can come in the form of a bright yellow letter. RIP Medical Debt is a charity that collects donations, buys debt collections and eliminates medical debt for families in poverty. According to its website, it has bought and paid off $715 million in medical debt for about 240,000 Americans. In the last year, it worked with 56 campaigns with local media and just over 70 faith-based groups to erase medical debt.  City Church pastor David Norris said he found out about this charity through friends who had done the same thing in other communities. He said this has been done in Howard and Hamilton counties as well.  He said medical debt is the leading cause for bankruptcy in America.  “We’re excited about being able to bless families,” Norris said.  He said when people are financially insolvent, which means they are not able to pay the debts they owe, the medical companies aren’t going to get their money anyway, so he wants to help with that burden. He said paying off the medical debt is a juggling act for  families.  The charity chooses families who need it the most, but the choice is confidential until the debt is bought and the RIP Medical Debt letters are sent out to their homes.  Daniel Lempert, RIP Medical Debt communications director, said there are three qualifications for debt to be forgiven: being financially insolvent, being two times below the poverty level and the family’s medical debt is 5% or more of their annual income.  In order to work with the campaign, a group needs to raise $15,000 for the charity. They then will locate the medical debt in the area to see which debt bundles they can buy. They work with groups like local campaigners, churches, citizens or school groups. Anyone can donate to RIP Medical Debt from its website, and all of the proceeds go directly to eliminating the debt. Lempert said because the medical debt costs only pennies on the dollar, one dollar relieves $100 of medical debt for the families.  “The community gets to benefit from this relief, and the campaigners get to make their statement about

SEE ESKENAZI, PAGE 5

SEE CHARITY, PAGE 5

LYDIA GERIKE | IDS

Sue Sgambelluri speaks about her victory Tuesday night in the city council District 2 election at the Monroe County Democrats watch party. Sgambelluri was the only one to face a republican candidate.

a speech alongside Mayor John Hamilton and city clerk Nicole Bolden. Both ran unopposed but still stood next to Smith to celebrate the victories. “I will work very hard and do my best

to represent the citizens of District 3 and the citizens and people of Bloomington, to do my very best,” Smith said. SEE ELECTION, PAGE 5

Eskenazi’s renovation focuses on guests By Claudia Gonzalez-Diaz clabgonz@iu.edu

You may have taken a photo of your legs pressed against the wall of the Eskenazi Museum of Art building that reflects the colors of the light totem at night. From 4-8 p.m. this Thursday, you'll finally be able to go inside. For three years, the Eskenazi Museum of Art has undergone a $30 million renovation led by Susan T. Rodriguez of IU’s Capital Projects office, overseen by Ennead Architects. These renovations transformed several spaces inside the museum. For instance, what used to be an enclosed gift shop is now officially the Luzetta and Del Newkirk Café and Gift Shop that is easily accessible with a new entrance facing the arboretum. This cafe will offer coffee, breakfast, lunch and pastries, with plenty of seating options. IU spokesperson Chuck Carney commented on the significance of establishing a gathering space for students within the mu-

IU Athletics announced Tuesday that redshirt freshman quarterback Michael Penix Jr. will miss the rest of the season due to an injury sustained last Saturday night against Northwestern. “We feel really bad for Mike,” IU head coach Tom Allen said in a press release. “He’s worked extremely hard and had a great season. He’ll recover from this and get bigger and stronger this offseason. Mike has a very bright future with the Hoosiers.” The press release said Penix Jr. injured his right sternoclavicular joint. In his first season as IU’s starter, Penix Jr. accumulated 1,513 total yards and 12 total touchdowns over six games started. As a true freshman, the quarterback suffered a season-ending injury when he tore his ACL against Penn State. Junior quarterback Peyton Ramsey – starter of all 12 games in 2018 – will assume the starting quarterback position.

IZZY MYSZAK | IDS

Director of Creative Services Mariah Keller leads a tour Nov. 4 during a press event at the Eskenazi Museum of Art. The museum will be reopen Nov. 7.

seum. “Indiana University is a place that should ideally offer everything that it has in all of its schools to every one of its stu-

dents,” Carney said. “That’s what this museum does.” Another addition is the artmaking studio, which used to be a library. Here, students and com-


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Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019 idsnews.com

Editors Alex Hardgrave, Ellen Hine and Joey Bowling news@idsnews.com

Man arrested for alleged insurance fraud, false report By Ellen Hine emhine@iu.edu | @ellenmhine

COURTESY PHOTO

Veteran James Hutchinson is an Eighth Army Air Corps B-17 veteran of 20 missions. Hutchinson was a teacher for years, and now he sells books he’s written regarding his experiences.

Veterans Day ceremony organized By Lyndsay Valadez lvaladez@iu.edu | @lynds_val

From World War II to now, James Hutchinson has been serving people. He is an Eighth Army Air Corps B-17 veteran of 20 missions, he was a teacher for several years, and now he sells books he’s written regarding his experiences. “I know that our stories are being forgotten,” Hutchinson said.  This Veterans Day, the 94-year-old war veteran and IU alum will share his experiences from 4:30-6 p.m. Nov. 11 at Stonecroft Health Campus. The event will kickstart

Stonecroft’s Memories Matter Series. For Hutchinson, this particular event and day at Stonecroft allows him to sell his books, tell his story and preserve the stories of many veterans who can't preserve their own. In an effort to keep those stories in the public conscious, he has written six books with over 300 short stories about poverty before World War II, the war and life after retirement. The stories are about himself and other veterans, who told him their stories through interviews and diaries.  April Williams is the Stonecroft and Hearthstone senior community representative

for Trilogy Health Services. She said part of the reason for organizing this event and remembering the past is that Stonecroft is a memory care campus, meaning for some of the community members, reflecting and hearing stories about the past are really important. The event is open to all community members. “I think this is an opportunity for the community to come together and learn about our history and our veterans and take pride for what they have done for our country,” Williams said. Williams said it’s an honor to have Hutchinson, who has been recognized by many

public officials for his service and preservation of history, speak at this event. Hutchinson said in an email he was honored before the Indiana General Assembly in 2008 and made Grand Marshal of the Bedford July 4 Parade by Mayor Shawna Girgis in 2015. Hutchinson was presented Indiana's Ninth District Veterans Commendation, which was read into the Congressional record in 2015 and received the Sagamore of the Wabash in 2018. He also earned the Air Medal with two oak leaf clusters, which denote subsequent awards, as well as other campaign medals.

A 26-year-old man was arrested Tuesday morning after allegedly claiming he had $80,000 worth of belongings stolen from his apartment in order to collect the insurance money. Bloomington Police Department Capt. Ryan Pedigo said police responded around 10:46 p.m. Aug. 9 to a residence on the 1200 block of S. Fenbrook Lane after the man who lived there, Tang Yee, reported his apartment had been burglarized. Yee told police he had arrived home that night to discover his front window open and his front door unlocked. He told officers he believed the items had been stolen sometime between 1:30 p.m. and 9 p.m. that day. He reported multiple items stolen, Pedigo said, including several pieces of luggage, kitchen appliances, electronics, clothing, jewelry and his cat’s food and water bowls.  Yee was able to provide pictures of all the items stolen because he had purchased a $200,000 renters insurance policy from State Farm in July, Pedigo said. He said Yee estimated the total value of the items to be $50,000, but he later filed a claim with State Farm stating the value of the items was $80,000.  After a BPD detective began investigating the case, Pedigo said he began

to notice inconsistencies between what Yee told him and what he had told the officer who had initially arrived on the scene. Pedigo said the detective interviewed Yee on Aug. 20 at the BPD station. Yee told the detective he had severely embellished the amount of the loss. He said he had been burglarized Aug. 9, but only roughly $1,400 of kitchen appliances had been stolen. Yee admitted he decided to “test” his new State Farm policy, Pedigo said. He told the detective he packed up his most valuable belongings in several pieces of luggage and a backpack and put them in his car in his apartment’s parking lot before calling the police.  Pedigo said Yee told the detective he planned on donating some of the $80,000 and then keeping the rest for himself. A warrant for Yee’s arrest was issued Oct. 1, according to court documents, but police did not arrest him until early Tuesday morning. Pedigo said officers arrived around 12:16 a.m. at Yee’s apartment and knocked on the door. The officers could see Yee was inside the apartment but was attempting to hide from them. Eventually he opened the door and was arrested.  Yee has been charged with insurance fraud and false informing. He was taken to the Monroe County Correctional Center early Tuesday morning.

IMU polls see few voters on Election Day By Grace Ybarra gnybarra@iu.edu | @gnybarra

Students stream through every hallway and crevice of the Indiana Memorial Union between classes — it’s lunchtime. But the University Club stands still. IMU polling stations were introduced fall 2018, situated on the first floor in the University Club. A year later, the IMU polls saw very few voters Tuesday during Election Day. Outside of the ornate University Club sat a “vote here” sign, but there were no voters inside. The two voting booths sat empty. The volunteers waited. The eight volunteers manning the IMU poll arrived at 5 a.m. to start off their day, and didn’t see their first voter until 8:58 a.m.

One woman did come in to vote when the polls opened at 6:00 a.m., but she wasn’t in the right place. That was the case with many people that came into the University Club to vote. Poll inspector Chantalle LaFontant said at 1 p.m. they had turned away around 10 people because they were from the wrong precinct or weren’t registered to vote. She said they’ve only had eight eligible people cast their votes. “If we break 20 I’d be surprised,” LaFontant said. A man walked in. He approached the poll clerks, Sandy Sluss and John Bean, at the front desk. Maybe they had their ninth voter of the day. Sluss looked him up and said he wasn’t registered to vote. The man left and Sluss

returned to her crossword. Her red ink occupied almost all of the boxes in the crossword, she only had a few words left. On the other half of her folded newspaper was the Sudoku she already completed. Sluss said she passed the long hours through Sudoku and many cups of coffee. But her favorite way to pass the time was through conversation.  Sluss didn’t know Bean before the start of the day, but halfway through the two had become friends.   At just over the halfway point of Election Day, the IMU poll was averaging just over one voter an hour. Some of the volunteers made a visit to the IMU food court to tide them over until dinner. They returned with plates of burgers and fries

and take-away boxes of Juannita’s. A pile of empty ballots sat on the table for precincts Bloomington 5 and Bloomington 23. The ballots only featured one position to vote on: Common Council Member District 2 City of Bloomington. There was only one mark to be made on the ballot, and it was either for Sue Sgambelluri or Andrew Guenther. Although the ballot only features one item to vote on, LaFontant said people should still cast their votes at the polls. “The council decides what happens in this town for the most part,” LaFontant said. “The mayor proposes but they decide. So it is important.”

BFC talks tenure, student evaluations By Joy Burton joyburt@iu.edu | @joybur10

The Bloomington Faculty Council met Nov. 5 at Franklin Hall to discuss changes in existing tenure evaluation policy and to pass a prior learning policy proposed at the last meeting. The prior learning policy was created to streamline the process of letting students use outside experience, such as IU EdX online classes as a qualification for academic credit at IU. The policy was passed unanimously without discussion. The Bloomington Faculty Council spent a majority of the meeting discussing adjustments to the evaluation criteria for promotion and tenure. IU President Michael McRobbie ordered the changes due to the prior policy’s lack of clarity, Kim Geeslin, associate vice provost for faculty and academic affairs, said. “The new changes should provide guidance and give departments room to make adjustments for their needs,” Jane McLeod, the IU sociology department chair, said. Changes include clarification about the meaning of specific evaluation criteria such as “very good” and “good.” McLeod said the new criteria is meant to apply to all departments.

ANNA BROWN | IDS

India Garden moved to a larger location less than a month ago on Fourth Street.

India Garden moves to Fourth Street location By Sara Kress sekress@iu.edu | @sarakress4

India Garden, an 8-year-old local Indian restaurant on Fourth Street moved locations less than a month ago to a larger building with more seating. The move wasn’t far – just the building next door, 420 E. 4th St. Restaurant owner Rakesh Kumar said the new location seats between 70-80 people while the old location only sat 46. “We have a party hall,” Kumar said. “We like birthday parties, marriage parties, things like that.” The new location is the largest restaurant on Fourth Street, Kumar said. It takes up two buildings that are connected in the middle.  Each side of the restaurant has two large rooms filled with tables and

chairs. There are booths closer to the buffet area. Customers are greeted by Indian music and the rich smell of spices. Kumar said he hopes this location will attract more people. “It is very near to the university, so there is more of a crowd,” Kumar said. Blake Wiles, 30, said India Garden is the best Indian restaurant in Bloomington. Wiles said he liked that the restaurant offers chai for free. He also said India Garden seemed to appreciate its customers more than other restaurants he had been to. “It seems like a better location here because there is more room,” Wiles said. The restaurant serves a lunch buffet from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and dinner from 5 to 10 p.m. every day.

CORRECTION

JOY BURTON | IDS

In the Nov. 4 edition of the Indiana Daily Student, the wrong caption was

placed with a front page photo. The IDS regrets this error.

IU faculty members listen to discussion during the Bloomington Faculty Council meeting Nov. 5 at Franklin Hall. The faculty passed a policy outlining criteria for students to earn academic credit for prior learning.

The Bloomington Faculty Council disputed the language, and they spent time discussing the “balanced case” mentioned in the policy. The balanced case occurs when a faculty member performs well in research, teaching and service rather than one category over the others. “I believe the balanced case is an example of what professors should be doing,” Peter Kloosterman, an emeritus professor at the School of Education, said. There was also discussion about the exclusion of student evaluations as a criteria

for evaluating teachers, which was part of the policy previously. Barbara Cherry, a media law professor, said student evaluations are not as accurate of a way to assess teaching as they used to be when the policy was implemented. “There are less people who respond now, and the ones who are responding are either very positive or negative,” Cherry said. Cherry said in her unit, faculty members use peer evaluations as a way to assess each other more accurately in addition to student evalua-

tions. Dennis Groth, vice provost for undergraduate education, said the University Faculty Council, which represents all seven campuses, put together a joint task force earlier this year to review the Online Course Questionnaire and the process of student evaluations. Groth said the results should be ready by the end of the year. McLeod said she will take into consideration these arguments as she and her colleagues make revisions to the promotion and tenure policy for the next meeting on Nov. 19.

Matt Rasnic Editor-in-Chief Christine Fernando & Ty Vinson Managing Editors

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Citizens Police Academy visits dispatch center By Sara Kress sekress@iu.edu | @sarakress4

ANNA BROWN | IDS

Elder Justin Longman, a missionary for the Church of Latter Day Saints, stands with a sign Nov. 3 in front of the IU Auditorium. He and several others offered the Book of Mormon to those who arrived to see the musical of the same name.

Missionaries try to reach musical-goers Missionaries handed out copies of the Book of Mormon at ‘The Book of Mormon’ By Carson TerBush cterbush@iu.edu

Many “The Book of Mormon” musical attendees were greeted by Mormon missionaries last week outside the IU Auditorium, cheerfully handing out free copies of the real “The Book of Mormon.” Elder Dallin Smith, a missionary from Boise, Idaho, said rather than protesting the musical, he sees it as an opportunity to spread the word about Mormonism.  “Personally, I don’t feel very offended,” Smith said. “Our church has done a great job of turning this so-called

‘negative’ into a great opportunity to share the truth and what the real ‘Book of Mormon’ is about.” The musical tells the story of two Mormon missionaries, Elder Price and Elder Cunningham, as they go on a mission trip to a village in Uganda and face difficulties helping the residents there. From the creators of “South Park,” the controversial musical satirically makes fun of Mormonism. Freshman Alexis DePaolo said the musical's ultimate message promotes the positive impacts of love and ser-

vice in communities. “I think the overarching story in the musical isn’t necessarily about Mormonism in general, it’s making fun of religions as a whole,” DePaolo said. DePaolo said she and her friend were approached by missionaries on their way to the musical who offered them religious materials.  “I think I found it really ironic because the whole opening song part is about the Mormons being very very persistent about being missionaries,” DePaolo said. Smith said he has seen bits and pieces of the musical and agrees while it is funny, it does not paint an accurate picture of the life of a Mor-

mon missionary. “Not all of it is accurate,” Smith said. “If you want to learn what a real missionary does, we can definitely tell you.”  Smith said the ultimate effect of the musical has been positive because it’s allowed a greater audience to learn about Mormonism. “Our church put out press releases when it won a Tony Award and said, ‘This musical can bring you happiness in the earthly state, but we know that the real 'Book of Mormon' can bring you an eternal happiness and eternal joy,’” Smith said. “I think it’s handled very well, and I think it hasn’t really been a negative.” 

Twelve citizens gathered at the Bloomington Police Station from 6-8:30 p.m. Tuesday to learn about crash investigation at the Citizens Police Academy. Bloomington Police Department Capt. Ryan Pedigo gave a presentation about officers’ responsibilities at crash sites and ways they reconstruct accidents. Pedigo has been a crash reconstructor for six years. “Working backwards and figuring out what caused this and why this wreck ever occurred in the first place I think is extremely interesting,” Pedigo said. Pedigo said there are three different levels to become a reconstructor. There are about six weeks of school that go into the training. Much of it deals with math and physics. “The energy involved in crashes between motor vehicles is just incredible and if you’re into math at all, it’s your thing,” Pedigo said. An accident is usually considered worthy of a report when there is damage or injury on a road. “A lot of people have a misconception that if a motor vehicle is involved then there should be a crash report done and that’s simply not the case,” Pedigo said. Pedigo said officers have a responsibility to protect and preserve the scene of the accident. He said he often tells officers to touch as little as possible at crash sites since objects can be used to determine the speed of impact.

The officers have an app on their phones that allows them to take photos that are uploaded directly into BPD’s cloud storage. Pedigo said officers can never take enough photos. The photos provide evidence for the position of the vehicle, driver and passengers. Pedigo said measurements from the crash site are important for determining what happened. They’re also useful in case officers have to testify in court about the crash. Getting these measurements is what causes road closures. Pedigo said it was important to not rush because once the crime scene is released, it is gone forever. Pedigo showed photos from three non-fatal crashes. He explained how crash reconstructors would view the scene to figure out what happened. After the presentation, the attendees went to the Monroe County Emergency Dispatch Center. BPD responded to about 53,000 calls for service from the dispatch center in 2018, Pedigo said. Pedigo said working at the dispatch center and responding to 911 calls is a job with a high stress level. Dispatch supervisor Amy Wolfe said there are 24 people who work at the dispatch center such as supervisors and people who answer calls. They are trained for three weeks on the basics, such as what language to use and how to operate the computers, but Wolfe said most of the skills are learned on the job.

Kinsey Institute offers continuing education initiative By Kyra Miller kymill@iu.edu | @kyra_ky94

The Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction launched an online continuing education program, which is certified by the American Psychological Association. The program began Oct. 4. These courses can be taken by psychologists for professional credit and by anyone interested in learning more about each topic, according to an IU press release.  The program is led by Jessica Hille, the newly appointed assistant director for education. This initiative is part of Kinsey’s overall mission to promote better understanding of human sexuality and relationships through research, outreach and education, according to their website.  Kinsey faculty designed their lectures based on American Psychological Association standards for people to earn professional credit. This is the first time the Kinsey Institute will offer education for APA credits. Normally, the institute staff attends conferences or organizes events at IU for education opportunities, like the Kinsey Institute Lecture Series, Hille said.  The initiative includes modules on sexual consent, gender, sexuality, dating and casual sex, trauma and love. Lecturers include Justin Garcia, acting director of

the Kinsey Institute, among other IU and Kinsey faculty members. "The Kinsey Institute is a leading source of research and education on human sexuality," Garcia said. "Our new continuing education initiative is an opportunity to share information with those who want to learn more and who otherwise may not have received education and training on sexuality.” 

“The new education program, including the continuing education initiative, will allow us to focus our efforts and provide new educational opportunities to fill critical gaps in knowledge.” Jessica Hille, assistant director for education

The programs are available to the public through IU Expand, a university portal. It costs $30 for courses worth one credit and $40 for 1.5 credit courses. Some current lecture topics include “Beyond binaries,” “The healing power of love: An oxytocin hypothesis” and “Consent and coercion: Sexual assault, sexual coercion and unwanted sex.” All courses currently offered are taught by Kinsey staff or affiliate staff from across the country

MADELYN KNIGHT | IDS

The Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction launched an online continuing education program. The program is certified by the American Psychological Association.

and world. The continuing education program has been in the making for over two years now, Hille said. Hille has led the program since her appointment in August. This program is important because the APA requires continuing education for its members and these courses allow for that, Hille said.

"The new education program, including the continuing education initiative, will allow us to focus our efforts and provide new educational opportunities to fill critical gaps in knowledge," Hille said. In the next months and years, Kinsey will add more lectures to its online portal. In the spring, courses on consent communication

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and consensual non-monogamy will be added to the course catalogue, Hille said. In addition to the continuing education program, Kinsey has partnered with the IU School of Medicine to offer a Human Sexuality and Health Scholarly Concentration for medical students at IU. Kinsey also added a Ph.D. minor in the sexual

science research methods in human sexuality. Other upcoming education initiatives will include a research blog and podcasts. “We are excited and honored to provide this new service and to continue to have a leadership role in encouraging greater understanding and acceptance of sexual and gender diversity," Garcia said. 

Graduating this semester? Rent your cap and gown now. go.iu.edu/capandgown Questions? iudegree@indiana.edu 812-855-3762 Office of University Events and Commencement Services


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Movies set to hit the IU Cinema screen this month By Helen Rummel hrummel@iu.edu

IZZY MYSZAK | IDS

Dr. Imani Perry talks Nov. 4 at a black music panel in the Simon Music Library. Perry is a professor at Princeton University.

Lecturer talks black musical tradition By Helen Rummel hrummel@iu.edu

Imani Perry, author and professor of African American studies at Princeton University, spoke about her new book and black musical tradition Nov. 4 at IU. With guests from departments spanning anywhere from Folklore and Ethnomusicology to vocal performance flooding into the classroom of the Music Library and Recital Center, the event was relocated to a new room to accommodate a larger crowd. Perry spoke about her 2018 book “May We Forever Stand” which discusses the song “Lift Ev’ry Voice and

Sing.” Perry emphasized the song’s significance within Black history but was careful not to define the composition as simply the “Black National Anthem” due to the nuance surrounding the song’s meaning. “The content of the song tells the history in epic terms," Perry said. "It was a way for the people who sang it to write themselves into that history. It is a hero’s journey, but not as an individual’s journey, rather a collective story.” In addition to teaching at Princeton, Perry has studied law and public affairs, jazz studies and gender and sexuality studies. When she began the research for her

book, she chose to focus on the historical significance singing in a religious context. “What was missing was a discussion of the formal rituals of black culture,” Perry said. “I felt that it has been invisible in the field of black studies.” After Perry spoke of her time composing her book, she opened the discussion to audience members who inquired on topics like cultural appropriation. A music theory professor asked about her concerns with teaching "Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing" to her students at the Jacobs School of Music. “I don’t worry about it at all,” Perry said. “If people are

trying to create purpose and unity, I don’t see anything wrong with it.” To conclude, the assorted group of attendees stood in unison to sing “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing” with one another. The sound of the piano at the front of the classroom guided them through the crescendos and fermatas of the piece until the group departed for the night. “I think the power of the song is not in the recordings by and large,” Perry said. “It’s the performances themselves. Even the earliest recordings are not particularly true to the power of the song. Singing along with other people in a ritualistic setting is powerful.”

As the temperature continues to drop and the leaves continue to fall, the IU Cinema is continuing its offerings of viewing experiences for Bloomington residents. With more than 20 showings before the beginning of December, the cinema will feature its usual repertoire of international arthouse pieces, classic action movies and time-honored masterpieces. To kick off November, the IU Cinema is showcasing three films diving deep into the music of the cultures they portray. At 7 p.m. Wednesday, Lily Keber will be attending a showing of her documentary “Buckjumping,” showcasing the culture of dance that permeates New Orleans. Continuing with the theme of cultural dance analysis is the 7 p.m. Thursday showing of the films “The Invisible Sounds” and “Look How Pretty,” a double-feature of documentaries directed by Ana María Arango, who will be present. Lastly, at 7 p.m. Friday, the cinema will screen “Babylon”, exploring the lives of Caribbean immigrants facing oppression in Margaret Thatcher’s England. The film’s lead, Brinsley Forde, will be in attendance. This weekend will also feature action movies spanning more than 50 years of the genre. The 1981 classic “The Clash of the Titans,” featuring revolutionary stop-

motion animation by Ray Harryhausen, will screen at 10 p.m. Friday for $4. The following afternoon, the 1935 film “Captain Blood” will screen at 4 p.m. for free. The film was nominated for five Academy Awards in 1936, including Best Picture, Best Director and Adaptation. The cult classic action film “Miami Connection” will screen at 7 p.m. Saturday. Though initially a critical and commercial failure, this film has since gained a dedicated following of B-movie enthusiasts since its re-release in 2012. The IU Cinema will also feature a number of historical dramas to round out its catalogue. Sunday will feature both parts of Sergei Eisenstein’s cinematic masterpiece “Ivan the Terrible.” Released in 1944 and 1958, these movies revolutionized cinema as both an art form and a language through their use of montages and metaphorical imagery. The film “Mary Shelley” will screen at the cinema Nov. 14, telling the story of the titular author and her husband, and how their relationship would both challenge their deeply patriarchal society and change the world of literature. Additional information on these showings and more is available on the IU Cinema website. Tickets are available for these showings online, at the IU Auditorium Box Office or in the IU Cinema Lobby an hour before each showing.

Petition for female remake of ‘Breaking Away’ circulates By Raegan Walsh ramwalsh@iu.edu

Thousands of fans stand in the bleachers of Bill Armstrong Stadium cheering on the riders as the white flag is flown, signaling the final lap of the 2019 Little 500 women’s race. The pack is narrowed down to three teams: Ski, Teter and Delta Gamma, all fighting for the first place trophy. Ski eventually drops back as Teter and Delta Gamma are the last two teams left cycling around the track. In a whirlwind finish, only .203 seconds determines who is hoisting up the first place trophy at the end of the race. Corrine Miller described racing in the Little 500 last year as the best day of her life. She was only a freshman when her team, Teter Cycling, won the 2019 Little 500. Miller and teammate Erika Wilson both agreed that when the race was over, they felt like they were a part of IU history. A week ago, Miller released a petition calling for a remake of “Breaking Away,” an Oscar-winning movie made in 1978 that was based off of the men’s race. The film tells a fictional story of

four local Bloomington boys, nicknamed “the Cutters” inspired by limestone cutters, who do not attend college and are made fun of by IU students, but are eventually invited to race in the Little 500. The men’s race started in 1951 to raise money for student scholarships. After years of petitioning and campaigning, a women’s race was established in 1988. Previously, the women participated in tricycle races, which Miller said required significantly less skill than what the men endured in the actual Little 500, thus demonstrating the first accounts of sexism associated with the event. In the months following the team’s historic run, Miller couldn’t stop brainstorming ideas about how they could increase popularity and attendance for the women’s race. Race tickets are $35, and they buy someone admission to both races, yet there are historically fewer fans at the women’s race compared to the men’s. Despite the countless hours of indoor and outdoor riding and miles upon

miles of training, Miller was troubled by the fact that after 32 years of the women’s race, people still held doubts about whether women were as qualified as the men. “Male riders and Bloomington residents in general have told me that the women’s race isn’t the ‘real race,’ or that the men’s race is the ‘real race’ or ‘more important,’” Miller said. “I’ve gotten that too many times to be acceptable.” Miller has faced gender discrimination from firsthand experiences, and she knew she wouldn’t be able to sit back and let it go on any longer. According to her petition, Miller states that the creation of a female movie could fuel attendance and interest in joining women’s teams, therefore increasing revenue that funds student scholarships. It would also aid in weakening sexism in women’s sports in general. However, Miller’s idea for the movie is not an exact remake of “Breaking Away,” but it reflects the same general theme of a passionate cycling team breaking away from discrimination and stereotyping.

IZZY MYSZAK | IDS

Bill Armstrong Stadium undergoes maintenance Nov. 5. A petition calling for a remake of “Breaking Away,” an Oscar-winning movie made in 1978 that was based off the men’s Little 500 race, featuring an all-female cast, was released last week.

In 1987, a year before the women’s race was officially established, a group of female Kappa Alpha Theta members attempted to qualify for the men’s race. Though coming close to qualifying, they ultimately fell short of the qualifying time. This action was one of the leading factors in proving that women were just as

capable to cycle in the race as men. Miller proposes that this story would increase awareness for women’s cycling and believes many people would be interested in seeing a film adaptation. The petition has almost 300 signatures to date. It can be found here. “The ultimate goal would be for them to remake a mov-

ie, but that would take time and money,” Miller said. “So, the first goal is to just start the conversation. We hope that it will inspire women to join teams, inspire people to go to the women’s race and attend female sports and then hopefully remove some of the unconscious sexism that is in a lot of people’s minds.”

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IDS Personalized News Updates

Purchase tickets at 812-855-7433 or operaballet.indiana.edu


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Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

» CHARITY

» ESKENAZI

the state of healthcare,” Lempert said. The organization buys from different medical debt holders who work with collection agencies within places like hospitals, clinics or ambulance groups. They purchase the debt that is the least likely to be paid off, often coming from people with chronic illnesses or people below the poverty level.   Lempert said the process of buying and forgiving the medical debt takes an average of six weeks, depending on when the organization buys the debt.  Phil Schuman, IU office of financial literacy director, offered some suggestions to keep in mind when having a pricey trip to the doctor.  He said that if the patient makes the doctors aware they have outstanding medical debt, they are able to try to negotiate the bills to be a lower cost.  “The worst thing they can say is no,” Schuman said. 

experiences manager. Daugherty said in art therapy, participants use the creative process to reflect on personal and shared experiences, expressing them through art. “We’re taking objects that other people have made and poured their souls into and finding how those are relevant to lives now,” Daugherty said. “It makes you spend more time with a work of art.” Other renovation highlights include the construction of the Nancy and Bill Hunt sky bridge overlooking the atrium, as well as a conservation department with a painting conservator. Visitors will be able to see the conservation process through glass windows. From the outside of the building looking in, paintings will be visible during certain times of the day thanks to the installation of blinds in the exhibitions,

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

» ELECTION

did not require an election Tuesday. He was unopposed for the position after primary candidate Amanda Barge dropped out in March following an Indiana Daily Student investigation into sexual harassment allegations against her. Hamilton said he is looking forward to working with the new council candidates and handling both the challenges and positive aspects of the job. “I’m gratified and excited for the next four years,” Hamilton said. Because he did not face

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 In an interview, Smith said his plans as a council member include being available to citizens at community events and finding new ways to bring green policy to the city. He said he wants to continue with his career in social work for another year or so until he is eligible for Social Security and can then put even more of a focus into his council position instead of working full time. Hamilton’s mayoral position was among those that

Horoscope

LYDIA GERIKE | IDS

Julie Ribits works on restoring a painting Nov. 4 during a tour of the Eskenazi Museum of Art. The museum will officially reopen Nov. 7.

instead of tinted windows. The building was built in 1982 and was designed by I. M. Pei, one of the architects of the Louvre Museum in anyone else, Hamilton did not go through the amount of debate and public discussion usually found in mayoral races as candidates go headto-head in front of voters. He said he plans to dive into plans for his new term soon. “I think in the next weeks and months it’ll be a good time to talk about the next chapter or two,” Hamilton said.  Sgambelluri came in around 7:30 p.m., and the Democrats came up to congratulate and hug her. As she stood in the middle of

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 7 — Indulge romantic dreams, especially when current realities don't match your vision. Find out what's required. Once you see what's underneath, you can build it stronger. Persist.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 9 — Articulate your vision and share it far and wide. Provide clear, simple arguments, illustrated persuasively. The excellent work you've been doing is getting attention.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is an 8 — Illustrate your vision for domestic renovations. Imagine possibilities and research potential options. Make a dream board to collect creative ideas. Share with your household.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 9 — Discover an excellent, innovative idea. Consider potential costs. Obsess over the details, and don't get your hopes too high. Advance and adapt on the fly.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is an 8 — Heed expert advice, even when you don't agree. It may not look like it, but conditions favor personal advancement. Persistent practice pays off. Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 6 — Share dreams and aspirations. Imagine your desired results as already achieved. Picture something seemingly impossible as realized. Rest and recharge. Organize and plan.

BLISS

HARRY BLISS

Paris. The museum, which houses over 45,000 objects, is among the best in the country, comparable to the the room to give her speech, she said she felt a little overwhelmed, noting the 17 unread texts she had on her phone. She talked about her opponent raising tens of thousands of dollars and still losing, which she said showed people trusted her to make Bloomington better. “At the end of the day, money matters a lot less than that,” she told the crowd. In an interview after her speech, Sgambelluri reemphasized her desire to help vulnerable populations and focus on Bloomington’s ecoTaurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 7 — Reach out to your networks for support with a challenge. Long-term dreams for a group project can be achieved with disciplined collaboration. Articulate and share. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Today is an 8 — Heed the voice of experience. Keep your own score. Maintain budgets and timelines. Strengthen foundations and structures. Disciplined efforts can help you realize a dream.

Harvard Art Museums. Carney commented on the effect the museum will have on the student body. “The university is a place,

through this museum, that can help students find inspiration of thought from somebody that may have lived 300, 400 years ago,” Carney said.

nomic health. Sgambelluri, who works for the College of Arts and Sciences at IU, said she plans to weigh IU interests equally with other local businesses. She also wants to find ways to incentivize green behavior such as using cars less often. Steve Volan, a current council member for District 6, came to the watch party just hours after being hospitalized with a kidney stone. “This is an important day,” Volan said. “It’s Election Day.”  He was supposed to canvass after attending a funeral in the morning, but the kidney

stone pain began to hit right around when he would have started. After being discharged earlier in the evening, Volan showed up still wearing his hospital wristband and a Tshirt supporting Sgambelluri, with whom he went to high school and is still friends. They joked throughout the night about how Sgambelluri had to wake him up in government class.  “Of course I’m all behind her,” Volan said. “She’s very disciplined, she’s very introspective and she’s going to make a great public servant.”

Cancer (June 21-July 22) Today is an 8 — Figure out how to pay for a dream exploration. Nebulous possibilities take shape with focused action. Consider angels, ancestors and future generations. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is an 8 — Put your talent to work for a team effort. Work out budgets and benefits. Keep your wits about you. Ask for more and get it.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is an 8 — Engage in creative partnership. Make plans to realize a shared dream. You can find the resources. Articulate in detail the long-term results you'd like. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is a 7 — Listen and learn. Share your health and work concerns with someone who always tells the truth. Look at a challenge from a new point of view.

© 2019 By Nancy Black Distributed by Tribune Media Services, INC. All Rights Reserved

Crossword

L.A. Times Daily Crossword 17 20 21 22 23 25 27 29 30 32 34 37 40 42 43 45 47 49

Publish your comic on this page. The IDS is accepting applications for student comic strips for the spring 2020 semester. Email five samples and a brief description of your idea to adviser@indiana.edu by Dec. 13. Submissions will be reviewed and selections will be made by the editor-in-chief.

su do ku

ACROSS

Difficulty Rating: How to play: Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 grid contains the digits 1 through 9, without repeating a number in any one row, column or 3x3 grid.

Answer to previous puzzle

© Puzzles by Pappocom

BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

1 6 10 13 14 15 16 18 19 20 21 24 25 26 28 31 33 35 36 38 39 41 44 46 48 49

Astrological Ram Cleans out badly? __-pitch softball Dry up Old photo hue Equivocate International waters Scrabble vowel value Focus of a modern crisis Branch bit "The Persistence of Memory" artist Teleflora rival Ice Capades setting Word with string or sing Washington post Ulaanbaatar native One concerned with bites South of France? Trifling amount Former NBA exec Jackson "Dumbo" (2019) director Burton Off-leash play area Like many courtside interviews Pine detritus New York Harbor's __ Island "Mad About You" daughter

51 53 54 55 58 59

63 64 65 66 67 68

__ Zion Church Actor Alan Runs Audit Holstein sound Politically diverse ballot ... and an apt description of each set of puzzle circles New Haven alum L.L.Bean headquarters locale River in some Renoir paintings "Voices Carry" pop group __ Tuesday Unaccompanied Lauder of cosmetics

50 52 55 56 57 59 60 61 62

Many an animated Twitter pic Picard's counselor Stops up Vocally Marinated beef dish Harmonize Grammy category Game console letters Member of the opposition Attachment to a car or a boat? Shy Result of Googling Natural table Heist units "How to Get Away With Murder" lawyer Annalise Quick looks Clobber, biblically "Glengarry Glen Ross" playwright Garlicky spread Tonsillitis-treating doc Row Parts of hips 65-Across feeder Texting format, briefly Set for assembly Dallas-to-Memphis dir. Simple top

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14

Fitting Root word? Hot temper Bouncing off the walls Castaway's salvation Lived Slanted page Slant KLM rival Locker room feature Red Square honoree Luxury watch They're poured at bars

Answer to previous puzzle

TIM RICKARD


Indiana Daily Student

6

SPORTS

Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019 idsnews.com

Editors D.J. Fezler and Phil Steinmetz sports@idsnews.com

SOME GROSS TAKES

Losing Michael Penix Jr. for the season is a huge loss for IU football Jack Grossman is a senior in sports media.

I get it; this is not a hot take. Hear me out. The loss of freshman quarterback Michael Penix Jr. to a right sternoclavicular joint injury — shoulder/collarbone in layman’s terms — is a crushing blow for IU football. This is not meant to be a slight against junior quarterback Peyton Ramsey, who will start the rest of the season in Penix’s absence. Ramsey has done a better than fine job filling in for Penix during his two previous injuries this season.  The Cincinnati native has put up strong stats in the seven games he has played in, having thrown for more than 1,300 yards and nine touchdowns this season. Ramsey led IU to its biggest win in decades and perhaps played his best game of his college career in the 38-31 win over Nebraska. In a year where starting quarterbacks have dropped like flies in both college football and the NFL, IU is incredibly lucky to have a guy like Ramsey.  The Hoosier backup has proven that he can be a steady hand behind center who will make smart decisions as a passer. Ramsey will not lose IU any games at quarterback. In IU’s five games against Eastern Illinois University, University of Connecticut, Rutgers, Maryland and Nebraska, Ramsey has had a quarterback rating [QBR] of 97.9, 64.8, 75.4 and 89.9. However, Ramsey has still struggled when the Hoosiers have faced good defenses. IU has only faced two defenses that are ranked in the top 60 of

ALEX DERYN | IDS

Redshirt freshman quarterback Michael Penix Jr. throws the ball Sept. 28 in Spartan Stadium in East Lansing, Michigan. Penix had season-ending surgery Monday.

ESPN’s S&P+ defensive rankings: top-ranked Ohio State and 21st-ranked Northwestern. Ramsey struggled during his playing time in both games, posting a poor 33.6 QBR against the Buckeyes and a 57.4 QBR versus the Wildcats. The IU offense has been efficient against bad defenses under Ramsey, but it has been explosive when Penix has taken snaps, no matter who the

opponent is. Penix proved in East Lansing, Michigan, earlier this season that he can compete with the best defenses in college football.  The freshman completed a school record 20 consecutive passes against the 11th-best defense in the country. Penix was 33/42 for 286 yards and a trio of touchdowns and posted a 93.1 QBR. Against Northwestern, Penix had already thrown for 162

yards in less than a half of play before leaving the game with injury and finished the game with a 92.2 QBR. Why does all of this matter? The Hoosiers are sitting with a 7-2 record with a great chance to get an eighth victory at Purdue to end the season. But without Penix, the chance to win nine or 10 games likely goes out the window. After IU’s bye week, IU faces a pair of the top six

defenses in Penn State and Michigan. Even if Penix played, the Hoosiers likely won’t win in State College. However, IU perhaps has its best shot in years to beat Michigan. A win over the Wolverines would not only give the Hoosiers their first win over the team from Ann Arbor, Michigan, since 1987, but it would also virtually guarantee a nine-win season for just the third time in school

history. There would then be the chance to win double digit games for the first time in program history by winning a bowl game. No matter what happens moving forward, 2019 will go down as a special season for the Hoosiers. However, it likely will be remembered for what could have been instead of how great of a season it was. jegrossm@iu.edu

WOMEN’S SWIMMING AND DIVING

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Things to know before IU opens season IU back home

to take on Texas, Louisville

By Will Trubshaw wtrubsha@iu.edu | @Willtrubs

The long-awaited start of the 2019-20 campaign for IU women’s basketball team is finally here. The Hoosiers are ranked 24th in the country entering the season, just the second preseason Top 25 appearance in program history. Meanwhile, star junior guard Ali Patberg finds herself on numerous preseason award watch lists, with more and more being added each day it seems. Patberg leads a deep and experienced team that is hoping to build off a second-round exit from the NCAA tournament last season. IU begins its quest for another tournament berth Thursday when it plays the Mount St. Mary’s University Mountaineers at Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall. Here are three things to know ahead of opening night. Young stars need to shine immediately. The Hoosiers played their lone exhibition game against McKendree University last Sunday and won in a 109-43 romping. Seven different players scored in double figures, most notably sophomore forward Aleksa Gulbe, who led all scorers with 20 points. Also, sophomore guard Grace Berger tallied 14 points. Both Hoosier sophomores were in the starting

By Bradley Hohulin bhohulin@iu.edu | @BradleyHohulin

CLAIRE LIVINGSTON | IDS

Senior Breanna Wise shoots a layup Nov. 3 at Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall. IU will play Mount St. Mary’s University on Nov. 7 at home.

lineup and will most likely remain there while junior guard Bendu Yeaney recovers from an Achilles injury and head coach Teri Moren determines former center Kym Royster’s replacement at the five. If they can be consistent contributors from the starting lineup, it will alleviate some of the burden off Patberg, who is returning to form after missing significant time due to injury last season, and junior guard Jaelynn Penn, who is dealing with a bout of plantar fasciitis. Send in the mob. Another key for the Hoosiers as they battle the early season injury bug will be the depth of their bench. Thirteen players made an appearance in the exhibition with eight off the bench, and there are a few key players from that group

who will be called upon consistently. Junior guard Keyanna Warthen came off the bench tallying 15 points in 28 minutes, and freshman forward Jorie Allen added 15 points in 22 minutes, while shooting an impressive 60% from the field. Redshirt freshman Chanel Wilson also joined the party with nine points in her first game as a Hoosier. All three will be instrumental for Moren and the Hoosiers as they do battle with ranked opponents like No. 2 Baylor University and No. 8 University South Carolina during early season tournaments. With the addition of Berger or Gulbe to the second unit once Yeaney returns around January, the Hoosiers’ reserves will be among the most formidable in the Big Ten.

Ain’t no Mountain(eer) high enough. Mount St. Mary’s has already played its first official game this season, losing to 13th-ranked University of Kentucky 67-44 on Tuesday. While the final score might not indicate a close game, the Mountaineers only trailed the Wildcats by six at halftime. And compared to the Hoosiers margin of victory over the Bearcats, it was a much tighter game defensively. IU will have to avoid early season trap games against theoretically lesser opponents before heading into games against Power Five teams. Mount St. Mary’s has already proven it can hang with a ranked opponent. The Hoosiers must come out and set the tone that they aren’t messing around this season.

MEN’S SWIMMING AND DIVING

IU to face Texas, Louisville this weekend By Zackary Swoboda zswoboda@iu.edu

No. 4 IU men’s swimming and diving will take on No. 11 University of Louisville and No. 2 University of Texas on Friday at 1:30 p.m. The Hoosiers are 4-0 after defeating both No. 6 Michigan and No. 23 Iowa last weekend. Taking down No. 2 Texas could put IU in a great position, as it could garner enough votes to propel the Hoosiers into one of the topthree spots in the nation.

Even if IU does not defeat Texas, it could still stay within the top-10 teams if they top Louisville. The Louisville Cardinals are currently 2-1. The team started its season with a win against Xavier University with a score of 177-81 but then fell to No. 10 University of Tennessee 150.5-149.5. Louisville rebounded and beat the University of Notre Dame 168-132 heading into Friday’s meet. Although the Cardinals fell to the Volunteers, it was a highly-contested meet, as the

Vols only won by one point. The Cardinals will be racing to try and top as many of the Hoosiers’ and Longhorns’ best swimmers. The Texas Longhorns have stayed a steady No. 2 throughout the season so far with a 2-0 record. Texas has defeated both No. 7 Texas A&M University, 181-11, and newly-ranked No. 17 University of Kentucky, 179-109.  The Hoosiers have the opportunity to shake up the rankings by beating the Longhorns’ top swimmers.  In Texas’ home opener

meet Oct. 25 with Kentucky, the Longhorns claimed the three top spots for the men’s 1,000-yard freestyle. However, first place was claimed by Texas freshman Jake Foster with a time of 9:06.20, beating second place by more than three seconds. IU sophomore Mikey Calvillo claimed second in the men’s 1,000-yard freestyle against Michigan last weekend. Although he lost to the Wolverines, Calvillo’s time was 9:05.93, which would put him in contention to win against the Longhorns.

IU women’s swimming and diving returns home Friday to familiar waters marred by fierce opposition. The two-day matchup against the University of Texas and the University of Louisville will be a three-way battle of ranked schools seeking early-season supremacy. Texas arrives undefeated, including versus a University of Kentucky squad that outpaced IU by 22 points in its first outing Oct. 9. In order to topple the top-10 Longhorns, the Hoosiers will have to rely on former Longhorn commit and IU freshman Cora Dupre. In her first collegiate meet, Dupre won the 100- and 200yard freestyle races and was a part of IU’s first-place 400yard freestyle relay team. Her finish of 49.43 in the 100 was good enough for an NCAA B-cut, moving her closer to an appearance at the NCAA Championships, but Texas has its own speedster to hassle Dupre. Sophomore Julia Cook also earned a B-cut in the 100-yard freestyle with her 49.45 performance against Texas A&M University on Friday. Another pillar for the Longhorns is junior Evie Pfeiffer, who thus far has netted times of 9:52.92 in the 1000yard freestyle, 4:45.14 in the 500, and 2:16.60 in the 200yard breaststroke. Pfeiffer will give IU senior Cassy Jernberg all she can handle in the endurance events, but IU has an edge in the breaststroke courtesy of sophomore Noelle Peplowski and freshman Em-

ily Weiss. Meanwhile, Peplowski and Weiss will race against Louisville junior Morgan Friesen, who has times of 1:02.16 and 2:13.32 in the 100- and 200yard breaststroke, respectively.  The Cardinals’ greatest advantage lies in senior Grace Oglesby, who has dominated the butterfly, jetting to a Bcut time of 1:57.82 in the 200 in Louisville’s defeat of Notre Dame.  As for diving, the Hoosiers may find themselves out of their depth given the onslaught of talent and experience coming to Bloomington. Texas’ Alison Gibson claims a pair of wins in the one-meter dive versus Kentucky and Texas A&M. Louisville’s senior Molly Fears has yet to leave the diving board without a victory through two meets.  While IU’s young divers are sure to make strides as the season progresses, with sophomores Kayla Luarde and Alyssa Wang showing promise in the year’s inaugural contest, this week’s competition appears to be in a league of its own.  As Texas continues its push to the top of the rankings, IU is one of the few groups with the sheer speed to pose a challenge. It will take standout performances in the freestyle and breaststroke to weather Texas’ attack and to expose weaknesses in a Louisville team which matches up very nicely elsewhere.  Regardless of the outcome, this meet should be an accurate depiction of the sort of competition many Hoosiers hope to face in March at the NCAA Championships.

MATT COHEN | IDS

IU women’s swimming and diving will compete in its first home meet of the season Friday at the Counsilman-Billingsley Aquatic Center against No. 8 Texas University at Austin and No. 13 University of Louisville.


SPORTS

7

Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

NATIONAL SPORTS COLUMN

College football superlatives halfway through the 2019 season Bradley Hohulin is a freshman in marketing.

Life of the Party: University of Oklahoma On Oklahoma’s second drive against Kansas State University, quarterback Jalen Hurts threw a screen to wide receiver Ceedee Lamb. Lamb then skittered back to Hurts and flipped him the ball, which Hurts hurled for a 70-yard strike to wide receiver Nick Basquine. Basquine later tried his hand at throwing in another display of trickery, this one leading to an interception. Kansas State secured the 48-41 upset only when replay showed an onside kick recovered by Oklahoma was illegally touched just half a yard short of the requisite ten. The big idea? Even when the victim of a historic upset, the Sooners are insanely fun to watch. They tally just shy of 50 points per game, doing so with a Heismancaliber quarterback that is responsible for more scores than any other individual in the nation. Though their odds of winning a national title are dwarfed by those of the University of Alabama and Ohio State, when it comes to an electrifying hour of football, there is no safer bet than the Oklahoma Sooners. Biggest Glow-Up: Louisiana State University Woah. Is it just me, or did LSU get kind of hot over the summer? Joe Burrow’s 2018 campaign was satisfactory with 2,894 yards and 16 touchdowns through the air, but nobody got whiplash from doing a double take at it. Eight games into the 2019 season, Burrow has nearly matched his yardage total from last year while netting 30 touchdowns, making him

the favorite to win the Heisman Trophy. The past decade has been riddled with promises of explosive offenses and championship contention in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, but only now do these bold proclamations seem to have any substance.  Finishing 38th in offensive production in 2018, the Tigers now boldly stand at fourth in the country. Passing coordinator Joe Brady has cleared up the acne of LSU’s offensive inefficiencies, and Burrow’s eye-catching numbers have turned enough heads to earn LSU the top spot in the AP Poll.  Biggest Flirt: University of North Carolina Entering week five, North Carolina was the quintessential girl next door. A comfortably decent group with an admittedly exciting true freshman quarterback in Sam Howell, but not quite the widespread intrigue needed to inflate the ACC Network’s subscriber pool. Then the plucky Tar Heels came within a twopoint conversion of toppling No. 1 Clemson in Death Valley, cementing themselves as the insufferable flirts of the college football world.  Discounting its drubbing of bottom-dweller Georgia Tech, North Carolina has won or lost each of its outings by a single score. Their defeats have involved a controversial bit of refereeing, a game-winning field goal, a failed two-point conversion, and a sixth overtime. North Carolina is a few crucial moments from being 8-1 or, just as easily, 2-7. Inconsistency in the rushing attack and often sloppy defensive line play has prevented the Tar Heels

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Clemson University offensive coordinator Jeff Scott yells Oct. 12 during a game against Florida State.

from making any serious commitments to greatness. Still, I can not help but check ESPN late on an odd Thursday night just to see what they are up to. Class Clown: Wisconsin Class clowns do two things best — making others laugh and pulling pranks. Wisconsin obliterated its first six opponents by a combined score of 255-29, and viewers guffawed at the losers’ expense. This notably included a 35-14 shellacking of then-No. 11 Michigan, a team notorious for laughable performances on big stages.  Before long, Wisconsin had been anointed the class of the Big Ten West and the sole threat standing in the

way of juggernaut Ohio State. That is, until Illinois kicker James McCourt dealt Wisconsin its first loss with a walk-off field goal in Illinois’ only defeat of a ranked opponent since 2011. Oct. 26, ESPN’s College Gameday broadcast from Brookings, South Dakota. Jubilant fans waved signs on live television thanking Wisconsin for losing to Illinois and souring the appeal of the Wisconsin-Ohio State matchup later that day. The Badgers went on to get thrashed 38-7 by the Buckeyes. Wisconsin gave us plenty of chuckles at the expense of lesser opponents, then pulled the classic jest of imitating an elite squad. For now, the pointing and

laughing continues, just not in the direction the Badgers would like. Most Likely to Succeed: University of Clemson There exists a multitude of reasons why Clemson is in the most enviable position to contend for a title. Chief among them is that the ACC is really, really bad.  Thus far, Clemson has showcased neither Ohio State’s defensive dominance nor Alabama’s offensive proficiency. However, while Alabama must stave off a whitehot LSU for the SEC West and Ohio State faces Penn State and Michigan in consecutive weeks, Clemson’s toughest remaining test comes against none other

than Wake Forest University. From there, the Tigers will battle for conference supremacy against the victor of the ACC Coastal, a division currently led by 6-3 University of Virginia.  Criticisms have been made of quarterback Trevor Lawrence’s supposed sophomore slump, which now consists of a meager 20 touchdowns. The horror. Clemson is still a massive orange steamroller whose path to victory is obscured by a handful of basketball schools.  Even if it is as the lowly fourth seed, fans can expect to see Clemson in the Playoff come December.  bhohulin@iu.edu

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Durham has perfect night in IU season opener win The junior guard scored 21 points. Phillip Steinmetz psteinme@iu.edu | @PhillipHoosier

Junior guard Al Durham moved his left hand down the stat sheet to find his name. Once Durham found his statistics, he sprung up and was alert. Sophomore guard Rob Phinisee couldn’t hold back a laugh as Durham announced how he performed. “Oh, we were seven for seven today,” Durham said. Durham was second on the team in scoring with 21 points as IU men’s basket-

ball secured a 98-65 season opening victory Tuesday night against Western Illinois University. “My teammates were finding me and trusting me to knock down shots,” Durham said. “I feel like I prepared for this moment and it went my way today.” Durham missed the exhibition game against Gannon University last week after sitting out for 10 days with a knee contusion. On Monday, Durham announced he was back to being 100% healthy, just in time for the season

opener. He joined freshman guard Armaan Franklin to make up the starting backcourt Tuesday in game one. Franklin had no problem as the lead guard by himself against the Golden Knights last week, but Durham made his presence felt early and often next to Franklin. With Western Illinois leading 3-2, Durham showcased his offensive potential now in year three as a Hoosier. In a span of 78 seconds, Durham scored seven points. He did it with two mid-range jump shots and a three-pointer. It was the type of shoot-

ing performance IU head coach Archie Miller talked about his team needing from someone if IU was to become a better offensive team. “Al’s an important part of what we do,” Miller said. “He’s played a lot of minutes, he’s a leader on our team. He did the same thing in the Marquette game; he ran our team, played with great tempo, was smart. And, again, tonight was able to make some shots and I think that’s a positive sign for his confidence level.” Even after the hot start to begin the game, Durham continued to show his shooting ability winding down the

first half. Each time he took his shot, he looked confident, expecting it to go in. As IU led 38-22 with 2:26 remaining before halftime, Durham didn’t hesitate to let the ball go. He hit a 3-pointer from the left side then followed it up 34 seconds later with another long-range shot from the center of the arc off a fast break pass from sophomore forward Damezi Anderson. “We talk about it every day in practice, pushing the tempo and just outrunning our opponents really,” Durham said. “So, if we can outrun our opponents for

most of the game, we can run them down.” Last season, it took until the first round National Invitational Tournament matchup with Saint Francis University for Durham to score 20 or more points. It’s only the first game of the season, but Durham already proved he’s capable of carrying more of an offensive load going forward. “I think he did a nice job, obviously, with our team in terms of leading them,” Miller said. “But I think you can tell he’s very comfortable right now in how we’re playing, and he’s got to stay with it.”

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Connect with members of many diverse faiths at idsnews.com/religious Paid Advertising

Non-Denominational

United Methodist

Sherwood Oaks Christian Church

Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors

2700 E. Rogers Rd. 812-334-0206

socc.org/cya facebook.com/socc.cya Twitter: @socc_cya Instagram: socc_cya Traditional: 8 a.m. Contemporary: 9:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Being in Bloomington, we love our college students, and think they are a great addition to the Sherwood Oaks Family. Whether an undergraduate or graduate student... from in-state, out of state, to our international community... Come join us as we strive to love God and love others better.

St. Mark’s United Methodist Church

St. Mark's United Methodist Church

100 N. State Rd. 46 Bypass 812-332-5788

Open Hearts * Open Minds * Open Doors

smumc.church Sunday Morning Schedule

An inclusive community bringing Christ-like love, healing and hope to all. Jimmy Moore, Pastor Mary Beth Morgan, Pastor

Ben Geiger, College Minister

First Methodist Connexion / Evangelical Community Church 503 S. High St. 812-332-0502

eccbloomington.org • cnxn.life Facebook: Connexion ECC Instagram: cnxn.life Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Connexion: Sundays, 6 p.m. Connexion is the university ministry of ECC. We’re all about connecting students to the church in order to grow together in our faith. We meet weekly for worship, teaching, and fellowship as well as periodically for service projects, social events and more. College is hard, don't do it alone! Bob Whitaker, Senior Pastor Adam deWeber, Worship Pastor Dan Waugh, Pastor of Adult Ministries

219 E. Fourth St. 812-332-6396

highrock-church.com Facebook: highrockchurch Instagram: highrockbtown

Fall Hours: 8:45 a.m. & 10 a.m. @ Fourth St. Sanctuary (Classic), 11:15 a.m. The Open Door @ Buskirk (Contemporary) Summer Hours: 9:30 a.m. @ Fourth St. Sanctuary (Classic), 11:15 The Open Door @ Buskirk (Contemporary) Wednesday: 7:30 p.m., Jubilee @ First Methodist Jubilee is a supportive and accepting community for college students and young adults from all backgrounds looking to grow in their faith and do life together. Meet every Wednesday night and also have small groups, hangouts, mission trips, events, service projects and more. Many attend the contemporary Open Door service on Sunday mornings. Lisa Schubert Nowling, Lead Pastor Markus Dickinson, Campus Director

Cooperative Baptist University Baptist Church ubcbloomington.org facebook.com/ubc.bloomington #ITSYOURCHURCHTOO

Sunday: 11 a.m. We are a Bible-based, non-denominational Christian church. We are multi-ethnic and multi-generational, made up of students and professionals, singles, married couples, and families. Our Sunday service is casual and friendly with meaningful worship music, applicable teaching from the Bible, and a fun kids program. Scott Joseph, Lead Pastor

3740 E. Third St. 812-339-1404

Sunday Worship: 10:45 a.m. Meals & Other Activities: see our social media Come visit the most refreshing church in town. We love all students but especially reach out to LGBTQ+ students and allies longing for a college church where you are loved, welcomed and affirmed without fear of judgment or discrimination. You love the Lord already — now come love us too. Free coffee and wifi.

Episcopal (Anglican)

Rev. Annette Hill Briggs, Pastor Rob Drummond, Music Minister

Canterbury House Episcopal (Anglican) Campus Ministry at IU 719 E. Seventh St. 812-334-7971 • 812-361-7954

indiana.edu/~canterby canterby@indiana.edu • facebook.com/ecmatiu 812-361-7954

Sacramental Schedule: Weekly services Sundays: 4 p.m. Holy Eucharist with hymns followed by dinner at Canterbury House

Tuesdays: 6 p.m. Bible Study at Canterbury House 1st & 3rd Wednesdays: 7 p.m. Music & Prayers at Canterbury House Episcopal (Anglican) Campus Ministry is a safe and welcoming home for all people. We are a blend of young and old, women and men, gay and straight, ethnicities from different cultures and countries, students, faculty, staff and friends. The worshipping congregation is the Canterbury Fellowship. The mission of the Fellowship is to restore all people to unity with God and each other in Christ. We pray, worship and proclaim the Gospel. We also promote justice, equality, inclusion, peace, love critical thinking and acting as agents of change in our world.

Mennonite

Inter-Denominational Redeemer Community Church 111 S. Kimble Dr. 812-269-8975

redeemerbloomington.org facebook.com/RedeemerBtown @RedeemerBtown on Instagram Sunday: 9 a.m. & 11 a.m. Redeemer is a gospel-centered community on mission. Our vision is to see the gospel of Jesus Christ transform everything: our lives, our church, our city, and our world. We want to be instruments of gospel change in Bloomington and beyond. Chris Jones, Lead Pastor

Nazarene First Church of the Nazarene 700 W. Howe St. (across from the Building Trades Park) 812-332-2461 • www.b1naz.org

Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday Small Groups : 9:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. & 6 p.m. We are Wesleyan in our beliefs, and welcome all to worship with us. We are dedicated to training others through discipleship as well as ministering through small groups. We welcome all races and cultures and would love to get to know you. Dr James Hicks, Lead Pastor

Mennonite Fellowship of Bloomington 2420 E. Third St. 812-646-2441 bloomingtonmenno.org • Facebook

Sunday: 5 p.m. A welcoming, inclusive congregation providing a place of healing and hope as we journey together in the Spirit of Christ. Gathering for worship Sundays 5 p.m. in the Roger Williams room, First United Church. As people of God's peace, we seek to embody the Kingdom of God. John Sauder mfbjohn@gmail.com

Jimmy Moore, Pastor Mary Beth Morgan, Pastor

Disciples of Christ First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 205 E. Kirkwood Ave. (corner of Kirkwood and Washington) 812-332-4459 • fccbloomington.org

Sunday Worship: 10 a.m. Jazz Vespers: 6:30 p.m. on first Friday of each month As God has welcomed us, we welcome you. With all our differences – in age, ability and physical condition, in race, cultural background and economic status, in sexual orientation, gender identity and family structure – God has received each one with loving kindness, patience and joy. All that we are together and all that we hope to be is made more perfect as the richness of varied lives meets the mystery of God’s unifying Spirit, and we become the Body of Christ. Helen Hempfling, Pastor

Wesleyan (Nazarene, Free Methodist) Central Wesleyan Church 518 W. Fourth St. 812-336-4041

4thstwesleyanchurch.org Facebook: Central Wesleyan Church of Bloomington, Indiana Sunday School: 10 a.m. Sunday Worship: 11 a.m. Evening Worship: 6 p.m. Wednesday Worship: 6 p.m. First Friday: 6 p.m. (Celebrate Knowing Jesus, open mic service)

Email: bloomingtonfirst@icloud.com Mother Linda C. Johnson+, University Chaplain Josefina Carcamo, Program Coordinator Ricardo Bello Gomez, Communications Coordinator Corrine Miller, Ben Kelly, Student Interns Rex Hinkle, Luiz Lopes, Nathan Stang, Music Ministers Jody Hays, Senior Sacristan Crystal DeCell, Webmaster

100 N. State Rd. 46 Bypass 812-332-5788 smumc.church

Sunday Morning Schedule: 9:00 a.m.: Breakfast 9:15 a.m.: Adult Sunday School Classes 10:30 a.m.: Sanctuary Worship 10:30 a.m.: Children & Youth Sunday School Classes

fumcb.org jubileebloomington.org Instagram: jubileebloomington

High Rock Church 3124 Canterbury Ct. 812-323-3333

An inclusive community bringing Christ-like love, healing and hope to all.

9:00: Breakfast 9:15: Adult Sunday School Classes 10:30: Sanctuary Worship 10:30: Children & Youth Sunday School Classes

You've ended your search for a friendly and loving church. We are a bible believing holiness group similar to Nazarene and Free Methodist, and welcome all races and cultures. We would love for you to share your talents and abilities with us. Come fellowship and worship with us. Michael Magruder, Pastor Joe Shelton, Church Secretary

Quaker Bloomington Religious Society of Friends 3820 Moores Pike (West of Smith Rd.) 812-336-4581

bloomingtonfriendsmeeting.org Facebook: Bloomington Friends Meeting Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Hymn Singing: 9:50 to 10:20 a.m. Our unprogrammed religious services consist of silent, centering worship interspersed with spoken messages that arise from deeply felt inspiration. We are an inclusive community, a result of avoiding creeds, so we enjoy a rich diversity of belief. We are actively involved in peace action, social justice causes, and environmental concerns. *Child Care and First Day School provided Christine Carver, Meeting Clerk

Lutheran (LCMS)

Catholic St. Paul Catholic Center 1413 E. 17th St. 812-339-5561 • hoosiercatholic.org

Facebook: Hoosiercatholic Twitter: @hoosiercatholic Weekend Mass Times Saturday Vigil: 4:30 p.m. Sunday: 8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. (Spanish), 5:30 p.m., 9 p.m. (During Academic Year) Korean Mass 1st & 3rd Saturdays, 6 p.m.

Weekday Mass Times Monday - Saturday: 12:15 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday: 9 p.m. St. Paul Catholic Center is a diverse community rooted in the saving compassion of Jesus Christ, energized by His Sacraments, and nourished by the liturgical life of His Church. Rev. Patrick Hyde, O.P., Administrator and Director of Campus Ministry Rev. Dennis Woerter, O.P. Associate Pastor Rev. Reginald Wolford, O.P., Associate Pastor

Unitarian Universalist Unitarian Universalist Church of Bloomington 2120 N. Fee Lane 812-332-3695

www.uublomington.org www.facebook.com/uubloomington Sundays: 9:15 a.m. & 11:15 a.m. We are a dynamic congregation working towards a more just world through social justice. We draw inspiration from world religions and diverse spiritual traditions. Our vision is "Seeking the Spirit, Building Community, Changing the World." A LGBTQA+ Welcoming Congregation and a certified Green Sanctuary. Reverend Mary Ann Macklin, Senior Minister Reverend Scott McNeill, Associate Minister

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Latter-day Saint Student Association (L.D.S.S.A) 333 S. Highland Ave. 812-334-3432

studentview.Ids.org/Home. aspx/Home/60431 Facebook: Bloomington Institute and YSA Society lds.org Monday - Friday: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. We have an Institute of Religion adjacent to campus at 333 S. Highland Ave. (behind T.I.S. bookstore). We offer a variety of religious classes and activities. We strive to create an atmosphere where college students and local young single adults can come to play games, relax, study, and associate with others who value spirituality. Sunday worship services for young single students are held at 2411 E. Second St. a 11:30 a.m. We invite all to discover more about Jesus Christ from both ancient scripture and from modern prophets of God. During the week join us at the institute, and on Sunday at the Young Single Adult Church.

Independent Baptist

University Lutheran Church & Student Center

Robert Tibbs, Institute Director

Lifeway Baptist Church

607 E. Seventh St. (Corner of 7th & Fess) 812-336-5387 • indianalutheran.com

Southern Baptist

facebook.com/ULutheranIU @uluindiana on Instagram

Bloomington Korean Baptist Church

7821 W. State Road 46 812-876-6072 • lifewaybaptistchurch.org Facebook • LifewayEllettsville

College & Career Sunday Meeting: 9 a.m. Sunday

Sunday Worship: 10 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wednesday Night Bible Study: 7 p.m. Lifeway Baptist Church exists to bring glory to God by making disciples, maturing believers and multiplying ministry. Matthew 28:19-20

Barnabas Christian Ministry Small Groups: Cedar Hall 2nd Floor Common Area, 7 - 8 p.m., meetings start Thursday, Sept. 5. We will meet every other Thursday during the school year. Steven VonBokern, Senior Pastor Rosh Dhanawade, IU Coordinator 302-561-0108, barnabas@indiana.edu barnabas.so.indiana.edu * Free transportation provided. Please call if you need a ride to church.

Sunday: Bible Class, 9:15 a.m. Divine Service, 10:30 a.m. The Best Meal You'll Have All Week, 6 p.m. Tuesday & Friday: Service of Morning Prayer, 8 a.m. Wednesday: Second Best Meal, 6 p.m. Midweek Service, 7 p.m. LCMS U Student Fellowship, 7:30 p.m. Thursday: Graduate/Career Study & Fellowship, 7 p.m. University Lutheran Church is the home of LCMS U at Indiana. Students, on-campus location, and our Student Center create a hub for genuine Christ-centered community that receives God's gifts of life, salvation and the forgiveness of sins through Jesus Christ. Sola Cafe is open 9-5 every weekday for coffee and a place to study. "We Witness, We Serve, We Love." Rev. Richard Woelmer, Campus Pastor

5019 N. Lakeview Dr. 812-327-7428

mybkbc.org facebook.com/mybkbc/ Sunday: 10:30 a.m. Friday: 7 p.m. Saturday: 6 a.m. Praise the Lord! Do you need a True Friend? Come and worship the almighty God together with us on Sunday, Fellowship included. We are a Korean community seeking God and serving people. Students and newcomers are especially welcome.

Jason Pak


Indiana Daily Student

OPINION

Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019 idsnews.com

Editors Emma Getz and Evan Carnes opinion@idsnews.com

9

THE ELECTIVE PERSPECTIVE

Beto O’Rourke’s candidacy came to its natural conclusion Max Sandefer is a sophomore in political science and Spanish.

And just like that, another one goes. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas) announced Nov. 1 that he was dropping out of the presidential race. The three-term congressman best known for his near-successful 2018 run against Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) started out strong in the presidential race. Registering a 9.5% polling average nationally at his April 2019 height and raising an eye-popping $9.4 million in his campaign’s first 18 days, his tumble into obscurity should seem like a surprise. Truthfully, it was destined to happen. Nicknamed “Betomania” by the media, O’Rourke propelled to national stardom during the 2018 midterm elections. With viral videos like when he defended NFL players kneeling during the National Anthem and a campaign that raised nearly $80 million, something about him resonated with Texans and the nation. O’Rourke nearly toppled Sen. Cruz in the Lone Star State, losing by a slim 2.6%. He was a rockstar within the Democratic Party as some even wondered if he was the next Kennedy or Obama. Now let’s not get too ahead of ourselves. There’s a fundamental difference between Kennedy and Obama vs. O’Rourke — they won their races. Like him or not, he didn’t make it across the finish line. As someone best known for almost winning a state race, how can anyone expect that to be a selling point for president? Does the Democratic Party really want their torchbearer to be someone who

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Texas representative and former Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke, waves as he arrives onstage Sept. 12 during the third Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign at Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas.

can almost win? Similarly, I can’t help but feel as if his whole campaign just felt so unbelievably fake and contrived. It was almost like it was like a premature “Beto’s Greatest Hits” album from his 2018 race. Skateboarding? Check. In-N-Out? Check. Swearing every once in a while to earn a few news stories? Check check check. He tried to rehash what made him a great candidate for Senate in Texas, not realizing that it doesn’t cut it on the national level. His cooldad, authentic persona was

a big strong suit for him, but it’s important to keep in mind that anyone with a semblance of charm seems down-to-earth compared to Sen. Cruz. Trying to redo his act in 2020 felt like a high school football star reliving his glory days a decade too late. Interestingly enough, the only time O’Rourke truly seemed genuine during the campaign was when he polling at his lowest. When he unveiled his unabashed support of a mandatory gun buyback program in the last

debate, it may have seemed like a final Hail Mary to his fledgling campaign, but it still demonstrated political courage. The idea is used as a boogeyman for the GOP as the party parrots the idea that Democrats want to take away everyone’s guns. The El Paso shooting brought a raw, honest reaction out of O’Rourke, something his campaign had lacked for the most part. In the end, O’Rourke unfortunately learned that he could only capitalize on his newfound national recogni-

tion so much before it hit a wall. Betomania devolved into a Beto-blip until it finally became a Beto-bust. I genuinely don’t know what comes next in O’Rourke’s political career. His old congressional seat is happily occupied by Rep. Veronica Escobar (D-Texas), and he’s explicitly stated he has no interest whatsoever in running for the 2020 U.S. Senate Seat against Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas). In a short interview with freelance political analyst Drew Savicki, he gave me two fea-

sible options for O’Rourke: “run for Senate” or “get a TV job,” adding that “there’s not much a former congressman can do to stay relevant.” And that’s the crux of the issue. At the end of the day, O’Rourke’s only political experience is still just a congressman. Mr. “I’m just born to be in it”’s vanity got the best of him and he flew too close to the sun. Icarus now has two options: cable news commentator or Cornyn opponent. maxsande@iu.edu

EMMA GETZ IT

EVAN’S ESSENCE

Cancel culture isn’t real

A farewell to my experience with a liquid diet

Emma Getz is a senior in English and history.

Former President Barack Obama is the latest of public figures to denounce cancel culture in a recent speech during the Obama Foundation Summit. He didn’t use the exact words, but he spoke to a phenomenon that has been plaguing many others as well — the concept of calling people out for their actions to hold them accountable and tarnish their reputation in the process. His words sound good on the surface, but when it comes down to it, “cancel culture” as described by many does not actually exist. During his speech, he said: “This idea of purity and you’re never compromised and you’re always politically ‘woke’ and all that stuff. You should get over that quickly. The world is messy. There are ambiguities. People who do really good stuff have flaws. People who you are fighting may love their kids. And share certain things with you.” He isn’t necessarily wrong. Nobody can deny that the world is messy and full of ambiguities, and that good people do flawed things. It depends on the scale of the flaw. For example, I disagree with Obama’s authorization of 542 drone strikes, but he definitely loves his kids. Of course, I cannot cancel Obama, even with that damning information. I don’t have the power to do that, no matter how many times I denounce his actions in the Middle East in an opinion column. War criminals, especially those who are former presidents, are generally celebrated for their efforts. Obama doesn’t have to worry about being cancelled. It’s not just about politicians, though. Cancel culture is most often discussed in relation to celebrities. Interestingly enough, most of the celebrities that have been “cancelled” by the internet still have incredibly successful careers, even the ones that

most deserve to have their careers destroyed. Take Harvey Weinstein, for example. He was accused of sexually abusing or harassing more than 80 women, but he still has a social life. A stand up comedian recently dared to stand up to him in public over his actions, and she was kicked out of the bar amid many other patrons booing her and telling her to “shut up.” Despite everything, he still received this show of public support, and the comic was the one punished. Sometimes celebrities are not accused of doing bad things, but they make controversial statements that garner negative attention. Sometimes they create entire stand-up specials around saying things they know will offend others, and then bemoan the results of their audience being offended. In his latest comedy special, Dave Chappelle is quoted as saying “I’m gonna say something that I’m not allowed to say,” before denying and joking about Michael Jackson’s child sexual abuse allegations. This sparked significant criticism, of course, but Chappelle is still the third highest paid comedian in the world. Chappelle isn’t being cancelled. It’s natural to point out and push back against things that are actively offensive and harmful. You can share Obama’s speech denouncing this culture as much as you want, but it is necessary to step back and think about your own intentions in doing so. Who is really hurting in this situation? The people who face abuse and oppression at the hands of the powerful, or famous people receiving their rightful critique? Perhaps the people agreeing with Obama in droves simply want to distance themselves from their complicity. Powerful men are not in danger of being cancelled, and marginalized voices speaking up for themselves are never the enemy. emmagetz@iu.edu

Evan Carnes is a junior in law and public policy.

This semester has been marked by an increase in unpredictability. From constant miscommunications to an overall dread, I’ve unwittingly been searching for a new sense of vitality as I near my 21st year. In doing so, I’ve weaponized my erratic choices into changing the most intimate and prized part of life: my diet. When your life is in a strange or uncomfortable place, altering the consistency and choice of your diet is never the right choice. IDS columnist Tom Sweeney approached me some weeks ago with, by many, a radical idea: what if we drank our food for a week? To preface, I’m someone who needs to eat nonstop to maintain my 160-pound frame, and much of what I consume never sticks to my ribs. This is in large part due to my vegan lifestyle. I only bring it up because it’s relevant, so don’t claim I went on a tangent in describing this detail. Considering my knack for unconventional diets and an unhealthy relationship with self-image, I naturally decided to subject myself to this. This proposed diet included liquid meals made by a company called Huel. Huel is a nutritional powdered food that, when mixed with water, produces “nutritionally complete” meals of 400 calories, with most users eating five servings a day to complete a 2,000 calorie intake each day. This is troubling not only because I feared I would not be eating enough, but because I felt the process was too cold and impersonal. Convening over a warm meal is the essence of human togetherness, and were I to partake, I’d consume 14 fluid ounces of “nutritional goop” while pretending it was common practice.  Many users rely on Huel

COLIN KULPA | IDS

Bags of powdered nutritional drink Huel sit on a desk Nov. 1 in Franklin Hall.

to supply sufficient sustenance for one or two meals a day as it is both filling and “healthy.” Tom surmised that we should eat nothing but Huel for the entire week. I still question if this was necessary, but still, we moved forth with this plan. The first day was splendid. I was full, the Huel tasted good (chocolate being the best flavor) and I felt as though I could keep up the pace with Tom. This trend seemed sustainable at the time but became worrying by day three. The most carnal trait of human nature is the desire to chew. Typing that out makes it sound especially weird, but you could relate if you ate nothing but “goop” for several days. Because of this, and a hypochondrialinked paranoia that my jaw muscles would weaken, I began chewing an unforeseen amount of gum. I didn’t share this with Tom, since he was such a strict adherent to the “nothing-but-Huel” mantra that I was worried he would protest. And plus, it was of minimal caloric value. I gave myself a pass. The other omission that began breaking me mentally was that of caffeine. I drink an admittedly unhealthy amount of coffee, and Tom was opposed to the idea of

consuming it while going through the week. Frankly, I was having none of that. I still lowered my intake to one cup a day in respect to his minimalist wishes. Doesn’t sound like a large change? It sure felt like it. The headaches were especially bad the first day or two but began leveling off soon thereafter. There was no feasible way to remove the drug of caffeine from my life entirely, as the fatigue I endured on one cup was still an exercise in perseverance. By day four, my aforementioned craving to chew on food grew ever stronger. I read online about some individuals who combined Huel with plant milk, egg replacer, and water to produce Huel pancakes. Bingo. Solid food that was still Huel. Tom couldn’t knock me for that, right? The only problem was the egg replacer and plant milk necessary for the recipe. I determined that I could double up on water, and still use the egg replacer in small doses to simulate the same effect, as it was also very low in calories. I know you’re reading this and thinking I’m a cheater, but a change had to be made or I was going to break. And yet, I did the next day. I was on-set of a short film with fantastic food offerings

on site, and I knew I had to break the pattern. I felt five days was an honorable showing having not tried a diet of this sort before. My friends were delighted because I feel they grew tired of seeing me with my Huel shaker and goop. The week was riddled with both inquisitive questions from them as well as derision for my choice to join Tom on his liquid journey. Otherwise, Huel was a palliative experience. It felt good that I could eat nothing but the stuff and meet my needs. I felt leaner and more awake than before and was so enchanted by this experience that I bought more to integrate into my diet to a reasonable degree, and with the option of ditching the goop for solids. The main takeaway is this: Whenever you disrupt such a large section of your life, it is sure to bleed into other parts of it. This is especially true when you’re already in a confusing place. Make no mistake: Huel, while uncanny, is a great option for making up nutrition while on a student’s budget. Just make sure that your use of it, and of any strange diet, comes at a time where your life can handle it. edcarnes@iu.edu

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EMPLOYMENT

Dagwood’s Deli Sub Shop, a 34 year Bloomington icon, is hiring part time help for delivery drivers. Scheduling flexible and accommodating to students! Drivers must have reliable vehicle and insurance & will average $12.00-$25.00+ an hour. Our delivery range is only 1 1/2 Miles! APPLY IN PERSON ONLY at Dagwood’s Deli Sub Shop, 116 S. Indiana Ave., Bloomington. (1 block South of Sample Gates on Indiana Ave.)

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To place an ad: go online, call 812-855-0763 or stop by Franklin Hall 130 from 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Monday - Friday. Full advertising policies are available online. idsnews.com/classifieds

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Thursday, November 7, 2019  

The Indiana Daily Student is an independent student newspaper covering Indiana University, IU sports and the city of Bloomington, Indiana.

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The Indiana Daily Student is an independent student newspaper covering Indiana University, IU sports and the city of Bloomington, Indiana.

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