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Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

Look inside for special offers from Kroger. Find the insert in the IDS print edition each Thursday. FOOTBALL

Football starting QB still unknown By Murphy Wheeler jonmwhee@iu.edu | @murph_wheelerIU

Mum’s the word in the IU quarterbacks room this offseason. Coach Tom Allen, offensive coordinator Mike DeBord and quarterbacks coach Nick Sheridan all have a major secret and they’ve all been doing a fine job of keeping it. That big secret, of course, is who the Hoosiers’ front-runner is for the starting quarterback position. Whenever a question is asked about the situation, Allen, DeBord and Sheridan usually give the same kind of vague, cryptic answers. “I’m not going to get into that.” “We’ll keep that between the staff.” “It’s still an open competition.” Although the battle between senior Brandon Dawkins, sophomore Peyton Ramsey and freshman Michael Penix Jr. has largely been kept under wraps, each candidate has been able to stake their claim so far during offseason practice. It’s made for an intense competition in which Allen and the other coaches have been impressed with all three options. “We’re telling whoever the guy is, ‘I want you to make it obvious,’ and it hasn’t been made obvious yet,” Allen said. “We’re still waiting on that but I will say I am pleased with what the guys are doing. I feel good about where we are and I feel like we have multiple guys that can play, and we all know as the season progresses, you’re going to need a bunch of guys.” Even though the competition has been fierce, it’s also been friendly. Dawkins, Ramsey and Penix Jr. all said they’ve been focusing on improving their own games and encouraging one another during practice. It’s led to each of them getting plenty of reps in practice, getting snaps with each unit and giving the coaches an opportunity to pinpoint each player’s strengths and weaknesses. “It’s a competition but we’re all pushing each other to do great because we all want what’s best for the team at the end of the day,” Penix Jr. said. Dawkins may be the most experienced candidate when it comes to actual playing time on the field but the least familiar with the Hoosiers’ offense. After coming to IU as a graduate transfer from Arizona this April, Dawkins has had the least amount of time out of all of IU’s quarterbacks to learn DeBord’s offense. He showed promise as a mobile quarterback for the Wildcats from 2015 to 2017, throwing for 15 passing touchdowns and rushing for around seven yards a carry and 20 touchdowns in 23 games played. Even though he hasn’t gotten as much practice time in Bloomington as Ramsey and Penix Jr., Dawkins said he’s starting to get used to how Allen and his staff run their program. “It’s very fast-paced,” Dawkins said. “I’ll admit, the first couple of days, I was out here and I was kind of gassed. I was throwing up between drills and trying to get back on my feet. I was just trying to breathe the first couple of days.” On the flipside of Dawkins is Ramsey. He got to learn Allen and DeBord's system quickly as a true freshman in 2017 while splitting time as the Hoosiers’ starting quarterback with Richard Lagow, so a battle for the SEE FOOTBALL, PAGE 6

IDS MATT BEGALA | IDS

Family members help move their student’s belongings Wednesday outside the Teter Quad during move-in week.

153 new students living in lounges By Christine Stephenson cistephe@iu.edu | @cistephenson23

As a record number of new students settle into dorm life, some are left in the limbo of temporary housing. Out of about 8,100 new students, 153 did not have permanent room assignments as of Tuesday, IU spokesman Chuck Carney said. As students begin to cancel their housing contracts, this number is expected to drop below 100

by the end of the first week of classes. Ideally, every student will be living in a dorm room by the end of the fall semester, Carney said. For now, the lounge spaces in dorms are housing up to six students each. “They’re secure, they’re private and they have all the amenities of regular rooms,” Carney said. “They’re just temporary.” Each year, IU plans for about 8,000 incoming students who will

be living in dorms. But as class sizes continue to grow, Residential Programs and Services struggles to keep up with accommodations. “I don’t think this is an unusually high number considering the class size,” Carney said. Michael Nichols, a freshman living in Forest Quad, said the lounges seem pretty accommodating for his floormates without permanent housing. “They’re lucky because they get

the coolest rooms,” he said. “But they’re also kind of not, because they don’t know where they’re going to end up.” Students living in temporary housing were notified weeks in advance and are paying 80 percent of their normal rent, Carney said. “It’s not ideal, but we don’t think it’s a terrible solution,” Carney said. Students waiting for housing assignments will be notified via email as vacancies open up.

Class of 2022 boasts biggest number of students ever as class sizes increase IU’s campus was flooded with new students this week as official move-in and welcome week activities began. 8,100

More than 60 percent of the class received some sort of financial aid.

8, 001

56.8% 7,879

are from Indiana

1,300 There are more than 1,300 underrepresented students, as defined by IU.

7,708

2014

7,683 2015

2016

2017

2018

SOURCE IU NEWSROOM GRAPHICS BY EMILY ABSHIRE AND VIVEK RAO | IDS

3.83 The students’ median GPA is 3.83 and average SAT/ACT score is 1292.

In the incoming class, 4,600 are Indiana high school graduates.

IUPD helps families on move-in days By Joseph Schroeder joemschr@iu.edu @joemschroeder

The Indiana University Police Department assisted students moving into dorms on Tuesday and Wednesday, helping with everything from traffic to emotional parents. This year was the first time that Residential Programs and Services and IUPD had students from odd and even floors move in on separate days. The two groups collaborated on a new policy for incoming students called Unload and Go, meaning families had 15 minutes to unload their cars before being asked by Resident Assistants to move to other parking. Making sure that people get moved in quickly while also not rushing parents can be difficult, but IUPD handled the task well, said Marcy Polk, a parent from Bremen, Indiana moving her daughter into McNutt Quad. “I thought their instructions were very organized, thorough and concise,” Polk said. “I’ve been crying on and off for a month now and

MATT BEGALA | IDS

An IU police officer assists people at a crosswalk during move-in week Aug. 15 between Wright and Teter quads.

I don’t feel stressed. That is very important." Officers who had been training all summer for the

students’ arrival patrolled campus. They wanted to create a welcoming and comfortable environment for

parents. “Traffic is huge on campus right now but there is a lot of emotion as well,” IUPD

Capt. Craig Munroe said. “As soon as students leave SEE MOVE IN, PAGE 6

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Editors Jaden Amos, Lydia Gerike and Peter Talbot news@idsnews.com

Student position could strengthen city relations By Emily Isaacman eisaacma@iu.edu | @emilyisaacman

PHOTOS BY TY VINSON | IDS

Hive is located at 2608 E. 10th St. The restaurant serves breakfast, lunch and dinner every day.

Hive opens on 10th Street By Alex Hardgrave ahardgra@iu.edu | @a_hardgrave

A hive is the safe place for a colony of bees. It’s where they go to be away from the outside world and where they eat their food. The owner of Bloomington’s new Hive restaurant said he hopes it will serve the same purpose for its customers. “A hive is this busy place of a lot of coming and going,” owner Jeff Mease said. Hive, which opened June 5, is located at 2608 East 10th St. The restaurant serves coffee and pastries every day starting at 6 a.m., and customers can order hot breakfast items from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. From 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., they serve lunch and dinner. Their menus can be found online. Mease and general manager Abbi Springer described Hive as “fast-casual.” They hope to get customers their food in eight minutes or less. However, for those who need their food even quicker, Hive offers online carry-out for everything on their menu. Mease is founder and CEO of One World Enterprises, which is the umbrella company behind Pizza X, Lennie’s, Bloomington Brewing Company, One World Kitchen Share and One World Catering and Events. The company has found their niche in creating these businesses, Mease said. “We’re now, in 35 years, the biggest restaurant company in Bloomington but doing it in a way I think feels good.” Hive was formed when Mease was approached by the IU Foundation in March 2017, which wanted to put a new restaurant in the thenempty building. With a hospital nearby and plenty of IU student and staff, the Foundation thought there were not enough places to eat in the area,” Mease said.

Hive sells a variety of foods and drinks. The restaurant also sells small things such as coffee mugs.

Mease said he and people from the IU Foundation discussed concepts and decided upon a place that served healthy food made fresh and quickly. One World Enterprises signed the lease for the building even before they had the concept fully figured out. Mease traveled through New York, Chicago, Miami and other cities visiting restaurants to gather inspiration for what is now Hive.

“We’re now, in 35 years, the biggest restaurant company in Bloomington but doing it in a way I think feels good.” Jeff Mease, Hive owner

“For me, what’s really appealing is this creative aspect of creating a restaurant,” Mease said. “If we can make art and also make it work economically then it works.” While traveling, Mease said he went to many restaurants that offered roast chicken. He came to realize roast chicken was not a common food in Bloomington and

decided to put it as a staple on Hive’s lunch and dinner menu. The restaurant gets chicken that is not genetically modified from an Indiana company called Miller Amish Country Poultry. Hive’s menu includes four international-style bowls like the Churrasco bowl which is steak, jasmine rice, beans and toppings. They also offer sandwiches like the Hot Ham and Cheese. The menu will stay the same throughout the year, but the fresh pies will change with what fruits are in season. One of Hive’s main goals is to be a sustainable and healthy business, Mease said. “Sustainability, the concept, is like a three-legged stool,” Mease said. “I think of all the three E’s of sustainability – economics, environment, and equity.” They avoid offering anything with high-fructose corn syrup, meaning there are no typical soft drinks on the menu. Instead they sell mostly fruit-based drinks. For those still looking for the carbonation that comes with a soda, Hive sells a root beer and cardamom cream

soda. Hive also offers a wide variety of bread, pastries and pies that are baked instore using an organic flour. Mease said the flour is about twice as expensive as regular flour but is worth the cost. “We are all looking for good food – food that is made with hopefully not the bottom-of-the-barrel stuff that you can buy,” Mease said. “Stuff that you pay a little bit more for ingredients and you make better food with it.” Springer added that the restaurant also commits to sustainability by composting, recycling and using paper straws as well as to-go boxes that are not plastic or made from recycled plastic. Hive is crafted so that people can use it for different purposes. Springer said she has seen people come in for everything from lunch meetings to having a beer after work. “There are a lot of opportunities to have different types of experiences here,” said Springer. “That is ultimately what we wanted: for it to be a community space for people to coming and going. Everyone has a different agenda but they can all still be here.”

Student Involvement Fair set for Aug. 20 By Ellen Hine emhine@iu.edu | @ellenmhine

With over 750 student organizations, IU students can join a club or group for almost anything they find interesting. The fall Student Involvement Fair will take place August 20, from 3-7 p.m. in Dunn Meadow. The event will include upward of 400 student groups, university programs and community organizations, said Alexis Fuentes, Union Board Graduate Adviser for Activities and Events. Fuentes said that while the fair mainly caters to first year students arriving at IU, all students are welcome to attend. Fuentes said this year the Union Board plans to put similar organizations, like religious groups or Greek organizations, close to each other to make it easier for students to find what they are interested in. Students will be given a flier when they enter the fair with a map of booths for help navigating around the event. Besides touring booths and signing up for new groups, students can also watch live performances by 10 student organizations. Fuentes said that these per-

As students move into their residence halls this week, the core of IU has returned to campus — and the city of Bloomington. With about 43,000 students and 9,000 employees, IU affiliated people make up approximately half of Bloomington’s population, city council member Stephen Volan said. While high level officials communicate regularly, there are now talks of representing student voices in city affairs as well. “Just the fact that we're having the conversation at all, I think, is a break through and is a positive development,” Volan said. Last spring, the IU Student Association had its first talks with the city government in more than 20 years, said senior Alex Wisniewski, incoming IUSA president. In these meetings, they discussed a liaison role to allow students to give input on city affairs. Pending the approval of both IUSA and the city council, the position could begin as early as this semester. Discussions with the full city council are set to begin as school starts, Wisniewski said, but he plans to appoint this student as a non-voting member of the council. The idea to provide student perspectives on city decisions in part arose from two developments last year: the beverage tax and the armored truck. During the heated debates over the latter, Wisniewski said there was concern among the student body that the truck would be used as a sign of force during student demonstrations. A student liaison position could help clarify these types of problems before they arise, he said. “There’s a plethora of issues that we think students could have a very tangible effect on,” Wisniewski said. While student viewpoints differ from concerns of University officials, Volan said these conversations with representatives of the student body could lead to a better relationship with the University as a whole. The city votes on issues weekly that affect students’ daily lives, Volan said, but many students do not realize how embedded they are in local issues. “If nothing else, if we can show students that they are truly citizens of Bloomington, even as they are students at IU, that would be a big accomplishment,” Volan said. Like many other towngown relationships, the term many officials use to describe the relationship between an institution of higher education – the gown – and its city – the town – Bloomington and IU are interconnected, said Kirk White, IU’s coordinator for city-campus relations. But conflict in towngown relations is common, said Lisa Dvorak, president of the International Town & Gown Association. In general, a higher education institution is primarily concerned with retention of students, which is not necessarily the driv-

ing goal of a municipal government. An annual survey among the organization’s members, who work on either the town or gown side, consistently identifies noise, housing affordability and unavailability, neighborhood conflicts, alcohol and student housing and rentals as common issues nationwide. But the biggest issue, Dvorak said, is establishing trusting relationships. “There is, happily, a very friendly and congenial relationship between the city and the University, working as partners,” said Yael Ksander, communications director for the office of the mayor. There are no legal rules governing relations between IU and Bloomington. However, White said University and senior city leaders talk weekly. Some departments, such as the Bloomington and IU police departments, may interact on a daily basis. The Bloomington Fire Department provides IU’s fire protection. With a $1.6 million operating budget for the Bloomington campus alone, IU is a driving force in the city’s economy. Ksander said the two entities are so fluid, divisions become arbitrary. The two administrations collaborate on some public works projects and joint beautification projects, White said. Most recently, they signed a memorandum of understanding to bring a dockless bikeshare program to Bloomington and campus. Ksander said these relations are largely the product of Mayor John Hamilton’s work since 2016 to conduct regular, official town-gown meetings with high level officials from both sides. Meanwhile, informal conversations between members of the IU and Bloomington communities happen constantly.

“Just the fact that we’re having the conversation at all, I think, is a break through and is a positive development.” Stephen Volan, city council member

But not all parties view these relations so positively. What White described as an “open door, open phone” relationship, city council member Stephen Volan said is largely separate. The Bloomington Comprehensive Plan is notably absent from IU’s 300 pagelong Master Plan, Volan said. And when Bloomington is mentioned, it is merely an acknowledgement that IU is part of Bloomington rather than a reference to city governance, he said. White and Ksander said the University consults the city government ahead of decisions that would affect Bloomington, but Volan said the University does not plan with the city in mind. If the University told the city of its intentions to increase enrollment, he said, the city could plan its housing more appropriately. “To say the very least, I think it should be closer,” Volan said. “But that’s not the nature of the two beasts.”

IDS FILE PHOTO

Groups of students looking for new opportunities flocked to Dunn Meadow for the annual Student Involvement Fair on Aug. 29, 2016. The event has everything from student orginizations to local nonprofits.

formances will give students a chance to see the groups like the Ballroom Dance Club in action before joining. IU’s Union Board also plans to give away free IU T-shirts through a raffle, with drawings every 15 minutes. Fuentes said local food trucks La Poblana Taco Truck, Kebab on Wheels, Pili’s Party Taco and Limestone BBQ will also be selling food at the event. Almost 60 Bloomington nonprofit and volunteer organizations will also be at the

involvement fair, IU Corps director Cassi Winslow-Edmonson said. She said local organizations like the Big Brothers Big Sisters of South Central Indiana and the Conservation Law Center see IU and its students as a major source for potential volunteers. IU Corps facilitates volunteer and service opportunities for IU students with local and global partners. Winslow-Edmonson said IU is a resource for these partners due to the size of the student body.

“It’s a campus goal to make them involved in their society,” Winslow-Edmonson said. She said IU wants to make sure its students remain civically minded during their time at school and after they leave. Bloomington organizations seek out students for their passion, energy and skills, Winslow-Edmonson said. “They have energy, time and talent to give,” WinslowEdmonson said.

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Boy Scouts conference educates, informs By Cameron Drummond cpdrummo@iu.edu | @cdrummond97

Nearly 7,000 delegates and staff members of the Order of the Arrow, the National Honor Society of the Boy Scouts of America, descended on IU’s campus from July 30 to Aug. 4 for the 2018 National Order of the Arrow Conference. The conference, which usually takes place every two years, is designed to bring together members of different Order of the Arrow lodges from around the country to participate in outdoor and adventure activities. Justin Wilson was in the Order of the Arrow when he was a boy scout, but his role during this year’s NOAC was to try and educate and inform those attending the event of bias and discrimination within BSA, as well as ways to combat that prejudice.

“We’re providing a space that boy scouts should be providing, but have yet to do.” Justin Wilson, executive director of Scouts for Equality

Wilson is the executive director of Scouts for Equality, a nonprofit organization started in 2012 in response to a BSA ban that then-existed against “open or avowed homosexuals.” He said the catalyst for the creation of SFE came in 2011, when Zach Wahls, a boy scout from Iowa, gave a speech to the Iowa Legislature in opposition to a ban against samesex marriage that was being

considered by the legislature. The speech by Wahls, who is the son of two lesbians, was recorded, uploaded to YouTube and went viral shortly afterward. Wahls was also an Eagle Scout, and he teamed up with a former National Chief of the Order of the Arrow to start SFE. Wilson, also an Eagle Scout, joined SFE in 2012 and started by working in his hometown of Dubuque, Iowa. After spending time as SFE’s National Grassroots Director, and following policy changes from BSA, Wilson became the executive director of SFE after Wahls stepped down. One policy change came in 2013, but wasn't effective until 2014, and rescinded the ban on homosexual youth in the program, while another policy change in 2015 rescinded the ban on homosexual adults. This year’s NOAC is the first for SFE, after the organization was also at the 2017 National Scout Jamboree as a guest of the United Church of Christ. However, the group was not allowed to have an official presence at NOAC. After having conversations with Doug Bauder, director of IU’s LGBTQ+ Culture Center, as well as Nicky Belle, director of IU’s First Nations Educational and Cultural Center, in the weeks prior to NOAC, SFE was able to operate out of the LGBTQ+ Culture Center on Seventh Street during the event. “We’re providing a space that the boy scouts should be providing, but have yet to do,” Wilson said. “We’re on the outside looking in. We would very much like to work with the boy scouts in some way,

but up to this point they’ve been unwilling to do so. At something like this, NOAC, we asked to be part of it and weren’t allowed to be part of it, so we created an unofficial presence right next to it and kind of got the word out on our own that we’re here unofficially.” The LGBTQ+ Culture Center was turned into a “Rainbow Cafe,” a term given to SFE by the international scouting community at previous jamborees, during NOAC. While SFE is focused on BSA, WIlson said the organization networks and makes its resources, including a special patch called the Inclusive Scouting Award, available worldwide. During NOAC, SFE members operated during business hours in the culture center, setting up on the front porch with free items like bracelets, stickers and, of course, patches, while also engaging in face-to-face dialogue with NOAC participants about their experiences in BSA. “We’ve been overwhelmed by the receptiveness of the scouts here,” Wilson said. “I was very worried that we’d have few, if any, visitors, being here unofficially. But we put up a bunch of signs and balloons and rainbow colors and people notice and they’ve come up and talked to us. We’ve been promoting our presence on social media and we were surprised to see scouts were then taking it upon themselves to tell people.” Belle also engaged NOAC participants, as well as SFE members, during their time in Bloomington regarding BSA’s use of native symbols and native-related events and

practices. He went to events featuring native symbols and practices and also met with senior leadership in specific areas regarding the events. “Our whole thing is education,” Belle said. “This is a perfect opportunity to try to educate and engage people in dialogue, talking about not only the real devastation, the effects that colonization and colonialism has and had on native people in this area, but also the importance of engaging in dialogue with contemporary native communities.” This was also Belle’s first time working with BSA within NOAC as director of the First Nations Educational and Cultural Center. He said BSA youth he’d spoken to had

“They just keep coming because these guys are out front and the porch is just festooned with colorful balloons and literature.” Doug Bauder, director of IU’s LGBTQ+ Culture Center

been receptive to potential changes, particularly regarding aspects of native regalia used in the ceremony portion. “As you see youth and adults engage in using native imagery, saying that their work is to honor native people and native histories, we’ve been trying to impress upon people the real importance of learning those histories, learning the real history,” Belle said. “Native history isn’t just those war bonnets. Native history, particularly in Indi-

ana, is genocide, is removal, is cultural oppression." At the LGBTQ+ Culture Center, Bauder and Wilson said several hundred people stopped by the center and engaged with SFE in the first couple days of NOAC, compared to just a handful of people who came in 2009 when NOAC also took place at IU. “They just keep coming because these guys are out front and the porch is just festooned with colorful balloons and literature,” Bauder said. “It’s one of the most significant educational opportunities we’ve had on a quiet summer week.” There were no formal programs as part of SFE’s presence at NOAC, according to Wilson. He said interactions with NOAC participants were more about having casual conversations and making sure the participants know they are loved and welcomed. “What we’re able to do at an event like this is to directly share those inclusive scouting patches, be able to have conversations about what does it mean to be a leader in the boy scouts,” Wilson said. “You might only be 17 now, but when you become an adult how can you help us continue to push the culture of the boy scouts?” When engaging with BSA members, Belle wants to make sure conversations are taking place with contemporary native communities to avoid cultural appropriation. He said those conversations are lacking, but he had a positive experience interacting with people during NOAC. “There have been many people who have been very, very open to having discus-

Left Eric Busse, training and volunteer engagement director for Scouts for Equality, talks to boy scouts July 31 on the porch of the LGBTQ+ Culture Center. Busse became an Eagle Scout in 2009. Middle Streamers, a pride flag and the official crest of Scouts for Equality is pictured July 31 outside the LGBTQ+ Culture Center. The Boy Scouts of America ended its ban against openly gay members in May 2013. The ban had previously been in place since 1978. Right A sign for Scouts for Equality is pictured July 31 outside the LGBTQ+ Culture Center. SFE is a non-profit orginization dedicated to ensuring the Boy Scouts of America is open and inviting to America’s young people, according to the SFE website.

sion with me and sitting down and talking with me and hearing my feedback,” Belle said. “When people often think about the boy scouts and the Order of the Arrow, they often think about the cultural appropriation aspect of it. It’s the people in war bonnets who have no idea what they mean. People in costumes who are playing Indian, parading around campus.” Belle said his ideal result would be for the aspects of BSA that don’t engage contemporary native communities or don’t encourage youth to learn the histories of tribal groups to be removed from use. Wilson’s focus is providing support to BSA members who feel the organization isn’t giving it to them. “We’re the group to make sure that, even if it’s only once a year, there are people that are out there that care about them, that want them to be here in scouting,” Wilson said.

Surprise: I-69 completion in Monroe County delayed From IDS reports

Construction along I-69 Section 5, will not meet its goal of substantial completion by Aug. 31, according to a press release from the Bloomington Department of Public Works. Roadwork will continue to cause delays for motorists through

the end of 2018. I-69 Section 5 has been under construction since 2014 and is a project of the Indiana Department of Transportation. INDOT reported the delay to the Bloomington/Monroe County Metropolitan Planning Organization Aug. 10. “After years of continu-

ing delays, we were hoping for better news from INDOT,” Bloomington Mayor John Hamilton said in the press release. To accommodate increased traffic during IU student move-in week, there will be four lanes open to traffic, two northbound and two southbound from

south of Fullerton Pike to between Sample Road and Chambers Pike. INDOT has also adopted an accelerated schedule, working 16 hours a day and six days a week. Starting in mid-September, intersection construction at State Road 46/State Road 37 could limit traffic NT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEA MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORT H &LOOKING FEATURES MULTIMEDIA FOR NT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEA MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORT H & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEA MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORT H & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEA MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORT H & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEA MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORT H & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEA MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORT H & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEA MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORT H & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEA idsnews MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORT H & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEA @idsnews MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORT H & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEA idsnews TERTAINMENT OPINION IN D N DEPTH & FEATURES MULT MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORT @idsnews H & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEA MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORT H & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEA MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORT H & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEA MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORT H & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEA MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORT H & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEA MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORT H & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEA MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORT H & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEA MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORT H & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEA

to one lane for eight weeks, according to INDOT’s presentation. The project was initially planned to be completed in 2019. INDOT also announced that it will coordinate with IU Athletics to ease congestion the lane restriction would cause during home football games.

“While construction continues we urge the university community to plan ahead, be patient and allow extra travel time,” said Kirk White, Indiana University Assistant Vice President for Engagement in the press release. Peter Talbot

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Editors Emma Getz and Ethan Smith opinion@idsnews.com

SELON SMITH

ILLUSTRATION BY MADELYN POWERS | IDS

This teenage candidate has a point He ran for governor (and lost) at 14, but his platform illuminates a new generation’s ideals Ethan Smith is a junior studying political science.

As of Tuesday Christine Hallquist won the Democratic primary in Vermont. One of her opponents Ethan Sonneborn, however, captured public attention because he wasn't even old enough to vote. Although he did not win, his candidacy has proven the need for other candidates to listen to the youngest generation. He was running on an incredibly progressive platform, focusing on universal healthcare, non-discriminative employment for members of the LGBT community, stricter regulations on carbon emissions, a higher state minimum wage and re-

formed education. The most attention that he has gotten has been about his age — for obvious reasons. However, he announced his candidacy long ago, and by now his age should be old news. “I think Vermonters should take me seriously because I have practical progressive ideas, and I happen to be 14, not the other way around,” Sonneborn said during a televised forum. Sure, this was new, exciting and maybe even a little funny. But nevertheless, Sonneborn has gotten the attention he needs to let his voice be heard; now it is our turn to hear what he has to say. Even though he has now lost the party’s bid for the

gubernatorial race, he has provided the world with a unique opportunity for a loud voice to come from his generation, where it would not otherwise exist. Hallquist and Phil Scott, incumbent governor and Republican nominee, ought to take this opportunity to tailor their platforms to speak to the youngest generation, even if they are too young to vote. Sonneborn received over 8 percent of the votes in the Democratic primary race, which is enough of the population to show that he got through to people. On his website he advocated for stricter gun laws. He claims that his generation is often targeting, and that he can provide a stronger voice to protect them.

"It's a culture that I respect," he said, "but if it's making the decision between letting my friends have a good time at a firing range and them possibly being involved in a school shooting, I'm choosing legislation to protect them from that school shooting.” Considering this, the least that the current nominees can do is listen to his call to action and recognize the importance to protect that generation. Furthermore, voters and politicians alike need to use him as a strong voice coming from his generation to be able to adequately represent those who cannot yet vote on their behalf. Sonneborn claimed that a major reason for his can-

didacy was because he saw “apathy from young people in (his) community.” He advocated for youth political engagement and active environmental protections, because he knew that it affected his generation the most. This has provided the perfect opportunity for other government representatives to verbally recognize the needs of young people and make it a point to add it to their policy agendas. Instead of gawking at the fact that Ethan Sonneborn is unusually young to be running for this position, let us notice the importance of it and make it a point to hear the needs of the next generation. smitheta@indiana.edu

MATT-ER OF FACT

CALLOUTS WITH CARSON

Federal district court ruling makes it easier to profit from child porn

‘Mamma Mia!’ is important

Matthew Waterman is a junior in jazz studies and theater & drama.

The deceptively-titled Free Speech Coalition, which is actually the largest American trade association and an advocacy group that works on behalf of the pornography industry, has been handed a big win by U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson. While it is a win for the porn industry, it is a huge loss for children. Along with a handful of other plaintiffs connected to the porn industry, FSC successfully sued to loosen the record-keeping obligations imposed on porn producers by U.S. Code Section 2257, and to lighten the penalties associated with breaking those obligations. Here’s what that means for the porn industry in practical terms: 1. “secondary producers” no longer need to obtain and keep age verification records for the performers in their materials, 2. the records that do have to be kept by primary producers will not be as strictly defined and 3) the maximum penalties for violating the record-keeping obligations in Section 2257 (formerly up to five years in prison) must be lowered. “Secondary producers” includes online porn sites such as PornHub, one of the most visited sites on the

internet. The “primary producers” are the companies that create the porn those websites display. Nowadays, it’s secondary, not primary, producers that rake in big profits. The District Court’s ruling removes a barrier to the display of child porn online. Previously, secondary producers had to obtain verification from primary producers that the performers in their materials are all 18 or above. Now, those secondary producers are totally off the hook. If studios are willing to run the risk of exploiting minors in their content, porn sites can post it without knowing or being liable for the performers’ ages. Section 2257 is a necessary (but not sufficient) law to prevent the production and distribution of child porn. The Free Speech Coalition, extremely well-funded by the $97 billion-dollar porn industry, has been in the courts attempting to weaken 2257 for 14 years. The FSC, which pretends to care deeply about preventing child porn, calls Section 2257 “unnecessary and burdensome.” If FSC had its way, 2257 would be repealed entirely. The absurdly large mega-corporations at the top of the porn industry, like MindGeek, need to be more heavily regulated.

This is especially true in light of the fact that a huge portion of their content is pirated or stolen, so the ages of the performers and the conditions under which the content was made are entirely unknown. Even though stricter regulations to prevent the production and distribution of child porn may sound like a popular idea, it’s surprisingly difficult to enact. This is largely because it requires taking on the porn industry, which has more than enough money to flood the courts with lawsuits via the FSC. The porn industry itself is also a vastly under-discussed issue. In part, that’s because sexual taboos prevent porn and other related topics from being discussed in some mainstream media. In keeping with the usual lack of attention, the only locatable online media coverage of the District Court case that is the focus of this column is from AVN, the trade magazine of the American porn industry, and XBIZ, another news outlet devoted to the porn industry. Hopefully, the Department of Justice will appeal Judge Baylson’s decision, and the justice system will put the welfare of minors ahead of the porn industry’s profits. matwater@indiana.edu

Carson Henley is a sophomore in media.

Having seen "Mama Mia!: Here We Go Again" five times now, I can say with absolute certainty that it is more than just hype and Swedish pop ballads. Yes, I am the girl who hasn’t been able to shut up about its release since April, and yes, I have had a soft spot for ABBA since I discovered their gaudy angst-packed music videos in middle school, but this film goes far beyond that. Naturally, I have a lot of surface level praise to give. Christine Baranski and Julie Walters in “Angel Eyes” forced me to reevaluate everything I thought I knew about love and proved that when we put women over 60 on the screen in roles more dimensional than “old,” they will steal the show. Amanda Seyfried is still perfect and now we know Lily James is, too. The “Waterloo” number was the most impressive and visually pleasing media content my brain has ever processed. Admittedly, it has flaws. Donna shames herself for her active sex life, the cast lacks in diversity, and in writing a second movie that is equal parts prequel, sequel and a compilation of ABBA’s greatest hits, plot holes were inevitable. Despite that, the film holds an important message. Donna Sheridan (Lily James) is a female protagonist in a coming of age story that not only passes the Bechdel test, but has a female at the center of nearly every scene. Donna sets out on her own, gets help from her girls

MOVIESTILLS DATABASE

“Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again” was released July 20, 2018 and stars Amanda Seyfried.

through the rough patches and eventually raises a daughter set on realizing the dream that her mother did not live to see. The film is a study in girl power, from the strength of an individual women, to the power and consistency of over twenty-five years of female friendship, to the magic of the relationship between mother and daughter. From start to finish "Mamma Mia!: Here We Go Again", portrays women supporting each other, making sacrifices for each other, choosing love over bitterness, pursuing what they want and being strong. Tanya emphasizes that they should be “bolstering” each other throughout the film, which is her highbrow way of saying “girls support girls” and the newest addition to my personal lexicon. And bolster they do. The women pull through for each other time and time again. Rosie does not pursue Bill because and stays on the island to make Donna feel better, despite the fact that Bill is attractive and has a boat, and

if that does not prove her undying loyalty to her friend, I don’t know what does. Sophie stays so loyal to her mother’s memory that she puts her own relationship on the line. Even the old Greek woman who doesn’t get a name gets a story line wherein she takes Donna under her wing, helping her with housing, men and eventually childbirth. This is perhaps what I envy most about the "Mamma Mia" world. Not the breathtaking views of Greece or the easy access to the Mediterranean. Not the ability to burst into a choreographed ABBA musical number at any moment without the boy I like so much as blinking an eye. But a world wherein bolstering is everywhere, not just in words, but in actions. My greatest takeaway from "Mamma Mia!: Here We Go Again" was not that if I cannot think of an ABBA song for any situation I am not thinking hard enough, but rather that a world of bolstering is a world I want to live in. Go forth and bolster. cehenley@indiana.edu


Indiana Daily Student

SPORTS

Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018 idsnews.com

Editors Murphy Wheeler and Stefan Krajisnik sports@idsnews.com

5

FOOTBALL

NOBLE GUYON | IDS

Then-junior kicker Griffin Oakes attempts a field goal for IU against Penn State in 2016. Oakes graduated after the 2017 season, leaving a starting kicker position open for the Hoosiers.

Hoosiers still searching for starting kicker By Murphy Wheeler jonmwhee@iu.edu @murph_wheelerIU

The siren on IU Coach Tom Allen’s bullhorn was on repeat Monday morning. With every press of the button, Allen filled the air around the IU football practice fields with a highpitched, screeching sound. Up close and personal with that blaring noise were two kickers — junior Logan Justus and freshman Charles Campbell. As the two practiced kicking field goals in lategame situations, Allen would get directly behind their heads and let the siren blare time and time again, giving each attempt more of a game-like atmosphere. It’s a standard practice drill for the Hoosiers, but it’s also one they might need to utilize a little more often than they have in the past as the 2018 season approaches. After losing a former two-time Big Ten Kicker of

the Year in Griffin Oakes this offseason, IU has been left with an inexperienced group of kickers that have combined for zero in-game collegiate field goals attempts. That’s why Allen and his staff have made it a priority to get those kickers comfortable and confident with game-like backdrops that will feature the raucous sound of thousands of screaming fans. “We all can kick and we all can do our job when it’s 70 degrees and sunny,” IU Special Teams Coordinator William Inge said. “But when the heat is turned up and everything is on the line and you’ve got 100,000 fans screaming against you, can you still have that same composure, that same calmness to execute the muscle memory that it needs to still be able to put that ball through the goal posts.” Now, the Hoosiers find themselves in the midst of a battle for the starting

field goal kicker position in which Justus and Campbell are duking it out for the top spot on the depth chart, while sophomore Jared Smolar is looking to secure a spot as the starter for kickoffs. As of right now, both Allen and Inge said there is no clear front-runner when it comes to field goal duties. “We’ve got several position battles and that’s a very intense one,” Allen said. “Right now, coming out of the scrimmage, I felt like Logan and Charles had kind of become the two frontrunners for that position for field goals. We’re charting every kick and trying to apply pressure and want to see somebody separate themselves there.” Out of the three main candidates, Justus is the most familiar with IU. The McCordsville, Indiana, native redshirted as a walk-on in 2015, but did not see any game action in 2016 or 2017 while serving as a reserve

behind Oakes. Meanwhile, Campbell is the most-heralded prospect of the kicking group and is the only one of the three candidates on scholarship for the Hoosiers. The freshman from Jackson, Tennessee, comes into his first season as a three-star recruit and also took part in the U.S. Army High School AllAmerican Bowl during the offseason. “He has great drive and great lift on the ball,” Inge said. “That’s what makes him special because that ball gets great lift right now. Individually, up front, the PAT or field goal block unit, if they do get pushed, he can get enough lift on the ball to where the ball’s got a chance to get through the uprights.” Joining Justus as a player with college experience in the group is Smolar, who is a transfer from Rutgers and has the most experience out of any of IU’s kickers. Although he never attempted an in-game field goal, Smo-

lar did play in the Scarlet Knights’ first three games as a freshman in 2016. In those three games, he totaled 21 kickoffs with an average of 55.1 yards. That experience seems to be working in his favor as Allen said Smolar is the frontrunner for handling kickoff duties in 2018, especially since Allen said he wants to separate field goal and kickoff duties this season. “I would definitely push toward that direction with him,” Allen said. “That’s one of his strengths and an area he has definitely done a good job at in the past and we need him to do that as well.” With nobody distancing themselves when it comes to field goal duties yet, Inge said one approach the Hoosiers might look at is rotating their kickers this season. “That’s something I have observed and experienced in college,” Inge said. “In the Big Ten, we had two kickers. We had someone who

WOMEN’S SOCCER

VOLLEYBALL

Hoosiers excited for 2018 season By William Coleman wicolema@iu.edu| @WColeman08

Last season was one of inconsistencies for the IU women's soccer team. When the Hoosiers ended their 2017 campaign with a 2-1 loss to No. 13 Ohio State, it pushed their record to 6-94 for 11th place in the Big Ten and they missed the cut for the Big Ten Tournament for the third time in four years. Sophomore goalkeeper Bethany Kopel had four shutout wins to her name, but also let up more than two goals on three occasions. As a team, IU won twice as many matches on the road than at home. Now, as they head into the 2018 season, IU is looking to improve on last year with a group of young players and new additions to the coaching staff that have IU Coach Amy Berbary more excited for an upcoming season than she's ever been during her time in Bloomington. “It’s the most excited I’ve been since I’ve been here,” Berbary said. “The team chemistry is through the roof. The coaches and team are on board to do something big this year.” Kopel will be back in goal after recording the third-most saves in the conference last season, while the team’s top six goal scorers are returning. The Hoosiers also had three players find their names on 2018 Big Ten Women’s Soccer Preseason Honors List on Aug. 13. Se-

Construction on Wilkinson Hall set back two months By Stefan Krajisnik stefkraj@iun.edu | @skrajisnik3

BOBBY GODDIN | IDS

Then-freshman goalkeeper Bethany Kopel gets in position against Iowa Oct. 12, 2017 at Bill Armstrong Stadium. The IU women’s soccer season opens against Wake Forest on Aug. 17.

niors Mykayla Brown and Maya Piper joined junior Chandra Davidson on the list after combining for 40 points last season. Meanwhile, a pair of new assistant coaches will help bolster their performance. This offseason, associate head coach Sergio Gonzalez took off for a job at Ohio State and assistant coach Michael Regan left the team to become the head coach at North Dakota State. However, IU had no trouble finding replacements for them. In February, the team announced the signing of Sandy Davison, a former

midfielder that Berbary said has “an attacking sense and offensive mind." Davison spent four years as an assistant coach at Washington State, where the Cougars racked up a record of 42-28-10. Replacing Gonzalez will be Daniel Brizard, who has bounced between the college coaching ranks for 20 years. Most recently, he finished up his second coaching stint in Baton Rouge with Lousiana State University where he helped with goalkeepers, medical trainers, film and scouting. "He’s been a head coach and his goalkeeping expe-

kicked kind of your midrange to short field goals and someone who kicked your long field goals.” With more late-game situations and plenty more of Coach Allen’s bullhorn surely to come during the practices leading up to the season, Inge said it all comes down to who can handle the pressure the best so that everybody feels comfortable heading into the Hoosiers’ season opener at Florida International on Sept. 1. “My goal is to be sure, no matter who we choose, they’re going to be ready and they’re going to be prepared,” Inge said. “That’s the one thing we told Coach Allen. We’re going to be confident in who we put out there and the next man is going to be ready because you never know how things go during a game and during a season, so we’re going to feel confident in who we put out there at the right time.”

rience is second-to-none," Berbary said. "His energy and passion for the game has brought a new level to our goalkeeping.” The team has been practicing together for the last two weeks in preparation for the 2018 season. On Aug. 9, the team played Ohio State in an exhibition, where the Buckeyes scored the lone goal of the game in the first half, en route to a 1-0 win over the Hoosiers. IU will now prepare to put all those pieces together in its season-opener against Wake Forest in the Hoosier Challenge Cup on Aug. 17 at Bill Armstrong Stadium.

The reason IU volleyball coach Steve Aird scheduled his team’s opening 11 games on the road had nothing to do with getting away from Bloomington — even if spending the opening three games in Las Vegas does seem appealing. Instead, it was made with the intention to give more time to finish the Hoosiers’ new home. IU’s new volleyball and wrestling stadium Wilkinson Hall will be opened for game action two months later than expected. “We were going to be on the road for the first four weeks with the hope that we come back with the facilities close to ready to go,” Aird said. “Whether that happens or not, that’s out of our hands. That’s construction.” The home-opener on Sept. 21 against Northwestern will be played at University Gym — the same home of the team since 1996. Current plans now look to have Wilkinson Hall put into use for the final regular season home game on Nov. 21 against Purdue. Despite not having home-court advantage,

Aird believes there are benefits to playing on the road for a long stretch. “The cool thing about being on the road is that you get time together as a team,” Aird said. “You get to get into some habits of how you do stuff with less distractions. I think we’ll grow a lot in the first four weeks.” In the Big Ten preseason poll, the team was ranked at No. 12 in the conference, one spot higher than it finished last year. Playing in a conference that had six teams reach the round of 16 last season, it will not be an easy path to the top for IU. IU started last season going 11-1 in non-conference play before going 1-19 in the Big Ten. So, Aird decided to strengthen the level of nonconference play before the season to prepare the team more for conference play. “We’ll also have a really tough schedule,” Aird said. “We’ll be the underdog in a lot of the matches that we play. We’ve got to learn how to get better.” The team will still play its scheduled intrasquad Cream and Crimson scrimmage at 6:30 p.m. on Aug. 18 at Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall.


6

Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

» FOOTBALL

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

starting position is nothing new for him. He completed 65.4 percent of his passes, while throwing for 1,252 yards, 10 touchdowns and five interceptions in nine games last year. “Peyton is a competitor by nature so being in a competition is nothing new for him,” Sheridan said. “Certainly, having Big Ten playing experience, you can’t simulate that in a practice setting. You can’t get 1,000 people out there screaming and hollering. I know for him, that has calmed things down for him and made him just more aware and better.” Meanwhile, Penix Jr. is the talented young gun of the group after coming out of high school as a highly-touted recruit. In two years as a starter at Tampa Bay Tech High School in Tampa, Florida, he threw 61 touchdowns and only six interceptions during that time. He’s been around Bloomington a bit longer than Dawkins and got some important reps in IU’s spring game, and Sheridan said they’ve been impressed with his composure against the college competition so far. “Even from his first day of spring practice, we’ve really been pleased with his composure, with his poise,” Sheridan said. “The game doesn’t seem to be too fast for him for a true freshman, which

isn't often the case.” Allen said he wants to make the big decision prior to the week of the Hoosiers’ first game on Sept. 1 at Florida International, so the coaches’ silence will likely continue until then. As each quarterback continues fighting to be the top dog on the depth chart, Allen and his staff still have a tough choice awaiting them.

“I feel good about where we are and I feel like we have multiple guys that can play, and we all know as the season progresses, you’re going to need a bunch of guys.” Tom Allen, IU coach

As Ramsey says, what makes it even more difficult is just how similar each of the options truly are. “We all have similar skillsets but we all do our thing a bit differently,” Ramsey said. “The thing that’s been fun is just learning from them. Brandon, having played in a Power Five conference, he knows a lot of football and Mike is growing up and learning fast. We’re all very similar but we all do things kind of differently and I think that’s a good thing.”

Top A family member wheels a bicycle down the sidewalk Wednesday outside the Wright Quad. Left Parents help move their student’s belongings Wednesday into the Wright Quad during move-in week. Move-in week runs from Aug. 12-17.

» MOVE IN

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

BOBBY GODDIN | IDS

Then-sophomore quarterback Peyton Ramsey runs the ball against Michigan in 2017. The Hoosiers are still battling to choose a front-running quarterback for the 2018 season.

we are preparing for them to come back.” Around 55 IUPD officers were present for move-in, with members of the Ellettsville Police Department also patrolling. Nine officers were sent out on bicycles so they could be more flexible. “It helps us out when moving from dorm to dorm,” officer Derek Line said. “It makes us available for calls and we can get there quicker than someone on foot.” The bicycles were also intended to help the police officers connect to students rather than intimidating them, officer Nick Schmitt said.

New students are not used to being on campus and seeing uniformed policemen, and it can create disconnect, Schmitt said. “It’s a big step for them, and so seeing a police officer ride up on a bike is cool because it takes away that barrier,” Schmitt said. RPS and IUPD were also able to implement their Unload and Go policy effectively, with barely any calls going through the radio, said officer Randy Frye. “This is definitely the best day I’ve seen in quite a while,” Frye said. In addition to preparing for move-in day, IUPD officers also had tips for students living in the dorm, many involving how to handle social pressures to consume drugs and al-

cohol. “Nothing good comes from binge drinking,” Munroe said. "If you don’t get arrested or hurt, you will probably end up getting sick." Officers also said that students should make sure valuables such as bikes, electronics and bags are not left unattended when in public. Of the many crimes IUPD handles during the beginning of the year, bike theft is one of the most common. Officer Munroe advised students to buy secure bike locks and never leave their doors open when they leave the room. “Some value leaving personal property alone while others do not,” Munroe said.

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Indiana Daily Student

EVENTS

Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018 idsnews.com

Editors Hannah Reed and Lauren Fazekas arts@idsnews.com

7

Welcome

Back! Troll & Laylow

All Madonna

9 p.m. The Bluebird

8 p.m - 12 a.m. The Backdoor

Kick off your first weekend back in Bloomington with different concerts, events and bar specials.

Amy O, Free Cake for Every Creature, Nice Try $8

Celebrating Brunch 7 a.m. - 3 p.m. Farm Bloomington

9:30 p.m. The Bishop

Aug. 16 Austin Lucas Album Release Party $10

Boy Band Review IMU Late Nite

9 p.m. The Bluebird

Live music, roller skating, free bowling, trivia with cash prizes and free food.

“Immortal Americans” 7:45 p.m. The Bishop

9 p.m. - 1 a.m. Indiana Memorial Union

Aug. 17 Hairbangers Ball

Epic AF!

Field Hockey

A Variety Show Power Ballads Battle

IU vs. Ball State

9 p.m. The Bluebird

9 p.m. - 12 a.m. The Backdoor

Block Party Concert & Carnival

1 p.m. IU Field Hockey Complex

Featuring Diplo, Whethan and Teenage Wrist

Aug. 18

5 p.m. - 1 a.m. Fee Lane & 13th Street Parking Lot

Upland Brewing 20th Anniversary Bloomington Block Party Celebrating Upland Brewing’s 20th anniversary with locally produced beer at this event for all ages. 1 p.m. - 6 p.m. Upland Brewery Company

Women’s Soccer

Aug. 19

IU vs. Miami 3 p.m. Bill Armstrong Stadium

Movies showing on campus for welcome week By Sarah Lloyd sadlloyd@iu.edu | @sxrxh99

If you’re an introvert, IU’s Welcome Week activities might sound a little tiring. All of those social endeavors and floor meetings require a lot of effort, and even though they are very important to start the school year, they can wear a student out pretty quickly. To relax after a hectic move-in, here are a few movies showing on campus that will be free to students with an ID during Welcome Week. "Yellow Submarine" A restored 50th anniversary edition of this 1968 movie will be shown at 7 p.m. on Thursday and 4 p.m.

Saturday. The movie is now in 4K Ultra HD resolution. With a 97 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes, this movie is sure to be an easygoing, feel-good flick. The animation is inspired by the art trends in the 70’s — think Andy Warhol's colorful scenes — and features a soundtrack dominated by the Beatles. "Ava" A coming-of-age story from a different perspective in the world, "Ava" is the daughter of a traditional and strict family in Tehran, Iran. “Ava” will be shown at 7 p.m. on Friday and Saturday at the IU Cinema. Even though the character lives in a different country, she still faces the same

struggles as many of us growing up: school, popularity and relationships. Her mother ends up discovering that she is spending time with a boy and gets very angry with her. Like a typical teenager, Ava learns to rebel against her authority and decides to make her own decisions despite the traditional values that surround her. "Ava" received a Canadian Screen Award for best first feature film in January 2018. The movie is in Persian, but will have English subtitles. "Infinity War" If you’re not into obscure movies and want to see something more recent, Union Board Films is show-

MOVIE STILLS DATABASE

Tom Holland as Spider-Man in “Avengers: Infinity War.” Union Board Films is showing “Avengers: Infinity War” at 8 p.m. Saturday in the Whittenberger Auditorium in the Indiana Memorial Union.

ing a recent blockbuster "Avengers: Infinity War" at 8 p.m. Saturday in the Whittenberger Auditorium in the Indiana Memorial Union. One of the most talked about movies this year since

its premiere on April 27, "Infinity War" might have produced the toughest enemy that the Avengers have faced: Thanos. Get ready for your favorite Marvel characters all at

once, boatloads of action and quite a bit of heartbreak. No spoilers here, so go see it if you haven’t already. If you love Marvel characters, prepare for tears.


Indiana Daily Student

8

ARTS

Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018 idsnews.com

Editors Hannah Reed and Lauren Fazekas arts@idsnews.com

Finding purpose in supreme failure: ‘Stoner’ Clark Gudas is a senior in English.

John William’s protagonist, William Stoner, wasn’t esteemed in his work as an assistant professor or as an author. His marriage, his affair and his work relationships failed to bring him fulfillment either — in fact, they turned the screws of misery in his existence. On page one, the reader sees Stoner had little impact on anything or anyone, and that his life was altogether insignificant, in the following passage: “Stoner’s colleagues, who held him in no particular esteem when he was alive, speak of him rarely now; to the older ones, his name is a reminder of the end that awaits them all, and to the younger ones it is merely a sound which evokes no sense of the past and no identity with which they can associate themselves or their careers.” Written in 1965, “Stoner” follows the life of William Stoner, a farm boy turned academic, as he seeks to live and work through constant and bitter strife. His miseries begin with his young and hasty marriage to Edith Bostwick. She is cold, indifferent and can barely stand the sight of him. She sees their marriage as an undesired obligation, a perspective Stoner quickly realizes in the following passage: “Within a month he knew that his marriage was a failure; within a year he stopped hoping that it would improve.” Edith is portrayed as vicious, cruel and hateful at times, and she grows sick at the sight of Stoner and is constantly jostling to make him miserable. His battles don’t stop there — his colleague, the ruthless Professor Hollis Lomax — who in a questionable way is introduced and marked by pairing his villainy with physical de-

IDS FILE PHOTO

The IU Cinema features Thomas Hart-Benton murals which were restored in a climate-controlled room during the renovation process.

Movies on campus to watch out for By Sarah Lloyd sadlloyd@iu.edu | @sxrxh99

CLARK GUDAS | IDS

John Williams’“Stoner” was released in 1965 and follows the life of William Stoner, a farm boy turned academic, as he seeks to live and work amidst constant and bitter strife.

ting in his office with his young daughter, Grace, or experiencing his love affair with Katherine Driscoll, a graduate student at the university, beautifully explored in passages such as the following: “William was shocked to discover his surprise when he learned that she had had a lover before him; he realized that he had started to think of themselves as never really having existed before they came together.” His work as an assistant professor brings him joy, and the effort he puts into his academic research fills him with a feeling of direction he finds nowhere else in his life. Despite the horrendous schedules and low-level classes Professor Lomax forces him to teach, and the spite and hatred Edith reserves for him, Stoner wears a face of indifference. In this way he takes on the stoic outlook of his parents, worn in their lifetimes on the farm. “Their lives had been expended in cheerless la-

formity — does everything in his power to make Stoner’s work at the University of Missouri miserable. Two of Stoner’s only real friends, Dave Masters and Professor Archer Sloane, die early in Stoner’s life.

“Their lives had been expended in cheerless labor, their wills broken, their intelligences numbed ... And they would become a meaningless part of that stubborn earth to which they had long ago given themselves.” Excerpt from “Stoner” by John Williams

When they occur, the occasional snapshots of happiness in Stoner’s life stand out against an onslaught of aggression and hatred directed at him. Namely, when Stoner is sit-

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August 19: Opening Service, 10:30 p.m. Welcome Picnic & Open House 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Cornhole, Tours & Prizes Worship Services Sundays at 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays at 7 p.m. 607 E. Seventh & Fess

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bor, their wills broken, their intelligences numbed ... And they would become a meaningless part of that stubborn earth to which they had long ago given themselves.” “Stoner” is beautifully written and masterfullycrafted. Williams is an author who understands not just characters, but real people. Even the villainous characters who oppose Stoner are full of emotional toil with understandable backgrounds. On his deathbed and in a haze of pills and deteriorating health, Stoner regards his teaching and career with great indifference, neither proud or disappointed. His thoughts about his own failing body sum up the mindset that won his life against abundant loss, disappointment and misery: “The flesh is strong, he thought; stronger than we imagine. It wants always to go on.” ckgudas@iu.edu

If you’re an introvert like me, IU’s Welcome Week activities might sound a little tiring. All of those social endeavors and floor meetings require a lot of effort, and even though they are very important to start the school year — and help cope with your homesickness — they can wear a student out pretty quickly. To relax after a hectic move-in, here are a few movies showing on campus that will be free to students with an ID during Welcome Week. "Yellow Submarine" An restored 50th anniversary edition of this 1968 movie will be shown at 7 p.m. on Thursday and 4 p.m. Saturday. The movie is now in 4K Ultra HD resolution. With a 97 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes, this movie is sure to be an easygoing, feelgood flick. The animation is inspired by the art trends in the 70’s — think Andy Warhol's colorful scenes — and features a soundtrack dominated by the Beatles. "Ava" A coming-of-age story from a different perspective in the world, "Ava" is the daughter of a traditional and strict family in Tehran, Iran. Even though the character lives in a different country, she still fac-

es the same struggles as many of us growing up: school, popularity and relationships. "Ava" will be shown at 7 p.m. on Friday and Saturday at the IU Cinema. Her mother ends up discovering that she is spending time with a boy and gets very angry with her. Like a typical teenager, Ava learns to rebel against her authority and decides to make her own decisions despite the traditional values that surround her. "Ava" received a Canadian Screen Award for best first feature film in January 2018. The movie is in Persian, but will have English subtitles. "Infinity War" If you’re not into obscure movies and want to see something more recent, Union Board Films is showing a recent blockbuster "Avengers: Infinity War" at 8 p.m. Saturday in the Whittenberger Auditorium in the Indiana Memorial Union. More information is available here. One of the most talked about movies this year since its premiere on April 27, "Infinity War" might have produced the toughest enemy that the Avengers have faced: Thanos. Get ready for your favorite Marvel characters, boatloads of action and quite a bit of heartbreak. No spoilers here, so go see it if you haven’t already.

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Connect with members of many diverse faiths at idsnews.com/religious Paid Advertising

Methodist

Non-Denominational

First United Methodist Church - Jubilee

Sherwood Oaks Christian Church

219 E. Fourth St. 812-332-6396

2700 E. Rogers Rd. 812-334-0206

fumcb.org Facebook: jubileebloomington.org Instagram: jubileebloomington Email: jubilee@fumcb.org

socc.org/cya facebook.com/socc.cya Twitter: @socc_cya Instagram: socc_cya

Contemporary: 9:30 a.m. & 11 a.m.

Wednesday: 7:30 p.m. @ Bloomington Sandwhich Company (118 E. Kirkwood Ave.)

Being in Bloomington, we love our college students, and think they are a great addition to the Sherwood Oaks Family. Wether an undergraduate or graduate student... from in-state, out of state, to our international community... Come join us as we strive to love God and love others better. Jeremy Earle, College Minister

Mark Fenstermacher, Lead Pastor Markus Dickinson, Campus Director

eccbloomington.org • cxiu.org Facebook: Connexion ECC Twitter: @connexionecc

111 S. Kimble Dr. 812-269-8975

Redeemer is a gospel-centered community on mission. Our vision is to see the gospel of Jesus Christ transform everything: our lives, our church, our city, and our world. We want to be instruments of gospel change in Bloomington and beyond. Chris Jones, Lead Pastor

Sundays Service: 9:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Connexion: Sundays, 6 p.m. Connexion is the university ministry of ECC. We’re all about connecting students to the church in order to grow together in our faith. We meet weekly for worship, teaching, and fellowship as well as periodically for service projects, social events and more. Bob Whitaker, Senior Pastor Dan Waugh, Pastor of Adult Ministries

Nazarene

The Salvation Army

First Church of the Nazarene 700 W. Howe St. (across from the Building Trades Park) 812-332-2461 • www.b1naz.org bfcn@sbcglobal.net Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday Small Groups : 9:30 a.m., 4 p.m. & 6 p.m.

111 N. Rogers St. 812-336-4310 • bloomingtonsa.org

Sunday: Sunday School, 10 a.m. Worship Service, 11:00 a.m. Bible Study, 3 p.m. The Salvation Army, an international movement, is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church. Its message is based on the Bible. Its ministry is motivated by the love of God. Its mission is to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ and meet human needs in His name without discrimination.

Mennonite Mennonite Fellowship of Bloomington 2420 E. Third St. 812-646-2441 bloomingtonmenno.org • Facebook

Gordon Hoag, Captain Cindy Hoag, Captain

City Church For All Nations 1200 N. Russell Rd. 812-336-5958

citychurchbloomington.org Instagram • Twitter • Facebook @citychurchbtown

Sunday: 5 p.m. A welcoming, inclusive congregation providing a place of healing and hope as we journey together in the Spirit of Christ. Gathering for worship Sundays 5 p.m. in the Roger Williams room, First United Church. As people of God's peace, we seek to embody the Kingdom of God. John Sauder mfbjohn@gmail.com

Saturday: 5:30 p.m. Sunday: 9:30 a.m., 11 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. We are a movement of all races and backgrounds, coming together to love people, build family, and lead to destiny. Join us at one of our weekend worship experiences, and visit our young adults ministry, 1Life at 7 p.m. on Mondays. David Norris, Pastor Sumer Norris, Pastor

Episcopal (Anglican) Canterbury House Episcopal (Anglican) Campus Ministry at IU 719 E. Seventh St. 812-334-7971 • 812-361-7954

Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors

St. Mark’s United Methodist Church 100 N. State Rd. 46 Bypass 812-332-5788

Sacramental Schedule: Weekly services Sundays: Holy Eucharist with hymns, followed by

smumc.church

dinner 4 p.m. at Canterbury House

1st & 3rd Wednesdays: 7 p.m. Taize Chants & Prayers at Canterbury House

Sunday Morning Schedule 9:00: Breakfast 9:15: Adult Sunday School Classes 10:30: Sanctuary Worship 10:30: Children & Youth Sunday School Classes

Episcopal (Anglican) Campus Ministry is a safe and welcoming home for all people. We are a blend of young and old, women and men, gay and straight, ethnicities from different cultures and countries, students, faculty, staff and friends. The worshipping congregation is the Canterbury Fellowship. The mission of the Fellowship is to restore all people to unity with God and each other in Christ. We pray, worship and proclaim the Gospel. We also promote justice, equality, inclusion, peace, love critical thinking and acting as agents of change in our world.

An inclusive community bringing Christ-like love, healing and hope to all.

Mother Linda C. Johnson+, University Chaplain Ricardo Bello Gomez, Communications Director Josefina Carcamo, Latino/a and Community Outreach Intern Rex Hinkle, Luiz Lopez, Nathan Stang, Music Ministers

7821 W. State Road 46 812-876-6072 • lifewaybaptistchurch.org Facebook • LifewayEllettsville

Jimmy Moore, Pastor Mary Beth Morgan, Pastor

Independent Baptist Lifeway Baptist Church

College & Career Sunday Meeting: 9 a.m. Sunday

Sunday Worship: 10 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wednesday Night Bible Study: 7 p.m.

PC (USA) United Presbyterian Church 1701 E. Second St. 812-332-1850 • upcbloomington.org

Email: upcbloomington@gmail.com Sunday: Pastor's Class: 8:45 a.m. Worship: 10 a.m. Fellowship: 11 a.m.

Tuesday: Bible Study: 12:15 p.m. Book Study/Discussion: 6 p.m. We are a diverse, inclusive people of God. Social justice, a welcoming spirit and focusing on Christ are integral to our congregation. We are students and non-students, native and non-native English speakers, young and old, who come together to worship in the name of Christ and to enjoy fellowship. John Napoli, Pastor Melanie Mathis-McBride, Education Director

Presbyterian (USA)

First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

First Presbyterian Church

205 E. Kirkwood Ave. 812-332-4459 • fccbloomington.org

Sunday: 10 a.m. As God has welcomed us, we welcome you. With all our differences – in age, ability and physical condition, in race, cultural background and economic status, in sexual orientation, gender identity and family structure – God has received each one with loving kindness, patience and joy. All that we are together and all that we hope to be is made more perfect as the richness of varied lives meets the mystery of God’s unifying Spirit, and we become the Body of Christ. Helen Hempfling, Pastor

Lifeway Baptist Church exists to bring glory to God by making disciples, maturing believers and multiplying ministry. Matthew 28:19-20

Barnabas Christian Ministry Small Groups: Cedar Hall 2nd Floor Common Area, 7 - 8 p.m., meetings start Thursday, Sept. 6. We will meet every other Thursday during the school year.

Callout Meeting: Aug. 30, IMU Redbud Room Steven VonBokern, Senior Pastor Rosh Dhanawade, IU Coordinator 302-561-0108, barnabas@indiana.edu barnabas.so.indiana.edu * Free transportation provided. Please call if you need a ride to church.

221 E. Sixth St. (Sixth and Lincoln) 812-332-1514 • fpcbloomington.org

Sunday Worship Times: Sunday: 9 a.m., 11 a.m.

Christian Ed: Sunday: 9:50 - 10:45 a.m.

Summer Worship Times: Sunday: 10 a.m. We are a community of seekers and disciples in Christ committed to hospitality and outreach for all God’s children. Come join us for meaningful worship, thoughtful spiritual study and stimulating fellowship. Ukirk at IU is a Presbyterian affiliated group open to all students. Andrew Kort, Pastor Kim Adams, Associate Pastor Grant Farmer, Interim Music Director Christopher Young, Organist

Orthodox Christian All Saints Orthodox Christian Church 6004 S. Fairfax Rd. 812-824-3600

www.allsaintsbloomington.org Email:frpeterjon@allsaintsbloomington.org Wednesday: Vespers 6 p.m. Saturday: Great Vespers 5 p.m. Sunday: Matins 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy 10 a.m. Come experience the sacred rhythm and rituals of the timeless Christian faith, a faith with a future, yet ancient and tested. Living the traditional worship of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit; as a sacred community of people striving to manifest the kingdom, on earth as it is in heaven. We, together with the saints throughout history, learn to live the love and compassion of Christ. Come and see, and put your roots down deep. Rev. Fr. Peter Jon Gillquist, Pastor Howard & Rhonda Webb, College Coordinators Church Van Pickup on Sundays - Call 314-681-8893

Cooperative Baptist

Catholic St. Paul Catholic Center 1413 E. 17th St. 812-339-5561 • hoosiercatholic.org

Facebook: Hoosiercatholic Twitter: @hoosiercatholic Weekend Mass Times Saturday Vigil: 4:30 p.m. Sunday: 8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. (Spanish), 5:30 p.m., 9 p.m. (During Academic Year) Korean Mass 1st & 3rd Saturdays, 6 p.m.

Weekday Mass Times Monday - Saturday: 12:15 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday: 9 p.m. St. Paul Catholic Center is a diverse community rooted in the saving compassion of Jesus Christ, energized by His Sacraments, and nourished by the liturgical life of His Church. Fr. John Meany, O.P., Pastor Fr. Patrick Hyde, O.P. Associate Pastor & Campus Minister Fr. Joseph Minuth, O.P., Associate Pastor

University Baptist Church 3740 E. Third St. 812-339-1404

Unitarian Universalist

ubcbloomington.org facebook.com/ubcbloomington

Unitarian Universalist Church of Bloomington

United Methodist

indiana.edu/~canterby canterby@indiana.edu • facebook.com/ecmatiu

Tuesdays: 6 p.m. Bible Study at Canterbury House

Church Van Pickup on Sundays Call 314-681-8893

Christian (Disciples of Christ)

Facebook: SABloomington Twitter: @SABtown

Thursday: We are Wesleyan in our beliefs, and welcome all to worship with us. We are dedicated to training others through discipleship as well as ministering through small groups. We welcome all races and cultures and would love to get to know you. Dr James Hicks, Lead Pastor

Howard & Rhonda Webb, College Coordinators

Come experience the sacred rhythm and rituals of the timeless Christian faith, a faith with a future, yet ancient and tested. Living the traditional worship of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit; as a sacred community of people striving to manifest the kingdom, on earth as it is in heaven. We, together with the saints throughout history, learn to live the love and compassion of Christ. Come and see, and put your roots down deep.

503 S. High St. 812-332-0502

Redeemer Community Church

Sunday: 9 a.m. & 11 a.m.

6004 S. Fairfax Rd. 812-824-3600 www.allsaintsbloomington.org Email:frpeterjon@allsaintsbloomington.org Rev. Fr. Peter Jon Gillquist, Pastor

Connexion / Evangelical Community Church

Inter-Denominational

redeemerbloomington.org facebook.com/RedeemerBtown @RedeemerBtown on Twitter & Instagram

Wednesday: Vespers 6 p.m. Saturday: Great Vespers 5 p.m. Sunday: Matins 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy: 10 a.m.

Traditional: 8 a.m.

Sunday: The Open Door, 11:15 a.m. @ The Buskirk-Chumley Theater (114 E. Kirkwood Ave.)

Jubilee is a supportive and accepting community for college students and young adults from all backgrounds looking to grow in their faith and do life together. Meet every Wednesday night for opportunities through small groups, hangouts, mission trips, events, service projects, and more. Many attend the contemporary Open Door service.

All Saints Orthodox Christian Church

Sunday: 9:30 a.m. (Bible study) 10:45 a.m. (worship) If you are exploring faith, looking for a church home, or returning after time away, Welcome! We aim to be a safe place to "sort it out" for those who are questioning, and a place to pray, grow, and serve for followers of Jesus. All are welcome - yes, LBGTQ too. Rev. Annette Hill Briggs, Pastor Rob Drummond, Music Minister

Lutheran (LCMS) University Lutheran Church & Student Center 607 E. Seventh St. (Corner of 7th & Fess) 812-336-5387 • indianalutheran.com

facebook.com/ULutheranIU @ULutheranIU on twitter Sunday: Bible Class, 9:15 a.m. Divine Service, 10:30 a.m. The Best Meal You'll Have All Week, 6 p.m. Tuesday & Friday: Service of Morning Prayer, 8 a.m. Wednesday: Second Best Meal, 6 p.m. Midweek Service, 7 p.m. LCMS U Student Fellowship, 7:30 p.m. Thursday: Graduate Study/Fellowship, 7 p.m. University Lutheran Church (U.Lu) is the home of LCMS U at Indiana, the campus ministry of the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Students, on-campus location, and our Student Center create a hub for daily, genuine Christ-centered community that receives God's gifts of life, salvation, and the forgiveness of sins through Jesus Christ. Rev. Richard Woelmer, Campus Pastor

2120 N. Fee Lane 812-332-3695

www.uublomington.org www.facebook.com/uubloomington Sundays: 9:15 a.m. & 11:15 a.m. We are a dynamic congregation working towards a more just world through social justice. We draw inspiration from world religions and diverse spiritual traditions. Our vision is "Seeking the Spirit, Building Community, Changing the World." A LGBTQA+ Welcoming Congregation and a certified Green Sanctuary. Reverend Mary Ann Macklin, Senior Minister Reverend Scott McNeill, Associate Minister

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Latter-day Saint Student Association (L.D.S.S.A) 333 S. Highland Ave. 812-334-3432

studentview.Ids.org/Home. aspx/Home/60431 Facebook: Bloomington Institute and YSA Society lds.org Monday - Friday: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. We have an Institute of Religion adjacent to campus at 333 S. Highland Ave. (behind T.I.S. bookstore). We offer a variety of religious classes and activities. We strive to create an atmosphere where college students and local young single adults can come to play games, relax, study, and associate with others who value spirituality. Sunday worship services for young single students are held at 2411 E. Second St. a 11:30 a.m. We invite all to discover more about Jesus Christ from both ancient scripture and from modern prophets of God. During the week join us at the institute, and on Sunday at the Young Single Adult Church. Robert Tibbs, Institute Director


10

ARTS

Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

Artist uses photography to protect nature From IDS reports

“Paradise Wavering,” by artist Alice Q. Hargrave, is open at the FAR Center for Contemporary Arts, located at 505 W. 4th St. until Sept. 29. Hargrave’s work, which opened in the center’s Pictura Gallery, explores flora and fauna. According to the gallery’s website, Hargrave is an environmentally motivated artist who advocates for the protection of the subjects that she loves, according to the website. Hargrave uses photography to capture plants and animals using colorscapes to display each shot. According to the website, it makes the viewer feel like they “can walk right into the strange green tangle of wood and leaves.” “Paradise Wavering” will be in Pictura Gallery and the exhibit is open from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Lauren Fazekas MOVIE STILLS DATABASE

Heath Ledger and Christian Bale starred in "The Dark Knight" which was released July 2008. The 10-year anniverary of the film’s release was July 18.

Revisiting ‘The Dark Knight’ (2008) a decade later Calie Schepp is a junior in journalism.

Intense, action-packed and dangerous, "The Dark Knight" boasts great cinematography, gripping storytelling and an iconic performance from Heath Ledger as the Joker. Just in time for the 10-year anniversary IMAX rerelease, let’s revisit Christopher Nolan’s classic 2008 film "The Dark Knight." The film has been ranked by critics and audiences alike alongside some of the best cinematic sequels and comic book films of all time. If this film is anything, it's unadulterated, intense, dramatic entertainment. From the first scene with the bank robbery, to the car chases and various explosions, director Christopher

Nolan wants you to watch and keep watching. Batman, aka the Dark Knight, aka Bruce Wayne, played by Christian Bale, isn’t trying to save the entire world from some fantasy mega monster, he’s just trying to save the city of Gotham from its own high ranking hoodlums, which is one of the many things that make this movie great. Comparisons are made between the Batman representing order, and the Joker representing chaos. The hero turned villain, Harvey Dent — or as comic book fans may know him, TwoFace — played by Aaron Eckhart, is a more literal representation of this double-sided sword metaphor. The use of his two-faced coin is a prominent aspect of storytelling in the film,

Whether it’s something odd or something ordinary,

go after it.

with the luck it draws bringing out one of his two alter egos, good or evil. His 50/50 chance of living when he and Rachel Dawes, played by Maggie Gyllenhaal, are each taken hostage by the Joker’s goons makes for a heart-pounding but ultimately gut-wrenching moment. And his face is literally split perfectly symmetrical down the middle, one side having been accidentally soaked in gasoline and then caught on fire. "The Dark Knight" is an incredible movie simply because the performance from Heath Ledger as the Joker was so good. Ledger abruptly passed away right before the film was released, and he won a posthumous best supporting actor Oscar for his role as the Joker. Everything from his

voice, to his posture, to his makeup and the way he smiled seemed so meticulously thought out, yet effortlessly executed. The artistry it took for him to make this character was raw, riveting and totally original. It's the type of performance actors should still strive for today. The Joker's sinister scenes are crafted in a way that moves the plot along perfectly, and it's almost weird how something so unsettling could run so smoothly for cinema. Each scene weaves in and out of scenarios that are intertwined and it makes for the best kind of visual storytelling — the kind that keeps it easy to understand and hard to look away. Bale, on the other hand, had every quality Batman

should have. He was handsome, brooding and deepvoiced, but his performance in this film dulled in comparison to Ledger's. Even so, revisiting this film is worthy of your time, comic book fan or not. Come for the edge-of-your-seat action. Stay for the Joker's antics. "The Dark Knight" will be playing in select IMAX theatres in New York, Toronto, San Francisco and Los Angeles starting Aug. 24 for a special weeklong engagement. The showings mark the 10th anniversary of the film's release, and celebrate it as the first major feature film to be shot using IMAX cameras. As of Aug. 13, "The Dark Knight" can be streamed on Netflix. crschepp@iu.edu

imp@indiana.edu

812.855.9588

www.indiana.edu/~imp

From IDS reports

The 14th annual IndyFringe Festival will take place from Aug. 16 to Aug. 26 in Indianapolis. The festival will present many genres of theater including comedy, music and musicals, multimedia and more. There will be 62 acts and 350 performances in the 11-day festival. On Aug., 17, there will be a contemporary dance repertory performance called “Present Memories” by Nugent and Shea Dance Theater, performed by IU colleagues Stephanie Nugent and Elizabeth Shea. All featured theaters are on or near Massachusetts Avenue in the Arts and Theatre district in Indianapolis, according to the festival's website. Hannah Reed

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EVENTS

11

Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

Top 5 IU sporting events for fall semester teams and a slam dunk contest for the men’s team. Add in the fact the women’s team is coming off a WNIT Championship from the 2017-18 season, and there will be plenty of hype surrounding the event this year.

By Matt Cohen mdc1@iu.edu | @matt_cohen__

1. Football vs. Iowa, 12 p.m. Oct. 13, Memorial Stadium IU's game against Iowa will be during homecoming weekend in Bloomington. The stadium will be packed as the Hawkeyes come to town to face the Hoosiers. The festivities of the weekend are highlighted by the football game. Iowa figures to be a strong team in 2018, bringing back quarterback Nathan Stanley, but he’ll have to overcome a loud Memorial Stadium. It’s a game that could also be key in IU’s season. This is likely to be the most fun and raucous sporting event of the fall season. The last time the two teams played, IU fell just short, losing to the Hawkeyes, 35-27, in Bloomington.

3. Men’s soccer vs Butler, 8 p.m. Oct. 16, Bill Armstrong Stadium IUs men’s soccer team came so close to winning the national championship a year ago, and, in 2018, the team has the talent to compete for a title yet again. The Hoosiers have four games set for broadcast on national television, and with an 8:00 p.m. start. This will be an in-state battle for IU against the Bulldogs, and a game to prove themselves to the nation. The Hoosier Army will be packed in for this one.

2. Hoosier Hysteria, Time TBA, Sept. 29, Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall Romeo. Langford. Is there more that needs to be said? Langford is one of the most hyped basketball recruits to play for the IU men’s basketball team in years, and Hoosier Hysteria will be the first chance for Indiana fans to see Langford wearing the cream and crimson. While there isn’t a game of any meaning played that night other than the men’s team’s scrimmage, Hoosier Hysteria is always a fun night for fans to meet their team and hear from the coaches. Along with the scrimmage, fans are introduced to both the men’s and women’s teams, while also watching a three-point contest for both

4. Football vs Penn State, Time TBA, Oct. 20, Memorial Stadium Penn State projects to be the best team coming to Bloomington this season. Led by quarterback Trace McSorley, the Nittany Lions will without a doubt be a contender in the Big Ten, and a possible top-10 team in the nation. Penn State will certainly be favored coming into this game, which will be played on national television, but the Hoosiers will have a chance to pull an upset. 5. Men’s soccer vs Michigan State, 4 p.m. Oct. 28, Bill Armstrong Stadium Michigan State comes to Bloomington in the last game

Horoscope

IDS FILE PHOTOS

Top Then-senior guard Robert Johnson goes up for a layup during the Hoosier Hysteria scrimmage in 2017. Right Then-freshman quarterback Kellen Lewis joins fans in the stands in celebration after Indiana upset number 15 ranked Iowa in 2006 at Memorial Stadium.

of the regular season for the men’s soccer team. It’s a game that could prove to have major importance for seeding in the Big Ten Tournament, but also a game with national implications. Michigan State will likely be the top team that IU plays in Bloomington this year, a top-10 team from a year ago.

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Today is a 6 — Prioritize working out misunderstandings at home. Resolve a conflict before it happens. Household projects take unplanned detours. Expect changes andchaotic moments. Take a gentle approach.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Today is an 8 — Keep generating money through tomorrow. Resist the temptation to overspend. Get what you need and no more. Financial arguments sprout easily. Silence can be golden.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — Today is a 6 — Enjoy peace for thinking and planning. Words can get twisted; private meditation leads to useful solutions. Stay sensitive to what others want and need.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Today is an 8 — You’re especially brilliant over the next few days. Passions may be in high gear, but look before leaping. Avoid controversy and stomping on someone’s sensitivities.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Today is a 9 — Pamper yourself. Try a new look or style. Avoid procrastination, and dive into a personal project. Edit your words carefully. You’re creating a buzz.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Today is a 7 — Keep your cool and word to manage your part of a team effort. Communication breakdowns could cause delays. Patience and diplomacy gets the job done.

BLISS

HARRY BLISS

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Today is a 7 — Adjust to professional changes. Stay respectful, even when others don’t. A challenge leads to higher levels. Ignore gossip. Avoid risky propositions. Return calls and correspondence. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) — Today is a 6 — Find a nice spot to rest and enjoy the scenery. Expect delays or surprises with traffic and transportation. Get lost in your studies.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Today is a 7 — Keep extra patience with a partner. Listen to intuition with unexpected plot twists. Wait to see what develops. Clarify miscommunications immediately. Gemini (May 21-June 20) — Today is a 7 — Schedule carefully, as demand for your energy rises. Slow to clarify miscommunications or adapt to surprising news. Anticipate resistance. The perfect solution appears.

Aries (March 21-April 19) — Today is a 7 — Focus on finances today and tomorrow. Hold your temper. Impulsive actions can backfire. Ignore rumors and gossip. Plot to realize a dream.

Crossword

© 2018 By Nancy Black Distributed by Tribune Media Services, INC. All Rights Reserved

L.A. Times Daily Crossword

Publish your comic on this page. The IDS is accepting applications for student comic strips for the fall 2018 semesters. Email five samples and a brief description of your idea to adviser@indiana.edu by Sept. 14. Submissions will be reviewed and selections will be made by the editor-in-chief.

su do ku

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

ACROSS

Difficulty Rating: How to play: Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 grid contains the digits 1 through 9, without repeating a number in any one row, column or 3x3 grid.

Answer to previous puzzle

1 5 10 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 25 27 29 33 34 35 36 37

38 39

Set of options Dodge “Sing it, Sam” speaker Gospel singer Andrews Annual Big Apple parade sponsor Darned New Zealand bird __ Wars: Rome vs. Carthage Tizzy Vogue VIPs __ wrench With 22-Down, “People’s Court” rival KOA campground area Bond film? Ally of “WarGames” “Westworld,” e.g. “It’s a Wonderful Life”director Juicy fruit Up to, briefly Revlon rival With 40-Across, party supplies found in this puzzle’s four corners Beige shade Hard to find

Cancer (June 21-July 22) — Today is an 8 — Love blossoms as you avoid irritations and silly arguments. Adapt to surprises. Silence can speak volumes. Relax and keep your sense of humor.

40 41 42 43 44 45 47 48 49 50 53 55 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66

See 37-Across Fail to mention Hill builder Cantina toast __ donna Fundamental measurement __ exercise: upper arm strengthener The “G” of GTO Apple __ Start of a French oath Norwegian contemporary of Tchaikovsky Bullfight “Bravo!” One-fifth of a limerick Guadalajara gal pal Target Field player Is indebted to Lacked Make (one’s way) Skin pics “My take is ... ” Circle parts

5 Use 6 Event for which Kerri Strug is famous 7 Unpopular spots 8 Endangered species 9 PC bailout key 10 Library, cardwise 11 Give for a while 12 Belt 13 Deal preceder 21 “Bridge of Spies”actor 22 See 22-Across 24 Fogg’s creator 26 Some aristocrats 27 Egyptian beetle 28 Morro Castle city 29 Threaded fastener 30 Electricity producer, perhaps 31 Dr. Evil’s cohort 32 Pub handle 34 Seeing red 37 African title of respect 38 Foe of “moose and squirrel” 43 “You bet” 44 Fussy sort 46 Means of escape 47 International agreement 49 Insurance giant 50 Part of a piggy bank 51 Bygone audio brand 52 Site for techies 54 Empties (of) 56 “The Mod Squad” cop 57 Circle’s lack 59 Tuna at a luau 60 Airline once owned by Howard Hughes

Look for the crossword daily in the comics section of the Indiana Daily Student. Find the solution for the daily crossword here.

DOWN 1 2 3 4

Karaoke need Novelist Bagnold Bulletins, e.g. “Argo” weapon

© Puzzles by Pappocom

NON SEQUITUR

WILY BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!

TIM RICKARD


Indiana Daily Student

Kuissential bread maker in good condition. Powerful, 12 modes. $30. dikang@iu.edu

3 BR, 2 BA, W/D, D/W, A/C, 801 W. 11th St., avail. now, $1200/mo.

bestrentsrdw@yahoo.com

leasinginfo@ grantprops.com

PAVILION

Urban STAtioN

4 & 5 Bedroom Houses

live your lifestyle

Newly Remodeled

BrAND NEW LuXurY aparTMENTS

Available August

downtown

pavprop.com 812-333-2332

3-4 bedrooms

3rd and Grant. 1 BR apt., $300/mo + utils. Share BA and kitchen. No pets. 812-879-4566

Dagwood’s Deli Sub Shop now taking applications for in-store staff & delivery drivers. Instore - hourly, drivers$7.25/hr + Tips + Commissions ($15-$25 average). “School first” flexible scheduling. Apply in store: 116 S. Indiana Ave.

Close to IU. 2 houses for rent. 1) 5 BR, 3 BA, 902 E. 14th St., $2450/ mo., 3 blks. to Geology & SPEA, off-street prkg. 2) 4 BR, 2 BA, 900 E. 14th St., $1600/mo. 3 blks. to Geology and SPEA, approved for 5 occupants. 812-327-7881

Studio,1,2,3 & 4 Bed Apts. Newly Remodeled Close to Campus Available August pavprop.com 812-333-2332

The IDS is accepting applications for Advertising Account Executives

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

Prime location: 2 BR apt. (from $655) & 3 BR twnhs. (from $825). Hdwd. floors, quiet. 812-333-5598

Biweekly pay. Flexibility with class schedule.

colonialeastapartments.com

Real-world Experience.

Sarge Rentals, Fall 2018. sargerentals.com 812-330-1501

NO WEEKENDS!

1 blk. to Jacobs. Priv. furn. rms. Shared kit. & W/D. $475/mo. Utils. & internet incl.1501 Atwater. 812-219-2219

PAVILION

All Majors Accepted. Seeking students with good organization, time management, and communication skills to work in advertising sales. Previous sales experience preferred but not required. Must own reliable transportation and make 3 semester commitment

Locations close to campus

1 BR in 2 BR house w/ male student. Very close to IU. $610. 812-239-0698

Now leasing for Fall 2018

2 girls seeking rmmte. 1 BR in 3 BR house on South Fess, next to Bryan Park, close to campus. $450/ mo. Sun room, W/D, garage. Full lease pref. but will consider sem. lease. lucy.m.elliott@gmail.com

Book a tour today

Apply in person at: Franklin Hall, RM 130. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

Email: rhartwel@indiana.edu

pavprop.com 812-333-2332

Room for rent, $500 plus 1/3 water bill, all other utils. incl. Everything in the home is NEW. Granite counter tops, new applns. House is fully furn. Close to football stadium. IU students and Graduate students welcome. 812-327-9016

Rooms for Rent. Next to Opt. on Atwater. On site pkg./laundry, utils. incl. 812-333-9579 or leasinginfo@ grantprops.com

Houses *** Now renting 2018 *** HPIU.COM 1-3 bedrooms. 812-333-4748 No pets please.

345

Restaurant & Bar

325

235

for a complete job description. EOE

***IU Vice President’s house. 8th & Lincoln. 8 BR, 3 BA,3 kit. W/D. 812-879-4566

305

Apartment Furnished Rooms for rent, next to Opt. on Atwater. On-site pkg./laundry. Utilities incl. 812-333-9579 or leasinginfo@ grantprops.com

360

1-5 BR houses for 18-19. Near Law/Opt./Music. Onsite laundry/parking. 812-333-9579 or leasinginfo@ grantprops.com

Sublet Apt. Unfurn. 1 BR in 3 BR apt. Rent & water: $710 mo. Lease now through July. megbball25@gmail.com

*Tiny, now avail. 1 BR, near IMU, $750/mo. 3-8 BR for 2019. 812-361-6154

HOUSING

Rooms/Roommates

1 BR w/ full bath, kitchen, TV + Internet. $400 + 1/3rd of utils. 812-391-0071 jacobwes17@gmail.com

Electronics

Furniture 1 yr. old Ikea queen mattress. Clean, no stains or markings etc. $150, obo. atpace@indiana.edu 3 brown wooden chairs: $10 each/ $25 all. Green wooden bookshelf: $25. dawars@indiana.edu 6-drawer white wooden storage dresser in like new condition. $60. bishen@indiana.edu Antique bedside lamp: $25. Bulletin borad: $15. dawars@indiana.edu Bed Riser Set from Bed Bath & Beyond. Pd. $29.99, asking for $12. Barely used. 8123697949 Brand new desk lamp. Never taken out of box. $10, obo. atpace@indiana.edu Brand new twin mattress. 12’’ innerspring memory foam. $180, obo. wang12@iu.edu Comfortable, clean couch.Washable cushion covers. Must pick up. $30. humin@iu.edu Double reclining leather sofa w/ matching oversized chair. Great cond. $425. 3176792543

Sublet Rooms/Rmmte. 2 BR, 1.5 BA. 3712 W. Parkview Dr. Westside, off Kinser Pk. $1150/mo. 812-798-1421 3 BR, 2 BA, W/D, yard. 714 S. High Street. Avail. now. $1590/mo. Text 415-235-1336.

Misc. for Sale 12 pc. dinnerware set w/4 dinner & salad plates, bowls + 12 pc silverware. $15 yafwang@hotmail.com

TRANSPORTATION Colts hemet and football in great cond. $450. 812-825-7244 or 812-876-3112

Mirrors: 2 Solid Light Oak Frame size 3’10” x 3’10”. Comes w/ wall fastener. $50. 812-327-7033 Organizational bookshelf in good condition. Ready for pick up. $25. dikang@iu.edu

2011 Mini Cooper. Great cond., 80K miles. Heated seats, sun roof, $7000, obo. kkmclean@iu.edu

Fujifilm X-T10 camera. 16-50 mm lens. Incl. soft case. Like new. $600. neg. bishen@indiana.edu Glass Pane: pebble glass. Suitable room divider, art proj. Like new, $50. 812-336-2569

2013 Hyundai Elantra Limited GLS. 121k mi. Well maintained, clean title. hantun@indiana.edu

Graco Booster Car Seat Good cond., lightly used. Pick up only. $10. xx15@iu.edu Indoor Wall Bike Rack. Holds 2 bikes, may be able to hold 4. Good cond., $50. 3177508046 Katana machete. 1055 carbon steel. 26’’ blade, polymer 12.25’’ handle. $35. 812-272-9547

Automobiles 2011 BMW 328i. 65,000 mi. Regularly maintained, clean title. $13,500 ppiriyam@indiana.edu

Drawing set w/ 2 portfolios, drawing board, metal ruler, sketch paper. $10. bishen@indiana.edu

Smithsonian species book- “Animals”. $10. bishen@indiana.edu

Large dresser from early 1800s. 6 drawers, ornate. $1000, obo. 812-360-5551

Physiology P215 Lab Workbook. Used. Has notes in it. $10. aclaymil@iu.edu

Yamaha AC1m acousticelectric guitar w/ case . In great cond., bright sound. $300. acsher@iu.edu

Full size bed, mattress, box spring, dresser, night stand, humidifier, lamp. $200. zhannanx@iu.edu

IKEA Sultan Havberg full bed and mattress in great cond. $130. 812-391-9746

NCLEX study materials, nursing textbooks, anatomy models for sale. marecoll@iu.edu

Baby Grand Piano. Good cond., $900. 812-360-3801

Regulation size slate pool table w/ all accessories. Good cond. $500. 317-679-2543

1 BR unfurn. sublease in 3 BR, Stadium Crossing twnhs. w/ 2 male rmmtes. $420/mo.+ utils. First 2 months’ rent incl. 765-617-6658

Macroeconomics: $20. Microeconomics: $20. ICORE: $30, Finite: $10. dawars@indiana.edu

Instruments

Floor lamp: $10. Black futon: $40.Imported carpet from India: $35. dawars@indiana.edu

Futon frame & mattress with wood headboard and footboard. Great cond. $40. prgholso@iu.edu

Textbooks I-CORE full set of 7 books from 2017. Good cond., $100. krstreic@iu.edu

Acoustic Electric Guitar w/ acessories. Excellent cond. $130. For more info: mhouston@iu.edu

Large analog JVC TV. Comes w/ converter. $40, will deliver. 812-855-6172 LUCID full-sized dual layered 10” gel memory foam mattress. $150, obo. nduesler@iu.edu

Vinyl albums at “Junk in the Trunk Sale” on Aug. 18. 2100 S Henderson. 630-942-1602

White tea table/TV stand: $25. Small white coffee table: $20. dikang@iu.edu

Epson Printer/Fax/ Scanner. Like new cond. With ink. $25. dawars@indiana.edu

Beautiful, singlefamily home, 3901 E. Breckenmore Drive, 3800 sq. ft., 4 BR/Study, $2900/month. Available now! Call 812-322-4799.

PAVILION

Computers

32 inch Samsung LED TV. Like new, no damage. No box. $100. obo atpace@indiana.edu

Avail. Aug.: 3 BR, 1 BA. W/D, basement, garage. 208 E. 16th St. $1000 + utils. 812-339-2830

335

220

THEUrBANSTATioN.CoM 812.955.0135

Class aid for college student w/ autism. $12.32/hr. 812-320-8581

2620 E. 10th St. NOW HIRING: Cook: $10.00/hr., Customer Service: $9.50/hr., Delivery Drivers: $5.50 /hr. + tips + $1/delivery. Breader: $10.00/ hr. Apply at store location or online at: wingsxtremeu.com

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

Available august

General Employment

Stylish luxury queen size mattress frame. Cream white, like new. $600. yangyiro@iu.edu

MacBook Air laptop in perfect condition. Less than 1 year old. $900. fjpatel@indiana.edu

Close to Campus

WALK To campus

EMPLOYMENT

410

Lot for sale in children’s area of Valhalla Gardens. $800. Can move. Call: 812-723-0179.

Unused Globe fish tail skateboard in like new condition. $60. bishen@indiana.edu

Set of 2 end tables (20”x 20”) w/ shelves & 1 coffee table (28”x42”). $100. 812-369-2425

White microwave: $25. Multipurpose table: $20. Coffee table: $40. dawars@indiana.edu

415

Announcements

420

110

317-661-1808

2 BR next to new Informatics! On-site laundry/parking. 812-333-9579 or

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Serta queen size mattress with metal frame. In good cond. $140. dikang@iu.edu

Professional blender with additional blade. Like new, powerful. $60. dikang@iu.edu

goodrents.homestead.com

Unopened Australian edition of Cards Against Humanity. $10, obo. atpace@indiana.edu

450

**Avail Now** 1 BR, 1 BA. $485/mo. utils. incl.

Air Conditioner. Comes w/ remote to change temp. Great cond. $120. yitseng@indiana.edu

Houses

Round outdoor iron table. 27”x24”. Comes w/ 2 chairs. $200 812-369-2425

505

Apt. Unfurnished

MERCHANDISE Appliances

Misc. for Sale Suitcase: Fits “carry-on” regs. Comes w/ wheels, pull handle, & 5 zipper pkts. $10. 812-327-7033

2014 Ford Fusion Hybrid. 107k mi. 44/41 mpg. in city/highway. $11,970. abbsmile@iu.edu 520

ONLINE POSTING: All classified line ads are posted online at idsnews.com/classifieds at no additional charge.

Furniture Ottoman: Suede, tan, upholstery for living rm. Seats 4, like new. $15 812-327-7033

430

PAYMENT: All advertising is done on a cash in advance basis unless credit has been established. The IDS accepts Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, cash, check or money order.

310

REFUNDS: If you cancel your ad before the final run date, the IDS will refund the difference in price. A minimum of one day will be charged.

COPY ERRORS: The IDS must be notified of errors before 3 p.m. the date of the first publication of your ad. The IDS is only responsible for errors published on the first insertion date. The IDS will rerun your ad 1 day when notified before 3 p.m. of the first insertion date. 405

HOUSING ADS: All advertised housing is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act. Refer to idsnews.com for more info.

COPY CHANGES: Ad copy can be changed at no additional charge when the same number of lines are maintained. If the total number of lines changes, a new ad will be started at the first day rate.

325

AD ACCEPTANCE: All advertising is subject to approval by the IDS.

420

CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING POLICIES

435

CLASSIFIEDS

Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018 idsnews.com

435

12

To place an ad: go online, call 812-855-0763 or stop by Franklin Hall 130 from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday - Friday. Full advertising policies are available online. idsnews.com/classifieds

Bicycles Kent Thruster 700C Fixie bike + helmet, red/black, good cond. $80. choi254@indiana.edu

Mountain Bike. Aspen 21 Speed. New & in box. Can deliver. $250. most@iu.edu

REI Barrow Cargo Bike. 24 speed, disc brakes, has less than 90 miles. $575 obo. rnourie@iu.edu

ELKINS APARTMENTS

NOW LEASING FOR 2019 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 BR Houses, Townhouses and Apartments Quality campus locations

ELKINS APARTMENTS

339-2859 www.elkinsapts.com

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Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018  

The Indiana Daily Student is an independent student newspaper covering Indiana University, IU sports and the city of Bloomington, Indiana.

Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018  

The Indiana Daily Student is an independent student newspaper covering Indiana University, IU sports and the city of Bloomington, Indiana.