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IDS Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

Things to do before summer ends page 5

$6 million IU center to study social media misinformation By Ellen Hine emhine@iu.edu | @ellenmhine

Social media transformed how humans communicate with each other, with billions of pieces of information sent everyday. Now IU scientists will study the effects of social media in a new $6 million center. IU’s Observatory on Social Media is a collaboration between the IU Network Science Institute, the Media School and School of Informatics, Computing and Engineering, according to a press release. The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, a nonprofit that supports journalism and the arts across the United States, donated $3 million to the center. The center is part of the Knight Foundation’s $50 million investment into projects that research the role of technology in democracies.  According to the release, the center will research how information and misinformation are spread online as well as provide students, journalists and citizens TY VINSON | IDS

SEE SOCIAL MEDIA, PAGE 4

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR What a summer. This is supposed to be a quiet, relatively calm time to cover IU and the Bloomington community, but things have certainly been interesting the past few months. Here’s a little recap. We covered the death of 12-yearold Eduardo Posso, and the subsequent court appearances of his father and stepmother charged with his murder by neglect and abuse. We covered the alleged white supremacists at the farmers’ market, and we were the publication who’s story was referenced when it was picked up by a national outlet. Later that month, then a tornado hit Monroe County and devastated homes there, we walked through the debris and spoke to those affected. We published an in-depth piece on the 1999 murder of IU graduate student Won-Joon Yoon, who was murdered by a white supremacist. Swastika tile removals. Board of Trustees election results. A stabbing on campus during a Jacobs School of Music summer camp. A burlesque show. D-Day. Struggling farmers. You get the gist. I want to let you in on a little notso-secret. Summers at the Indiana Daily Student are famously shortstaffed, but this summer was particularly skeletal. Our stellar photo editor was pretty much our only photographer, people had to edit multiple desks and work in multiple roles. We’ve all had to stretch and strain ourselves for the last couple months, but it’s been worth it to tell these stories and serve this community. We’re a small but dedicated team, and your support means the world to us. We’ve done our best. We’re not perfect — because who’s perfect at 20 years old? — and we know there have been times we fell short. We welcome your critiques and comments wholeheartedly, because without them we would never get better. Personally, this summer has been maybe the most fulfilling one of my life so far. Summer’s end is always bittersweet, but this one is particularly so: I’m so grateful to have been given the opporunity to lead the IDS. I just wish I had more time. Side note: To the reader who emailed me simply to say “get a clue,” I promise you that I’m trying. Thanks for reading this summer, and we hope you’ll keep reading in the fall semester. Without you, this would be pointless.

Annie Aguiar Editor-in-Chief

Ellen Hine Managing editor

A range of puppies and cats are for sale at Delilah’s, a local pet store in Bloomington. The Animal Control Commission introduced a policy proposal that would only allow pet stores to get their animals from shelters or rescue organizations in an effort to eliminate puppy mill usage.

Can’t teach an old shop new rules New city pet store policy proposal causes dispute over animal sourcing By Claire Peters clapete@iu.edu | @claire_peterss

For a bunch of dog lovers, the discourse surrounding pet protective policies has gotten ruff. The Animal Control Commission of Bloomington introduced a policy proposal in early July that would only allow pet stores to get their animals from shelters or rescue organizations in an effort to eliminate puppy mill usage.  “The goal is to move animal care forward, and we believe our community does not want animals come up from puppy mills,” said Rebecca Warren, the head of the commission and executive director of the Monroe County Humane Association.  While the proposal was passed unanimously by the commission, it is still in the early stages of development. The commission has done similar work in the past, such as providing policy recommendations to keep dogs out of hot cars and to not allow pets to be outside in inclement weather. 

The proposal has been sent to the mayor’s office to be reviewed, and Warren said the commission is reaching out to local pet stores to get feedback.

“I’m hoping through conversation we can find better sourcing for animals in our community.” Rebecca Warren, the head of the Animal Control Commission of Bloomington and executive director of the Monroe County Humane Association

“It’s a direct impact to their business,” Warren said. “I’m hoping through conversation we can find better sourcing for animals in our community.” One Bloomington pet store, Delilah’sPet Shop, has not taken the proposal well. Previous owner and founder Karen Kidwell said the proposal could cause them to not sell animals anymore. “Shelter dogs aren’t for everyone,”

Kidwell said. Kidwell said it was important for families to buy dogs that are socialized when they are puppies. Shelter dogs that were abused could cause harm to new families that buy them, she said.  “They never forget anything,” Kidwell said. “They’re going to be wary of that group.” Delilah’s recently received public scrutiny when Facebook users accused the store’s employees of keeping puppies in inhumane conditions in the basement, saying they left the dogs there to die. Many of the Facebook comments alleging the abuse have since been deleted. Kidwell said she received hateful messages, including one telling her she “should have a bullet put between her eyes.”  Kidwell said a puppy had a disease that staff members did not want to spread to the other animals. A veterinarian recommended brief isolation, so SEE PET STORES, PAGE 4

Health department discusses ethics, budget By Avery Williams avefwill@iu.edu | @Avery_faye

The Monroe County Health Department wants to become an accredited public health institution recognized by the Public Health Accreditation Board. But before that can happen, the department has to show it can appropriately discuss ethical dilemmas. A new ethics board was discussed at the Monroe County Board of Health meeting Tuesday night as well as disease demographics, art and more. The board meets quarterly to discuss disease prevention and public health. Some board members were unsure about the creation of a separate ethics committee. Suggested ideas included a small number of board members serving on an ethics committee in addition to the board and involving a member outside of the medical community, as well as a lawyer, on the hypothetical committee. “This is not a decision-making body, it doesn’t say yes or no,” chairperson Mark Norrell said. “It’s a deliberating committee.” The board is waiting for additional information on accreditation requirements before making a decision. IU Health licensed practical nurse Sally Hudson came to

ALEX DERYN | IDS

Monroe County Health Department administrator Penny Caudill speaks July 23 in the Monroe County Health Department. The meeting discussed an ethics board and disease intervention.

the meeting to read the Monroe County Public Health Clinic’s report. Hudson said there have been 54 new cases of hepatitis A in Monroe County since an outbreak was declared November 2017. The clinic has organized 33 hepatitis A vaccination clinics and 14 back-to-school shot clinics for 5th graders, Hudson said. It is planning to organize additional clinics.  Hudson also addressed another Bloomington outbreak:

mumps. She said the outbreak, which started this spring at IU, is over, and a significant percentage of the 53 people infected had been vaccinated for mumps twice. Hudson said someone who has undergone the two recommended vaccinations for mumps still has a 12% change of obtaining the disease.  Norrell said men made up about two-thirds of those infected in the Bloomington outbreak. A large number of mumps cases originated at an IU fraternity, but

not everyone affected was an IU student. Monroe County Health Department administrator Penny Caudill spoke about the health department and Indiana Recovery Alliance’s weekly community clean-up walks. Volunteers search for abandoned syringes on the walks. Caudill said one way they choose walking sites is by using data from phone calls requesting disposal in a specific area. “They’ve come back with more trash than they have syringes,” Caudill said.  Norrell asked if the walks could become a community service opportunity. Caudill said she would look into seeing if it were possible.  Finally, Caudill said the Monroe County Health Department will hold a ribbon cutting ceremony and open house for the reveal of the “Ramp Up Awareness” mural on Aug 2. The mural intends to promote awareness of public health services such as the public health clinic and Futures Family Planning Clinic.  Small changes were made to the 2020 budget with a unanimous vote. The health department will seek approval on its budget from the Monroe County Council.  The tentative date for the next Board of Health meeting is Oct. 1.


Indiana Daily Student

2

NEWS

Thursday, July 25, 2019 idsnews.com

Editor Ellen Hine news@idsnews.com

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICES

Special counsel Robert Mueller makes a statement about the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election at the Justice Department on May 29 in Washington, D.C. Mueller testified today before Congress.

Mueller testifies that investigation didn’t exonerate Trump From Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — Robert S. Mueller III, in his first congressional testimony on the Russia probe, directly contradicted President Donald Trump’s false claims that he was exonerated by the investigation and said he considered the Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential campaign a direct threat to American democracy. “Over the course of my career, I’ve seen a number of challenges to our democracy. The Russian government’s effort to interfere in our election is among the most serious,” Mueller said at the start of the highstakes hearing. Mueller, 74, provided mostly staccato yes and no answers to inquiries from Democrats and Republicans, who tried to maximize their limited opportunity to interrogate the former FBI director about what he did and did not do during the Russia investigation. “Did you actually totally exonerate the president?”

asked Rep. Jerrold Nadler, a New York Democrat and chairman of the Judiciary Committee. “No,” Mueller responded. The former special counsel also confirmed that Justice Department guidelines prevent charging a sitting president with a crime, so prosecutors did not consider whether Trump had broken the law. But Mueller said a president could be indicted after leaving office. Republicans worked to undermine confidence in the investigation and accused Mueller of overstepping his bounds by declaring that Trump was not exonerated. “The bedrock principle of our justice system is the presumption of innocence,” said Rep. John Ratcliffe, RTexas. “Everyone is entitled to it, including sitting presidents.” Mueller said he agreed to the special counsel appointment in May 2017 because he believed the investigation “was of paramount in-

terest to the nation.” “We worked quietly, thoroughly and with integrity so the public would have full confidence in the outcome,” he added. The former special counsel, who was subpoenaed by

“Over the course of my career, I’ve seen a number of challenges to our democracy. The Russian government’s effort to interfere in our election is among the most serious.” Robert Mueller, Special counsel

House Democrats, is scheduled to appear for three hours before the House Judiciary Committee and then two hours more before the House Intelligence Committee. Mueller has vowed to only discuss material that appeared in the public ver-

sion of his 448-page report, which was released in midApril. The Justice Department this week officially directed him not to stray from the report’s written findings. But lawmakers took turns trying to nudge or goad Mueller to answer additional questions in the nationally televised hearings. In his opening statement, Nadler praised Mueller’s service as special counsel and said Congress had a responsibility to address the evidence he uncovered. “You recognized as much when you said ‘the Constitution requires a process other than the criminal justice system to formally accuse a sitting president of wrongdoing,’” a reference to Mueller’s report. The first hearing is expected to focus on the second half of Mueller’s report, which examines whether Trump obstructed justice by trying to end or limit the Russia investigation. The second hearing will deal mostly with Moscow’s interference in the 2016 election

Man and woman use scam to buy guns at multiple Rural King locations By Claire Peters clapete@iu.edu | @claire_peterss

A man and a woman used fraudulent product returns and gift cards to buy a Sig Sauer rifle and ammunition over the weekend at Rural King. James Rodgers, 37, went Saturday into the Rural King on West State Road 45, grabbed a pair of $350 boots off the shelf and took them to the customer service desk to return them, said Bloomington Police Department Lt. John Kovach. Since he did not have a receipt, the employee didn’t

allow him to return them. Rodgers then stole them. On Sunday, he asked 27-year-old Amber Whaley to return the boots in exchange for gift cards, Kovach said. She returned Monday to purchase a Sig Sauer AR-15 rifle and ammunition valued between $700-$800. Police identified Rodgers and Whaley through Rural King video surveillance. After police questioned the two Monday, Whaley admitted to returning the stolen boots and buying the rifle but said she was returning the boots for her

mother. Rodgers admitted to walking out of the store with the boots and taking possession of the rifle but told police he never asked Whaley to return the boots. The police were able to recover the rifle and the shotgun from Rodgers’ apartment. When police contacted Rural King’s loss prevention office, the office said the two had performed this type of scam multiple times throughout the area. Rodgers told police he had repeated the scam in Martinsville and Bedford,

where Whaley bought him a Mossburg shotgun valued at $400. Rodgers couldn’t buy firearms personally due to having several felony convictions that identify him as a serious violent felon, including weapons offense, Kovach said. Whaley told police she didn’t know what intentions he had for buying the guns. Whaley received a misdemeanor citation for theft. Rodgers was charged with theft and the possession of firearms as a serious violent felon.

Man reportedly leaves hospital while still wearing heart monitor, breaks into office, steals company car By Claire Peters clapete@iu.edu | @claire_peterss

A man wearing a heart monitor reportedly broke into Psara Technologies on Sunday night and stole a company car. Before he came to the Psara Technologies building, James Kee, 57, left IU Health Bloomington Hospital against medical advice,

Bloomington Police Department Lt. John Kovach said. He left with his telemetry monitor still on, which measures a heart’s electrical activity. After leaving the hospital, Kee traveled to Psara Technologies’ office at 1550 West Third St., Kovach said. He broke into the office using an angle iron to break

through the glass on the door. Kee ransacked the office, but Kovach said nothing appeared stolen. Kee then stole the vehicle, a 2000 Toyota Tacoma, and drove it down the road. After receiving a call from a Psara Technologies employee at 5 a.m. Monday, police found the car near South College Avenue and West

Third Street. Kee had walked away from the vehicle, but he left his heart monitor inside. Police used the monitor to identify Kee. When the police were able to find him Monday morning, he refused to talk when they took him in for questioning. Kee was arrested for burglary and vehicle theft.

by hacking and releasing internal Democratic Party emails and spreading disinformation on social media. Democrats hope to capitalize on Mueller’s testimony to highlight what they consider serious wrongdoing by Trump, including embracing Russian assistance to his campaign or trying to fire the special counsel — episodes they say have not received adequate public attention. Some Democrats see Mueller’s testimony as their last best chance to build public support to start impeachment hearings against the president. A House vote last week found only 95 Democrats willing to consider an impeachment resolution, less than half those needed to pass it. Republicans want to undermine public confidence in the investigation by highlighting what they see as political bias and improper tactics by Mueller and his team. Trump has repeatedly claimed that Mueller exon-

erated him — even though the report specifically said it does not _ and his allies are looking to convince voters it’s time to move on. They point out that no one was charged with conspiring with Russians to influence the election. The Mueller investigation led to criminal charges against 34 people, including 25 Russians. Among those charged were Trump’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort; his former national security adviser, Michael Flynn; and his former lawyer and fixer, Michael Cohen. Manafort was convicted at trial, while Flynn and Cohen pleaded guilty. Roger Stone, Trump’s longtime political adviser, is scheduled to stand trial in November on charges of lying to Congress about his conversations involving WikiLeaks. Stone has pleaded not guilty. By Chris Megerian and Jennifer Haberkorn Los Angeles Times

$10,000 worth of skincare products stolen from Bloomington Clinic By Claire Peters clapete@iu.edu | @claire_peterss

Police were called Monday morning to Bloomington Skin Care and Acne Clinic after the store’s entire inventory was stolen in the night. The owner of the business next door noticed a window was broken in during the night and contacted the owner of the store, said Bloomington Police Department Detective Sgt. Dana Cole. The only employee with keys to the store told the

police she had locked up before she had left. The store’s entire inventory, including an estimated $10,000 worth of high end skin-care products, was stolen, Cole said. The products stolen were from high-end brands such as Circadia, Control Corrective and Tizo. A 3.5 ounce Tizo sunscreen is valued in the $40 price range on Amazon, with other products similarly priced. Cole said there was no other physical evidence other than the broken window. The investigation is inactive.

Annie Aguiar Editor-in-Chief Ellen Hine Managing Editor

Vol. 165, No. 35 © 2019

www.idsnews.com Newsroom: 812-855-0760 Business Office: 812-855-0763 Fax: 812-855-8009

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The Indiana Daily Student publishes Mondays and Thursdays throughout the year while University classes are in session. Part of IU Student Media, the IDS is a self-supporting auxiliary University enterprise. Founded on Feb. 22, 1867, the IDS is chartered by the IU Board of Trustees, with the editor-in-chief as final content authority. The IDS welcomes reader feedback, letters to the editor and online comments. Advertising policies are availale on the current rate card. Readers are entitled to single copies. Taking multiple copies may constitute theft of IU property, subject to prosecution. Paid subscriptions are entered through third-class postage (USPS No. 261960) at Bloomington, IN 47405.

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Indiana Daily Student

OPINION

Editor Abby Malala opinion@idsnews.com

Thursday, July 25, 2019 idsnews.com

3

POLITICAL POWERS

ILLUSTRATION BY MADELYN POWERS | IDS

SIDE WITH SANDERS

Donald Trump is inarguably racist Elsbeth Sanders is a junior in molecular life sciences

Somehow we are still having the argument about whether or not President Donald Trump is racist. Trump has been followed by accusations of housing discrimination, called Mexicans rapists, pushed for a Muslim ban and started the birther movement. Look me in the eyes and tell me he isn’t racist. Yet, it’s a scandal to call him racist in Congress because apparently it’s bad manners. Everyone needs to stop trying to be respectful toward Donald Trump and call it like it is. These are not new facts. He has always been racist, and he always will be racist. It’s a strategy that works for him, and it is showing no signs of stopping. His recent tweets about congresswomen Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Illhan Omar, Ayanna Pressley and Rashida Tlaib, however, are on a whole new level. He is specifically inciting racism against four congresswomen of color, two of which are the first Muslim woman in Congress ever. He is telling these actual members of Congress who were elected by the people that they have no place in American politics because the “places from which they came” are “crime-infested.” Trump’s mind has a wire that got disconnected and prevents him from using his critical thinking skills. Two

TY VINSON | IDS

President Trump points at the media and calls them fake news during the NRA-ILA Leadership Forum on April 26 in Indianapolis. Trump spoke about the history of gun violence in America, and he introduced people who have experience dealing with intruders and shooters.

of the three congresswomen were actually born in the U.S., not that that should even matter. Rep. Illhan Omar has been drawing the majority of Trump’s recent scorn, however, since she is a naturalized U.S. citizen born in Somalia. The rhetoric here is astounding. Trump is saying

loud and clear that people who aren’t white — especially people who aren’t white and who were born abroad — are not true Americans. Despite Omar’s completely legitimate citizenship status, Trump still says she does not belong in American politics. Put nothing past Donald

Trump. He is the president of the United States, yet he is still stooping low enough to support completely unsubstantiated rumors about Omar just to prove a point. Just three days after his racist tweets, he told an interviewer, “Well, there’s a lot of talk about the fact that she was married to her brother.”

That’s such a disgusting thing for anyone to say, let alone a president to say about a current Congress member. When people say you have to be the bigger person, they mean you should just do the dishes anyway even though it’s your roommates turn. They don’t

mean you should ignore racism for the sake of respect. The Congress members who did not want to support the statement that Trump is racist are cowards. Silence is compliance when you’re in such a position of power. elssande@iu.edu

HEAR ME OUT

Extension of the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund is well overdue Tristan Jackson is a sophomore in journalism.

“#NeverForget the brave men and women who died on 9/11 and those who sacrifice to this day to protect and defend us,” Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., said in a tweet on Sept. 11, 2016. “Let’s #neverforget those lost on #September11 and honor those who fight to defend us. I pray we work together for peace,” Paul tweeted a year later, again on 9/11.  “Our nation suffered a tremendous loss on #September11th 2001. #NeverForget the families and loved ones lost or the fallen soldiers that lost their lives defending our

country after,” Paul tweeted again in 2018. These are all empty words from a spineless senator.  After clearing the House of Representatives with a 402-12 vote, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y. proposed unanimous consent of the Senate to pass an extension to the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund, ultimately to be shot down by Paul.  Concerns over how this program will be funded until the proposed extension is set to end in 2090 are why Paul claims to object.  “It has long been my feeling that we need to address our massive debt in the country…and therefore any

new spending that we are approaching, any new program that is going to have the longevity of 70, 80 years should be offset by cutting spending that’s less valuable,” Paul saidon the Senate floor Wednesday. In other words, the estimated $10.2 billion over the next 10 years is simply too much to pay in a country with a deficit of over $22 trillion without cuts elsewhere. The fact that almost 18 years later this is even a discussion is horrendous, and it’s even worse that there would be an objection for any reason. Thankfully, on Tuesday the Senate voted on the

bill, and it passed in a landslide 97-2 vote. The bill now heads to the desk of President Donald Trump, who is expected to sign it. Our first responders are dying, and even more are out of work due to illness. What Paul did isn’t noble, it’s a joke. The passing of this bill was liable to happen; 73 senators had already sponsored the bill before the vote. All Paul did was prolong the inevitable and make sick and dying people wait on the support they desperately need and deserve. The fund was set to stop taking claims in December 2020, and there are over

19,000 unpaid claims that need to be addressed. I get it, this money has to come from somewhere, but curbing the national debt should not be put on the backs of dying first responders. The irony of this story is unreal. The same week that the GOP is attacking congresswomen for being “unAmerican,” a Republican senator has the nerve to stand up and block a bill that supports arguably the most American group of people there is. Ultimately, Paul failed. Thankfully, most of our senators have at least a little bit of empathy for these people, but Paul’s actions are inex-

cusable and pathetic.    Now, in some cases time really wouldn’t be an issue. But when we’re talking about people who are dying from cancer or unable to work as a result of exposure to toxic chemicals, time isn’t really something that can be afforded to waste. I am happy to know those men and women will soon get the support they deserve, but it’s a stain on our government that it has taken this long for the fund to become permanent. Rand Paul and any who defend his actions should be ashamed of themselves. tripjack@iu.edu


Thursday, July 25, 2019 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

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» PET STORES

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

staff kept the dog in gated area in the basement of their newly built store while it received treatment. Kidwell said she was worried the proposal would put Delilah’s out of business. Employees have created a petition against it directed at the City of Bloomington.  According to the petition, Delilah’s only get its animals from humane individual breeders across the state and resell them at the store. It said people should at least have an option when they are looking to purchase a pet. “We just want to educate people that not all pet stores are out to just make money but instead provide an option to those who don't have the means to adopt or rescue,” the petition read.  As of Wednesday, the petition had almost 400 signatures, with a goal of 500.  Virgil Sauder, the director of Animal Care and Control at the Bloomington Animal Shelter, said a policy proposal targeting bad breeding practices is something that aligns with the shelter’s goals. “As an animal welfare shelter, we want to help support good care for the animals,” Sauder said. “We want to have healthy pets coming from good sources.”  Although this would stop to pet stores working with

TY VINSON | IDS

Lori Shields brushes a poodle Tuesday at Delilah’s, a local Bloomington pet store. Delilah’s claims to only get its animals from humane individual breeders across the state and then resell them at the store, according to an online petition.

» SOCIAL MEDIA

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 resources on how to identify and fight misinformation and attempts to sway public opinion online.

Horoscope

breeders, inhumane or not, he said the proposal would not put breeders out of business since they could still independently breed and sell

their pets. “It’s the start of a process,” Sauder said. “The proposal is just one recommendation.”  He said he is working

with the commission to help guide its work with the local pet stores and pet shelters. Warren said more work needs to be done on the pro-

posal before the commission votes on it. “There’s lots of footwork that needs to be done, we need to figure out what it’s

going to look like in action,” Warren said. “I hope that everyone realizes there are great animals in shelters and rescues situations.”

The center will also create a new master’s degree program for data journalism and create new technology to study the abuse of social media. It will expand upon the work already done by

computer science and informatics professor Filippo Menczer and the IU Network Science Institute. "This new center comes at a time when there has never been more confusion

about news: its sources, its accuracy, its effect on the public," Media School dean James Shanahan said in the release. "Bringing journalists and students into contact with the best technol-

ogy for assessing news legitimacy and accuracy will be an important step forward in the evolution of journalism in a new media environment." Shanahan will be a co-

leader of the center along with faculty from the Media School and the School of Informatics, Computing and Engineering as well as staff from the IU Network Science Institute.

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) Today is a 7 — Huddle with your team. Don't force an issue or risk breakage. Help others see the big picture. Play your part. Go for distance, not speed.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 7 — Passions are in high gear. Look before you leap. Slow to avoid sparking someone with a short fuse. Stay flexible, and roll with the tide.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is an 8 — Focus on a professional challenge. Prepare your presentation before going public. Misunderstandings abound; clarify as you go. A sudden move changes the game.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is an 8 — Resist the temptation to throw your money around. Stick to your financial plan. Clean up to discover valuable resources you didn't know you had.

BLISS

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 7 — Stay objective in a tense situation with your partner. Save time and upset by compromising. Change direction intuitively. A creative spark can ignite. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is an 8 — Plan thoroughly before implementation. Prioritize your own health and wellness. Maintain practices and routines as long as you can. Balance activity with rest.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 7 — Passions could heat up. Avoid provoking your partner's sensitivities. When in doubt, listen to your heart. Keep harsh words to yourself. Let your love lead.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 7 — Research and study facts and data. Ignore rumors or gossip. Keep your tone respectful. You won't agree with everyone. Stay objective. Monitor the news closely.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is an 8 — A difference in priorities could arise at home. Work out misunderstandings immediately, or they could grow. Family matters require attention. Avoid risky propositions.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 7 — Take advantage of windfall apples. Ignore rumors or gossip. Focus to gather in a nice harvest. Tend your garden, and sidestep distractions. Hold your temper.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 7 — Consider consequences before leaping into action or saying something you might later regret. Minimize risk. You're making a good impression. A surprising development merits thought. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Today is a 6 — Slow down. Temporary confusion could lead you into a costly mistake. Dreams show you the right path. Consider things from a higher perspective. © 2019 By Nancy Black Distributed by Tribune Media Services, INC. All Rights Reserved

HARRY BLISS

Crossword

L.A. Times Daily Crossword

Publish your comic on this page. The IDS is accepting applications for student comic strips for the summer & fall 2019 semesters. Email five samples and a brief description of your idea to adviser@indiana.edu by Aug. 1. Submissions will be reviewed and selections will be made by the editor-in-chief. Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

su do ku

ACROSS

Difficulty Rating: How to play: Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 grid contains the digits 1 through 9, without repeating a number in any one row, column or 3x3 grid.

Answer to previous puzzle

1 6 10 13 14 15 16 19 20 21 23 24 27 29 30 31 32 34 35 38 41 42 46 47 48

“Welcome to Kauai!” Channel bobber Persian for “crown” “Service at the Speed of Sound” fast-food chain Tolstoy title name Moment or way lead-in Place to get gifts? Web statistic Cruet contents “Yay me!” French friend Place to get fireplace equipment? Hedy of Hollywood Stick with a boat? Singer DiFranco Roman fountain “Rebel Yell” singer Billy Grasp, in slang Place to get movie actors? Put up with Techniques Liver spreads Prefix with catastrophe Online help page “My turn”

49 Place to get laundry detergent? 53 Shopkeeper who by his own admission sells “surprisingly expensive” penny candy at the Kwik-E-Mart 54 Silent performers 55 Oz. or lb. 56 “Instinct” star Cumming 57 Place to get help with estate planning? 61 Park it, so to speak 62 Slope overlooking a loch 63 Speak formally 64 Pair of allies? 65 “G’day” addressee 66 Put on the back burner

10 Royal topper 11 Ring-shaped 12 Host of a “garage” show since 2014 17 Jordan’s Queen __ 18 Berth place 22 Composer Satie 24 __ fixe 25 They may be pitched 26 Spanish surrealist 28 Say with conviction 32 Mosul native 33 Calendar square 34 FBI agent 36 Christmas poem contraction 37 Tach nos. 38 Ray 39 Total or partial event 40 Outlook alternative 43 One steeping in a cup 44 One-sided, in legal proceedings 45 Huge surprise 47 Complain 48 Analogy words 50 Conquers 51 Pester 52 One sporting a mic 56 “Back forty” unit 58 Tech giant that sold its PC division to Lenovo 59 New Deal agcy. 60 Drift (off)

Look for the crossword daily in the comics section of the Indiana Daily Student. Find the solution for the daily crossword here. Answer to previous puzzle

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

It can cover a lot “Dallas” production studio Former Sound neither an actor nor a hiker wants to hear Top fighter pilot Dyeing art “I give up!” Peace activist Yoko Thanksgiving veggie

© Puzzles by Pappocom

BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!

TIM RICKARD


SUMMER

Thursday, July 25, 2019 idsnews.com

Editor Annie Aguiar editor@idsnews.com

5

Getting out BEFORE the students get back Summer is almost over.

Go

Soon, the fall semester will be in full swing, and thousands of students will come to Bloomington, be it for the first time or for another year of classes. Here are some things to do before it all starts again.

for

as wim at a loc al l ake

Go to the IMU waiting in li Starbucks without ne for six hours If you ’re ove bars b r 21, g efore weeken o to some lo d warr iors ta cal ke ove r

Go to a r w h il e ite s t a u r a n t o n K ir k is n w in b e t w e’ t l u n c h s p o t so o d en class es

t s’ marke r e m r a f g Visit the ay mornin d r u t a S on a

Go to a local coffee shop before it becomes a study spot again

Shop a it’s fi t College M lled w a ith ne ll before w stu dents

c ve-in day traffi Prepare for mo le (as usual) to be unbearab

ry fore eve e b s ’ r a e other B rents do M a p t a r i e t a h E t dent and u t s w e n

Park with ease while you still can

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Indiana Daily Student

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ARTS

Thursday, July 25, 2019 idsnews.com

Editor Abby Malala arts@idsnews.com

MOVIE COLUMN

Guys, we need to talk about the 'Cats' trailer Chris Forrester is a junior in journalism.

Guys, we need to talk about the “Cats” trailer. No, we can’t ignore this. Yes, I’m sorry. I’ve never really believed we live in a just, good, happy universe, but if you were to pinpoint the exact moment when I lost faith in all that is good, it would probably be sometime around 6:30 p.m. Thursday, July 18, when I watched the new “Cats” trailer for the first time. Good. God. Adapted by an Oscarwinning filmmaker—Tom Hooper, director of Best Picture winner “The King’s Speech”—from the beloved musical and starring a cavalcade of A-listers — Judi Dench! Idris Elba! Taylor Swift!—”Cats” seemed like a surefire hit. And then came the trailer and with it a horde of hideous, half-cat, half-human hybrids. And a really, really big question:  Why? I found myself baffled by how spectacularly Hooper flubbed this. And at the core of all that is unholy about this new “Cats” trailer—a great deal, mind you, including nipple-less fuzzy cat breasts—is the very same issue beneath most of what hasn’t worked in big blockbuster movies for the last two decades. Why CGI? I understand the desire to assemble an A-list cast to bring the musical’s felines to life. I understand the desire to render them kindasorta-humanoid. And I even understand the desire to make the stars’ faces visible to capitalize on the sheer insanity of “Oh my god, that cat is Judi Dench!” But nothing can aptly explain, or justify, the need for the movie’s protagonists to be scaled-down, half-feline, half-human, all horrific CGI monstrosities. First off, there’s the question of why Hooper even felt the need to go so heavy on the animation front. The characters are already humanoid cats, so there’s no legitimate reason why they couldn’t just be actors caked in makeup and fursuits. And think of how impressive it would be to see the world

MOVIE STILLS DATABASE

“Cats” is a film about a tribe of cats called the Jellicles who must decide yearly which one will ascend to the Heaviside Layer and come back to a new Jellicle life. The film will release Dec. 20.

around them brought to life with oversized sets to emphasize their feline size. But in opting for such a CGI-heavy representation of this story, he’s rooted his sensibilities firmly in the uncanny valley, crafting nightmare creatures that might make Wes Craven or Guillermo del Toro jealous. Beyond that, why even keep this live action? It’s a story that’s been told many, many times on stage with people in fursuits, though there are certainly formal

differences to capitalize on in telling “Cats” as a movie rather than as a stage play. The thing that so many filmmakers nowadays fail to remember is just how spellbinding and expressive animation can be as a medium. There’s a reason Disney made a name for itself with an entire canon of animated delights well before it put itself on the map as a big name in live action, too. There’s a reason studios like Pixar, Dreamworks and Illumination continue to pour

so many resources into animated filmmaking. It’s simple, really: Some stories are too good for live action. Take, for instance, last year’s Academy Award-winning “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” an immaculately crafted and genuinely transcendent stunner of a movie that wowed audiences of all ages. It’s imaginative, full of heart and the best comic book movie in years purely because it takes decades’

worth of comic book storytelling styles and lore and lovingly molds it into something all its own. It not only understands the heart of the narratives that inspired it, but it aptly translates the singular expressiveness and unique rhythm of comic storytelling onto the big screen in a way that so many superhero films before it failed to do. So why couldn’t “Cats” have taken notes from “Into the Spider-Verse” or the hundreds of other trail-

blazing animated films that forged their own visual language? Imagine “Cats” as a cartoon delight, a stop motion animated marvel or even a 3D animated family film in the vain of “Moana.” It would be way less horrific, way more expressive and all the more able to embrace its own gleeful weirdness. But alas, we’re stuck with Judi Dench Cat, and she’ll haunt us forever. chforres@iu.edu

‘Close Encounters of the Third Kind’ to be screened at Buskirk-Chumley in August By Chris Forrester chforres@indiana.edu| _Chrisforrester

The second screening in the Buskirk-Chumley Theater’s Summer Sci-Fi film series, “Close Encounters of

the Third Kind,” will screen at 7:30 p.m. Friday, August 9 at the Buskirk-Chumley Theater. Tickets to the screening are $5 and can be purchased online or at the theater’s box office. Doors open for the screening

at 7 p.m. Released in 1977, “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” is revered as one of the science fiction genre’s best, as well as a high point in the canon of its director. Steven

Spielberg also wrote the film, which stars Richard Dreyfuss and Teri Garr. “Cableman Roy Neary is one of several people who experience a close encounter of the first kind, witnessing UFOs

flying through the night sky,” according to a plot synopsis on the Buskirk-Chumley’s website. Spielberg released an original cut of the film in 1977. It was then rereleased in 1980 with an alternate ending.

“‘Close Encounters,’ which was already a wonderful film, now transcends itself; it’s one of the great moviegoing experiences,” wrote film critic Roger Ebert of the film’s 1980 rerelease.

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Connect with members of many diverse faiths at idsnews.com/religious Paid Advertising

Methodist

Non-Denominational

First United Methodist Church - Jubilee

Sherwood Oaks Christian Church

219 E. Fourth St. 812-332-6396

2700 E. Rogers Rd. 812-334-0206

fumcb.org Facebook: jubileebloomington.org Instagram: jubileebloomington Email: jubilee@fumcb.org

socc.org/cya facebook.com/socc.cya Twitter: @socc_cya Instagram: socc_cya

Contemporary: 9:30 a.m. & 11 a.m.

Wednesday: 7:30 p.m. @ Bloomington Sandwhich Company (118 E. Kirkwood Ave.)

Being in Bloomington, we love our college students, and think they are a great addition to the Sherwood Oaks Family. Wether an undergraduate or graduate student... from in-state, out of state, to our international community... Come join us as we strive to love God and love others better.

Connexion / Evangelical Community Church

Inter-Denominational

eccbloomington.org • cxiu.org Facebook: Connexion ECC Twitter: @connexionecc

111 S. Kimble Dr. 812-269-8975

Redeemer is a gospel-centered community on mission. Our vision is to see the gospel of Jesus Christ transform everything: our lives, our church, our city, and our world. We want to be instruments of gospel change in Bloomington and beyond. Chris Jones, Lead Pastor

Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Connexion: Sundays, 6 p.m. Connexion is the university ministry of ECC. We’re all about connecting students to the church in order to grow together in our faith. We meet weekly for worship, teaching, and fellowship as well as periodically for service projects, social events and more. Bob Whitaker, Senior Pastor Dan Waugh, Pastor of Adult Ministries

Nazarene

The Salvation Army

First Church of the Nazarene 700 W. Howe St. (across from the Building Trades Park) 812-332-2461 • www.b1naz.org bfcn@sbcglobal.net Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday Small Groups : 9:30 a.m., 4 p.m. & 6 p.m.

111 N. Rogers St. 812-336-4310 • bloomingtonsa.org

Sunday: Sunday School, 10 a.m. Worship Service, 11:00 a.m. Bible Study, 3 p.m. The Salvation Army, an international movement, is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church. Its message is based on the Bible. Its ministry is motivated by the love of God. Its mission is to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ and meet human needs in His name without discrimination.

Mennonite Mennonite Fellowship of Bloomington 2420 E. Third St. 812-646-2441 bloomingtonmenno.org • Facebook

Gordon Hoag, Captain Cindy Hoag, Captain

City Church For All Nations 1200 N. Russell Rd. 812-336-5958

citychurchbloomington.org Instagram • Twitter • Facebook @citychurchbtown

Sunday: 5 p.m. A welcoming, inclusive congregation providing a place of healing and hope as we journey together in the Spirit of Christ. Gathering for worship Sundays 5 p.m. in the Roger Williams room, First United Church. As people of God's peace, we seek to embody the Kingdom of God. John Sauder mfbjohn@gmail.com

Sunday: 9:30 a.m., 11 a.m.

Episcopal (Anglican) United Methodist Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors

St. Mark’s United Methodist Church

719 E. Seventh St. 812-334-7971 • 812-361-7954

indiana.edu/~canterby canterby@indiana.edu • facebook.com/ecmatiu

100 N. State Rd. 46 Bypass 812-332-5788

Sacramental Schedule: Weekly services Sundays: Holy Eucharist with hymns, followed by dinner 4 p.m. at Canterbury House

Tuesdays: 6 p.m. Bible Study at Canterbury House 2nd & 4th Wednesdays: 7 p.m. Taizé Chants & Prayers at Canterbury House Episcopal (Anglican) Campus Ministry is a safe and welcoming home for all people. We are a blend of young and old, women and men, gay and straight, ethnicities from different cultures and countries, students, faculty, staff and friends. The worshipping congregation is the Canterbury Fellowship. The mission of the Fellowship is to restore all people to unity with God and each other in Christ. We pray, worship and proclaim the Gospel. We also promote justice, equality, inclusion, peace, love critical thinking and acting as agents of change in our world. Mother Linda C. Johnson+, University Chaplain Ricardo Bello Gomez, Communications Director Josefina Carcamo, Latino/a and Community Outreach Intern Rex Hinkle, Luiz Lopes, Nathan Stang, Music Ministers

smumc.church Sunday Morning Schedule 9:00: Breakfast 9:15: Adult Sunday School Classes 10:30: Sanctuary Worship 10:30: Children & Youth Sunday School Classes An inclusive community bringing Christ-like love, healing and hope to all. Jimmy Moore, Pastor Mary Beth Morgan, Pastor

Independent Baptist Lifeway Baptist Church 7821 W. State Road 46 812-876-6072 • lifewaybaptistchurch.org Facebook • LifewayEllettsville

College & Career Sunday Meeting: 9 a.m. Sunday

Presbyterian (USA)

First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

First Presbyterian Church

205 E. Kirkwood Ave. 812-332-4459 • fccbloomington.org

Sunday: 10 a.m. As God has welcomed us, we welcome you. With all our differences – in age, ability and physical condition, in race, cultural background and economic status, in sexual orientation, gender identity and family structure – God has received each one with loving kindness, patience and joy. All that we are together and all that we hope to be is made more perfect as the richness of varied lives meets the mystery of God’s unifying Spirit, and we become the Body of Christ. Helen Hempfling, Pastor

All Saints Orthodox Christian Church 6004 S. Fairfax Rd. 812-824-3600

www.allsaintsbloomington.org Email:frpeterjon@allsaintsbloomington.org Wednesday: Vespers 6 p.m. Saturday: Great Vespers 5 p.m. Sunday: Matins 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy 10 a.m. Come experience the sacred rhythm and rituals of the timeless Christian faith, a faith with a future, yet ancient and tested. Living the traditional worship of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit; as a sacred community of people striving to manifest the kingdom, on earth as it is in heaven. We, together with the saints throughout history, learn to live the love and compassion of Christ. Come and see, and put your roots down deep. Rev. Fr. Peter Jon Gillquist, Pastor Howard & Rhonda Webb, College Coordinators

Cooperative Baptist

Sunday: 9:30 a.m. (Bible study) 10:45 a.m. (worship) If you are exploring faith, looking for a church home, or returning after time away, Welcome! We aim to be a safe place to "sort it out" for those who are questioning, and a place to pray, grow, and serve for followers of Jesus. All are welcome - yes, LBGTQ too. Rev. Annette Hill Briggs, Pastor Rob Drummond, Music Minister

Lutheran (LCMS) University Lutheran Church & Student Center 607 E. Seventh St. (Corner of 7th & Fess) 812-336-5387 • indianalutheran.com

facebook.com/ULutheranIU @ULutheranIU on twitter Sunday: Bible Class, 9:15 a.m. Divine Service, 10:30 a.m. The Best Meal You'll Have All Week, 6 p.m.

Barnabas Christian Ministry Small Groups:

1701 E. Second St. 812-332-1850 • upcbloomington.org

Cedar Hall 2nd Floor Common Area, 7 - 8 p.m., meetings start Thursday, Sept. 6. We will meet every other Thursday during the school year.

Bible Study: 12:15 p.m. Book Study/Discussion: 6 p.m. We are a diverse, inclusive people of God. Social justice, a welcoming spirit and focusing on Christ are integral to our congregation. We are students and non-students, native and non-native English speakers, young and old, who come together to worship in the name of Christ and to enjoy fellowship. John Napoli, Pastor Melanie Mathis-McBride, Education Director

Steven VonBokern, Senior Pastor Rosh Dhanawade, IU Coordinator 302-561-0108, barnabas@indiana.edu barnabas.so.indiana.edu * Free transportation provided. Please call if you need a ride to church.

Summer Worship Times: Sunday: 10 a.m. We are a community of seekers and disciples in Christ committed to hospitality and outreach for all God’s children. Come join us for meaningful worship, thoughtful spiritual study and stimulating fellowship. Ukirk at IU is a Presbyterian affiliated group open to all students. Andrew Kort, Pastor Kim Adams, Associate Pastor Grant Farmer, Music Director Christopher Young, Organist

Catholic St. Paul Catholic Center 1413 E. 17th St. 812-339-5561 • hoosiercatholic.org

Facebook: Hoosiercatholic Twitter: @hoosiercatholic Weekend Mass Times Saturday Vigil: 4:30 p.m. Sunday: 8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. (Spanish), 5:30 p.m., 9 p.m. (During Academic Year) Korean Mass 1st & 3rd Saturdays, 6 p.m.

Weekday Mass Times Monday - Saturday: 12:15 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday: 9 p.m. St. Paul Catholic Center is a diverse community rooted in the saving compassion of Jesus Christ, energized by His Sacraments, and nourished by the liturgical life of His Church. Fr. John Meany, O.P., Pastor Fr. Patrick Hyde, O.P. Associate Pastor & Campus Minister Fr. Joseph Minuth, O.P., Associate Pastor

Unitarian Universalist Church of Bloomington

United Presbyterian Church

Tuesday:

Sunday: 9:50 - 10:45 a.m.

ubcbloomington.org facebook.com/ubcbloomington

Wednesday: Second Best Meal, 6 p.m. Midweek Service, 7 p.m. LCMS U Student Fellowship, 7:30 p.m.

Callout Meeting: Aug. 30, IMU Redbud

Christian Ed:

Unitarian Universalist

Lifeway Baptist Church exists to bring glory to God by making disciples, maturing believers and multiplying ministry. Matthew 28:19-20

Room

Sunday: 9 a.m., 11 a.m.

3740 E. Third St. 812-339-1404

PC (USA)

Pastor's Class: 8:45 a.m. Worship: 10 a.m. Fellowship: 11 a.m.

Worship Times:

University Baptist Church

Tuesday & Friday: Service of Morning Prayer, 8 a.m.

Sunday:

221 E. Sixth St. (Sixth and Lincoln) 812-332-1514 • fpcbloomington.org

Orthodox Christian

Sunday Worship: 10 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wednesday Night Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Email: upcbloomington@gmail.com

Mother Linda C. Johnson+, University Chaplain Ricardo Bello Gomez, Communications Director Josefina Carmaco, Latino/a and Community Outreach Intern Rex Hinkle, Luiz Lopes, Nathan Stang, Music Ministers

Christian (Disciples of Christ)

Church Van Pickup on Sundays - Call 314-681-8893

We are a movement of all races and backgrounds, coming together to love people, build family, and lead to destiny. Join us at one of our weekend worship experiences, and visit our young adults ministry. David Norris, Pastor Sumer Norris, Pastor

Canterbury House Episcopal (Anglican) Campus Ministry at IU

719 E. Seventh St. 812-334-7971 • 812-361-7954 indiana.edu/~canterby canterby@indiana.edu facebook.com/ecmatiu

Facebook: SABloomington Twitter: @SABtown

Thursday: We are Wesleyan in our beliefs, and welcome all to worship with us. We are dedicated to training others through discipleship as well as ministering through small groups. We welcome all races and cultures and would love to get to know you. Dr James Hicks, Lead Pastor

Tuesdays: 6 p.m. Bible Study at Canterbury House

Episcopal (Anglican) Campus Ministry is a safe and welcoming home for all people. We are a blend of young and old, women and men, gay and straight, ethnicities from different cultures and countries, students, faculty, staff and friends. The worshipping congregation is the Canterbury Fellowship. The mission of the Fellowship is to restore all people to unity with God and each other in Christ. We pray, worship and proclaim the Gospel. We also promote justice, equality, inclusion, peace, love, critical thinking and acting as agents of change in our world.

503 S. High St. 812-332-0502

Redeemer Community Church

Sunday: 10 a.m.

dinner 4 p.m. at Canterbury House

2nd & 4th Wednesdays: 7 p.m. Taizé Chants & Prayers at Canterbury House

Jeremy Earle, College Minister

Mark Fenstermacher, Lead Pastor Markus Dickinson, Campus Director

redeemerbloomington.org facebook.com/RedeemerBtown @RedeemerBtown on Twitter & Instagram

Sacramental Schedule: Weekly services Sundays: Holy Eucharist with hymns, followed by

Traditional: 8 a.m.

Sunday: The Open Door, 11:15 a.m. @ The Buskirk-Chumley Theater (114 E. Kirkwood Ave.)

Jubilee is a supportive and accepting community for college students and young adults from all backgrounds looking to grow in their faith and do life together. Meet every Wednesday night for opportunities through small groups, hangouts, mission trips, events, service projects, and more. Many attend the contemporary Open Door service.

Canterbury House Episcopal (Anglican) Campus Ministry at IU

Thursday: Graduate Study/Fellowship, 7 p.m. University Lutheran Church (U.Lu) is the home of LCMS U at Indiana, the campus ministry of the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Students, on-campus location, and our Student Center create a hub for daily, genuine Christ-centered community that receives God's gifts of life, salvation, and the forgiveness of sins through Jesus Christ. Rev. Richard Woelmer, Campus Pastor

2120 N. Fee Lane 812-332-3695

www.uublomington.org www.facebook.com/uubloomington Sundays: 9:15 a.m. & 11:15 a.m. We are a dynamic congregation working towards a more just world through social justice. We draw inspiration from world religions and diverse spiritual traditions. Our vision is "Seeking the Spirit, Building Community, Changing the World." A LGBTQA+ Welcoming Congregation and a certified Green Sanctuary. Reverend Mary Ann Macklin, Senior Minister Reverend Scott McNeill, Associate Minister

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Latter-day Saint Student Association (L.D.S.S.A) 333 S. Highland Ave. 812-334-3432

studentview.Ids.org/Home. aspx/Home/60431 Facebook: Bloomington Institute and YSA Society lds.org Monday - Friday: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. We have an Institute of Religion adjacent to campus at 333 S. Highland Ave. (behind T.I.S. bookstore). We offer a variety of religious classes and activities. We strive to create an atmosphere where college students and local young single adults can come to play games, relax, study, and associate with others who value spirituality. Sunday worship services for young single students are held at 2411 E. Second St. a 11:30 a.m. We invite all to discover more about Jesus Christ from both ancient scripture and from modern prophets of God. During the week join us at the institute, and on Sunday at the Young Single Adult Church. Robert Tibbs, Institute Director


**Avail Now** 1 BR, 1 BA. $485/mo. utils. incl. bestrentsrdw@yahoo.com

General Employment

Full time office help needed, property management company. Resumes to:

omegaproperties@gmail.com

On 3rd St. $550 to $900/mo. Wifi+utils. Avail Aug. W/D onsite. 812-361-6154 call/text

1 – 5 Bed Apts/Houses AVAILABLE NOW 1 to 2 blocks from Campus

Houses

345

**Avail. August!** 203 S. Clark ALL UTILS. INCLUDED www.iurent.com 812-360-2628

pavprop.com 812-333-2332

Furniture Business chair, great for long hours of study. $58. jhageih@iu.edu

Comfortable grey futon. Good cond. Pickup only. $40. 812-369-8267 gakumar@iu.edu

Sublet Apt. Unfurn.

MERCHANDISE

Instruments

Size 8 (fits 8.5) Gucci slides. $85. nebhatt@indiana.edu

Intermediate Yamaha YOB-441 oboe. Great cond. $1,900. grhess@indiana.edu

Misc. for Sale

15 pc LENOX butterfly dinnerware set. Excellent cond. $45. jl130@iu.edu

TRANSPORTATION 505

11 Sterilite plastic containers. All prices $7 to $2. 812-322-0808

2001 gray Lincoln Town Car, 4 door, good cond. Air conditioning. $1,000. alpatric@indiana.edu

18 crystal hangers, $6. 7 clear hangers, $2. 21 clear slack hangers, $7. 812-322-0808

2005 BMW M3 Convertible in excellent cond. 150k mi. $14,000. kbucy@indiana.edu

Brand new Columbia size 8.5 medium hiking boots. Never worn. $60. 812-322-0808

2008 Grey Toyota Yaris Sedan 4D. 128,065 mi. $4500. sabas@iu.edu

M Hadley Pottery Casserole dish. Used but in new cond. $50. dmprobst@indiana.edu

2015 Red Honda CRV. 52,000 mi. $16,800. lulip@iu.edu

Reader glasses. Brand new. 2.5 magnifcation. Nice designs w/ cases. $5 each. 812-322-0808 The North Face Wasatch backpack in black. $40. 812-322-0808

Automobiles

Silver 2013 Subaru Impreza WRX. 72,000 mi. Muffler delete, AWD, etc. dawmyers@indiana.edu

Bicycles

Full size mattress, foam topper. Great cond. Lightly used. $100. mma3@indiana.edu

Tom Ford women’s sunglasses, only worn once. $75, obo. rnourie@indiana.edu

1974 Men’s white Raleigh Grand Prix. $200 812-333-5757

Grey futon for sale, only one year old. Price neg. njbochan@iu.edu

Vintage MicroMachine & larger scale Star Wars toys from 80s & 90s. $60 dmprobst@indiana.edu

Murray 18-speed mountain bike, good condition. $60. brennmat@indiana.edu

Less than 1 yr. old blue velvet couch in great cond., $550. gosterho@indiana.edu

Loveseat -Grey, lightly used $199. No stains/rips daviscrm@iu.edu

3-8 BR. W/D. Aug. ‘19. 1 blk. from campus on Atwater Ave. $700. 812-361-6154

3 BR, 2 BA, A/C, a mile from Law School. Unfurn., w/stainless steel kitchen. Avail. Aug. Call/text: 812-325-0848.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

Village at Muller Park Lease Aug. 22-July 30. Priv. BR/BA, male rmmt. drew@woohoodrew.com

1-5 BR. Close to Campus. Avail. immediately. Call: 812-339-2859.

Insignia 39” 1080p class LED Smart HDTV, $150. bpnichol@indiana.edu

Dark wood roll-top desk. Like new, will deliver. $600. 48” x 42”. 812-3320447. Leave message.

PAVILION

405

220

EMPLOYMENT

Large 2 BR apartments & townhouses avail. NOW! Close to Campus & Stadium. 812-334-2646

325

We run a dog rescue 25 mi. West of Bloomington. We have 35 permanent dogs who live freely as pets. We have a mobile home along with our house on the property. We would like to find a student who would like to love dogs for free in exchange for caring for the dogs from time to time. We are a gay couple. LGBT friendly essential. 541-230-8281

2, 3, 4 BR apt., avail. Aug. 1. Rooftop deck. Downtown. 812-320-6794

Electronics

Clothing Express brand, gray cocktail and maroon dresses, $20 each. kayfarre@iu.edu

520

110

Apt. Unfurnished

Announcements

Kirby Sales & Services. 7296 W. State Rd. 46, Ellettsville, IN. Vacuum cleaners: $25 and up. 812-300-0377

Stockpot. Good cond. $30 or negotiable. xiazhen@iu.edu

Houses IU STUDENTS!! HOUSE FOR RENT IN BLOOMINGTONVERY CLOSE DISTANCE TO COLLEGE MALL AND IU CAMPUS. 4 BR, 2 BA, LARGE LIVING/ COMMON AREA, BASEMENT, KITCHEN APPLIANCES, FURNISHED, LARGE BACKYARD FOR GATHERINGS. GREAT FOR STUDENTS WHO WANT TO LIVE OFF CAMPUS BUT NEARBY! AVAILABLE AUGUST 1ST. CONTACT: 812-325-1290, 812-631-3585 OR 812-827-4058

HOUSING 310

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Small slow cooker. Good cond. $15. xiazhen@iu.edu

ONLINE POSTING: All classified line ads are posted online at idsnews.com/classifieds at no additional charge.

Furniture Queen mattress, bed frame and box spring. Great shape. $160. lpector@iu.edu

Pot made for hotpotting. Good cond. $10. xiazhen@iu.edu 430

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Indiana Daily Student

Mattress with frame, queen size, good cond. Pick up only. $55, neg. yao6@iu.edu

Now Leasing for August 2019 and 2020 1, 2, 3, 4, & 5 BR Houses, Townhouses, and Apartments Quality campus locations

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Appliances Mr. Coffee, Coffee Maker, in good cond. $8. jiang34@iu.edu

Mattress, box spring & a bed stand all for $250! ajuneja@iu.edu

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Thursday, July 25, 2019  

The Indiana Daily Student is an independent student newspaper covering Indiana University, IU sports and the city of Bloomington, Indiana.

Thursday, July 25, 2019  

The Indiana Daily Student is an independent student newspaper covering Indiana University, IU sports and the city of Bloomington, Indiana.

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