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Monday, June 24, 2019

IDS

Taste of Bloomington page 5

Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

MEN’S BASKETBALL

THEY’RE IN.

Bloomington says IUPD officer is new ‘night mayor’ By Ellen Hine emhine@iu.edu | @ellenmhine

Bloomington has announced the identity of its new “night mayor.” Jenna Whiteaker will start her new job as the city’s after hours ambassador — or “night mayor” as some have called it — on July 1, according to a City of Bloomington press release. Whiteaker’s role is to connect businesses and people downtown at night with city government. “We are excited to launch the after hours ambassadorship and proud to bring Jenna Whiteaker into this role,” Mayor John Hamilton said in the release. Hamilton said similar positions in other cities help open lines of communication and improve the delivery of night-time services. The position was recommended in 2017 by the city’s Safety, Civility and Justice Initiative and approved as part of the 2019 budget last October. Whiteaker earned a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from IU and is currently working on a master’s in public administration, according to the release. SEE NIGHT MAYOR, PAGE 3

WOMEN’S SOCCER

Two IU men’s basketball players, Romeo Langford and Juwan Morgan, signed deals with professional teams after the NBA Draft last week.

New transfer from University of Dayton joins IU team By Dylan Wallace

First-round pick Romeo Langford selected 14th by the Boston Celtics By Dylan Wallace dswallac@iu.edu | @Dwall_1

Romeo Langford became the 26th player in IU men's basketball history to be selected in the first round of the NBA Draft. Langford was selected 14th by the Boston Celtics at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, New York. Langford will enter the NBA after one year of playing for the Hoosiers. The former freshman averaged 16.5 points and 5.4 rebounds per game. His point average was the fifth best among college freshmen last season and ranked first in Big Ten freshmen scoring. Many attributed inconsistency in his performance at IU to the torn ligament in his right thumb — his shooting hand — that wasn't revealed until after the season concluded. Langford had surgery to repair the ligament in April, which kept him from participating in the 2019 NBA combine as well as trying out for NBA teams leading up to the draft. This was why Langford was predicted to be selected outside the lottery, but nonetheless, the former

Hoosier was chosen as the final pick in the lottery at 14. "I know what I'm capable of doing," Langford said in an ESPN interview. "I've been doing it for a long time at a young age, so there wasn't really too much doubt in my head that I was gonna be in the lottery." Langford is the first Hoosier to be selected in the first round of the NBA Draft since OG Anunoby in 2017. Anunoby went 23rd to the Toronto Raptors. IU is now tied with Michigan for sixth place all-time among all colleges for the most players drafted in the first round. The Celtics finished 49-33 last season and were fourth in the Eastern Conference, losing in the second round of the playoffs to the Milwaukee Bucks. With All-Star guard Kyrie Irving opting into free agency, there are roles to be filled in the Celtics back court. Langford will join a group of young guards such as Jayson Tatum, Jaylen Brown and Marcus Smart, under the guidance of Indiana native and former Butler University Head Coach Brad Stevens.

Juwan Morgan agrees to deal with Utah Jazz after going undrafted By Dylan Wallace dswallac@iu.edu | @Dwall_1

After going undrafted Thursday night, Juwan Morgan has agreed to a deal with the Utah Jazz. The Athletic's Michael Scotto first reported the deal and Hoops Hype writer Bryan Kalbroksy revealed the details of it. For now, Morgan's undrafted free agent deal is only for the summer league. Morgan is coming off a four-year career at IU. In his senior season, he averaged 15.5 points and 8.2 rebounds per game. “I just want to be remembered as somebody that never gave up,” Morgan said in the IU locker room after his last game, a March 26 loss against Wichita State University. “Regardless of who we were going against, what we were going against or anything like that. I never gave up.” Morgan worked out for the Jazz May 23 and will now hope to get invited to the

team's training camp in the fall to further pursue his goal of making an NBA roster. Since Morgan's deal is only for the summer league, other NBA teams are allowed to pursue him for the latter stages of the offseason process. Utah will play in the Salt Lake Summer League — a four-team, six-game event put on by the Jazz on July 1-3 at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City, Utah. The Jazz will then compete in the Las Vegas Summer League, which all 30 NBA teams play in. It will also feature two national teams, China and Croatia. The Las Vegas Summer League will start July 5 through July 15 at Thomas and Mack Center and Cox Pavilion in Las Vegas on the campus of University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Morgan and the Jazz can be seen playing in the Las Vegas Summer League on either ESPN, ESPN2 or ESPNU.

Government, charities tackle tornado fallout By Avery Williams avefwill@iu.edu | @ Avery_faye

Monroe County government, charities and residents have sprung into action in the aftermath of the June 15 tornado that destroyed multiple homes, . The 130-mile-per-hour tornado caused damage to almost 30 homes, blew over trees and knocked powerlines down in its 3.7 mile path through Ellettsville, Indiana. United Way of Monroe County executive director Efrat Feferman said relief funds donated through the United Way website or by check are used to provide victims with clothing, furniture, medication, appliances and other essential items. "Think about all those things in your house that got wiped out, and

you have to replace immediately," Feferman said. She said she urges those who have unevaluated tornado damage to contact the Red Cross. Washington Township, which sits northeast of Ellettsville, was also hit by the storm. Trustee Barb Ooley facilitates relief support through local government. "We are basically the first line when working with people,” Ooley said. “When you need assistance, you have to go to your trustee.” Ooley organizes taxpayer money to provide support for the families affected by severe weather in Washington Township. She said Washington Township residents who have damage can contact her to start receiving aid.

dswallac@iu.edu | @Dwall_1

Megan Wampler is transferring to IU women's soccer after spending one season at the University of Dayton. Wampler will be eligible to play this fall. Wampler played just 15 minutes in only one of the team's 19 games. She recorded zero stats. Wampler is a Carmel, Indiana, native and played high school soccer at Guerin Catholic High School. In her four years, she earned a pair of All-State, All-Conference and All-District selections. In her senior season, Wampler received All-County and All-Region honors and was named Hamilton County Player of the Year. She was also a nominee for the Indianapolis Star Player of the Year in 2017. With her individual success came team success. Guerin Catholic won its first regional championship since 2010 her senior year, advancing to the state championship. Top Drawer Soccer also gave Wampler SEE TRANSFER, PAGE 3

WOMEN’S SOCCER

Women's soccer adds Emily Basten as volunteer assistant coach By Zackary Swoboda zswoboda@iu.edu | @zackaryswoboda

IU women's soccer Head Coach Erwin van Bennekom announced Tuesday that Emily Basten would be a volunteer assistant coach for women's soccer. She played for the Hoosiers when she transferred to IU from Central Michigan University for her senior season in 2015. Basten spent that year playing on the defensive line for the Hoosiers and earned the Big Ten Sportsmanship award. She graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in neuroscience. ALEX DERYN | IDS

SEE RELIEF, PAGE 3

Tina and John Paynter’s living room opens up to the outside June 17 in Ellettsville, Indiana. A tornado on June 15 took the entire front of the Paynter family residence.

SEE COACH, PAGE 3


Indiana Daily Student

NEWS

Monday, June 24, 2019 idsnews.com

Editor Ellen Hine news@idsnews.com 2

Buttigieg navigates fallout after white cop kills black man in South Bend

Two women use scanner app to evade police in south side chase

From Tribune News Service

By Ellen Hine emhine@iu.edu | @ellenmhine

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — In the aftermath of a white police officer fatally shooting a black suspect in South Bend, a mostly African American crowd of family members, pastors and politicians gathered at a street-side vigil to voice anger over the killing, question its circumstances and emphasize their distrust of the police. One key leader wasn’t there to hear their grievances: Mayor Pete Buttigieg. The rising, 37-year-old Democrat had suspended his presidential campaign to return home, but mostly remained out of public view for three days. When he resurfaced, it was to deliver a speech telling six newly sworn police officers that they carry the “burden” of past racial injustice between police and minorities. “We’ve spent years working to build trust between city leaders, public safety officers and members of the community we are charged to serve,” Buttigieg told the officers Wednesday. “Today, those same relationships we’ve worked so hard to build are in jeopardy. It’s a reminder to all of us how fragile our work can be.” A few hours later, the mayor appeared at a civil rights center flanked by the local NAACP chapter president and supportive African American leaders, saying the work to help the city heal could begin even as the “process” into investigating what happened plays out. The two events illustrate the delicate balance Buttigieg is trying to strike in the most marked challenge of his presidential campaign to date as his relationship with South Bend’s African American community has come under renewed scrutiny. On one hand, Buttigieg is attempting to show African American voters, whose support any Democratic presidential hopeful needs, that he understands the importance of constitutional policing and the ramifications of controversial shootings of black residents by officers. On the other, the mayor has to be careful not to draw conclusions about a shooting that’s under investigation or alienate law enforcement nationally as well as the local officers he relies on to fight crime. After Buttigieg learned Sunday that Eric J. Logan, 54, had been shot and killed by an officer responding to a report of a suspect breaking into cars, the mayor canceled a scheduled appearance at the Democratic National Committee’s LGBTQ Gala in New York and called off a California fundraising swing. As word of the candidate’s decision popped up on cable TV news tickers, those at the vigil in South Bend clutched white candles and metallic blue and silver balloons as they raised questions about police cameras that failed to record the shooting, Sgt. Ryan O’Neill’s decision to use deadly force and previous accusations of racist comments against the officer. “Mayor Pete should have been here. I’m surprised he wasn’t,” the Rev. Lonell Hudson of South Bend’s Greater New Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church said afterward. “This is one that everyone knows he has to get a grip on and do something about, because if he doesn’t, his chances at the presidency are slim and none.” James Mueller, Buttigieg’s former chief of staff and the Democratic nominee to succeed him as mayor, was among the last to leave the gathering. He described the vigil as a no-win situation for his friend. “It comes from a genuine place, that he wants to make sure the community is feeling supported by their mayor, but it also is no secret that he’s on the presidential trail now and you’ve got to temper any major deviations, because people will read into that,” Mueller said. “He can get criticized either way.” Buttigieg decided not to run the risk of overshadowing a family in mourning, a move that also avoided the possibility of any public interactions

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

South Bend Mayor and 2020 presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg attends a board of public safety swearingin ceremony at the South Bend Police Department Wednesday June 19, in South Bend, Indiana. Buttigieg is navigating fallout after a white police officer shot a black suspect.

with people upset at what happened. “I took some advice from community leaders on this,” he said, “and reached the conclusion that it would be more of a distraction if I were to attend.” Sgt. O’Neill’s deadly encounter with Logan, who records show had spent time in prison for felony drug convictions and a gun charge, began with a 911 call early Sunday reporting an individual breaking into cars in an apartment complex parking lot. Authorities offered the following account: O’Neill approached a vehicle after seeing the legs of a man hanging out from an open driver’s side door. Logan emerged with a purse in his clothing, refused orders to drop a knife and raised the weapon as he approached O’Neill. The officer fired two shots as he backed away, one of which struck Logan in the right front abdomen. O’Neill called for an ambulance but then allowed another officer to transport Logan to the hospital in a squad car, authorities said. Neither O’Neill’s body camera nor his police dashboard camera recorded the shooting, authorities said. O’Neill suffered a forearm injury from the knife, which became airborne after Logan was shot, authorities said. A St. Joseph County probe is ongoing, with a South Bend Police Department internal affairs investigation to follow. O’Neill, who is on leave pending the outcome, previously has faced accusations of racism, court records show. South Bend police Chief Scott Ruszkowski testified during a lawsuit in 2017 that O’Neill was promoted to sergeant despite an earlier internal affairs probe spurred by two officers complaining that O’Neill used racial slurs. Ruszkowski also testified that O’Neill passed a polygraph test.

“I’ve learned that there is no such thing as enough engagement or dialogue, that we have to learn to listen as well as to speak.” Pete Buttigieg, Democratic presidential candidate

In a separate case in 2008, a man self-filed a lawsuit from prison alleging that O’Neill called him a racial epithet during a domestic violence call. The suit was dismissed for failure to pay court fees. Some activists and city leaders argued that the O’Neill allegations feed into what they say is a recurring pattern of racist behavior within the department. During a community meeting at a gospel radio station in the days following Sunday’s shooting, several faith leaders called for the city to request a Justice Department civil rights investigation. South Bend Common Council member Oliver Davis said Wednesday he would draft a letter requesting the federal intervention, and Buttigieg said he was open to any form of an independent investigation. Such investigations were far more common during former President Barack Obama’s tenure than Presi-

dent Donald Trump’s. The lack of video coupled with officers removing Logan from the scene before paramedics arrived led family members and some activists to allege police have not been forthcoming. “How do they have no video footage of nothing? No dashcam, no bodycam, no nothing? The reason they don’t have it is because they don’t want to tell the truth,” said Tyree Bonds, 52, one of Logan’s brothers. “Since when do the police put somebody in the police car when they shot them? Since when? It’s a cover-up.” Authorities say the cameras didn’t record because they are triggered by turning on a squad car’s emergency lights or by a manual button, neither of which O’Neill used. Buttigieg told reporters he was “extremely frustrated” that the officer’s body camera didn’t record the shooting. “The whole purpose of body cameras is that when there is a difficult or tense moment, we can either validate that an officer did the right thing or determine that an officer didn’t,” Buttigieg said. “It defeats the purpose of that system if it is not activated. Buttigieg has faced policing controversies throughout his eight years in office. Just three months on the job, he donned a symbolic hooded sweatshirt and marched in a local March 2012 protest against the death of Florida teen Trayvon Martin, who was visiting relatives when George Zimmerman shot him, claiming self-defense. The march was the same day that Buttigieg fired South Bend’s first African-American police chief. In his memoir, “Shortest Way Home,” Buttigieg wrote that he fired Darryl Boykins because he had lost faith in his leadership ability after he failed to immediately inform the mayor he was under federal investigation for recording officers’ phone calls. Only later, Buttigieg wrote, did he learn that officers may have made racist comments. Council members sued to release the tapes, a matter still tied up in court. Boykins received a $50,000 settlement, while legal fees and other settlements have cost South Bend $2 million. The so-called tapes case is frequently brought up as a prime example of racial injustice under Buttigieg. “If your foundation is shaken, everything you do on top of it shakes that much more, and our foundation is concealing those tape recordings,” said Davis, the council member who led the lawsuit challenging Buttigieg on the issue. Buttigieg’s policing controversies have been similar to the ones former Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel had to navigate amid the fallout of the Laquan McDonald police shooting scandal. Both Democratic cities saw protests, calls for civilian oversight of the police department, police union complaints that the mayor hasn’t had their back and mayors who pleaded to let the investigative process unfold. South Bend Officer Aaron Knepper has been involved in several use-of-force controversies, including against

African American residents. In 2016, a federal jury found that three officers, including Knepper, had violated a family’s rights by handcuffing, punching and using a stun gun on a 17-year-old asleep in his bed after mistakenly believing he was a suspect. Knepper has remained on the force despite widespread calls for him to be fired. Another frequent criticism under Buttigieg is one that Chicago also is dealing with: a police department that doesn’t match the city’s racial makeup. South Bend, best known as the home to the University of Notre Dame, has a population of 100,000 that’s 54% white, 26% black and 14% Hispanic, according to U.S. Census data. The Police Department’s 242 sworn officers are 88% white, 5% black and 5% Hispanic, according to city figures. Buttigieg called hiring more black officers “one of our biggest challenges.” South Bend Common Council member Regina Williams-Preston said the predominantly white department is viewed as an “occupying force” in black neighborhoods. “(Buttigieg) has relationships with people of color, but does he have a relationship with the community? Those are two different things, and I don’t know if he understands the difference between the two,” Williams-Preston said. “A lot of the people in the community really pushing the administration on these different issues, they’re not the ones invited to the table when it’s time to quote ‘connect with the black community.’ “ Michael Patton, the local NAACP president who stood by Buttigieg’s side at Wednesday’s shooting news conference, said, “It’s impossible to get hundreds of people to the table. “But I think there have been good faith efforts that have been happening to bring other people into the process, where our community has been able to participate,” said Patton, senior pastor at South Bend’s Kingdom Life Christian Cathedral. Mueller, the mayor’s former chief of staff, said that as a Rhodes scholar, Harvard graduate and former consultant at McKinsey & Company, Buttigieg was heavily involved with the mechanics of government and less attentive to community engagement early in his tenure. “He had a very heavy focus on data, processes, systems, all that,” Mueller said. “But I do think there have been a lot of efforts over the last few years to increase his level of engagement with the community and build those bridges.” Buttigieg acknowledged he’s had a learning curve. “I may have had a theoretical understanding of what’s at stake in issues of race and racism and policing, but it’s different when you bear responsibility for a police department and for the well-being of the community,” he said. “I’ve learned about how raw these issues are. ... I’ve learned that there is no such thing as enough engagement or dialogue, that we have to learn to listen as well as to speak.”

Two women tried to evade police Saturday using a police scanner app. Bloomington Police Department Sgt. Brandon Siniard said an officer on patrol early Saturday morning near the intersection of South Rogers Street and South Rockport Road noticed a black Pontiac with a fake license plate. The officer signaled for the car to pull over, but the driver kept going. The officer began to pursue the vehicle around the south side of Bloomington. Police used a tire-deflation device called a stop stick to force the car to stop south of the intersection of South Smith Road and East Moores Pike. Police identified

24-year-old Casera Sims as the driver of the car. Sims was arrested on charges of resisting law enforcement, driving without ever having a license and having no insurance for the car. Sims also had active warrants for battery, burglary, forgery and theft. The car’s passenger, 18 year-old Shelby Murray, admitted to police during questioning that she and Sims had used a police scanner app on her phone to try and evade them. Murray was arrested on four possession charges for a syringe, an unknown drug, marijuana and drug paraphernalia found in the car as well as a charge for unlawful use of a police radio. Murray also had an active warrant for criminal mischief.

Two different women shoplift from same Kohl’s location two hours apart By Annie Aguiar aguiara@iu.edu | @annabelaguiar

Police responded to two different shoplifting incidents at Kohl’s Tuesday evening, Bloomington Police Department Sgt. Brandon Lopossa said. A woman hid $157 worth of merchandise in a bag before driving away at around 5. p.m. from the Kohl’s located at 3140 West Whitehall Crossing Blvd. A Kohl’s employee wrote down the license plate number, and a warrant has been filed. The woman was described to police as 5-feet5-inches tall and white with blonde hair. At the time of the theft, she was wearing a twotoned shirt and glasses. A little over two hours

later, police responded to another shoplifting call at the same Kohl’s location. Martinsville woman Khila Maxey, 26, was arrested Tuesday evening for theft. Her car ran out of gas and she planned on stealing items from Kohl’s to later sell them at a secondhand store for gas money, Lopossa said. Maxey paid for two inexpensive skincare products while attempting to hide five pairs of sandals, four leather wallets and one activewear shirt in her bag. Kohl’s security detained Maxey before she could leave the store. The total cost of the almost stolen goods was $199.66.

Shots allegedly fired after a fight breaks out in a basketball game By Annie Aguiar aguiara@iu.edu | @annabelaguiar

Police responded to reports of shots fired during a basketball game a little after 8:30 p.m. Thursday at the apartment complex the Village at Muller Park. Bloomington Police Department Sgt. Jason Shaevitz said witnesses told officers a fight broke out during the game, which took place at the basketball courts behind the apartment complex. A man reportedly pulled a gun out and shot a warning shot into the air. However, Shaevitz said witnesses were evasive when questioned by police. Officers received multiple conflicting stories. Some said the man then shot his gun several times, ranging from one to five shots, at a specific man. The alleged shooter then ran into a wooded area. Witnesses said the man who was shot at also ran away. No injuries have been reported. One woman who watched the incident from

the window of her apartment told police she saw the suspect shoot a man in the leg before throwing the gun into a specific car. Shaevitz said no gunshot wound matching that description has been reported. Officers searched the car but did not find a gun. Shaevitz, who was at the scene, said there were 15 to 20 people at the court at the time of the incident. He said he saw a young girl around 10 years old while responding. The investigation is still active, and police have yet to identify the suspect. Shaevitz said witnesses described the suspect as a black man in his mid 20s who was wearing basketball shorts, sneakers and a durag at the time of the incident. Shaevitz also said that there is no guarantee the suspect is a resident of the Village at Muller Park complex since the courts are used by residents of other complexes as well, such as nearby Canterbury House Apartments.

Annie Aguiar Editor-in-Chief Ellen Hine Managing Editor

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Monday, June 24, 2019 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

» NIGHT MAYOR

3

» RELIEF

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Her most recent job was as a police officer with the IU Police Department, serving in the executive protection detail as well as working on inclusion and recruiting for the department. “Jenna Whiteaker brings a wealth of experience to this position,” said Beverly Calender-Anderson, director of Bloomington’s Community and Family Resources Department, in the release. “Her public safety experience together with her ability to connect with people will contribute to the success of this position and be a great asset to the CFRD team.”

Feferman said Monroe County Community Organization Active in Disaster will have opportunities for those who want to help with on-site cleanup in the near future. "In times like these when our neighbors' homes, properties and belongings are destroyed, we want to make sure that individuals who want to help have a way to do so," Feferman said. Ooley said families in Washington Township whose homes are inhabitable have been put up in hotels. Because cleanup is in the early stages, Ooley said the only funds she has allocated so far are for hotel fees. Additional funds will be used to clean up debris and fallen trees. "However, I fully expect that to change once the clean up really begins,” Ooley said. Ooley said the cleanup could take weeks or even months because of further damage caused by other

» TRANSFER

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

All-Region and State Star accolades in 2017. In addition to high school, Wampler played club soccer for the Indiana Fire Juniors. She helped lead the team to a pair of Elite Clubs National League Playoffs and a top-six national finish during her sophomore season. Last season, IU women's soccer finished 8-8-2 and missed out on qualifying for the Big Ten Tournament. This season, the Hoosiers will play two exhibition games Aug. 10 and 14 before officially starting the season Aug. 22 against the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

ALEX DERYN | IDS

Greg White points at a dead tree June 17 in the backyard of the White family residence. “That’s the only tree I really care about," he said. "It was the best tree in the whole yard."

storms this season. She said she believes it will take years before the area looks like it did prior to the tornadoes.

The National Weather Service recommends staying informed with local forecasts, assessing the im-

mediate damage, contacting loved ones and helping those negatively affected after one's area has severe weath-

Man claims he thought items he stole were free By Ellen Hine

porch were free for the taking. Police responded to a report of a burglary in progress around 8:12 p.m. Saturday at 913 W. 11th St., Bloomington Police Department Sgt. Brandon Siniard said.

emhine@iu.edu | @ellenmhine

A Bloomington man was arrested for theft Saturday night after claiming he thought items left on a front

» COACH

studying in the School of Public Environmental Affairs, earning her Master’s Degree. “I am really excited to continue my career with Indiana women’s soccer as a volun-

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Basten previously worked at IU as a graduate assistant for the past two years while

Horoscope

teer assistant coach,” Basten said in a press release. Basten also has experience coaching outside of IU. She coached the Cutters and Alliance FC, two elite soccer

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) Today is an 8 — Study a secret system to advance your career. Keep your wits about you. You're learning valuable tricks, and there's a test. Review options, and choose.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is an 8 — Do your financial homework. Keep your part of a bargain. Stay current with paperwork, legal matters and insurance. File and organize archives and accounts.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is an 8 — Practice your physical moves. Try new techniques or twists. Strive for balanced energy and health. Nurture yourself with excellent food, music and rest.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is an 8 — Get out and explore. Try a different mode of transportation. Expand your options. Discover a new side of something familiar. Investigate fresh terrain.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is a 9 — Follow through with what you told your partner you would do. Avoid controversy,s and just do it. Collaboration arises naturally on strong foundations.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 7 — Relax and play with someone interesting. Provide a stabilizing influence. Enjoy fun activities in good company. Romance develops with half a chance. Add candlelight.

BLISS

HARRY BLISS

found 37-year-old Maurice Gifford near the house with the stolen items on his bike. Gifford said he thought the items on the porch were free for anyone to take, like furniture put out on the curb.

Gifford was arrested for theft. While the initial call was a burglary report, Gifford was not charged with burglary since he did not enter the residence.

the game of soccer itself,” van Bennekom said in the release. “We are excited that she has decided to stay on as a coach and continue to develop her role with Indiana women’s

soccer.” Aside from her training and on-field coaching responsibilities, Basten will be coordinating the clinics and camps for the team.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 7 — Savor domestic crafts and comforts. Cook up something delicious, and invite family and friends. Clean one mess and make another. Others are happy to help.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 9 — Apply energy to profitable schemes. Not every suggestion works. Choose prudently. Monitor budgets and statistics for best value. The more you complete, the more you gain.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 6 — Clean, sort and organize for inner peace. Consider dreams, recent and old. Write down intentions and visions. Rest, and recharge your batteries.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 9 — When pursuing a possibility, the first thing you may notice is the opposite. You may see everywhere it's missing. Articulate your message for a powerful presentation.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 7 — An obstacle could obscure a personal dream. You're getting stronger today and tomorrow. Use charm and imagination to upgrade your style. Polish and beautify.

A resident told police a man walked up onto the porch of the house and knocked on the door before taking picture frames, a book and a lamp. When police arrived, they

clubs teams located in southern Indiana. “She’s knowledgeable about the athletic department, the history of our program and most importantly

Crossword

L.A. Times Daily Crossword

Publish your comic on this page.

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

ACROSS

Difficulty Rating: How to play: Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 grid contains the digits 1 through 9, without repeating a number in any one row, column or 3x3 grid.

Answer to previous puzzle

Gemini (May 21-June 20) Today is a 7 — Collaborate with your team. Draw upon hidden resources to get farther. Heed the voice of experience. Take action to realize a shared dream.

© 2019 By Nancy Black Distributed by Tribune Media Services, INC. All Rights Reserved

The IDS is accepting applications for student comic strips for the summer & fall 2019 semesters. Email five samples and a brief description of your idea to adviser@indiana.edu by Aug. 1. Submissions will be reviewed and selections will be made by the editor-in-chief.

su do ku

er. Creating and practicing a plan are necessary proactive measures according to the National Weather Service.

1 6 9 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 29 30 31 33 37 38

39 40 41 42

Esau’s twin Wee bit Cause to blush Love, in Milan Hoopla 1945 “Big Three” summit site Medical licensing test Go in “Pull up a chair” “Ghostbusters” goo Sport with rifles and disks Tot’s mealtime chest protector Cardin of design Translates, as a cipher Deborah of “The King and I” Get away from Rain really hard Smell Group of quail Burglary, for short ... and a hint to this puzzle’s four longest answers Pen name that sounds like a drink Maple or sycamore 1998 film with talking bugz? Longed (for)

43 State between Mont. and Minn. 45 Transfers from computer to cloud, say 47 Theater platforms 50 Actor McKellen 51 Instruments for Yo-Yo Ma 52 Flinch or blink 55 “Hulk” director Lee 58 Thing of the past 59 Online mass marketing message 61 Won by __: squeaked out the victory 62 Wrath 63 Artery in an angiogram 64 Unverified stories 65 Mariner’s “Help!” 66 Called the game

8 Rotunda topper 9 Sailor’s assent 10 Wearing away of a riverside slope 11 Change 12 Rodeo bovine 13 Poker Flat chronicler Bret 18 North Sea feeder 23 Torso-twisting “spin” that has no effect on the ball 24 Dijon dad 25 Credit report item 26 At any time 27 Home to Alley Oop 28 Hit on the tush 29 Invasive Asian vine 32 Toronto’s prov. 34 Delany of “Desperate Housewives” 35 Approved 36 Frees (of) 38 Sounds at shearings 42 Kin of a mesa 44 Gets the frost off, as plane wings 46 Prospector’s tool 47 “Get lost!” 48 So, so small 49 Portion out 52 Sluggers’ stats 53 Milan money 54 Taproom orders 55 Strong lobby for seniors 56 Late time, in ads 57 Delighted 60 Judy, to Liza

Look for the crossword daily in the comics section of the Indiana Daily Student. Find the solution for the daily crossword here. Answer to previous puzzle

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5

Short punches Mine, in Metz Paint layer Hockey immortal Place for reading a nighttime story to a tot 6 Ride with a meter 7 Actor Sandler

© Puzzles by Pappocom

BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!

TIM RICKARD


Indiana Daily Student

ONLINE POSTING: All classified line ads are posted online at idsnews.com/classifieds at no additional charge.

STRESS RELIEF A FEW BLOCKS FROM CAMPUS Visit us on Facebook:

Large 2 BR apartments & townhouses avail. NOW! Close to Campus & Stadium. 812-334-2646

facebook.com/e3rdStreet/

pavprop.com 812-333-2332

Bicycle Garage, Inc. is seeking enthusiastic, passionate, part-time Bicycle Mechanics and Sales Team members. We offer flexible hours and special savings on the products we carry. Apply online at: bikegarage.com

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Houses **Avail. August!** 203 S. Clark 313 N. Clark ALL UTILS. INCLUDED www.iurent.com 812-360-2628

MERCHANDISE 405

General Employment

Sublet Apt. Furnished

Keurig coffee maker, used, decent condition, not much use. $20. dduford@indiana.edu

1-5 BR. Close to Campus. Avail. immediately. Call: 812-339-2859.

3-8 BR. W/D. Aug. ‘19. 1 blk. from campus on Atwater Ave. $700. 812-361-6154

Appliances

Computers 2018 MacBook Pro, 15 inch w/ touch bar, $1700. danmeeks@iu.edu

Loveseat -Grey, lightly used $250. No stains/rips daviscrm@iu.edu Mattress, box spring & a bed stand all for $250! ajuneja@iu.edu Queen mattress, bed frame and box spring. Great shape. $160. lpector@iu.edu Tan vertical dresser, good condition. $60, obo. shusch@indiana.edu

2013 Toyota Camry XLE $8,999. Excellent cond. 1 owner; garaged; 164K.

Tom Ford women’s sunglasses, only worn once. $75, obo. rnourie@indiana.edu Yocaher skateboard longboard and never used. $50, obo. yy42@iu.edu

Jewelry Women’s gold Michael Kors watch. Like new only worn twice. $50 khbryant@iu.edu

Automobiles Jeep Cherokee $14,000 OBO. 97,651 mi., FWD, backup camera, etc. ashuffor@iu.edu

Reader glasses. Brand new. 2.5 magnifcation. Nice designs w/ cases. $5 each. 812-322-0808

Herman Miller Aeron Chair - supportive and healthy for posture. $500. bpnichol@indiana.edu

Less than 1 yr. old blue velvet couch in great cond., $550. gosterho@indiana.edu

2006 Saturn Ion (Good Cond.) $1700. 212k mi., white. palfarov@iu.edu 812-955-8876

sparky1tartan@msn.com

Knife set in good cond. Modern and useful with stainless steel accents. skardane@iu.edu

Green loveseat, comfy, good cond. Pick-up only. $60. makablac@indiana.edu

Leather couch, $50. Good cond. Pickup only. anabilah@indiana.edu

TRANSPORTATION

Brand new Columbia size 8.5 medium hiking boots. Never worn. $60. 812-322-0808

Furniture

Leather reclining sofa, 2 LazyBoy recliners & 36” square coffee table. All for $300. 812-322-0152

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EMPLOYMENT

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

Avail. now- July ‘19: 1 BR in 4 BR apt. w/ 3 male rmmtes. in Deluxe at the Monroe. Utils. & internet incl. Reduced rate, $434/mo. 317-557-7394

On 3rd St. $550 to $900/mo. Wifi+utils. Avail Aug. W/D onsite. 812-361-6154 call/text

18 crystal hangers, $6. 7 clear hangers, $2. 21 clear slack hangers, $7. 812-322-0808

Vizio 50” 4k HDR Smart TV - incl. controller tablet and can pair with app. $500. dearthur@iu.edu

1 to 2 blocks from Campus

2, 3, 4 BR apt., avail. Aug. 1. Rooftop deck. Downtown. 812-320-6794

28” Insignia LED TV. Excellent cond. $60. wrigmary@indiana.edu

New iPhone 8 plus - price is negotiable. nebhatt@indiana.edu

AVAILABLE NOW

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Announcements

11 Sterilite plastic containers. All prices $7 to $2. 812-322-0808

HP Officejet Pro 9610 Printer - USB cable and ink cartridges incl. $40. davishf@indiana.edu

1 – 5 Bed Apts/Houses

Apt. Unfurnished

Misc. for Sale

2014 Macbook Air - 13”, 128 GB, in great cond., incl. charger. $650, obo. andcalde@indiana.edu

50” Vizio TV - perfect cond. Can deliver. Only $120 yang281@iu.edu

Houses

PAVILION

HOUSING 310

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Electronics

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Lexus RX350: Clean title, new tires. 136,000 miles. $12,650, obo. malrowai@indiana.edu Silver 2013 Subaru Impreza WRX. 72,000 mi. Muffler delete, AWD, etc. dawmyers@indiana.edu 520

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CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING POLICIES

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CLASSIFIEDS

Monday, June 24, 2019 idsnews.com

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To place an ad: go online, call 812-855-0763 or stop by Franklin Hall 130 from 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Monday - Friday. Full advertising policies are available online. idsnews.com/classifieds

Bicycles 14 speed Univega bike. Incl. fenders, lights, etc. $300,obo. ljalston@indiana.edu 1974 Men’s white Raleigh Grand Prix. $200 812-333-5757

ELKINS APARTMENTS NOW LEASING FOR AUGUST 2019 & 2020 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 BR Houses, Townhouses and Apartments Quality campus locations

ELKINS APARTMENTS

339-2859 Office: 14th & Walnut

www.elkinsapts.com

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Current stories for everyone idsnews.com


Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com | Monday, June 24, 2019

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NEWS Editor Ellen Hine news@idsnews.com

ALEX DERYN | IDS

Bloomington resident Brandon Panganiban eats a meat bun from Oasis Chinese’s booth June 22. “I’m here for the food,” he said.

‘I’m here for the food.’

Showers Plaza was filled with booths, live music and activities for the Taste of Bloomington food festival. By Avery Williams avefwill@iu.edu | @ Avery_faye

Thousands of people crowded downtown Saturday afternoon to have a taste of Bloomington. Each summer, dozens of local restaurants set up booths to cater Taste of Bloomington, a festival where varieties of food are sold. People from all over Indiana pay the $10 admittance fee to try new foods, listen to live music and participate in arts activities. Attendees could try pizza slices from Mother Bear’s Pizza, pulled pork nachos from Crazy Horse, sweet corn on the cob from Smokin’ Jacks Rib Shack, butter chicken from Taste of India or smoked pulled pork sliders from Upland Brewing Company. Additional options included alcoholic drinks, snow cones and many more food choices. Taste of Bloomington offered free flower crown making workshops and caricature art for those in attendance. Downtown Bloomington Inc. board member Cindy Kinnarney stamped attendees’ hands as they entered the Taste of Bloomington through the 7th and Morton streets’ entrance. She said part of ticket sales are donated to Hoosier Hills food bank, Community Kitchen of Monroe County, Downtown Bloomington Inc. and Bloomington Independent Restaurant Association. Kinnarney watched over will call throughout the entire event. She said getting to interact with all the people made her job worth it. “There are wonderful and passionate people in this town, and most of them are here today,” Kinnarney said. Unlike other local events catering to specific age groups, Kinnarney said Taste of Bloomington caters to everyone. Children under 12 enter for free, and the live music is friendly for all ages. Kinnarney pointed to volunteers in red Taste of Bloomington shirts. She said it made her happy to see the community collaborate for this event. Saturday was the first time Noah Thorpe, 21, went to Taste of Bloomington. Thorpe, an interior landscape technician for Nature’s Way, said he was unaware of the event until he asked his Soma barista why the roads were closed. She encouraged

ALEX DERYN | IDS

TOP RIGHT Mercedes Scott decorates a flower crown June 22 at the Taste of Bloomington. Mary M’s Walnut House Flowers and Gifts had a “make and take” flower crown booth for attendees to make floral crafts. TOP LEFT Bloomington resident Alexis Ray places buns on trays June 22 at the Taste of Bloomington. Ray prepared food for Janko’s Little Zagreb. MIDDLE Robert Barga juggles June 22 at the Taste of Bloomington. Barga brought balls and plastic bowling pins to juggle to entertain attendees. BOTTOM Country artist Cody Ikerd sings June 22 at the Taste of Bloomington. Ikerd performed from 3:00 pm to 3:45 pm.

Thorpe to go to Taste of Bloomington, and he said he will definitely be attending the next event in 2020. “It’s a great way to sample local foods without spending too much money,” Thorpe said. He tried bison hushpuppies from Red Frazier Bison and garlic fries from Farm Bloomington. Thorpe said he was most excited to have an opportunity to try Farm Bloomington. Ryan Hughes is the market manager for the food delivery service Mr. Delivery . He said 2019 was the fourth year he has vended for Mr. Delivery at the Taste of Bloomington. He said he returns because it makes him feel like a part of a community. Hughes handed out free cookies, popsicles, cups and more throughout Taste of Bloomington. He said watching a child’s face light up for a popsicle was the best part of his day. “This is a big opportunity to give back,” Hughes said.


Indiana Daily Student

6

SPORTS

Monday, June 24, 2019 idsnews.com

Editor Dylan Wallace sports@idsnews.com

FOOTBALL

FIRST TEAMMATES. NOW ROOMMATES. They played on the same high school football team back in Miami. At IU, Gary Cooper and Jeramy Passmore are teammates and roommates. By Dylan Wallace dswallac@iu.edu | @Dwall_1

Moving 1,200 miles away from home was hard for IU freshman Gary Cooper, who left Miami, Florida, for Bloomington this summer to start his college football career as a tight end. “It was hard for the first week,” Cooper said. “To leave home like that.” What made the transition easier for Cooper was coming to Bloomington with one of his high school teammates, defensive lineman Jeramy Passmore. “He’s been helping me out getting adjusted to everything,” Cooper said. Cooper and Passmore both played football together at Christopher Columbus High School in Miami, Florida. Passmore committed to IU June 15, 2018. Four days later, Cooper

did the same. “We’ve been friends for a long time,” Passmore said. “He’s like a brother to me. Bringing him up here with me together, so it just feels

“He’s been helping me out getting adjusted to everything.” Gary Cooper, IU football team tight end

like I’m still at home.” Both Passmore and Cooper are two of six out of the 21 incoming freshmen to be recruited from a high school in Florida. In addition to the 2019 signees, 18 players on the IU roster also hail from Florida. Passmore attributed the high amount of Florida recruits to how being in Indiana is a different

experience many guys haven’t had before in Florida. “It’s a really quiet, laid back kind of town,” Passmore said of Bloomington. “That’s kinda my personality, and I fell in love with the coaches and the area. Bloomington is really beautiful, and I kinda wanted to experience something new.” When it comes to onfield productivity, both Hoosiers had impressive high school careers. Cooper was selected to the 2018 Miami-Dade AllStar Game and was ranked as the No. 13 hybrid tight end nationally by ESPN. As for Passmore, he racked up 57 tackles, 10 sacks and 13 tackles for loss his senior season and was also selected to the 2018 Miami-Dade All-Star Game. Christopher Columbus reached the 2018 state

championship in Cooper and Passmore’s final year. Cooper said he likes how IU’s offense uses tight ends and that IU’s veteran tight

“He’s like a brother to me. Bringing him up here with me together, so it just feels like I’m still at home” Jeramy Passmore, IU defensive lineman

ends have helped him get adjusted to the playbook. “It’s a great offense,” Cooper said. “I see myself doing great things. I see myself catching a lot of touchdown passes, making a lot of yards this year.” There’s a lot depth on the defensive line this season, so Passmore said he has used his hard work and

vocal leadership to earn his playing time. “I think I work really hard, and my work ethic rubs off on a lot of guys in different ways,” Passmore said. Older players have helped teach patience along with the defensive schemes, Passmore said. Passmore was ranked as the No. 64 strong-side defensive end nationally and said he should be starting off on the strongside and work his way to the inside as the season progresses. Speed and strength were both areas that Cooper and Passmore harped on improving with during the offseason to get ready for the bigger and faster game in college. The former high school teammates will be rooming together in the fall. When talking about

PHOTOS BY DYLAN WALLACE | IDS

LEFT Freshman defensive lineman Jeramy Passmore talks to the media June 18 inside Memorial Stadium. Cooper is from Christopher Columbus High School in Miami, Florida. RIGHT Freshman tight end Gary Cooper talks to the media June 18 inside Memorial Stadium. Cooper is from Christopher Columbus High School in Miami, Florida.

favorite memories with one another, the subject remained strictly on the football field. “Having those great, tough games together and coming out on top,” Passmore said. Cooper and Passmore look to bring their winning ways onto the field with IU when the season starts Aug. 31 against Ball State University in Lucas Oil Stadium.

Get news headlines sent to your inbox. Unitarian Universalist Church of Bloomington 2120 N. Fee Lane 812-332-3695 • www.uubloomington.org www.facebook.com/uubloomington Sundays: 9:15 a.m. & 11:15 a.m. We are a dynamic congregation working towards a more just world through social justice. We draw inspiration from world religions and diverse spiritual traditions. Our vision is “Seeking the Spirit, Building Community, Changing the World.” A LGBTQA+ Welcoming Congregation and a certified Green Sanctuary. Reverend Mary Ann Macklin, Senior Minister Reverend Scott McNeill, Associate Minister

Check

the IDS every Thursday for your directory of local religious organizations, or go online anytime at idsnews.com/religious

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Indiana Daily Student

OPINION

Editor Abby Malala opinion@idsnews.com

Thursday, June 20, 2019 idsnews.com

7

COURTESY PHOTO

Columnist James Bassett poses for a photo with Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren. Bassett says the gesture of taking photos with people does a lot for a politician's campaign.

BASSETT’S BANTER

A picture is worth a thousand votes james Bassett is a junior in political science.

Some say it’s the big dollar donors. Others say it’s the performance on the debate stage. I say it’s the selfie. Winning votes doesn’t necessarily require stellar town hall meetings or major news network airtime. It requires a personal connection with voters, which is sealed with the snap of a selfie. I attended Elizabeth Warren's MSNBC town hall with Chris Hayes in Fort Wayne, Indiana, where the dynamic and clearly passionate senator gave her pitch for a cleaner economy and wealth tax to a group of Democrat, Republican and independent voters. The policy was structurally sound, skillfully crafted

and modernized to meet the needs of today and the desires of tomorrow. But it wasn’t the policy or even Elizabeth Warren herself that crystallized my vote for Warren in 2020. It was the selfie I snapped with her in the selfie line at the conclusion of the MSNBC town hall.

“A simple photo snapped in a crowded room following a town hall— that will guide my hand as I fill in the box next to Warren’s name on Primary Day 2020.” James Bassett

Upwards of 150 guests sat patiently in their seats at the end of the town hall pro-

duction until they were dismissed to stand in the selfie line to catch that special moment with the senator. I took my place in the line, approached Warren, shook her hand and smiled for the camera. In a world where social media plays such a dominant role in everyday life, it would be a shame not to post that photo on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat and even LinkedIn. That’s exactly what I did, and I wasn’t alone. Scrolling through social media, I saw hundreds of similar photos of smiling voters standing side-by-side with Warren. These images win elections, as they illustrate the personal connection held by Warren and each individual voter. Her personality shines in each unique selfie, brighter than the flash of the

camera. The selfie lines at Warren’s campaign stops are not organically occurring. The skillful use of the selfie to build personal connections with individual voters is a tactic used by the campaign to garner support for the grassroots movement. An article authored by CNN correspondent MJ Lee noted Warren spent over 26 hours snapping selfies with voters in selfie lines across the country. While the lines have been dubbed selfie lines, the fact Warren staffers take the photo of the voter with Warren highlights the use of the line as an organized votegarnering machine. Hours spent speaking with these voters in the selfie line, having one-on-one conversations with them and giving them a keepsake

to treasure forever is a political magic trick that Warren has used to her advantage. The 2020 Democratic Primary will not be won through fundraising or postage mailers. This election will be won through Warren’s selfie line. Having the chance to stand in the line myself was an experience unrivaled by anything I’ve had the chance of doing before. I’m sure I’m not alone in thinking that either. It is the common bond I share with Warren — a simple photo snapped in a crowded room following a town hall — that will guide my hand as I fill in the box next to Warren’s name on Primary Day 2020. jambasse@iu.edu

POLITICAL POWERS

ILLUSTRATION BY MADELYN POWERS | IDS


Indiana Daily Student

8

ARTS

Monday, June 24, 2019 idsnews.com

Editor Abby Malala arts@idsnews.com

MOVIE REVIEW

New Bob Dylan Netflix documentary may be exactly what Dylan wanted Olivia Elston is a graduate student in optometry.

It has been 44 years since Bob Dylan went on his "Rolling Thunder Revue" tour. Now with the help of Martin Scorsese, everyone can experience an inside glimpse of it in the Netflix documentary, "Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story." The film shows neverbefore-seen footage from the tour itself and has interviews with Dylan along with some of the other members of the tour such as Joan Baez, one of Dylan's longtime friends and performer. The tour included other musicians such as Joni Mitchell and Patti Smith. The "Rolling Thunder Revue" tour was meant to be a tour played in small arenas or halls to contrast Dylan’s previous tours in large stadi-

ums. The purpose of the tour was not to make money but to have 15 or so musicians and bands go around sharing their music. Scorsese focuses on the fall leg of the tour and also puts some emphasis on the cultural and political events going on at that time, such as the resignation of President Richard Nixon. However, the documentary does not do much to tie the concert with the events going on outside of it. Clips of politics never seem to connect with any of the tour or Dylan himself. While "Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story" will be welcomed by Dylan fans who may want to relive the tour or even see it for the first time, it tends to be a little lackluster. Behind the scene clips do not offer much excitement or insight to the concert tour as a whole.

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Martin Scorsese's new Bob Dylan documentary is now on Netflix. The documentary documents a tour of his.

With such a famous tour, I expected more songs to be highlighted. The documentary did of course show performances of some of his best songs, such as "A Hard Rain's

A-Gonna Fall" and “Blowin’ In The Wind,” but I felt it could’ve shown more. There didn’t seem to be an overall point to the documentary. It wasn’t a straight-

through film of the tour itself. The interview questions sometimes felt disconnected and meaningless. Dylan himself explains how he doesn’t even really remem-

ber much of the tour. However, that is probably the point. This documentary is full of fake accounts and misinformation; Stefan van Dorp is not a real person and Jimmy Carter didn’t give tickets to a fictional character. However, all of this ends up being something right up Dylan’s alley. Dylan would definitely make things up as he goes for a story. Dylan is an American music legend. He has been touring and making music for most of his life. He’s been known for his mysterious, stubborn attitude but also for his poetic lyrics about romance or injustices in the world or even about everyday life. This documentary does not do Dylan justice, especially for one of his iconic tours. But it is probably exactly what Dylan wanted. oelston@iu.edu

the care and services you need to stay healthy at idsnews.com/health

Oral/Dental Care

Health Spotlight

The Center for Dental Wellness

J. Blue Davis, D.D.S. Matthew L. Rasche, D.D.S., M.S.D. Certified, American Board of Pediatric Dentistry

A privately owned, people-oriented practice located next to the College Mall. Dr. Davis provides cosmetic, restorative, family and emergency dentistry in a comfortable, relaxed atmosphere with a caring, knowledgeable and experienced staff. We use Cerec technology, allowing us to make restorations in one visit. Dr. Davis is a provider for Invisalign, Zoom! and Under Armour Performance Mouth Guards. Also offering other advanced services. We look forward to getting to know you and taking of you and your entire family with the goal of improving your smile and dental health.

Mon. - Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 2909 Buick Cadillac Blvd. 812-339-3427 dentalwellness.com

Southern Indiana Pediatric Dentistry with Dr. Matt Rasche specializes in providing comprehensive dental care for infants, children and adolescents, including those with special needs. We provide quality dental care and an exceptional experience for each patient. We welcome new patients! All insurance plans and private pay accepted. Our office is located near College Mall in Bloomington, at 828 Auto Mall Road in Bloomington. 812-333-KIDS. Call today! Mon. - Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Fri.: By appointment 828 Auto Mall Road 812-333-KIDS (5437) sipediatricdentistry.com

Chiropractic

Dr. Mary Ann Bough Office Manager: Melinda Caruso Chiropractic Assistants: Diona Bradbury, Jennifer Wilson, Stephanie Gregory Discover Chiropractic for the entire family! We are a state-of-the-art chiropractic facility using computerized analysis and adjustment techniques. We specialize in gentle “no-Twist-Turn” adjusting of infants to seniors! We are close to campus and near major bus routes. New patients are welcome and most insurance plans accepted. Call today and find out how you and your family can stay naturally healthy with chiropractic care. Mon., Wed., Fri.: 8:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. Tue.: 1 - 6 p.m. 3901 Hagan St., Suite C 812-336-7552 Emergency: 812-219-4927 drmaryann.com

Physicians Optometry

Optometry

Oral/Dental Care

J. Blue Davis, D.D.S. The Center for Dental Wellness • Eye Exams • Contact Lens Exams • IU Student & Employee insurance provider

• 24-hour Emergency Service (call 812-340-3937) Our Designer Frames and Sunglasses include: Nautica Flexon Nike Ray-Ban Bebe Calvin Klein Lacoste

Nine West Burberry Coach Anne Klein Vogue Prada Ralph Lauren

2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS! Bloomington Tue. - Sat.: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 812-333-2020 1105 S. College Mall Road Located just Left of Kroger and Plato’s Closet Ellettsville Mon. - Fri.: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 812-876-2020

Dr. Brandy Deckard, O.D., F.A.A.O. Dr. Derek Bailey, O.D. Precision Eye Group specializes in comprehensive vision health. We offer examinations and treatment for a wide array of eye diseases, conditions, and problems, with advanced diagnostic and vision care technologies. We help our patients achieve and maintain good eye health for life. You can shop our wide variety of designer frames including Lindberg, Lafont, Barton Perreira, Ray-Ban, Tom Ford, and many more! Schedule your appointment now, by calling the office or online at our website, and see your world with the best vision possible. Mon. - Fri.: 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sat.: 9 a.m. - noon

Oral/Dental Care

Timothy J. Devitt, D.M.D.

For membership in the Indiana Daily Student Health Directory, please contact us at ads@ idsnews.com. Your deadline for next Monday’s Health Directory is 5 p.m. Wednesday.

Campus Family Dental is the preferred choice for dental care among many IU students and professors. We will work with your schedule to provide the highest quality of general dentistry services. We pride ourselves in our professionalism and high-tech equipment to make your appointments as comfortable and efficient as possible. Enjoy the convenience of walking to our office. We are located near the southeast corner of campus and accept many forms of insurance. Mon. - Wed.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. (Closed 1-2 p.m. for lunch) Thu.: 8 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Mon. - Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

409 S. Dunn St. 812-339-6272 campusfamilydental.com

2909 Buick Cadillac Blvd. 812-339-3427 dentalwellness.com

We provide a full scope of oral surgery procedures in a caring and comfortable manner. Our services include dental implants, IV sedation and wisdom teeth removal. We’re a provider for most insurance plans, including IU and Medicaid. No referral necessary Conveniently located on S. College Mall Road, across from Kroger and Five Guys. Mon. - Fri.: 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 1116 S. College Mall Rd. 812-332-2204 oralsurgeryofbloomington.com

Dr. Lisa Robinson, Laci, Nikki, Tana, Amanda, Kaitlyn, PA-C A Medical Center, offering the IV Room for Pre-Party or HANGOVER IV a.k.a. banana bag treatment, and B12 Bloomington, vitamin and IV therapy. Walk-in care available for sick visits and lacerations. Walk-in lab, bring your order from your doctor. Medical spa services: Botox, Juvederm, laser hair removal, Coolsculpting, Thermi for cellulite. Weight loss program includes HCG. Owned and operated by a board certified family physician, IU School of Medicine graduate. All your health care needs met here! Mon.-Thu.: 8:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. Fri.: 8:30 a.m. - noon 1310 W. Bloomfield Rd., Suite C 812-334-2772 www.jdvmedical.com

Chiropractic

Jackson Creek Dental Ryan D. Tschetter, D.D.S.

HoosierEyeDoctor.com

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Dr. Gregory Velligan, Dr. Eric Hein, Crystal Lynn, Shanna Yarnell, Krista Sears, Ejay Rippy, Julie Waymire & Sandy Fastridge

322 S. Woodscrest Drive 812-332-2020 precisioneye.com

4719 West State Road 46 Located across from True Value Hardware

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A privately owned, people-oriented practice located next to the College Mall. Dr. Davis provides cosmetic, restorative, family and emergency dentistry in a comfortable, relaxed atmosphere with a caring, knowledgeable and experienced staff. We use Cerec technology, allowing us to make restorations in one visit. Dr. Davis is a provider for Invisalign, Zoom! and Under Armour Performance Mouth Guards. Also offering other advanced services. We look forward to getting to know you and take care of you and your entire family with the goal of improving your smile and dental health.

Joie de Vivre Medical

Jackson Creek Dental is a privately owned dental practice conveniently located on South College Mall Road. Most insurances accepted, including the Indiana University Cigna Insurance plans as well as the IU Fellowship Anthem. Dr. Tschetter offers state of the art dental technology such as Zoom whitening, same day crown appointments, and Invisalign. Dr. Tschetter also provides restorative, cosmetic and emergency care. We pride ourselves in giving the best care to our patients while offering a pleasant yet professional atmosphere.

Dr. Crystal Gray Dr. Andrew Pitcher Gentle, effective chiropractic care helping students reduce back and neck pain, stress, headaches, migraines, fatigue, sports injuries, whiplash, etc. We have treatments that will fit your individual needs. We accept most insurance plans. Give us a call today! Consultations are always complementary. Mon., Wed., Thu.: 9 a.m. - noon, 2-7 p.m. Tue., Fri.: 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Mon. - Fri.: 7 a. m. - 5 p.m. 1124 S. College Mall Rd. 812-336-5525 jcdsmiles.com

The Health Directory is your guide to health and wellness in the Bloomington area.

1710 W. Third St. 812-336-BACK (2225) bloomingtonchiropractor.com

Brian Logue, M.D. Eric Smith, M.D. Dave Elkins, P.A.C. Board certified physicians with over 70 years combined experience. Services include: kidney stones, urinary tract infections, urinary incontinence, prostate problems, same day emergency appointments, vasectomy. Mon. - Wed.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Thu.: 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. Fri.: 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. 2907 McIntire Drive 812-332-8765 summiturology.com Or visit us at our other location. Dr. Warren L. Gray 2200 John R. Wooden Drive Suite 207 Martinsville, IN 46151 765-342-8427 PAID ADVERTISING

Profile for Indiana Daily Student - idsnews

Monday, June 24, 2019  

The Indiana Daily Student is an independent student newspaper covering Indiana University, IU sports and the city of Bloomington, Indiana.

Monday, June 24, 2019  

The Indiana Daily Student is an independent student newspaper covering Indiana University, IU sports and the city of Bloomington, Indiana.

Profile for idsnews