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Monday, September 9, 2019

IDS

Kiwanis Balloon Fest, page 7

Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

7 arrested in connection to residential entry Friday By Grace Ybarra gnybarra@iu.edu | @gnybarra

On Saturday in the home opener, IU blew past Eastern Illinois for the largest margin of victory in Memorial Stadium history,

52-0. By Caleb Coffman calcoffm@iu.edu | @CalCoff

The tone for IU football’s home season opener was set before the captains met for the coin toss. As fireworks went off, the IU players poured out of the tunnel and past Hep’s Rock. Head coach Tom Allen let out a roar and a huge fist pump as he led the Hoosiers onto the field at Memorial Stadium for the first time this season to face Eastern Illinois University. The same energy that exuded from Allen carried onto the field during the game as the Hoosiers started fast and didn’t slow down until the final whistle. IU cruised to a 52-0 victory, the largest margin of victory in Memorial Stadium history. On the first drive of the game, IU spread the ball out and executed with efficiency as it marched down the field.

Sophomore Stevie Scott, who struggled in the season opener against Ball State, averaging only 2.5 yards per carry, found room to run early with 18 yards in the first drive of the game. He managed 61 yards Saturday afternoon, averaging 5.1 yards per carry.

“We’re seeing the progress. We were tacking better and now you got to go do it against a top five team” Tom Allen, head coach

In the air, freshman Michael Penix Jr. picked up right where he left off last week, starting five-for-seven for 57 yards while

ALEX DERYN | IDS

Redshirt freshman quarterback Michael Penix Jr. hands off the ball to sophomore running back Stevie Scott II on Sept. 7 at Memorial Stadium. IU was leading at halftime against Eastern Illinois University, 28-0.

throwing to five different receivers before finding red shirt freshman wide receiver Miles Marshall in the end zone to open the scoring. “I love throwing it to all of them,” Penix said. “Whoever’s open, I tell them they’re going to get the ball and make sure that happens.” In just under a half of play, Penix continued to show his promise as the starter, completing 14-of-20 passes for 197 yards and two touchdowns while leading the team up and down the field as the HooSEE FOOTBALL, PAGE 5

A young comedian and actor starts at IU By Raegan Walsh ramwalsh@iu.edu

Freshman Joe Goehl thought making his comedic debut as a 10-year-old at a retirement home was a joke in itself. But it was a start. Goehl was ready to take any opportunity he could to experiment with his newfound interest in acting and comedy. While watching an episode of the 1990s sketch comedy television show, “In Living Color,” Goehl was introduced to a dream that would soon become a reality. When a commercial aired announcing that auditions were taking place for the program at the Laugh Factory in his hometown Chicago, he begged his father to try out. Despite the auditions having an age restriction of 21, the Laugh Factory’s founder Jamie Masada encouraged Goehl to come SEE COMEDIAN, PAGE 5

Seven people were arrested early Friday morning for residential entry into an apartment after coming in through an unlocked door. Albert Lavelle, Jessica Bell, Vanenna Guy, Mary-Jo Neighbors, Stanley Staples and James Stewart are being held under the preliminary charges of residential entry. All are between the ages of 21 and 35. Blake Cunningham was arrested for residential entry, along with resisting law enforcement. The Bloomington Police Department received a call at around 3 a.m. to an apartment complex located at 1890 S. Walnut St. The caller stated there were people testing to see if doors to apartments in the complex were unlocked.  Upon arrival, police saw through the window of the apartment one man, Blake Cunningham. They asked him who the apartment belonged to. He said he didn’t know.  The police asked him to open the now-locked door. He declined and went to a back room in the apartment. After breaking down the door, the police found five people in the apartment: Jessica Bell, Vanenna Guy, Mary-Jo Neighbors, James Stewart and Stanley Staples.  After arresting these five people, police found the back window open. Cunningham, the man they spoke to before, had fled with another man, Albert Lavelle. Police arrested them.

HALEY KLEZMER | IDS

Freshman Joe Goehl filmed a movie with actor Joey Lawrence titled “Pardoned by Grace” this past month. Goehl acquired onstage experience opening for comedians Tim Harmston, Mary Mack, Ryan Budds and mentor Tom Dreeson, who suggested he try acting.

WOMENS’ SOCCER

Dominant play leads IU to win By Will Trubshaw wtrubsha@iu.edu | @Willtrubs

One of the major subplots for IU women’s soccer in the early part of the season has been an inability to finish off scoring chances. The Hoosiers managed to flip that script on its head Sunday, as they routed the Morehead State University Eagles 5-0. IU dominated in virtually every offensive category and looked every bit of the part on the field. “Right from the first minute I just felt comfortable in the way we were defending, the way we were locking them in,” IU head coach Erwin van Bennekom said. “All we needed was the first goal to come. I think they did a good job of finishing the game off sooner than later.” IU finished the game with a 26-0 shot advantage, while also managing to draw fifteen corner kicks. After a corner kick in the 12th minute the Hoosiers silently controlled the ball until the 20th minute, when freshman midfielder Avery Lockwood launched a shot from just outside the penalty box that sailed slightly over the cross bar. Lockwood found the ball again in the 32nd minute from almost the exact same spot and did not miss. A low bending shot took a skip into the net to put the Hoosiers on the board 1-0, Lockwood’s first goal of her career. SEE FOOTBALL, PAGE 5

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Indiana Daily Student

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NEWS

Monday, Sept. 9, 2019 idsnews.com

Editors Alex Hardgrave, Ellen Hine & Joey Bowling news@idsnews.com

TY VINSON | IDS

Anti-facist protestors march down the street with red flares Sept. 7 to protest white supremacy in Bloomington. The group marched to Showers Commons, where the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market takes place.

March Against White Supremacy takes place By Lydia Gerike lgerike@iu.edu | @lydiagerike

While families picked restaurants for a post-football game dinner and students packed into bars to begin their Saturday night, one group on Kirkwood Avenue was not there to celebrate. More than 150 people gathered in Peoples Park around 7 p.m. for the March Against White Supremacy. They listened to speakers and then marched mostly down one lane of Kirkwood, turning on the B-Line Trail to gather at Showers Commons and finally coming back. “No hate, no fear, the time to fight is here,” they chanted as they marched down Kirkwood. They were protesting a variety of issues related to white supremacy, from alleged white nationalists at the Bloomington Community Farmers' Market to national raids by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The march was organized by Young Democratic Socialists of America Bloomington with support and speakers from other Bloomington activist chapters including UndocuHoosiers, No Space for Hate and Black Lives Matter. Community members and students also joined in. Some anti-facist, or antifa, protestors were dressed in black clothing, and pink bandanas covered their faces instead of the usual black masks. One member

said the pink was a show of solidarity with anarchist feminism and how different groups, including sex workers, are affected by white supremacy.

“What is more dangerous, what is more fascist, than the idea that progress cannot be interrupted?” Ko Dokmai, UndocuHoosiers board member

Senior and YDSA cochair Jess Tang, who uses they/them pronouns, said the march had a general anti-white supremacy message to help include a wide variety of experiences. “To me, it is important to have a voice in the community that is confidently anti-racist, anti-fascist,” Tang said. Some concerns center around recent issues in Bloomington, Tang said, such as the Ku Klux Klan flyers found around town and the claims of farmers market vendor Schooner Creek Farm being tied to white nationalism.  But Tang said students and members of the community may have also experienced or seen white supremacy in other forms, whether it be in Bloomington or somewhere else in the world. Tang said they faced retaliation from some

people for organizing the march. However, they said the event was important enough to keep going. “I think sometimes there are necessary sacrifices for wanting to speak out,” Tang said. Ko Dokmai, an UndocuHoosiers board member and one of the event’s speakers, said marching down Kirkwood was a way to fight against the belief that society has a certain time and place for everything. In an interview, he said people don’t like the idea of their day-to-day progression through life or even the progress of capitalism being shaken by people bringing up issues they believe to be in the past, including slavery and police brutality. “What is more dangerous, what is more fascist, than the idea that progress cannot be interrupted?” Dokmai said. The group had a large audience of onlookers as they marched through downtown Bloomington, including many IU parents and fans there for that afternoon’s football game against Eastern Illinois University. Students yelled from Kilroy’s on Kirkwood and the Upstairs Pub as marchers passed, and young men booed the group from above Five Guys Burgers and Fries. For some of the march, a Bloomington Police Department car followed behind the group, a K-9 dog barking in the back.

TY VINSON | IDS

Protesters march down Kirkwood Avenue on Sept. 7 in protest against white supremacy. The group marched from Peoples Park to Showers Commons, which is the location of the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market.

People recorded the group, and Crazy Horse outside diners stopped eating when the marchers walked by. Some families looked on in disbelief, quietly telling other family members how stupid the ordeal seemed. Anti-facist protesters flanked the outside of the group, holding out their hands to stop traffic at intersections to tell drivers to stop even if they had the green light. When the group reached Showers Commons, they formed a circle and sang songs. Anti-facist protesters formed a second outside circle, watching over the

singers but not really participating. The group marched back to Peoples Park afterward, with two antifascist protesters at the front lighting red flares that illuminated protesters' faces in the night’s fallen darkness. More people continued to react by yelling things like “white lives matter” in response to a “black lives matter” chant, raising a fist in solidarity or just recording with their phones. “Don’t just record us, join us,” one marcher yelled out. “You can see a lot more from the center.” At least one group was

convinced: a trio of freshman girls joined in toward the front of the march, still wearing IU gear for the game earlier that day. They said it was a cause they all believed in and wanted to exercise their right to protest. Freshman Isobel Kennedy said joining in was empowering. She saw the march as a way to spread an anti-white supremacy message to a larger audience as people watched the group go by. “It made it relevant for people to hear us screaming down the streets,” Kennedy said.

New club Yes Theory IU says ‘Yes’ to seeking discomfort By Lyndsay Valadez lvaladez@iu.edu | @lynds_val

Students Mattie Taylor, Devanshi Ruparel and a couple others met online last school year through a Facebook group called “Yes Theory Fam.” This group stems from the YouTube channel Yes Theory, whose mantra is to say“Yes” to opportunities and to seek discomfort. “It’s such a contagious message,” said Ruparel, Yes Theory IU co-founder and director for marketing. “We are so motivated and passionate about the message to seek discomfort.”  When Ruparel and the other students each realized they all attended IU, they wanted to meet up and do something together, similar to what the actual Yes Theory group would do. 

MADELYN KNIGHT | IDS

Junior Dakota Johnson, left, and senior Mattie Taylor present a slideshow Sept. 5 at the Yes Theory IU callout meeting. Yes Theory IU is a new club this school year and encourages its members to get outside of their comfort zones.

So they met up at the Sample Gates, handed out flowers to people, and from there, they decided to form Yes Theory IU, which emulates the same principles Yes

Theory centers on. “It was honestly one of the most positive experiences that I’ve ever had here,” said Taylor, Yes Theory IU co-founder and vice

president. Yes Theory IU is beginning its first full year as a club this school year. Their next planned event, called Operation Flower Power, is scheduled for 3-5 p.m. Friday at the Sample Gates, where they will hand out flowers, mirroring the event that started it all. While they do plan some events, they also allow members to share ideas via their GroupMe. Members are not required to go to events but are encouraged to get out of their comfort zones.  Because of Yes Theory IU, Ruparel went from being scared to talk to people to speaking with students for hours at a table promoting Yes Theory IU.  In order to be a member, students must pay dues of $10 for the year, which will help fund the group’s events.

However, they don’t want money to be a barrier to membership. Dakota Johnson, Yes Theory IU co-founder and president, said he expects from the members a sense

of community in which they will encourage self-growth and development. “Anyone who joins will come out with a lot of new friends from different backgrounds,” Johnson said.

Matt Rasnic Editor-in-Chief Christine Fernando & Ty Vinson Managing Editors

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NEWS

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Monday, Sept. 9, 2019 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Scott Pelley, anchor of "CBS Evening News," pictured March 3, 2012, in New York, helped CBS return to form. Pelley will be the keynote speaker for the Arnolt Center for Investigative Journalism’s grand opening.

Investigative journalism center opens Tuesday By Lyndsay Valadez lvaladez@iu.edu | @lynds_val

PHOTOS BY ALEX DERYN | IDS

Senior Ryan Ogden holds a husky puppy Aug. 30 in Anthony’s Pets. “Every time we’re at the mall we come here,” he said when referring to his pet store visits with his girlfriend.

Pet store remains open despite petition By Claire Peters clapete@iu.edu | @claire_peterss

Members of the Bloomington community have been attempting to close down Anthony’s Pets due to allegations of mistreatment of the animals. Amanda Bradtmiller, a junior at IU, posted a thread on Twitter containing tweets with pictures of puppies that appeared to be unwell and offices within the city and county to send complaints to. The original tweet got over 1,000 likes. She strongly encouraged people to take action off Twitter.  “While it’s a way to spread the word, people want to do something outside of that,” Bradtmiller said. “The strongest thing you can do outside of shutting down is boycotting it.” She also suggested making posters to put around town spreading the word about the alleged bad conditions the dogs are being put in. There

is also a petition she encouraged people to sign. So far the petition has a little over 3,000 and signatures. This has prompted many people to contact the Bloomington Animal Control Commission, but the complaints they are sending may not hold the weight they were hoping.  “We got a slew of generic information that wasn’t actionable at all,” said Virgil Sauder, the director of Animal Care and Control at the Bloomington Animal Shelter. “Without the ability to follow up on specifics, there’s not a lot we can do.” Even if there are no specifics in the complaints, every time a complaint is received about Anthony’s Pets, someone is sent to inspect. So far, no evidence has been found that would cause the store to lose its permit to sell animals.  This is a pattern the owner of Anthony’s Pets, Tony Taboas, has gotten used to. He has been at Anthony’s Pets for 15 years. 

A female Lhasa Poo puppy plays with a shoe string Aug. 30 in Anthony’s Pets. A Lhasa Poo is a lhasa apso and poodle mix.

“They have to check every call, but I’ve never gotten any citations,” Taboas said. But he says if a complaint holds any merit, then it will change that aspect of the business. Although the goal of the petition was to shut down Anthony’s Pets, Sauder said taking that route and going through animal control won’t cut it, as it isn't breaking any requirements for keeping its permit.  “If they’re upset with the

concept of pet stores, that’s one thing, you deal with it the same way you deal with another business you don’t agree with in the community,” Sauder said. “They are a business, and the animals are the product.” He suggested voicing complaints by talking to a council member or going through the Better Business Bureau. “From the animal care end of things, that’s what we’re concerned with,” he said.

The Arnolt Center for Investigative Journalism is having its grand opening Tuesday, in Presidents Hall of Franklin Hall. The center is located in Room 106 of Franklin Hall. This investigative journalism center is independent of IU, where students will learn how to create “highquality investigative journalism for the state of Indiana and beyond,” as stated on its website. To celebrate the grand opening, there are several events throughout the day, all of which are free to the public.  The panel "Investigative Sports Journalism in a Multimedia World" will take place from 10 to 11:15 a.m. The panel will include former IndyStar reporter Mark Alesia and IndyStar reporter Zach Osterman, Deadspin senior editor Diana Moskovitz and Gatehouse Media data reporter Kenny Jacoby.  The second panel, “Investigative Journalism’s New Golden Age? The Rise of the Nonprofits,” will take place from 11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. The panel will include Christina Jewett, Kaiser Health News senior correspondent, Brant

Houston, Knight Chair in Investigative and Enterprise Reporting at the University of Illinois and Dee Hall, Wisconsin Watch managing editor. There will be a ribbon cutting at 2 p.m., signifying the opening of the Arnolt Center.  The third panel, “The New New Muckrakers: Investigative Reporting in the Twenty-First Century,” will take place from 2:30 to 3:45 p.m. The panel will include Duane Pohlman, WKRC Cincinnati investigative reporter, Cheryl Thompson, NPR investigative correspondent and Investigative Reporters & Editors board president and Lee Zurik, Gray Television director of investigations.  The fourth and final panel, “Pro Tips: Putting Your Investigative Skills to Work,” will take place from 4 to 5:15 p.m. The panel will include Steve Berta, IndyStar investigations team leader, Terri Cope-Walton, WRTV-6 Indianapolis news director, Kate Glover, WNDU South Bend news director and Andy Hall, Wisconsin Watch executive director.  At 6 p.m., Scott Pelley, a “60 Minutes” correspondent, will be giving the keynote speech.  

Fourth Street garage demolition and construction begin By Claire Peters clapete@iu.edu | @claire_peterss

The Fourth Street garage has begun its construction, beginning the project that could take over a year to complete. Department of Public Works director Adam Wason said the demolition will take 90 days, and the construction will take up to a year. Because the demolition will take place in a populated area, the city is taking a different approach.  “The demolition isn’t going to be your typical implo-

sion," Wason said. "It’ll be a surgical type procedure. We’re taking the garage apart piece by piece.” The construction company is providing a covered walkway to ensure safety for people accessing the businesses behind the garage, such as the Back Door and Best Taste, Wason said. Although the city has taken precautions for safety, it doesn’t mean the businesses aren’t being affected.  Firestone Complete Auto Care, a store located across the street from the parking garage, is experiencing the consequences of the large

construction area. “It takes away a lot of parking," store supervisor Kyle Lannan said. "We’re already pretty restrained."  While they’re short on spaces now, he said the extra parking will be nice for business.  When the parking garage finished, it’ll provide multiple sustainable options, such as bike lockers, electric vehicle charging stations and solar panels. These features qualify the structure for a Parksmart certification, which recognizes environmentally friendly garages. 

The garage will contain space on the floor level for commercial retail too. Wason said they have not narrowed down the field of who will be in that space yet. Although the parking garage has the Parksmart certification, there is still a large portion of the community that was opposed to it being rebuilt, as many claimed that building it will encourage car usage and harm the environment.  “This was a controversial project, " Wason said. "But it’ll be vital for the longterm sustainability of our town."

COLIN KULPA | IDS

Heavy machinery sits idle Sept. 5 next to the Fourth Street parking garage. The demolition of the existing garage is expected to take 90 days.

Get news headlines sent to your inbox. Canterbury House Episcopal (Anglican) Campus Ministry at IU 719 E. Seventh St. 812-334-7971 • 812-361-7954 indiana.edu/~canterby canterby@indiana.edu • facebook.com/ecmatiu 812-361-7954 Sacramental Schedule: Weekly services Sunday: 4 p.m. Holy Eucharist with hymns followed by dinner at Canterbury House Tuesday: 6 p.m. Bible Study at Canterbury House 1st & 3rd Wednesdays: 7 p.m. Music & Prayers at Canterbury House Episcopal (Anglican) Campus Ministry is a safe and welcoming home for all people. We are a blend of young and old, women and men, gay and straight, ethnicities from different cultures and countries, students, faculty, staff and friends. The worshipping congregation is the Canterbury Fellowship. The mission of the Fellowship is to restore all people to unity with God and each other in Christ. We pray, worship and proclaim the Gospel. We also promote justice, equality, inclusion, peace, love critical thinking and acting as agents of change in our world.

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Indiana Daily Student

4

OPINION

Monday, Sept. 9, 2019 idsnews.com

Editors Emma Getz & Evan Carnes opinion@idsnews.com

“IN THIS ESSAY I WILL...”

So what if gay people aren’t born that way? Who cares! Tom Sweeney is a senior studying economics and mathematics.

Some LGBTQ advocates are worried that a new study from Harvard and MIT will add fuel to the conversion therapy fire. It’s well known that homophobia persists in the United States and internationally. In Boston, members of a far-right nationalist group organized a “Straight Pride” parade on Saturday, coincidentally on the same day as Bloomington’s own PrideFest. Around the world, same-sex sexual activity is criminalized in over 70 countries, and the situation isn’t necessarily improving. Kenya, for example, upheld its gay sex laws in its highest court earlier this year. One much-discussed problem is conversion therapy. The Williams Institute at the UCLA School of Law estimates that nearly 700,000 American adults have received conversion therapy, and nearly 80,000 minors will be subjected to some form before they become adults. The belief that it’s possible to change sexual orientation can be deadly. One recent study from researchers at San Francisco State University found that being subjected to conversion therapy more than doubles the likelihood of depression and suicide for LGBT young people. It’s no surprise, then, that some activists are concerned about scientific evidence which casts doubt on the idea that sexual orientation is determined from birth. That’s exactly what’s happening now. A significant new study from Harvard and MIT’s Broad Institute, published in "Science," a top general science journal in the world, reports that there is no gene or even set of genes that determines same-sex sexual behavior. All in all, genet-

ics helped explain less than one-quarter of the variation in sexual behavior in the study. In other words, when it comes to having gay sex, genetics doesn’t explain very much. There were some important caveats to the study. First, it looked at sexual behavior, not sexual identity. In particular, the researchers tested for any statistical connection between genes and whether a person had ever had a samesex sexual partner. It did not make significant conclusions about why someone might be likely to have more same-sex sexual partners and fewer heterosexual sexual partners. Second, it found high correlation between having ever had a same-sex sexual partner and risk-taking. It’s unclear how much of the population who had ever had sex with someone of the same sex were straightidentifying but willing to try gay sex. This is not the first time scientists have examined the connection between homosexuality and biology. Last year, researchers at Stanford University successfully used artificial intelligence to predict people’s sexual orientation by their faces in their social media profile pictures. Regardless, the implications of the study have prompted concerns and stirred controversy. Several scientists associated with the Broad Institute, a biomedical and genomic research center, have argued that the results, or at least confusion about them, could give more ammunition to bigots. Bioinformatics analyst Carino Gurjao expressed unease that misinterpretation of the results could be used to support conversion therapy and gene editing. “I worry that this study is the beginning of a very slippery slope into institutionalized homophobia — supported by false claims of evidence

from the scientific community,” he explained. Broad Institute researcher Meagan Olive even cited a line from Jeff Goldblum in "Jurassic Park": “Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn’t stop to think if they should.” Their worries have merit. For decades, much of the argument against conversion therapy for gay, lesbian and d bisexual people has focused on the claim that sexual orientation is innate. nnate. Lady Gaga ushered in a new name for this idea dea in 2011 with the words, “I'm on the right track, baby / I was born this way.” The “Born This Way” model of sexual al orientation, which suggests ests that it’s determined from m birth, has certainly helped d advance d gay rights politically. Jane Ward, a gender studies professor at University of California, Riverside, explains that the “Born This Way” rhetoric is “legitimizing and politically expedient.” By positing sexual orientation as a feature set at birth, it cements the idea that sexual orientation is beyond one’s control, which aids the arguments against conversion therapy and LGBT discrimination. Yet Ward and other academics argue that whether you’re born gay or not shouldn’t matter. Even if sexual identity is consciously formed, as many gender studies researchers contend, society should still accept queer people for who they are. To

(NOTE: THIS IS STILL NOT WHAT HAPPENS.)

most young people, this idea is probably strikingly self-evident. The argument can be extended. The Broad Institute study d merely l suggests skepk ticism for genetic determination of sexual orientation. It doesn’t provide insight on epigenetic, hormonal or other physiological influences, and it doesn’t follow that people can control their own sexual orientation. It certainly doesn’t imply that sexuality is a choice. Moreover, there is robust evidence that sexuality is fluid into adulthood. After accepting sexual fluidity, the idea that same-sex sexual behavior can’t be predicted from your genes not only seems less controversial, but it also seems patently obvious.  Consider the logic of conversion therapy. The case against conversion therapy does not depend on the genetic contri-

JONAH’S JUSTIFICATIONS

The health care debate within the U.S. has repeatedly been met with staunch criticism from many other developed nations around the globe. In the Commonwealth Fund study of 11 developed countries’ health care systems, the U.S. health care system was ranked 11th out of 11. For many Americans the idea of a single-payer health care system might seem overwhelming or unnecessary, especially if they feel comfortable with their current health care provider. The problem lies within the profit-driven health insurance system which puts profits over patients and has a vested interest in denying coverage.  Americans pay out far too much money in health insurance and prescription drug costs because they are being price gouged by rapacious middlemen – the health insurance industry. The heart of the debate is finding the best way to achieve universal health coverage and save Americans money on the cost of health care.  Unfortunately, this would be impossible to achieve. As long as health care is privatized, the incentive structure encourages nefarious business practices such as price gouging and denying coverage to save insurers money.  A Medicare for All system removes this corrupt incentive structure and has unprecedented upsides that make it the clearest choice for Ameri-

can healthcare reform. According to a study by the Political Science Research Institute at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, a Medicare for All system would save up to $5.1 trillion over the course of 10 years. Individuals would also be paying significantly less for health care because they would no longer be paying private health premiums and would instead be paying the much lower Medicare rates via an increase in taxes.  For those who argue about the increase in taxes, paying for health care is unavoidable; everyone needs health care. Medicare for All would eliminate your private insurance premiums and would ultimately save individuals money because Medicare does not overcharge to make a profit, unlike private insurers. Nearly 45,000 Americans die every year from a lack of basic health coverage, and medical bills are the leading cause of bankruptcy according to a Harvard study. This is unacceptable for a country that claims to have the best health care system in the world.  Some common concerns with Medicare for All are that there will be exorbitant wait times. Under a Medicare for All system, there may be increased wait times for elective procedures, meaning it does not require a medical emergency, because this system would prioritize need rather than the size of one’s wallet. Medicare for All also has many Americans worried about whether they can keep their doctors. Under this system, not only would Ameri-

ILLUSTRATION BY ANNIE AGUIAR

ward. Scientists know more this week than they did last week. In the spirit of IU’s own Alfred Kinsey, I look forward to a time when we may discuss with full openness and honesty the science of human sexuality, without having to worry about the response from bigots. The “Born This Way” model was necessary for an earlier time in the American public discourse. Let’s work for a new social rhetoric, which, regardless of the biological underpinnings, accepts queer people for who they are. tpsweene@iu.edu

THE ELECTIVE PERSPECTIVE

Medicare for All needs to be a litmus test for the Democrats Jonah Hyatt is a junior studying political science and philosophy.

bution to i same-sex behavior. It depends instead on the complete wrongheadedness of conversion therapy’s goal, and additionally on the damning degree to which conversion therapy has failed to achieve that goal. The ethical concerns about the gene study would carry less weight if the argument for queer acceptance did not depend on biological foundations. A rhetoric which preserves the dignity of gays, lesbians and bi people without tying it to their genes would preempt the arguments of homophobes. The jury is still out on whether this type of science does more good than harm. Nevertheless, it has helped move the conversation for-

cans be able to keep their doctors, but it also allows for more freedom of choice by cutting the tie between employers and health insurance. A single government health insurance provider would be accepted by all doctors, preventing disparities between health insurance networks. Additionally, Medicare for All would free workers unions to fight for increased wages and other important benefits and would allow for reduced pharmaceutical drug prices. This would occur by having the government negotiate drug prices directly with drug manufacturers. For those who still prefer private health insurance, not a single Medicare for All bill proposed bans supplemental private insurance, so people can keep their current plans. Democrats need to make support of Medicare for All a core issue and a requirement of being in the Democratic party. Ultimately, 70% of the country already favors a single-payer health care system and the only thing stopping Democrats from falling in line with the American people are campaign contributions and incessant lobbying from powerful health insurance providers. Single-payer health care has so many clear advantages over privatized health insurance as demonstrated by the many other developed countries that have it. It is time for the Democrats to actually fight for the people and make this issue a number one priority. hyattj@iu.edu

We didn't deserve Jay Inslee's presidental campaign Max Sandefer is a sophomore studying political science and Spanish.

Lt. James Gordon said in the film “The Dark Knight” that Batman was, “the hero that Gotham deserves, but not the one [they] need right now.” Gov. Jay Inslee (DWashington) proved to be the opposite. His presidential campaign was what America needed right now, but honestly did not deserve. He suspended his campaign via "The Rachel Maddow Show" on Aug. 21 after consistently lackluster polling. Inslee’s campaign primarily centered around one issue: climate change. In fact, his campaign’s logo even included an artistic hemisphere meant to represent Earth. On paper, his campaign should have clicked with many voters. In fact, a CBS News Poll from late July found that 78% of early Democratic primary voters listed climate change as a “very important” issue for them. This was second only to healthcare, arguably the biggest issue in the 2018 midterm elections. This makes sense. The world has suffered greatly from the effects of climate change caused by human activity. Many in China are forced to wear masks due to rampant pollution. There is more carbon dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere than in any point in human history. Indonesia even has to move its capi-

tal city because the current one is sinking due to rapidly rising sea levels. The Earth weeps as humanity destroys it day by day. Inslee’s plans tackled the climate crisis head on. This included ending all direct government financial support to all fossil fuel industries, proposing a “climate pollution fee” to the point where it has a large economic impact on these companies, and even rejecting any and all new infrastructure that relies on fossil fuels. Inslee’s bold climate proposals should excite primary voters, so what happened? Simply put, Inslee was never in a good spot to begin with. A crowded primary with big names like Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders can only pull a few lesserknown candidates to the mainstream. Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D-Indiana) of South Bend and entrepreneur Andrew Yang seem to be the only candidates to have successfully broken from obscurity and into tangible support in the polls. Similarly, in his debate performances, he never got his breakout moment on the stage. When 20 candidates took over two separate nights of debate, he easily fell into the shadows. He spoke the secondleast amount of words of any candidates from both nights of the first debate and the fifth-least in the same format a month later. This led him to never pick up any steam and remain a

relatively under-discussed candidate within the primary. However, Inslee hasn't put his political career on hold. He announced his run for a third term as governor of Washington, and whispers of him heading the Environmental Protection Agency under a Democratic administration have surfaced. He's discussed his hope for Washington state to become a “progressive beacon” for the nation as his policies pave the way for future leaders. Ultimately, Inslee’s climate plan and bold, progressive platforms didn’t catch the same wave as other big players. It is unfortunate, too, since he has clearly shown that he has consistently been a climate protector in politics. He even was one of the pioneers of the United States Climate Alliance, which has vowed states to individually uphold the Paris Climate Agreement after Trump announced the United States' withdrawal back in 2017. Ultimately, Inslee was handed the short end of the stick in the primaries. The other candidates drowned out his message of it being “our moment” to reverse climate change. Hopefully, Inslee’s intellect and climate innovation will be utilized further in a third term as governor or to shine nationally as the leader of the EPA. maxsande@iu.edu

LETTER TO THE EDITOR POLICY The IDS encourages and accepts letters to be printed from IU students, faculty and staff and the public. Letters should not exceed 400 words and may be edited for length and style. Submissions must include the person’s name, address and telephone number for verification.

Letters without those requirements will not be considered for publication. Letters can be mailed or dropped off at the IDS, 601 E. Kirkwood Ave. Bloomington, IN 47405. Send submissions via e-mail to letters@idsnews.com. Call the IDS with questions at 812-855-5899.


5

Monday, September 9, 2019 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

» FOOTBALL

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

siers scored on their first three drives of the game. IU’s energy and execution did not relent even as the backups started to enter the game late in the second quarter and in the second half. When junior quarterback Peyton Ramsey entered the game in relief of Penix late in the second quarter, his first play was a 64 yard touchdown pass to backup running back sophomore Ronnie Walker down the right sideline. This was an early exclamation point on a game in which he completed 13 of 14 passes

» COMEDIAN

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 for a private audition. Three celebrity impressions and numerous jokes later, Masada was impressed. Goehl was not old enough to act on the show, but his audition catapulted him to where he is now. “I love making people laugh, and I love seeing myself up on a big screen, making other people feel good,” Goehl said. “Hopefully I can inspire people to do what they want, and they’ll say, ‘If a kid at 10 years old can do this, well I can do it too.’” Goehl acquired on-stage experience opening for comedians Tim Harmston, Mary Mack, Ryan Budds and mentor Tom Dreeson, who suggested he try acting. Dreeson, who opened for Sammy Davis Jr. for three years and Frank Sinatra for 14 years, took Goehl under his wing and taught him about the industry. Goehl made his first tele-

Horoscope Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 9 — The pace is picking up. Toss the ball to a teammate. Collaborate to get farther. Step lively, and keep the action going. You're growing stronger. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is an 8 — Move quickly to make a good impression. Little things express your love. Get creative and artistic. Find romance in ordinary vistas. Share your quirky side.

for 226 yards and two touchdowns. On defense, IU was just as sound, bringing players down as quickly as they were getting the ball. “We’re seeing the progress,” said Allen after the game. “We were tackling better and now you got to go do it against a top five team.” Allen and defensive coordinator Kane Wommack couldn’t have asked for a better start to the game from the defense as the Hoosiers forced the Panthers to go three and out on their first three drives of the game. “All week during practice, coach Allen and coach

Wommack made an emphasis [on cleaning up mistakes] and had specific tackling drills, so I feel like we brought that onto the field,” sophomore linebacker James Head said. In a game where IU dominated from start to finish and had more touchdowns than Eastern Illinois had first downs, it was a good dress rehearsal for its first Big Ten game next week against Ohio State. “Ohio State is just another team,” Penix stated. “We all work out the same, we all put our clothes on the same, so there’s nothing different between us.”

vision appearance in an NFL Play 60 commercial, where he worked alongside retired Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck. He then moved on to film another commercial for an Indianapolis supermarket named Martin’s. Most recently, Goehl landed a role in his first feature film entitled “Pardoned by Grace.” Based on a true story, the film recounts the life of Scott Highberger, a pastor. Highberger was arrested 35 times and sentenced to jail five times, but turned to a life of ministry upon being released. Goehl portrays the role of young Highberger and worked with Joey Lawrence, famous for his roles in “Melissa and Joey” and “Blossom,” who stars as Highberger in the film. “The best advice Joey gave me was to keep grinding and outwork others,” Goehl said. “He also told me that you have to want it more and to never be satisfied.” Coming to IU to pursue business and entertainment

seemed like destiny, as the majority of his projects were filmed in Indiana, Goehl said. As he enters a competitive industry, Goehl has his eyes set on improving his skills. With every “no” he receives, he said he knows that soon a “yes” will come, making all the work worth it. His ultimate goal is to win an Academy Award, but overall, he hopes to reach a point where he can help other people reach their own acting dreams. “I’m kind of wise beyond my years just because I’ve seen a lot more than a lot of people,” Goehl said. “I knew that I wanted to go in this direction at 10 years old. Most kids don’t really know what they want to do at a younger age.” Similar to the feeling he had when he finished his set at the retirement home eight years ago, Goehl said he still feels reassured after each show that this is exactly what he wants to do for the rest of his life.

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is an 8 — A domestic dream seems within reach. Make repairs and upgrades. Surround your family with a comfortable, nurturing space. Add plants, soft lighting and art.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 9 — Be assertive, not hasty. Heed a warning, and save money. A great assignment develops. The profit potential of this venture entices. Use your secret powers.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 9 — Keep following threads. The answer you've been looking for is closer than you think. Creativity with communications and artist ventures can produce longlasting benefits.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 9 — Prepare to launch a personal dream. Put your worries aside, and enjoy the moment. Stay gentle with yourself. Strengthen foundational integrity. You're especially powerful.

BLISS

HARRY BLISS

SAM HOUSE | IDS

Freshman Avery Lockwood attempts a shot during IU’s 5-0 win over Morehead State University on Sept. 8 at Bill Armstrong Stadium. Lockwood scored twice during the match.

» SOCCER

half in which they fired off 12 shots along with seven total corner kicks. Despite the high scoring first half, the Hoosiers managed to have an even more productive second half. In the first three minutes IU put up two more shots and earned two more corners. In the 60th minute, Davidson scored her second of the game on a header to put the Hoosier lead at 3-0. “To connect with her on a ball, and to see her determination to score, I feel like it’s rubbing off a little bit,” Lockwood said. Two minutes later freshman midfielder Alaina Kalin found herself in the right spot at the right time when

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “We’ve been working on that in practice,” Lockwood said. “Just quality on the ball to finish it and not just shoot the ball. We had a lot of possession of the ball, but we couldn’t connect, so I was just thinking turn and put a little curve on it to put it past the keeper.” Not four minutes later, senior midfielder Chandra Davidson ran through the middle and while falling down, tapped the ball in with her right foot to double the Hoosier lead. The two goals were the first that IU had scored in a first half this season and were the cherry on top to a

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 7 — Stay close to home. Meditate on what has been and what is still to come. Enjoy this present moment. Share sweetness with your inner circle. Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 9 — Celebrate team accomplishments. Reinforce strong traditions and bonds. Share the love and acknowledge great moves and vision. You're building something of long-term value together.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is an 8 — Strengthen your professional infrastructure. Use the best equipment you can afford. Take charge for an interesting opportunity. Make long-range plans, and forge ahead.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) Today is a 9 — Measure and track shared funding goals. Collaborate for greater impact. Accept a generous offer. Organize plans for best value on expenses. Contribute for the future.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) Today is an 8 — Investigate and explore possibilities. Classes, seminars and conferences impart valuable skills and resources. Travel expands your horizon to new views. Stick to stable sources.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is an 8 — Share words and action for collaborative effort, and get farther than expected. Ask for more, and get it. Consult an expert. Listen to suggestions.

© 2019 By Nancy Black Distributed by Tribune Media Services, INC. All Rights Reserved

Crossword

L.A. Times Daily Crossword

Publish your comic on this page. The IDS is accepting applications for student comic strips for the fall 2019 semester. Email five samples and a brief description of your idea to adviser@indiana.edu by Sept. 30. Submissions will be reviewed and selections will be made by the editor-in-chief. Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

su do ku

ACROSS

Difficulty Rating: How to play: Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 grid contains the digits 1 through 9, without repeating a number in any one row, column or 3x3 grid.

Answer to previous puzzle

© Puzzles by Pappocom

BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!

a corner kick deflected off her heel into the net for her first goal with the Hoosiers. In the 68th minute, Lockwood struck again to cap off the offensive onslaught. A shot from distance curved into the top left corner to put the Hoosiers up 5-0. IU managed to play keep away for the remainder of the game, not allowing a single shot on their own net for all 90 minutes. “I felt building up to this game that we were going to have a good performance,” van Bennekom said. “This just feels good going into next weeks travel to University of Tennessee at Martin and the University of Kentucky.”

1 More certain 6 Gp. with moms, dads and educators 9 “Thereabouts” suffix 12 “Men” or “teeth,” grammatically 14 One of Ringo’s set 15 __ kwon do 16 Absurd, as a scheme 17 Autodialed annoyance, often at dinnertime 19 Prof’s aides 20 System of rules 22 Protection for political refugees 23 German I 25 Philosophies: Suff. 27 Picky details 28 Computer event with a “blue screen of death” 30 Penultimate Greek letter 31 Big Pharma watchdog: Abbr. 32 Suggest 34 Encroach (on) 38 Musical knack 39 Naughty 41 Black or Red waters 42 Downpour concern

44 46 47 49 50 52 53 54 56 58 61 63 65 66 67 68 69 70

Bills with Franklin on them Good times Japanese vegetable Infatuated with, with “about” “__ Land”: 2016 Best Picture? Not! Elite English boarding school Deadly “2001” computer “Brideshead Revisited” novelist Waugh Laundry Wall St. takeover Exacts revenge Punctuation that Brits call a full stop Guggenheim display Johns, to Brits “__ can play!”: “It’s easy!” Caustic chemical Bowler’s target Emails

7 Low-pitched brass instruments 8 Cookiedom’s Famous __ 9 *Stallone nickname, with “the” 10 Henri’s “Hi” 11 Pilothouse wheels 13 Lion constellation 14 Severe reprimands, and a hint to the starts of the answers to starred clues 18 Singer Lauper 21 Slight market slide 24 St. Louis hrs. 26 Short skirt 28 Kitchen master 29 Iranian currency 31 *Trio after turtle doves 33 Paris pronoun 35 TV watchdog 36 “Wow!” 37 “No sweat” 40 Letter-shaped fastener 43 October gemstones 45 Italian hour 48 “We’re __ schedule here!” 50 Permitted by law 51 Bugs Bunny animator Tex 52 Ballade’s last stanza 55 Website with business reviews 57 Rejuvenation site 59 “__, James __” 60 Poems of praise 62 Many millennia 64 Deli bread

Look for the crossword in the comics section of the Indiana Daily Student. Find the solution for the crossword here. Answer to previous puzzle

DOWN 1 Barbecue rod 2 Arm bone 3 *Deadly “game” in “The Deer Hunter” 4 Big Band __ 5 *Ones helping with the horses 6 Expert

TIM RICKARD


6

NATIONAL NEWS

Monday, Sept. 9, 2019 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

MSU to pay $4.5 million fine after Nassar case From Tribune News Service

DETROIT — Michigan State University will pay a record $4.5 million fine for its problems in handling the Larry Nassar case, the federal education department announced Thursday. “What happened at MSU was abhorrent ... so was the university’s response to their (Nassar and Strampel) crimes,” U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said in announcing the findings. In addition, the school must hire an outside law firm to review all sex assault case decisions made by the school’s Title IX office and issue a report to the federal government. MSU’s board and president must also receive a regular report of all cases and decisions. In addition, MSU must conduct a sweeping investigation into who knew what and didn’t act on both the Nassar case and his boss, William Strampel, who was recently convicted of criminal charges.

That includes former MSU President Lou Anna Simon, who is currently facing criminal charges of lying to police in the Nassar investigation; current Provost June Youatt, who knew for years of sexual harassment claims by Strampel and cleared him; along with the Associate Vice President for Academic Human Resources, employees of the Office of the General Counsel, and the former head coach of the women’s gymnastics team. “Because it failed to promptly and equitably respond to reports and grievances alleging sexual harassment perpetrated by Employee X (Larry Nassar) and the Dean (William Strampel) and failed to take appropriate actions reasonably calculated to end the harassment, eliminate the hostile environment, and prevent the harassment from recurring,” the Office of Civil Rights finding says. Nassar was a doctor at MSU, along with the team doctor for USA Gymnastics.

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Larry Nassar appears for his sentencing Jan. 31, 2018, at Eaton County Circuit Court in Charlotte, Michigan. Michigan State University will pay a record $4.5 million fine for its problems in handling the Larry Nassar case, the federal education department announced Thursday.

He was sentenced to 60 years in federal prison on child pornography charges. He also faces a 40- to 175-year sentence issued in Ingham County and a 40- to 125-year

sentence from Eaton County for sexual assaults. Those sentences will not begin until he finishes the federal sentence. Strampel was sentenced to a year in jail in June, af-

ter jurors found he used his power as dean of MSU’s College of Osteopathic Medicine to proposition and control female medical students. The jury also determined

there was enough evidence to support prosecutors’ argument that Strampel displayed “complete indifference” about whether Nassar was following protocols meant to decrease risk for the university following a complaint of sexual assault in 2014. MSU settled lawsuits by more than 300 Nassar survivors with a payment of $500 million. However, there are lawsuits still pending by more than 100 Nassar survivors. Late last month, MSU said in legal filings it shouldn’t be held legally responsible for Nassar. “Although Nassar’s actions were repugnant and merit the heavy criminal penalties imposed upon him, the law does not support Plaintiffs’ attempts to hold the MSU Defendants liable for his wrongs,” the university said in a court filing of more than 100 pages, backed by nearly 900 pages of exhibits. By David Jesse Detroit Free Press

the care and services you need to stay healthy at idsnews.com/health Oral/Dental Care

Health Spotlight

Matthew L. Rasche, D.D.S., M.S.D. Certified, American Board of Pediatric Dentistry

We provide a full scope of oral surgery procedures in a caring and comfortable manner. Our services include dental implants, IV sedation and wisdom teeth removal. We’re a provider for most insurance plans, including IU and Medicaid. No referral necessary. Conveniently located on S. College Mall Road, across from Kroger and Five Guys. 1116 S. College Mall Rd. 812-332-2204 oralsurgeryofbloomington.com

Oral/Dental Care

Timothy J. Devitt, D.M.D. Mon. - Fri.: 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Oral/Dental Care

Jackson Creek Dental is a privately owned dental practice conveniently located on South College Mall Road. Most insurances accepted, including the Indiana University Cigna Insurance plans as well as the IU Fellowship Anthem. Dr. Tschetter and Dr. Marsh offer state of the art dental technology such as Zoom whitening, same day crown appointments, and Invisalign. Dr. Tschetter also provides restorative, cosmetic and emergency care. We pride ourselves in giving the best care to our patients while offering a pleasant yet professional atmosphere. Mon. - Fri.: 7 a. m. - 5 p.m. 1124 S. College Mall Rd. 812-336-5525 jcdsmiles.com

Timothy J. Devitt, D.M.D. We provide a full scope of oral surgery procedures in a caring and comfortable manner. Our services include dental implants, IV sedation and wisdom teeth removal. We’re a provider for most insurance plans, including IU and Medicaid. No referral necessary. Conveniently located on S. College Mall Road, across from Kroger and Five Guys. Mon. - Fri.: 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 1116 S. College Mall Rd. 812-332-2204 oralsurgeryofbloomington.com

Chiropractic

Dr. Crystal Gray Dr. Andrew Pitcher Dr. Ann Z. Granicz, D.M.D. We are a full service orthodontic practice specializing in creating beautiful smiles. We accept all insurance. No referral necessary. Best results guaranteed. We are conveniently located on Bloomfield Rd., next to Buffalo Wild Wings. Mon. - Thu.: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 1320 W. Bloomfield Rd., Suite B 812-822-1196 www.bracesbydrg.com

Check

Gentle, effective chiropractic care helping students reduce back and neck pain, stress, headaches, migraines, fatigue, sports injuries, whiplash, etc. We have treatments that will fit your individual needs. We accept most insurance plans. Give us a call today! Mon., Wed., Thu.: 9 a.m. - noon, 2 - 6 p.m. Tue., Fri.: 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. 1710 W. Third St. 812-336-BACK (2225) bloomingtonchiropractor.com

the IDS every Monday for your directory of local health care services, or go online anytime at idsnews.com/health

For membership in the Indiana Daily Student Health Directory, please contact us at ads@idsnews.com. Your deadline for next Monday’s Health Directory is 5 p.m. Wednesday.

Mon. - Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Fri.: By appointment 828 Auto Mall Road 812-333-KIDS (5437) sipediatricdentistry.com

Dr. Brandy Deckard, O.D., F.A.A.O. Dr. Derek Bailey, O.D. Dr. Jenna Dale, O.D., F.A.A.O., F.C.O.V.D. Dr. Diana Christensen, O.D. Dr. Luke Streich, O.D. Precision Eye Group specializes in comprehensive vision health. We offer examinations and treatment for a wide array of eye diseases, conditions, and problems, with advanced diagnostic and vision care technologies. We help our patients achieve and maintain good eye health for life. You can shop our wide variety of designer frames including Lindberg, Lafont, RayBan, Tom Ford, Maui Jim, Oliver Peoples and many more! Schedule your appointment now, by calling the office or online at our website, and see your world with the best vision possible. Now providing care in both the Bloomington and Bedford communities!

322 S. Woodscrest Drive 812-332-2020 Bedford: Mon., Wed., Thu., Fri.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tues.: 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sat.: 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. 3343 Michael Ave. 812-279-3466

Discover Chiropractic for the entire family! We are a stateof-the-art chiropractic facility using computerized analysis and adjustment techniques. We specialize in gentle “no-TwistTurn” adjusting of infants to seniors! We are close to campus and near major bus routes. New patients are welcome and most insurance plans accepted. Call today and find out how you and your family can stay naturally healthy with chiropractic care. Mon., Wed., Fri.: 8:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. Tue.: 1 - 6 p.m. 3901 Hagan St., Suite C 812-336-7552 Emergency: 812-219-4927 drmaryann.com

Dr. Linda Figen M.D. Dr. Austin Starr D.D.S., Oral Surgeon Psychiatrist Dr. Aaron Strickland D.D.S. Dr. Gregory Velligan D.D.S. Dr. Figen specializes in Dr. Steven Lenos D.D.S. depression, anxiety, leaving home Dr. Rob Shirley D.D.S. issues, anorexia, obsessivecompulsive disorder, performance A caring patient centered dental anxiety and others. She does not office with a Certified Oral Surgeon accept insurance or treat ADD. and 4 General Dentists accepting Private and confidential care by an new patients of all ages performing experienced doctor. IV Sedation, Wisdom Teeth/Full Mouth Extractions, Implants, Bone Mon., Tue., Thu., Fri.: Grafting, Root Canals, Laser and 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Cosmetic Dentistry, Same Day Crowns, Frenectomies, Periodontal 413 W. Howe St. Treatment, Zoom Whitening, etc. 812-334-2394 with convenient hours in a new high Emergency Care: tech 7500 sf building. Conveniently 812-320-2117 located off SR 46 at I-65 Columbus’ Dr.Figen.com Westside. Accepting most State Medicaid insurance plans. Physicians

Mon. - Sat.: 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. 2380 Merchants Mile 812-378-5500 WRDental.com Emergency Phone: 812-346-3212

J. Blue Davis, D.D.S. The Center for Dental Wellness

precisioneye.com Bloomington: Mon. - Fri.: 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sat.: 9 a.m. - noon

Dr. Mary Ann Bough Office Manager: Melinda Caruso Chiropractic Assistants: Jennifer Wilson, Shaphir Gee Stephanie Gregory

Behavioral/Mentall

Optometry

Jackson Creek Dental Ryan D. Tschetter, D.D.S.

Southern Indiana Pediatric Dentistry with Dr. Matt Rasche specializes in providing comprehensive dental care for infants, children and adolescents, including those with special needs. We provide quality dental care and an exceptional experience for each patient. We welcome new patients! All insurance plans and private pay accepted. Our office is located near College Mall in Bloomington, at 828 Auto Mall Road in Bloomington. 812-333-KIDS. Call today!

Chiropractic

A privately owned, peopleoriented practice located next to the College Mall. Dr. Davis provides cosmetic, restorative, family and emergency dentistry in a comfortable, relaxed atmosphere with a caring, knowledgeable and experienced staff. We use Cerec technology, allowing us to make restorations in one visit. Dr. Davis is a provider for Invisalign, Zoom! and Under Armour Performance Mouth Guards. Also offering other advanced services. We look forward to getting to know you and take care of you and your entire family with the goal of improving your smile and dental health. Mon. - Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

The Health Directory is your guide to health and wellness in the Bloomington area.

Brian Logue, M.D. Eric Smith, M.D. Dave Elkins, P.A.C. Board certified physicians with over 70 years combined experience. Services include: kidney stones, urinary tract infections, urinary incontinence, prostate problems, same day emergency appointments, vasectomy. Mon. - Wed.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Thu.: 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. Fri.: 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. 2907 McIntire Drive 812-332-8765 summiturology.com Or visit us at our other location. Dr. Warren L. Gray 2200 John R. Wooden Drive Suite 207 Martinsville, IN 46151 765-342-8427

2909 Buick Cadillac Blvd. 812-339-3427 dentalwellness.com PAID ADVERTISING


7

Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com | Monday, Sept. 9, 2019

ARTS Arts editors Ally Melnik & Greer Ramsey-White arts@idsnews.com

ALEX DERYN | IDS

Pilot Travis Vencel opens his hot air balloon’s canvas Sept. 6 at the Monroe County Fairgrounds. Vencel owns TJV Balloons and operates an Oliver Winery hot air balloon.

Kiwanis Indiana Balloon Fest happens for 7th year By Pooja Jeyakumar pjeyakum@iu.edu

T

he Kiwanis Indiana Balloon Festival took place this weekend for the seventh year in a row at the Monroe County Fairgrounds. Some of the balloons that were highlights included Tweety Bird, a Smiley Scarecrow, a haunted mansion balloon from Oklahoma and a “Wizard of Oz” balloon. “They are balloons we don’t normally see in the community and to see them here is pretty awesome,” said Vanessa McClary, the organizer and founder of the balloon festival. Chip Curtis Jr. is a hot air balloon owner and piloted his balloon, “The Wind Rose,” during the festival. “I’ve been all over the world,” Curtis said. “I go anywhere the wind blows.” Although the balloons didn’t launch until 6 p.m., there were multiple activities to do during the day. From helicopter rides to a giant kite exhibit to the Pep Boys Car and Bike Show, there were several booths to keep festival-goers busy. Pilot Chip Curtis Jr. looks out into the distance Sept. 6 at the Monroe County Fairgrounds. “I’ve been all over the world,” he said.  “We were looking for something unique to the community and brand our Kiwanis club,” McClary said.     The Kiwanis club is a group of volunteers who give back to the community. The goal at the beginning was to get a group of pilots together and fundraise, and as the years have gone on, they have been able to give up to

SARAH ZYGMUNTOWSKI | IDS

Hot air balloons fly in the sky Sept. 7 above the Monroe County Fairgrounds. Members of the Bloomington community gathered Sept. 6-8 for the Kiwanis Club of South Central Indiana Balloon Fest.

$30,000 to charities. “The unique things they bring to the community are also bringing families together while supporting Kiwanis,” McClary said. Community involvement has been greater as the years have gone on. This year they’ve had volunteers of all ages from the Kiwanis Club, including

elementary school-level volunteers called “K Kids,” high school key clubs and college-level Circle K members. Something McClary has seen change over the years is the number of families that attend the festival.  “As a society, we’ve all gotten so busy that it’s so cool to see families come together to an event like this,”

McClary said. Bloomington is a relatively medium-sized town, but bringing the community together by having a balloon festival and showcasing balloons from all over the nation is truly a unique way to brand the Kiwanis club. “It’s not just the Kiwanis Club but the Kiwanis family,” McClary said.

PHOTOS BY ALEX DERYN AND SARAH ZYGMUNTOWSKI | IDS

Left Pilot Chip Curtis Jr. lights the burner of his hot air balloon Sept. 6 at the Monroe County Fairgrounds. Curtis Jr.’s balloon is called the “Wind Rose.” Above Miss Kiwanis Balloon Fest A’Niyah Birdsong holds open a hot air ballon Sept. 7 at the Monroe County Fairgrounds. Birdsong rode in one of the hot air balloons for the Saturday morning flight.


Indiana Daily Student

8

SPORTS

Monday, Sept. 9, 2019 idsnews.com

Editors D.J. Fezler and Phil Steinmetz sports@idsnews.com

IU ends chippy match against Seattle in a tie By Jared Kelly Jaakelly@iu.edu | @Jared_Kelly7

For the fourth-consecutive game to begin the season No. 2 IU men’s soccer, the full 90 minutes of regulation time Sunday couldn’t decide on a winner. The only difference this time was that two extra overtime periods weren’t enough to stir up a goal either. In a game that was both chippy at times and sloppy at other times, IU and Seattle University played to a 0-0 draw in the final game of the Mike Berticelli Memorial Tournament. Five yellow cards and a red card shown to the Redhawks emerged as the clear match theme for the day, while also highlighting IU’s ongoing inability to take advantage of opponents’ shortcomings. Nine total fouls were called to begin the yellow card-laden match before IU sophomore midfielder Joe Schmidt tallied the first shot of the game in the 19th minute that went wide left.

As the pace picked up on the offensive side of the ball, so too did Seattle’s aggressiveness on defense when Seattle midfielder Julian Avila-Good picked up his first yellow card after getting tangled up with an IU midfielder. The Hoosiers couldn’t parlay the yellow card into any momentum, squandering a corner kick try and allowing the Redhawks to take possession of the ball for a nearly 10-minute stretch. The first half ended with Seattle midfielder Burke Fahling receiving his first yellow card in the 43rd minute. The second half introduced far more action and up-tempo play with the Hoosiers getting off six shots but not being able to find the back of the net either time. For the game, IU totaled eight shots with only one shot on goal. Three more yellow cards on Seattle in the second half gifted IU multiple opportu-

nities to seize control of the match, none of which were capitalized upon. Though no one on IU played a noteworthy game, IU senior goalkeeper Sean Caulfield came up clutch with big saves on three occasions, two coming in the fourth and final overtime period. A tapered, back-andforth game ensued the rest of the way with neither team being able to set up quality looks in front of the net, giving way to a 0-0 tie. The abundance of overtime games for a young Hoosiers team will bode well for them in the long term, but with the season still being early and with teams still jockeying for position within the Top 25 rankings, IU will have plenty of opportunities to justify the high current ranking. A clash with the No. 11 ranked University of Notre Dame next Tuesday at Bill Armstrong Stadium will test just how much IU has grown following a mostly sporadic start to the season.

SAM HOUSE | IDS

Redshirt junior A.J. Palazzolo passes the ball during IU’s win over DePaul on Aug. 24 at Bill Armstrong Stadium. IU tied the University of Seattle on Sunday 0-0 in South Bend, Indiana.

Three takeaways from IU’s scoreless tie with Seattle By Sam Bodnar Sbodnar@iu.edu | @sgbod13

Dominant defensive performances from both sides of the field gave the No. 2 Hoosiers their first tie in another double overtime game. IU and Seattle University’s offense walked away with zeros. All four games this season now have gone into overtime for IU men’s soccer. No golden goal came for IU head coach Todd Yeagley’s offense Sunday, and the team is now 3-0-1.  Despite having a goal elude the Hoosiers, here are three takeaways from their fi-

nal game at the Mike Berticelli Tournament in South Bend, Indiana. Lockdown Defense in Regulation Play For the first time all season, IU did not allow a goal in both regulation periods. It was also the only time where its opponent did not score first or in the first period. The Redhawks took three shots in the first period, but none caused IU senior goalkeeper Sean Caufield to make a play. Two corner kicks also availed to nothing as the IU defensive unit of senior defender Jordan Kleyn, senior

defender Simon Waever, junior defender A.J. Palazzolo and sophomore defender Jack Maher cleared the ball from the goal box with ease. IU’s defense in the second half was just as locked in, allowing only two shot attempts. Caulfield saved a shot from Seattle’s senior midfielder Hamish Ritchie in the 68th minute, the only one of five shot attempts that IU’s goalkeeper had to save in regulation. Defense Continued: Sean Caufield’s First Shutout 2019 is Caulfield’s first full season protecting the net. After the senior surrendered two

goals to the University of Pittsburgh and one to the University of California at Los Angeles and to Denver University, he finally gave an opponent the goose egg. Caulfield saved the Hoosiers with a diving stop to block Redhawk sophomore defender Nkosi Burgess’ shot in the 101st minute. Four minutes later, the IU goalkeeper blocked another shot on goal, this time from Seattle’s sophomore midfielder Hal Uderitz. The Florida native rejected three total shots on goal out of the 11 taken by the Redhawks. His communication with the defense on Seattle’s eight cor-

ner kicks and offensive plays prevented Seattle from handing IU its first loss. IU has led the NCAA in shutouts back-to-back seasons and finally earned its first clean sheet of 2019. Former IU goalkeeper Trey Muse, last season’s Big Ten goalkeeper of the year, left a legacy to keep, and Caulfield is finally embracing his position in Muse’s cleats. Missed Opportunities Seattle’s defenders were ruthless throughout, earning five yellow cards and even a red card in the last minute of double overtime. Nevertheless, the IU offense could not

put things together to create shot opportunities for the team. Yeagley’s offense took eight shots, yet only one required Seattle’s sophomore goalkeeper Akili Kasim to save a shot on goal. Additionally, only one of those IU shots came in the overtime periods.  The Hoosiers also had seven corner kicks in overtime, but none failed to convert.  IU has a nine-day break before resuming play against the University of Notre Dame on Sept. 17 at home. These teams did not clash this weekend but saw plenty of each other before going one-onone next week.

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FOOTBALL

Beer, wine sales begin at Memorial Stadium By Will Coleman wicolema@iu.edu | @WColeman08

Pete Batule helped carry several crates, each stowing a few dozen 16-ounce beer cans and he did it with a smile. IU’s 2019 home opener against Eastern Illinois University had just ended its third quarter with the Hoosiers up 42-0. In between quarters, a wave of fans headed out to Memorial Stadium’s new beer and wine stands, but are disappointed to find Batule, COO of Upland Brewing Company, and his crew packing up for the day.  Hoosier fans had to learn the hard way that Memorial Stadium shuts down its sale of alcohol at the conclusion of the third period, but Batule is confident that three quarters were enough. “I’ve seen a lot of smiling faces and people enjoying the game, enjoying the opportunity to drink a few beers while they watch the Hoosiers,” Batule said. “Overall, I think it’s been really positive.” Earlier this spring, the athletics department announced that IU would

become the seventh Big Ten school to sell beer and or wine at home football games. Upland was named as the local distributor to partner with the university when IU Athletics released more information about the program last month. An area of tailgating fields already surround Memorial Stadium, but having alcohol for sale inside the stadium is a game-changer for many fans. “Obviously it will add some fun to the game as long as everyone is drinking responsibly,” Roy Anderson said after purchasing a Bud Light at the end of the third quarter. “It opens people up and makes everything more fun.” College football and athletics are some of the biggest contributors to the underage drinking culture at major universities throughout the country and because of that, illegal consumption in the stadium is a high priority for the sales program in its pilot season said IUPD Capt. Shannon Bunger. Bunger said the first lines of defense are the people and the vendors at the stadium.

ALEX DERYN | IDS

An IU football fan screams before the game begins Sept. 7 at Memorial Stadium. IU played East Illinois University and won, 52-0.

“See something, say something. If I’m a parent here at the game and I look over and see someone that

doesn’t look 21 with a beer, I think it’s my responsibility to go up to an officer or usher and say ‘Hey, this doesn’t

look right.’”said Bunger. Bunger said the police were able to limit the number of issues in and around

the stadium Saturday, but he expects it to be a bigger crowd next weekend when IU plays No. 5 Ohio State.

VOLLEYBALL

Hoosiers win three straight sets to overcome Yale, 3-1 By Luke Lusson llusson@iu.edu | @LukeLusson

This season, much of IU volleyball’s focus has been about “starting on time,” a phrase preached by IU head coach Steve Aird to try to get his team off to a quick start at the beginnings of matches. On Sunday’s match against Yale University, Aird’s words couldn’t have been more apparent. Fresh off a five-set match against Oklahoma University, IU dropped the first set to Yale and looked “sluggish” doing so, according to Aird. “We weren’t real crisp with the ball and they [Yale] played well,” Aird said. “When you lose a match like we did Friday night, a fivegamer that could’ve gone either way, you have to be resilient and be able to prepare the right way.” After the first set, the Hoosiers turned the tide, winning the final three sets by a combined 30 points

and capturing the win. Junior Deyshia Lofton was dominant both offensively and defensively, totaling 17 kills and seven blocks as a middle blocker for the Hoosiers. The Plainfield, Illinois native also had .654 hitting percentage on the afternoon. “The only reason that I put up the numbers that I put up is because of my team and its setting and passing,” Lofton said. “Collectively, I think that was our best game.” Sophomore outside hitter Breana Edwards matched Lofton with 17 kills, while having a .324 hitting percentage. Edwards leads all Hoosiers with 105 kills on the season. Seniors Megan Sloan and Jacqui Armer also played a large part in defending the net for IU. Sloan notched five blocks, and Armer added three for the Hoosiers. Freshman libero Haley Armstrong did not play in the match due to an up-

JOY BURTON | IDS

IU middle blocker Jacqui Armer glances at the scoreboard as outside blocker Breana Edwards speaks with her Sept. 6 at Wilkinson Hall. IU defeated Oregon State University 3-0.

per body injury that kept her out of the final two sets against Oklahoma on Friday night. Aird has no update on her status as of now. In Armstrong’s place was

junior Bayli Lebo, who is no stranger to the libero position. Lebo set the single season dig record for IU a year ago and dug 13 balls against Yale in place of Armstrong.

“It’s a luxury to have a couple players to play the position and do it that well,” Aird said. “She’s a good player. She’s going to have a great career and she’s done

what we’ve asked her to do.” After playing its first seven matches at home, IU will be away from Bloomington for its next eight matches. Its next home match won’t be until Oct. 3, when the University of Illinois comes to Bloomington for a conference matchup. The Hoosiers will play three matches next weekend in Lexington, Kentucky. against Cleveland State University, the University of Kentucky and Stetson University as a part of their nonconference schedule. Friday night’s match against Kentucky should prove to be a test for IU. Aird believes that the Wildcats are a Final Four caliber team and one that could win the Southeastern Conference. “Next weekend is a huge challenge,” Aird said. “We’ll learn about our squad. We’ve got to address what system we want to be in and who’s going to play what position.”

IU overcomes early deficit for 2-1 victory over Ball State By Aiden Kantner Akantner@iu.edu | @AidenKantner

The IU field hockey team took down Ball State University 2-1 on Sunday afternoon. Goals from senior captains Kelsey Giese and Ciara Girouard won the game for the Hoosiers. Ball State scored early, with junior midfielder Rachel Pereira scoring five minutes into the game. IU’s offense was stagnant in the early going, and it led to a score for Ball State, putting IU down quickly. Neither offense was able to get momentum, even after the opening goal, and this was due to both teams’ defensive effort, especially in the second half. Both IU and Ball State forced many mistakes, and neither of the teams were consistently in control of the ball.  

Both of IU’s goals came off of defensive plays that were able to produce a counterattack, including Giese’s equalizer with five minutes to go in the first half. IU pressured Ball State’s midfielders and forced a turnover in the circle while Giese sent the ball past Ball State goalkeeper Grace Chavez for her first goal of the season. Giese led the Hoosiers with her goal, four total shots and the assist on Girouard’s game winner. IU sophomore goalkeeper Sachi Ananias ended the game with five total saves, including three in the fourth quarter, when Ball State took shot after shot, piling up 11 shots and 10 corners in the last 15 minutes.   IU head coach Kayla Bashore was impressed with the defensive effort after her team gave up 13 goals in its first three matches of

SAM HOUSE | IDS

The IU field hockey team celebrates senior Ciara Girouard’s goal against Ball State University on Sept. 8 at the IU Field Hockey Complex. Goals from Girouard and fellow senior Kelsey Giese gave the Hoosiers their 2-1 win over the Cardinals.

the season. She mentioned that the improvement was imperative moving forward, coming off of the game Friday against Miami University where Ananias and IU’s defense allowed five goals.

IU’s offense struggled for most of the game, only getting five shots on goal all day. Although it resulted in victory against Ball State, Bashore was adamant that an offensive showing like that would

Reporting & Editing & Podcasting & Designing & Photography & Coding & Multimedia & You. The Indiana Daily Student has been telling the stories of IU, Bloomington and the world for more than 150 years. Come join our staff — no experience or specific major required. Apply online at idsnews.com/jobs. An Equal Opportunity Employer

not end in the same result during conference play. “We need to focus more on finishing the plays that we create for ourselves,” Bashore. “We can’t put all this effort into making good Get drinks. Get food.

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runs and not finishing at the end.” The win for the Hoosiers is their sixth straight over the Cardinals, and they now move on to St. Louis, where they will take on Saint Louis University and Fairfield University next weekend in their last two games before starting Big Ten play against Michigan State Sept. 20 in East Lansing. The game was sloppy, but IU goes into its first road trip of the season with a 2-2 record, and Bashore was encouraged by the effort her team put in. “We needed the momentum,” Bashore. “I think we could have finished the game and had a bit more organization in the fourth quarter, but it’s good to walk away with a win. But there is also a lot of things for us to continue to work on.” 


Indiana Daily Student

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ARTS

Monday, Sept. 9, 2019 idsnews.com

Editors Ally Melnik & Greer Ramsey-White arts@idsnews.com

PHOTOS BY ALEX DERYN | IDS

Freshman Carmen Gonzalez draws model Brian Bourkland on Sept. 5 in front of the Showalter Fountain. “I’m just doing this for fun,” she said.

First Thursdays Festival is back in full bloom By Grace Abushalback gabushal@iu.edu

The start of the monthly spectacle known as First Thursdays Festival began at 5 p.m. in the middle of IU's Fine Arts Plaza. The main performance stage was situated at the base and front steps of the IU Auditorium which faces Showalter Fountain. An array of booths, photo opportunities and shaded tents were scattered about to have visitors interact and engage with various types of art. Dior Quartet, a relatively new band formed last fall that plays revamped classical music, took the stage and showcased some of the student musicians at the Jacobs School of Music who are all pursuing master's degrees. The four string musicians who make up the band are violinists Noa Sand and Tobias Elser, violist Darryl Manley and cellist Joanne Yesol Choi.  Pages of sheet music could be seen atop their music stands. This classical music is not one to lull you to sleep, but instead is inventive and allows for each member to play off one another. The quartet fully relies on its instrumental playing to carry the performance. A seven-man marching

“I love you. Let’s rock.” Jada Bee, singer in Royalty, a Prince cover band

band called Jefferson Street Parade Band, which was described by the announcer as “easily Bloomington’s cra-

Singer Allison Victoria sings into her microphone Sept. 5 in the IU Arts Plaza. Victoria sang at Tiny Dorm Concert’s tent.

ziest and coolest marching band,” started performing around 6:30 p.m. Loud, energetic sounds infused with a blend of Latin American culture is what the band specializes in. The marching band aspects were still present with crashing cymbals, and closed out its set by proceeding to march around the stage and festival. “I thought it was good. Kind of a ragtag group of men,” IU junior Ellie Pemberton said. She has been attending the event, which is held

A sax musician plays with the Jefferson Street Parade Band on Sept. 5 in front of the IU Auditorium. Bands played throughout the First Thursdays Festival.

Mabel McKeen, 3, takes a bite of her father Grahm McKeen’s hotdog Sept. 5 in the IU Arts Plaza. “I work at IU and my wife is out of town, so I brought her here to run around,” he said.

en op lic d b an pu ee he Fr o t t

A New Era for Investigative Journalism Opening celebration and symposium • Ribbon-cutting • Panelists from Gray Media, Deadspin, National Public Radio, Scripps Howard and IndyStar • Evening keynote by Scott Pelley of CBS News go.iu.edu/2bjE

Sept. 10 | Presidents Hall | Franklin Hall

about three to four times a year, since she was a freshman. Royalty, a Prince cover band, dazzled audiences with Prince tunes featuring a feminine spin. The band consisted of a keyboardist, two guitarists, bass player, drummer and singers Traneisha English and Jada Bee.

The performance included multiple guitar solos and engaging audience and band interactions such as gesticulate movements to accompany I Would Die 4 U’s chorus. As Royalty’s set wound down to a close, prior to playing “Kiss,” Bee addressed the crowd by saying “I love you, let’s rock.” 

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Seeking delivery drivers & bikers for DH and AP Enterprises, an independent Jimmy John’s Franchisee. Must be at least 18 years of age, have a valid driver’s license, reliable transportation, current automobile insuance, and a clean driving record. antoine.houston@gmail.com

Computers Selmer 1401 Clarinet. Excellent cond. Comes with hard case. $100. joldson@indiana.edu

Mac Mini Server - two hard drives, 8GB RAM, Quad Core i7, $450. mnapier@indiana.edu

!!NOW LEASING!! August ‘20 - ‘21. Omega Properties 812-333-0995 omegabloomington.com

1-5 BR. Close to Campus. Avail. immediately. Call: 812-339-2859.

3 BR, 2 BA, A/C, a mile from Law School. Unfurn., w/stainless steel kitchen. Avail. Aug. Call/text: 812-325-0848.

3 BR, 2 BA, W/D, AC, covered patio, lg. backyd. Near Campus. 215 E. 16th St. 812-360-1588

HPIU.com Houses and apt. 1-5 BR. Close to campus. 812-333-4748 No pets please.

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2013 Subaru Forester, silver/ black interior. 66k mi. Newer tires & brakes, automatic, AWD,sunroof, heated front seats, trailer hitch, 2 remote start. $13,500, obo. Tumeni98@gmail.com

Self-defense class mitts, great quality & condition. $20. aclaymil@iu.edu

Chevrolet Malibu LT 2008. 106K miles. Okay condition. $4,700, neg. danan@iu.edu

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21.5’’ IPS Full HD (1920x1080) Monitor. Good cond. $70. addunton@iu.edu

Thermos 3 burner gas grill still in box. $100,obo. 812-336-8742

Used 18” Sabian HH Medium Thin Crash Cymbal: $175, obo. tedkunkel@yahoo.com

Key Board natural microsoft ergonomic, $20. 812-876-3112

Mint cond. PS4 slim w/ 5 games incl. 500GB. 704-998-7989 jacdorse@iu.edu

Nikon D60 & accessories. $280. 847-772-9619 emkjones@indiana.edu

Oculus Rift Touch & accessories. Great cond. $300, obo ahemsath@indiana.edu

Sony speakers. Lifetime warranty incl. $400. 812-827-4841 sethhill@indiana.edu

TI-nspire CX. Excellent cond. Charge w/ usb, cable incl. nikikuma@iu.edu

Misc. for Sale

2 person kayak. 17ft long, 65lbs. Easy to transport. $750, obo. rnourie@indiana.edu

Textbooks

Jewelry Brand new Casio GShock watch. Warranty card incl. $60 wang584@iu.edu

Music Equipment Sheet music from early 20th century composers. Fake books avail. as well. discoverydee@gmail.com

2015 Harley-Davidson FXDYG DYNA Wide Glide. 6,500 mi. $11,500. 812-947-3447

Bicycles Boys 21in bike, looks really nice. Tires like new. $30. 812-349-8730 Murray 18-speed mountain bike, good condition. $60. brennmat@indiana.edu

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Motorcycles 2002 blue Harley Davidson FXST. 44k mi. $7500. camrward@iu.edu

Anatomy A215 lab book, good condition. $10 neg. kikischu@indiana.edu

Used 20” Paiste Giant Beat Multi-Function (ride/ crash) cymbal. $225, obo. tedkunkel@yahoo.com

12 pc. dinnerware set w/ 4 dinner & salad plates, bowls, & silverware. $15. yafwang@hotmail.com

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Electronics 2018 Macbook Pro 15’ w/ AppleCare+. Great cond. $2,250, obo. jy41@iu.edu

Automobiles 2011 BMW 328i xDrive. 103,000mi. $10,900. 317-494-2690 lewisjet@iu.edu

Scanner: Canon CanoScan 8600F, $100, Laser Jet Print Cartrage. 812-876-3112

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Intermediate Yamaha YOB-441 oboe. Great cond. $1,900. grhess@indiana.edu

Automobiles

2002 HONDA CIVIC EX, 4 door sedan, maroon w/ tan interior, automatic, air, good tires, sunroof, well maintained & runs great, not ugly, 146k mi., $3,100 obo. paul.f.arnold@mail.com

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Solid wood dining table. Excellent condition. $60.

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Loveseat -Grey, lightly used $199. No stains/rips daviscrm@iu.edu

MERCHANDISE

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Profile for Indiana Daily Student - idsnews

Monday, September 9, 2019  

The Indiana Daily Student is an independent student newspaper covering Indiana University, IU sports and the city of Bloomington, Indiana.

Monday, September 9, 2019  

The Indiana Daily Student is an independent student newspaper covering Indiana University, IU sports and the city of Bloomington, Indiana.

Profile for idsnews