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Monday, July 16, 2018

IDS Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

West Nile Virus found in county By Dominick Jean drjean@iu.edu | @Domino_Jean

TY VINSON | IDS

Sophomore guard Bendu Yeaney claps after a timeout is called by Purdue in IU’s game against the Boilermakers on March 22 at Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall.

Serving

up smiles Sophomore guard Bendu Yeaney is serving the Bloomington community by making kids smile. By Murphy Wheeler jonmwhee@iu.edu | @murph_wheelerIU

Brayden Wierzba doesn’t want people to be mistaken. When Brayden, the twoyear-old son of IU women’s basketball assistant coach Rhet Wierzba, wears his cream and crimson IU jersey with the number one on it, many people assume he’s a fan of the men’s team’s incoming freshman Romeo Langford, or former point guard Jordan Hulls. But he wants to make something very clear — that’s no Romeo jersey. That’s his Bendu Yeaney jersey. He dons his Yeaney jersey with pride and considers her one of his “big sisters” on the team. “He takes on loving them,” Rhet said. “They basically treat him like a little brother.” After constantly being around the program with his father, who is going into his fifth season as an assistant coach, Brayden has grown close to the entire team. However, he and Yeaney, a sophomore guard who averaged 8.4 points and played an integral part to the Hoosiers’ WNIT Championship run last season, have built a special bond

over the course of her first season in Bloomington. She babysits him, plays race cars or play-doh with him and always comes and finds him to talk after each home game. “For whatever reason, he’s just really hit it off with Bendu,” Rhet said. “After the games, Bendu signs autographs and she always comes and finds him, and they talk and sit down.” One doesn’t have to look much further than Yeaney’s Twitter page to see the kind of relationship she’s built with Brayden. In her pinned tweet, there’s a picture of the two of them sitting together on a sideline bench in Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall after the Hoosiers' 74-54 WNIT secondround victory over Milwaukee on March 18. Yeaney scored 12 points on 50-percent shooting that night, but it was her missed layup with 4:40 left in the first quarter that still lingered on Brayden's mind, as evidenced by their dialogue featured in the tweet. “Did you like watching the game?” Yeaney asked. SEE SMILES, PAGE 3

COURTESY PHOTO

Sophomore guard Bendu Yeaney poses with Avery Schwartzman outside Schwartzman’s home in Bloomington. Yeaney, a women’s basketball player, offered to take Schwartzman to see “Incredibles 2” after Schwartzman’s father contacted her on Twitter.

COURTESY PHOTO

Sophomore guard Bendu Yeaney sits on the bench and talks with Brayden Wierzba at Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall. Wierzba is the son of assistant women’s basketball Coach Rhet Wierzba.

Medical information in this article was provided by the Monroe County Health Department. The Monroe County Health Department announced Friday a sample of mosquitoes in Monroe County had tested positive for West Nile Virus, according to a press release. “You can help protect your family and your community from West Nile Virus by eliminating areas of standing water available for mosquito breeding in or near your property,” Environmental Health Specialist Simeon Baker said in the release. Mosquitoes carrying West Nile Virus breed in places like ditches, open septic systems, unused or untended pools and unused containers of water left stagnant. A small bucket of water, if left stagnant for seven days, can breed as many as a 1,000 mosquitoes, according to the release. West Nile Virus is transmitted to humans by mosquitoes that have first bitten an infected bird. A person who is bitten by an infected mosquito may show symptoms within three to 15 days after the bite. Most people who get infected with West Nile Virus will have either mild or no symptoms. There is no specific treatment for West Nile Virus. In cases with severe symptoms and health issues, the best way to deal with West Nile Virus is respiratory support, good nursing care and plenty of fluids, among other things. According to the press release, people over 50 years old are at higher risk for serious illness. Persons who develop high fever, severe headache, neck stiffness, muscle weakness or paralysis, nausea or vomiting, sore joints, or confusion should see a doctor. People can protect themselves from mosquitoes by: Avoid being outdoors in the late evening, early afternoon and early morning. Use insect repellent containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus or p-Menthane-3,8-diol. Cover exposed skin by wearing a hat, long sleeves and long pants in places where mosquitoes are especially active. Install or repair screens on windows and doors to keep mosquitoes out of the home.

IU theater presents classic comedy ‘The Foreigner’ By Christine Fernando ctfernan@iu.edu

IU's Summer Theatre cast will present the classic two-act comedy “The Foreigner” this month. The play, which has become a staple of professional and amateur theater alike, will run through July 29 at the Wells-Metz Theatre. “It’s very funny,” Director Jonathan Michaelsen said. “It’s farcical. It’s got interesting characters. It’s just a lot of fun.” The play follows two Englishmen who arrive at a rural town in Georgia. Charlie, one of the Englishmen, is nervous about interacting with the townspeople, so his friend, Froggy, introduces Charlie as a “foreigner” who does not speak English. Thinking Charlie cannot understand them, the townspeople share their secrets, and awkward, absurd conversations ensue. Michaelsen, who is also the director of graduate studies for the theater department, said he rediscovered “The Foreigner” when perusing plays for the summer and chose it because it was particularly poignant in today’s political climate. “When I read it again, I went ‘wow’ because there’s some things

in there that could be from today’s headlines,” Michaelsen said. The play includes white supremacists and characters wanting to cleanse their town of “foreigners” like Charlie. “When the play debuted in the (19)80s that was very poignant too, but I think it also matches the tenor of our current political debate,” Michaelsen said. “Albeit funny, the play has darker elements that express what we’re seeing in current discourse.” Since choosing the play, Michaelsen said the play has become more timely as perceptions of immigrants in the U.S. have worsened, culminating in the Trump administration’s now-abandoned zero-tolerance immigration policy that separated parents from children while crossing the U.S.Mexico border. As a “foreigner,” Charlie has a positive influence on the “good” characters of the play, making them more human and allowing them to reach their full potentials, Michaelsen said. While the people around him transform, Charlie also blossoms as he becomes used to being the center of attention, becomes part of the community and finds happiness. At the same time, the dark-

COURTESY PHOTO

Glynnis Kunkle-Ruiz and Michael Bayler, both second year M.F.A. actors, rehearse as characters Catherine Simms and David Lee in the 2018 IU Summer Theatre production of “The Foreigner.”

er characters grow even darker around Charlie as they treat him as an outsider. “So he has the opposite impact on these groups,” Michaelsen said.

“He enables certain characters and brings out real hatred in others.” Michaelsen said this effect may reflect how people today respond to interacting with immigrants

and refugees. Both the good and evil characters make assumptions about SEE THEATER, PAGE 3


Indiana Daily Student

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Monday, July 16, 2018 idsnews.com

Editor Dominick Jean news@idsnews.com

How to navigate financial aid as a student at IU From IDS reports

Making the money work for school can sometimes be hard. Even after finding ways to pay, you still might miss an important step in the set-up process. We spoke to Jackie KennedyFletcher, the director of the office of student financial assistance, to help your student successfully find and keep financial aid.

DOMINICK JEAN | IDS

Bloomington residents review the draft of the city’s new transportation plan that was presented for public comment Thursday night at City Hall.

Residents discuss city plan By Dominick Jean drjean@imail.iu.edu | @Domino_Jean

More than 100 people came out to Bloomington City Hall on Thursday night, several of them with vocal concerns about the nature of the latest draft of the Bloomington Transportation Plan. Suggestions and recommendations from Toole Design Group, the consulting firm hired by Bloomington to draft the $125,000 plan, included: redesigning Kirkwood Avenue, extending bicycle trails and eastwest routes and the restoration of two-way traffic on Atwater Avenue and Third Street. The plan calls for 67 new street and road connections throughout the city and looks to create what’s called a multi-modal transportation system, which prioritizes multiple types of travel from cars to cyclists and pedestrians. Many residents were excited by the recommendation the city add separate bike lanes with vertical barriers between traffic and cyclists. Restoration of two-way traffic was perhaps the most controversial recommendation at the meeting, with numerous Bloomington residents making comments citing their concerns. One vocal complaint came from resident Margaret Clements, who said she didn’t believe all these changes were necessary and the recommendations did not take into account an aging Bloomington population. “I think we are over-engineering for a nonexistent problem,” said Clements. Clements also said the plan failed to take into account the number of drivers in Bloomington and was trying to force people to walk or ride a bicycle rather than drive. Sagar Onta, the engineering director for Toole Design Group, explained, both before the meeting and during, that the plan is conceptual right now and is not meant to alarm residents who might be

concerned about changes. Onta said he and Toole Design Group are presenting this plan to the city and the plan reflects desired or ideal changes to Bloomington, but not all those changes will be realized but, by planning for them now, Bloomington can be prepared if and when things change. “The reason we took this long-term view is cities change, development happens,” Onta said. Kirkwood changes One recommendation is a remodel of Kirkwood Avenue, extending from Indiana Avenue to Walnut Street. Kirkwood Avenue would become what’s called a shared street, Onta said. The new curbless street design will prioritize nonmotorized traffic like pedestrians and bicyclists, and help slow speeds in the area. Changing Kirkwood to a shared street would allow it to slow down traffic and function like a festival street when needed. “The idea is to make that part of downtown the center of town,” Onta said. The transportation plan notes street parking is optional on shared streets, but Onta was clear there would be no loss of parking downtown and on Kirkwood Avenue, although businesses might be able to choose between street parking and an outside, patio area. Two-way traffic Currently, Walnut and Third streets, as well as College and Atwater avenues, are all one-way streets, but the final draft calls for the restoration of two-way traffic on these streets to help facilitate the process of getting residents downtown, slowing traffic and making downtown the true center of town both economically and culturally. This change will help facilitate another east-west connection in the city, something Bloomington currently lacks. While those are the streets Toole Design Group

Margaret Clements, a Bloomington resident, argued against the draft of the city’s new transportation plan Thursday and its focus on cyclists and younger residents over drivers and the elderly. A public meeting about the plan took place at City Hall.

recommended, Bloomington resident Jenny Southern argued changing traffic along those roads isn’t feasible and the city should look at changes to possibly Henderson Street and Indiana Avenue, where confusion over one-way access has created a problem and two-way traffic could help. “I see a lot of wrong ways, confusion and traffic problems,” Southern said about Indiana Avenue. B-line expansion Also included in the final draft of the transportation plan is an expansion of the B-Line Trail. The plan suggests expanding the trail’s level of safety and comfort onto Seventh Street would benefit the IU and local residential communities. The B-line expansion is one of the Phase 1 projects, Onta singled out during the meeting. Even though the city

could be facing major changes in street design, Onta said he wanted to reassure residents no changes were happening right away and they should not be alarmed. Download the plan The entire Bloomington Transportation Plan is available for download on the city’s website, and residents who were unable to make it to the meeting can still comment about the plan online or stream what happened at the meeting through CATS TV. The plan, in theory, should be finalized by fall 2018. Beth Rosenbarger, Bloomington’s bicycle and pedestrian coordinator, said the goal is to have more final documents by August. The plan will then be given to the Bloomington Plan Commission and the Bloomington City Council for review and adoption.

City alters display of overdose data By Dominick Jean drjean@imail.iu.edu | @Domino_Jean

Recent Facebook comments by Monroe County Commissioner Amanda Barge featured criticism about a city of Bloomington-run website which contained information about fatal overdoses in the city, including the exact addresses where those deaths occurred. That criticism sparked a closed meeting with city officials, and Mayor John Hamilton has since decided to change how the data is organized. The site, BloomingtonRevealed.com, was launched in 2017 and contains data on the city, county, local nonprofits and

more. Barge said the information “cannot stand” and she is worried the exact location of these fatal overdoses could embarrass those affected by substance abuse. “I am so very disappointed that our city government appears to be so out of touch with WHO our community is,” Barge wrote. “I am not the only one who has shared my concerns with the city and it doesn’t seem like anyone gets it or listens.” Barge’s post had over 170 comments before further comments were forbidden. One of those comments came from Mary Catherine Carmichael, Bloomington’s director of com-

munity engagement, who called Barge’s post disingenuous. “Of course this data is painful to our community — as every overdose death is,” Carmichael wrote in her post. “But transparency and facts and clear-eyed approaches to health crises are all essential. Your expressed shock seems contrived and intended to agitate and divide, rather than work together to address this health crisis.” Th is debate led to a closed-door meeting between Bloomington city officials and social service leaders July 10, according to a press release from the city. The release also stated

overdose death location information has been removed from the City-run website. The press release stated the decision to eliminate the overdose death location information was made in response to concerns raised over the past week by some relatives and friends of those individuals who have died, and some social service providers. In the release, Hamilton invites those with concerns about these issues to contact him to discuss their concerns and make suggestions, by calling (812) 349-3406, or sending an email to mayor@ bloomington.in.gov.

Papers, papers everywhere. Applying to college comes with a long paper trail, but some are more important than others. Kennedy-Fletcher stressed the financial reward letter and packet is of the utmost importance. You should have received this letter sometime in March. She recommends students and parents carefully read the letter and make sure they have enough funding to cover IU. The letter includes how much financial aid their student qualifies for, how much it costs to attend IU and the leftover amount parents and students will have to pay. The letter also comes in a packet with information on financial aid definitions and a guide on how to receive more financial aid. Finally, any emails or letters from the Office of the Bursar or Student Central are important for parents to read over carefully because they often require some sort of action, KennedyFletcher said. Need more money? If your student didn’t receive enough financial aid to cover school and you don’t have enough to cover the bill, there are a few options. Students and parents can apply for additional student loans or private loans. However, KennedyFletcher warns parents to highly consider how much loan debt they and/or their child is willing to take on. She encourages parents and students to look into other sources of money such as employment or additional scholarships. Student Central on Union can also help advise parents and students about their financial options. It also provides information about student and private loan options on its website under the paying for college tab at studentcentral.indiana.edu. Impending deadlines Another key aspect of financial aid is making sure you pay by the right date.

Not paying on time can result in late fees. Eventually, if the payments aren’t made, the University can put a hold on your student’s records and prevent them from enrolling in the next semester. First, it is highly recommended students apply for financial aid before March 10. This ensures you will get the most possible funding. If your student hasn’t applied yet, he or she still can, but funds are limited. The financial aid application must be filled out each year and, for the 2019-20 academic year, the application will open sometime in October. The next big deadline for payments will be for the first tuition and room and board payment. This will be billed to your student’s bursar account in late August and will be due Sept. 10. All bursar bills are due the 10th of the month. For example, if your student visits the health center in October, the bill will likely be due Nov. 10. If the payment can’t be made, students and parents can also set up a payment plan, which would change dates payments are due. To set up a payment plan, call Student Central for help at (812) 855-6500. Deadlines are another important reason to stay on top of emails and letters because many of the actions required will have deadlines that could have bad consequences if not met on time. Keeping tabs Finally, and possibly most importantly, parents should have their student set them up as a third party user on their bursar account. This allows parents to monitor activity and track financial aid progress. It will also send the parents email alerts of bill payments and grades to parents upon request. To sign up as a third party user, follow the instructions below. Log in to One.IU. Read FERPA disclosure agreement (only presented first time you access page). Click I accept. Provide a username, password, and first and last names for your user. Note: password must be at least eight characters, contain one number and is case sensitive. Click Bursar Balances and Bills box. Enter Third party user’s email address; confirm address by entering again. Click Save user. Cameron Drummond

Check out the Bloomington Buzz podcast From IDS reports

The Indiana Daily Student recently released a new podcast, the Bloomington Buzz. Each week, the Buzz will highlight a few of the top stories and headlines published by the IDS in the past week. The podcast will also provide interviews with experts, special guests and

other sources about both local and national news. We’ll try to add a distinctly Bloomington flavor to each story, and keep it focused on the issues and stories that affect and interest Bloomington and Monroe County. The episodes can be found on our website and Soundcloud page. Dominick Jean

Cameron Drummond Editor-in-Chief Murphy Wheeler Managing Editor

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Monday, July 16, 2018 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

» THEATER

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

TY VINSON | IDS

Sophomore guard Bendu Yeaney holds the ball and waits for a teammate to be open against Wisconsin on Jan. 24 in Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall.

» KIDS

Eight-year-old Avery Schwartzman has learned that first-hand. Schwartzman was one of many kids that attended the program’s basketball camp this summer, where Yeaney and her teammates were working as coaches. Schwartzman and her family had been to many of the Hoosiers’ games in the past and she was already one of Yeaney’s biggest fans, admiring her scoring ability and her knack for constantly getting the opening tip for her team. “She’s really nice and she’s really good,” Schwartzman said. “Every time she tips the ball, she always gets it and it’s really cool.” During the camp, Yeaney tweeted she really wanted to see the newest Disney film, "Incredibles 2." Schwartzman told her father, Ed, she would go with her, so he half-

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “Yeah, but you missed your layup over there,” Brayden responded. “Did you see me make my other ones?” “Yeah, but you missed over there.” Whether Brayden was satisfied or not, Yeaney said his tough coaching style is nothing new for her. “He’s a little bit of a tough coach,” Yeaney said. “Sometimes he’s really nice when I have really bad games, but then there’s games where I have good games and he’s like ‘you still missed a layup.’” Even though Yeaney and Brayden have built a special friendship, he’s not the only kid that’s made friends with her. Her influence has stretched beyond just her IU women’s basketball family.

Horoscope Aries (March 21-April 19) — Today is an 8 — Focus physical energy for your desired result. Choose stability over illusion. Play the long game. Go for endurance rather than a sprint. Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Today is an 8 — Family comes first. Connections forged now have long-term value. Relax, and share some fun. Seek out harmony, beauty and creativity. Practice your favorite arts.

jokingly replied to Yeaney’s tweet, suggesting she take Avery to see it with her. Somewhat to her father’s surprise, Yeaney reached out to them immediately. Before they knew it, Yeaney was at their front door, picking Avery up to go see the movie. “She jumped on it right away,” Ed said. “She didn’t have to respond or she could’ve ignored me. I kind of said it as a joke, but she immediately said yes.” It was just one of a number of instances in which Yeaney has gone above and beyond people’s expectations. As Wierzba says, IU Coach Teri Moren and her staff have set up three core tenants for their players to live by while at IU — graduate, win and serve. They're expected to sign autographs after games, coach kids at the team's basketball camp

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Gemini (May 21-June 20) — Today is a 7 — Practical domestic jobs require your attention. Clean up an old mess. Finish something you began earlier. Keep your promises and agreements. Your family appreciates it.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Today is a 9 — There’s extra cash to be made. Avoid silly arguments or irritations. Focus on practical, simple strategies. Get support when needed. Take orders, and make arrangements.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) — Today is an 8 — Dig deeper into a favorite subject. Avoid distractions and side trips. Stick to your study goals. Do the reading, and summarize. Profit through communications.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Today is a 9 — You’re looking good. Dress for success, and focus on one dream at a time. Simplify your objectives, and polish your presentation. Smile for the camera.

BLISS

HARRY BLISS

and help with the team's annual Candy Stripe Crew program for people with special needs. In Yeaney’s case, Wierzba said she’s been a shining example of how to serve the fans, especially the children, in the community. “She’s phenomenal,” Rhet said. “Whether it is at our camps or just seeing her out, she really takes the time to connect with them. It’s not just a ‘hey, how’re you doing,’ she really goes that next level deeper. I think the kids can see that genuineness from her.” Yeaney said she considers herself a family person that likes to make people smile and has learned a lot about how to deal with children by being around her nieces and nephews in her hometown of Portland, Oregon. However, whether it’s signing autographs after

games, coaching at camps or going the extra mile and taking a young fan to the movies, Yeaney says it’s all much larger than just serving the community. Her actions reach from Bloomington, all the way back to Portland. “I’m obviously a role model to those kids, but I’m also a role model to my nieces and nephews,” Yeaney said. “I want to always be a positive influence on them.” In the end, Brayden will still be Yeaney’s “little brother” and Avery will still be one of her biggest fans. But Yeaney sees them as just the start of many more smiles to come. “I’m down for whatever if I have the time,” Yeaney said. “That’s another thing some people say they’ll do and then they won’t do it. I’m the type of person that if I say I’m going to do it, I’m going

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Today is a 5 — Postpone travel, expense or crowds. Rest and recharge. Let someone draw you into another world. Fantasies may fade, while details provide practical application. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Today is an 8 — Social gatherings benefit your career. Expand and grow your connections. Share talents and resources for common benefit. Generosity inspires generosity. Play on a powerful team. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — Today is a 9 — A professional challenge comes into focus. All isn’t as it appears. Keep an open mind

Crossword

and get farther than expected. Someone is impressed. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Today is an 8 — You’re on the verge of a discovery. Avoid risky propositions. Resist distraction or procrastination. Study the route, book your seat and go. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Today is an 8 — A financial opportunity deserves investigation. Manage investments, insurance or property. Keep files and accounts updated. Share your vision with your partner.

Publish your comic on this page. Email five samples and a brief description of your idea to adviser@indiana.edu by July 31. Submissions will be reviewed and selections will be made by the editor-in-chief. Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

su do ku

Difficulty Rating: How to play: Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 grid contains the digits 1 through 9, without repeating a number in any one row, column or 3x3 grid.

Answer to previous puzzle

© Puzzles by Pappocom

1 Carpenter’s file 5 Necklace pellet 9 Thorns in one’s side 14 __ mater 15 Wrinkly citrus fruit 16 Neckwear named for a British racecourse 17 1970s-’80s fashion inspired by astronauts’ footwear 19 The “a” sound in “above” 20 Like Frosted Flakes’ coating 21 Responsibility 23 “Above,” in verse 24 DVD holder 26 Series installment 28 Like easy, wellpaying jobs 31 Traditional 15th anniversary gift 33 1993 Presidential Medal of Freedom awardee Arthur 34 Vietnamese soup 35 Souped-up vehicle 38 __ Speedwagon 39 “Was I premature?” 41 Fútbol cheer 42 NASA explorers 44 “Dig in!”

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) — Today is a 9 — Together, you’re stronger. Use intuition with your partner. Pay attention to nonverbal cues. Listen and discover an unexpected dream. Connect on another level.

(c)2018 By Nancy Black. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

L.A. Times Daily Crossword

The IDS is accepting applications for student comic strips for the summer and fall 2018 semesters.

ACROSS

Charlie after identifying him as an outsider, Michaelsen said. Likewise he said people in real life also jump to conclusions about foreigners who enter their countries, either assuming they are poor refugees in need of help or lawbreakers who should be kicked out. “In the play, they don’t even know what country he’s from, but they know he doesn’t speak English, so they immediately jump to conclusions,” he said. “And we’re off to the races. There’s really no thought that goes into who this person might be beyond that label of ‘foreign.’” Michaelsen said it is also important to note Charlie is not considered a foreigner because he is from England, but because he does not speak English — a distinction he said is reflected in how people in general view those who cannot speak English. Michaelsen said “The Foreigner” focuses on the idea of building community because of how some characters try to ostracize Charlie from the community and how others make him a part of their community. One challenge of the play is to balance the zany comedy with the serious undercurrent, Michaelsen said. “It’s tricky,” he said. “Comedy is really hard. The timing, the inflections, the way the language is used is not easy. And then you pile on that serious, darker side, and it gets even harder." As a director, Michaelsen works to strike this balance by working with the actors on timing, inflections and physicality while still encouraging them to build real, truthful characters. But he also does not want to sugarcoat the darker themes with humor. “I’m not really pulling punches on the darker stuff,” he said. “The audience needs to know what they’re coming to. There’s some dark stuff, and we’re not just going to hide it in humor.”

45 Coke or Pepsi 46 Most sour 48 Humped beast 49 “Who Let the Dogs Out?” one-hit wonder 51 Carry with effort 53 __ Grande 54 Colored eye part 56 Citrus-flavored diet drink 60 “__ have a clue” 62 1990s cartoon series featuring a classic 8-Down dog 64 Conical home 65 Short skirt 66 First blank on many forms 67 Donkeys 68 Trebek of “Jeopardy!” 69 Heavenly spheres

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Ewes’ guys Moises of the 2007-’08 Mets Urban pollution Dashing style Regatta markers Sense of self Glee club voice Mickey Mouse creator “Tell your friends”

10 Corner PC key 11 Teacher’s domain 12 Hauled to the shop 13 Look steadily (at) 18 Donkey’s cry 22 Final result 25 Rebound, like sound 27 H.S. exam for college hopefuls 28 Fisherman’s soup fish 29 PC manual reader 30 Play some b-ball 32 Prickly flowers 34 Dorm room decoration 36 Shoppe sign adjective 37 “Let’s Make a __” 39 Home-wrecking insects 40 Witness’ promise 43 Sheep cry 45 City near Naples 47 Real mystery 48 Terse 49 Big name in water filtration 50 Senate staffers 52 Stick on, as a label 55 Gardener’s bagful 57 Fly high 58 Hair care tool 59 “Planet of the __” 61 Born, in alumni newsletters 63 Single

Look for the crossword daily in the comics section of the Indiana Daily Student. Find the solution for the daily crossword here. Answer to previous puzzle


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Cuisunart Breadmaker. Good cond., $25. qulij@iu.edu

Houses

Small red Keurig coffee machine. Barely used. $35. slganser@indiana.edu

*** Now renting 2018 *** HPIU.COM 1-3 bedrooms. 812-333-4748 No pets please.

White microwave and black and silver microwave. $30 each. dawars@indiana.edu

***IU Vice President’s house. 8th & Lincoln. 8 BR, 3 BA,3 kit. W/D. $4500/mo. 812-879-4566

White mini fridge. Good for dorm or apt. Pick up only. $25. cpidd@iu.edu

1-5 BR houses for 18-19. Near Law/Opt./Music. Onsite laundry/parking. 812-333-9579 or leasinginfo@ grantprops.com

Available August pavprop.com 812-333-2332

111 E. 9th. 5 BR, 3BA, 2 kit., 2 W/D, garage., $2500/mo. + util. Avail. Aug. 812-606-1562

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

Large 3 BR south of Stadium. On-site laundry/ parking. 812-333-9579 or leasinginfo@ grantprops.com

203 South Clark 3 BR, 2 BA, ALL UTILS. INCLUD. $2100/mo. www.iurent.com 812-360-2628

420

15’ Riot Kayak. Good cond., includes lots of amenities. $900. rellenso@indiana.edu

Furniture 2 lightly used Japanesestyle room dividers. 6 ft long: $40. 14 ft. long: $70. gr2@iu.edu

Textbooks Physiology P215 Lab Workbook. Used. Has notes in it. $10. aclaymil@iu.edu

Antique bedside lamp: $30. Beige rug: $55. dawars@indiana.edu Black Futon. Comes from pet free home. $65, obo. dawars@indiana.edu Brand new twin mattress. 12’’ innerspring memory foam. $180, obo. wang12@iu.edu Floor lamp: $10. Black futon: $65.Imported carpet from India: $75. dawars@indiana.edu

TRANSPORTATION

Futon couch-bed. Likenew condition. Pick up only. Price neg. 812-6069170, hwangse@iu.edu

2014 Ford Fusion Hybrid. Up to 44/41 mpg in city/highway. $11,970. abbsmile@iu.edu

Golden Technologies Monarch medium power lift recliner. $450, obo. ajmirows@indiana.edu IKEA bedroom furniture. $600 for all, individual items, price neg. rosseli@indiana.edu IKEA Sultan Havberg full bed and mattress in great cond. $130. 812-391-9746 Large dresser from early 1800s. 6 drawers, ornate. $1000, obo. 812-360-5551 Oversized LoveSac bean bag chair. Stuffed with memory foam. $200. geverett@indiana.edu

Automobiles 2011 BMW 328i. 65,000 mi. Regularly maintained, clean title. $13,500 ppiriyam@indiana.edu

Full size bed frame with mattress, all in good condition.$250. wanqgeng@indiana.edu

2014 Honda Accord in excellent cond. 71k mi. Avail. now. $12,300. abbansal@iu.edu

Bicycles 2 Huffy Cruisers in good cond. Comfortable, ready to ride. $75 each. 310-844-2834

Mountain Bike. Aspen 21 Speed. New & in box. Can deliver. $250. most@iu.edu

Computers MacBook Air laptop in perfect condition. Less than 1 year old. $900. fjpatel@indiana.edu

NOW LEASING FOR 2018

Touch-screen Acer Chromebook R11 w/ charger. Folds into tablet. $150 obo jlhavers@iu.edu

Newly Remodeled Close to Campus

Appliances Air Conditioner. Comes w/ remote to change temp. Great cond. $120. yitseng@indiana.edu

Rooms for Rent. Next to Opt. on Atwater. On site pkg./laundry, utils. incl. 812-333-9579 or leasinginfo@ grantprops.com

Grant Properties

Tripod w/ phone and GoPro mount. Comes w/ box, good cond. $10. yuwbai@indiana.edu

3 brown wooden chairs: $15 each. Green wooden bookshelf: $35. dawars@indiana.edu

Misc. for Sale 12 pc. dinnerware set w/4 dinner & salad plates, bowls + 12 pc silverware. $15 yafwang@hotmail.com

Glass Computer Desk w/ multiple shelf levels. Includes 2 yr warranty, $30 obo. clbloom@iu.edu

405

Music Director: United Presbyterian Church seeks Music Director for diverse congregation near Jacobs School. It’s an important ministry as it relates to UPC’s worship, fellowship and growth. Incl. playing piano/organ, directing choir, coordinating guest artist/student singer programs and overseeing maintenance of Allen electronic organ and Broadman grand piano. 5-10 hours/week. Bachelor’s in keyboard performance, choral conducting, music education or equivalent exp. in a Christian church pref. For detailed description, salary and application, e-mail: upcbloomington@ gmail.com, Allen Pease on subject line. Inquiries held in strict confidence.

Each unit accom. 2-5 tenants Outstanding downtown/campus location

410

Admin./Professional

Grant Properties

415

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EMPLOYMENT

Close to IU. 2 houses for rent. 1) 5 BR, 3 BA, 902 E. 14th St., $2450/ mo., 3 blks. to Geology & SPEA, off-street prkg. 2) 4 BR, 2 BA, 900 E. 14th St., $1600/mo. 3 blks. to Geology and SPEA, approved for 5 occupants. 812-327-7881

Rare Fender Concord II acoustic guitar. Looks and sounds great. $165. mhouston@indiana.edu

Samsung 50 inch Smart TV in good cond.$280. wanqgeng@indiana.edu

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

509 N. Lincoln, 4 BR, 2 BA. 2 kit., priv. backyard, $2000/mo. + util. & dep. 812-606-1562 or txt

Rooms for rent, next to Opt. on Atwater. On-site pkg./laundry. Utilities incl. 812-333-9579 or leasinginfo@ grantprops.com

facebook.com/e3rdStreet/

Available August

pavprop.com 812-333-2332

335

1 BR, 0n-site pkg./ laundry. 1 block to Opt, Math, Chem & Law. 812-333-9579 or leasinginfo@ grantprops.com

Lot for sale in children’s area of Valhalla Gardens. $1,000. Can move. Call: 812-723-0179.

Close to Campus

Apartment Furnished

325

Announcements

Phillips 32 inch HD TV with dark wood TV stand. Like new. $100 for both. kaeldrid@indiana.edu

Newly Remodeled

Only 1 left! Very nice large, 2 BR downtown/ Campus. On-site parking. W/D. 812-333-9579 or leasinginfo@ grantprops.com

HOUSING 305

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

Apt. Unfurnished

Instruments 5 String Banjo. Excellent cond., comes w/ hard case. $160. mhouston@indiana.edu

435

PAYMENT: All advertising is done on a cash in advance basis unless credit has been established. The IDS accepts Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, cash, check or money order.

Electronics

450

REFUNDS: If you cancel your ad before the final run date, the IDS will refund the difference in price. A minimum of one day will be charged.

Houses 313 North Clark 3 BR, 1 BA, fenced in backyard. ALL UTILS. INCLUD. $2100/mo. www.iurent.com 812-360-2628

COPY ERRORS: The IDS must be notified of errors before 3 p.m. the date of the first publication of your ad. The IDS is only responsible for errors published on the first insertion date. The IDS will rerun your ad 1 day when notified before 3 p.m. of the first insertion date.

505

HOUSING ADS: All advertised housing is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act. Refer to idsnews.com for more info.

COPY CHANGES: Ad copy can be changed at no additional charge when the same number of lines are maintained. If the total number of lines changes, a new ad will be started at the first day rate.

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To place an ad: go online, call 812-855-0763 or stop by Franklin Hall 130 from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday - Friday. Full advertising policies are available online. idsnews.com/classifieds

1, 2, 3, 4, & 5 BR Houses, Townhouses, and Apartments Quality campus locations

Electronics

“Everywhere you want to be!”

47’’ Vizio flat screen TV in good cond. $195. edwarali@iu.edu Epson Printer/Fax/ Scanner. Like new cond. With ink. $40. dawars@indiana.edu

339-2859

Office: 14th & Walnut www.elkinsapts.com

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Indiana Daily Student Monday, July 16, 2018 idsnews.com

SPORTS

Editor Murphy Wheeler sports@idsnews.com

BASEBALL

JUNHUI WU | IDS

IU played Kentucky on May 8 at Bart Kaufman Field. IU announced new Coach Jeff Mercer’s coaching staff on July 11.

Hoosiers announce coaching staff From IDS reports

On Wednesday, IU officially announced new baseball Coach Jeff Mercer’s staff after days of reported hirings. The first new member of the staff, as reported by Kendall Rogers over the weekend, is former Central Florida and Wright State Coach Justin Parker. Parker helped develop UCF’s pitching staff into one of the best in the nation and will take over as IU’s pitching coach. Parker will take over as IU’s assistant coach and pitching coach, the role previously filled by Kyle Bunn, who joined Middle Tennessee State’s coaching staff ear-

lier this week. During Parker’s time in Orlando, the Central Florida pitching staff was among the best in the nation. In 2017, the group posted an ERA of 3.00, the fifth-best mark in the nation, while a pair of pitchers collected 10 wins each, which was tied for 13th-most in the country. In each of the last four seasons, dating back to Parker’s time at Wright State, his pitching staff has recorded a sub-4.00 ERA. Parker has also sent seven pitchers to join the professional ranks in his time as a coach. The second coach to join the staff was Dan Held, also reported by Rogers earlier

this week. The former minor leaguer joins IU after serving as the executive director of the Indiana Bulls, one of the more prestigious travel baseball programs in the state, for more than a decade. Held also brings professional coaching experience to Bloomington, as he served as an assistant bullpen coach with the St. Louis Cardinals prior to his time with the Indiana Bulls. Before his time with the Bulls, Held played nine seasons of professional baseball — six with the Philadelphia Phillies organization, one with the New York Mets organization and two in an independent league.

Following his playing career, Held joined the Batavia Muckdogs coaching staff. The next year, he moved on to join the Cardinals. During his time with St. Louis, the club reached two World Series, winning the championship in 2006. Held’s ties to the Indiana Bulls could prove crucial to IU’s recruiting efforts, as the Hoosiers currently have commitments from five different Bulls players. The third member of the new staff announced by IU is volunteer assistant coach Casey Dykes. Dykes played under Mercer at Western Kentucky, before joining the Hilltopper coaching staff, coaching with

Mercer for a year. After his time at Western Kentucky, Dykes joined the staff at the Virginia Military Institute as the recruiting coordinator. In his time with VMI, he also worked with the catchers and hitters. In Dykes’ first season with the Keydets, catcher Matt Winn was a finalist for the Johnny Bench Award, an award given annually to the best catcher in division one collegiate baseball. The coach also saw 14 players earn all-conference honors, five MLB draft picks and two of the three All-Americans in VMI baseball history. Auston Matricardi

MEN’S SOCCER

NOBLE GUYON | IDS

Top Freshman midfielder Griffin Dorsey looks to pass the ball to a teammate during the second half of the NCAA semifinal against North Carolina on Dec. 8 at Talen Energy Stadium in Philadelphia. Dorsey, Trey Muse and Justin Rennicks were named to the United States Under-20 National Team Training Camp Roster. BOBBY GODDIN | IDS

Bottom Freshman goalkeeper Trey Muse deflects a penalty kick against Michigan State in the quarterfinals of the NCAA Tournament on Dec. 1 at Bill Armstrong Stadium. Muse saved three Michigan State penalty kicks to help IU advance to its 19th college cup with a 3-2 penalty kick shootout win. NOBLE GUYON | IDS

Right Freshman midfielder Griffin Dorsey looks to pass the ball to a teammate during the second half of the NCAA semifinal against North Carolina on Dec. 8 at Talen Energy Stadium in Philadelphia. Dorsey, Trey Muse and Justin Rennicks were named to the United States Under-20 National Team Training Camp Roster.

Hoosiers named to US Under-20 National Team From IDS reports

With IU’s first exhibition match less than a month away, IU men’s soccer had three players named to the United States Under-20 National Team Training

Camp Roster. IU was the only school with three players on the roster as sophomores goalkeeper Trey Muse, forward Griffin Dorsey and midfielder Justin Rennicks earned spots on the 20-man squad.

They’ll be in Raleigh, North Carolina, from July 15-22, fighting for a spot on the USA Under-20 National Team roster that’ll participate in the CONCACAF Under-20 Championship for a chance to earn a qualifying bid into the 2019

FIFA Under-20 World Cup. The CONCACAF Under-20 Championship will be held in Bradenton, Florida, from Nov. 1-21. The United States is the defending champion from 2017 and will be one of 34 teams to participate.

If any of the three players are named to the official roster, they would miss the Big Ten Tournament, but would be back for the NCAA Tournament. Phillip Steinmetz

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Indiana Daily Student

6

ARTS

Monday, July 16, 2018 idsnews.com

Editor Clark Gudas arts@idsnews.com

COURTESY PHOTO

Sharon and Jessica Bussert traveled to natural sites around the country, such as Yosemite National Park, Glacier National Park in Montana and the Oregon Coast. The couple bought an ice fishing tent to use as a dark room for the trip.

Gallery showcases photos from cross-country RV trip By Christine Fernando ctfernan@iu.edu

With cameras in hand, Sharon and Jessica Bussert bought an RV in 2014, moved in and hit the road for a three-year photography adventure spanning the U.S., from their home state of Indiana to the West Coast. Their dog, Shadow, and cat, Midnight, came along for the ride, which included pit stops at Yosemite National Park, the Oregon Coast, Northern California, the Nevada desert, Glacier National Park in Montana and the Columbia River Gorge. Now, By Hand Gallery, located at 101 W. Kirkwood Ave., will display photos from the trip in a free gallery, which is titled “On the Road” and is open until Aug. 31. “Today they are back home in Indiana,” Tova Lesko, manager of By Hand, said. “By offering them a chance to show their work in By Hand Gallery, it is a wonderful opportunity for us to see their journey come full circle.” Sharon, a landscape and

wildlife photographer, said the trip was not a spur of the moment decision. Jessica, a registered nurse, had been interested in travel nursing for some time, and the couple saw it as an opportunity to explore the country and take some pictures. But Sharon was initially resistant to the idea of traveling in an RV and suggested renting houses instead. She couldn’t see how two people and two animals could share the small living space, but soon found cutting extra, unnecessary belongings could go a long way. “It was way more fun than I expected,” she said. “As soon as we moved in, I just loved it.” Sharon said she also loved how they didn’t have to live out of a suitcase or keep unpacking and repacking their belongings. If they were travelling long distances and got tired, they could just park somewhere and sleep. “And if we decided we wanted to go somewhere, we could just drive up with our house and hang out for a few days,” she said.

Another perk was that the RV allowed Sharon and Jessica to stay in one place for as long as they needed. As a result, they could return to the same location to shoot multiple times. “If the lighting wasn’t just right the first time, you can go back,” Sharon said. “If you’re just in one place for three hours and it happens to be really bright sunlight with harsh shadows, there’s nothing you can do about it. When you’re staying in the area, you can go back in different lighting, weather, time of day.” For Sharon, the biggest challenge of RV life was still space, especially when matting, framing and packaging photos for sale or for shows. “We would completely trash the RV just trying to frame 10 pictures,” she said. “And then, we’d live with them in the middle of the floor until we got to the show because we had nowhere else to put them.” The RV also wasn’t the ideal darkroom because it let in a lot of light, so the couple bought an ice fishing tent, draped an extra tarp cover over it and used it as a

darkroom. “Our neighbors got used to the fact that the ice fishing tent was going to be living outside the RV,” Sharon said. In Yosemite, the pair processed their photos in the ice fishing tent before finishing the procedure in public restrooms. “So there were a lot of confused people with a lot of questions,” Sharon said. Sharon and Jessica also experimented with other photographic processes, including tintypes, ambrotypes and pinhole photography. In Sacramento, the couple worked with a woman who focuses on tintype photography, a mid-19th century style that involved thin sheets of metal coated in dark lacquer. In Yosemite, Sharon and Jessica bumped into a photographer doing large-size tintype in a mobile darkroom in his trailer. The man invited the two to help him process his photos, giving them a chance to practice tintype again. While the process is challenging and time-consuming, Sharon said she would

like to incorporate the style into her future work. Sharon said the experience also took her back to her roots in darkroom photography, as opposed to digital photography, which allows photographers to cheaply take hundreds of photos at once. “When you get used to the digital cameras doing so much of the work, you can get a little lazy,” Sharon said. “This reminded me that to be a photographer isn’t to take 30 pictures and hope something turns out good. It’s to stop and think about your shot. And when you’re using these formats, you have to do that because it’s expensive to buy and process and time-consuming to process.” Out of the stops on the trip and the 50 states and 40 countries Sharon has visited in her life, she said she could never pick a favorite place to shoot. “Every single place I’ve been, I’ve found something I love about it,” she said. “We found something beautiful in every place we went to.” Photographing their

home, Indiana, can be difficult, Sharon said. She said photographers often become complacent about photographing their home because they see it everyday. They also may not carry a camera with them because they think they can always go back. But Sharon said one of her photos of the full moon poking out through the fog at night shows the importance of always carrying a camera, even when at home. This photo was taken in the perfect conditions and at the perfect time in the moonrise, she said. “It is probably something we can never go back and see again because there were too many elements out of our control,” she said. While the couple values their trip and the photos that came out of it, Sharon said she wants other photographers to know that they don’t have to go on a vacation or a trip across the country just to get cool new photos. “Sometimes the best pictures can be taken right in your own backyard,” she said.

Jazz in July concert series happening in Bloomington From IDS reports

You like jazz? WFIU Public Radio and the Department of Jazz Studies are bringing a Jazz in July concert series to Bloomington. While the first concerts

took place July 6 and 13, performances will continue July 20 and 27, each featuring a different band or artist. The concert on July 6 took place at the Conrad Prebys Amphitheater, with a performance by the Al Cobine Big Band.

The band’s original leader, Al Cobine, who died in 2009, once put together orchestras and arrangements for performers such as Elvis Presley and Johnny Mathis. The July 13 concert, also at the Conrad Prebys Amphitheater, featured Joe

Galvin Latin Jazz Octet: Soneros de la Caliza. Galvin is the director of IU’s Latin American Ensemble. The Charlie Ballantine Quartet will perform July 20 at the School of Global and International Studies Build-

ing lawn. Attendees may bring a chair or blanket. On July 27, at the Conrad Prebys Amphitheater, the Heartland Trio and Kathryn Sherman will perform. Sherman is a vocalist, arranger and educator based in Bloomington. In the past,

she was the lead vocalist for ExWo, a neo-soul band, and Giraffe House, a math rock band. In the event of rain, concerts will be moved to Musical Arts Center 066. Clark Gudas

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IDS Personalized News Updates

St. Paul Catholic Center 1413 E. 17th St. 812-339-5561 • hoosiercatholic.org Facebook: Hoosiercatholic • Twitter: @hoosiercatholic Weekend Mass Times: Saturday: 4:30 p.m. Sunday: 8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. (Spanish), 5:30 p.m., 9 p.m. (During Academic Year) Korean Mass 1st & 3rd Saturday, 6 p.m. Weekday Mass Times: Monday-Thursday: 7:20 a.m. Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 5:20 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday: 9 p.m. St. Paul Catholic Center is a diverse community rooted in the saving compassion of Jesus Christ, energized by His Sacraments, and nourished by the liturgical life of His Church. Fr. John Meany, O.P., Pastor Fr. Patrick Hyde, O.P. Associate Pastor & Campus Minister Fr. Joseph Minuth, O.P., Associate Pastor

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Indiana Daily Student

OPINION

Monday, July 16, 2018 idsnews.com

Editor Hannah Reed opinion@idsnews.com

MOORE TO SAY

MATT BEGALA | IDS

The Lenco BearCat armored vehicle sits parked on display July 10 in the Switchyard Operations building. The viewing was the first official unveiling of BPD’s new armored vehicle to the public.

Armored truck wastes money, militarizes police Dylan Moore is a senior studying business economics and public policy. He is a former Opinion Editor for the Indiana Daily Student.

The Lenco BearCat G2, a contentious, expensive armored truck purchased by the City of Bloomington earlier this year, finally arrived for public viewing July 10, according to the Indiana Daily Student. Among the BearCat’s features are ballistic protection, gun ports for sheltered shooting and a detachable battering ram for breaking down walls. Not only is this $225,000 investment an abject waste of taxpayer dollars better spent actually improving Bloomington, it is an active step toward consolidating police power in a city that does not need such paramilitary law enforcement. The process of purchasing the BearCat began when the government opaquely shifted funds originally intended to build a new police garage in 2017. According to Mayor John Hamilton’s 14-page announcement about buying the new armored truck, the garage project’s bids were too high, so the city determined the money set aside for its construction should instead be invested in the BearCat.

This was decided without first consulting the public. Mayor Hamilton and Bloomington Police Department Chief Michael Diekhoff have since apologized for the initial lack of transparency, but Hamilton’s ensuing justification for this purchase laid out in the announcement provides more attempts to confuse and mislead. In the “Review and Analysis” section of the document, Hamilton suggests that, because violent crime in our community and the nationwide concentration of privately owned guns are both increasing, the purchase of an armored vehicle is warranted. He also mentions BPD stopped a gunowning individual who may have been planning to attack Kilroy’s Sports in 2012. There are a few issues with these statistics. First, an increase in violent crime does not infer an increase in mass shootings, hostage situations or other instances in which the BearCat would be necessary or permissible. This is a dishonest use of statistics. Additionally, legal civilian gun ownership is not an acceptable justification for increased police power. Hamilton writes that law enforcement officers “have no way of knowing when

they enter a residence if the person is unarmed, or in the possession of more firepower than our entire police department possesses.” It is difficult to imagine how an armored truck parked on the side of the road would make knocking on doors any safer. While the city government and BPD may imagine themselves foiling terrorist plots or stopping mass shootings with the BearCat, the reality is the city has pressing issues that an expensive paramilitary vehicle will do absolutely nothing to solve. The mayor admits the CIRT team, which would be the only team authorized to use the vehicle, is only deployed in 0.016 percent of Bloomington’s dispatch calls. Keep in mind the report does not claim that any of these calls over the past three years, including the possible planned attack on Kilroy’s Sports, would have been better handled with the use of the BearCat. Instead, the mayor asserts a BearCat was used in the Orlando, Florida, Pulse nightclub shooting to help about 30 hostages escape. By this logic, any other SWAT gear that has saved approximately 30 people located hundreds of miles away from Bloomington is fair game for our city’s law enforcement

to purchase. The BPD and city government made no remarks about how the BearCat would curb rape, rampant homelessness, petty theft or the litany of other problems that actually affect daily life in Bloomington. $225 thousand could go a long way in alleviating any of these issues, but a reinforced truck, the cost of which is only revealed in the “Supplementary Information” section at the end of Hamilton’s announcement, is apparently a more pressing investment. No community wants to find itself underprepared if tragedy strikes. But the citizens of Bloomington have not — at least in modern memory — needed law enforcement equipped with such an expensive piece of paramilitary equipment. We need a city that is safer for women to walk through at night, a city that solves pressing problems rather than prepping for far-off hypotheticals and a city that spends its limited resources in a way that actually improves our lives. In this pursuit, Mayor Hamilton and the BPD have failed. A $225,000 BearCat will not make daily life in Bloomington any better, and taxpayers should be outraged the local government did not keep their best interests at heart.

MUSIC AND MATT

MATT BEGALA | IDS

Lead singer Brendon Urie performs the song “Don’t Threaten Me with a Good Time” on Friday night in Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis.

Panic! At The Disco celebrates life and love Matt Begala is a junior studying photojournalism. He is currently the summer photo editor for the IDS.

INDIANAPOLIS — Panic! At The Disco brought together thousands of people Friday night in a packed Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis for the band’s second stop of its “Pray For The Wicked” tour. Before the show started, a giant digital clock started counting down from 10 minutes at center stage and screams of excitement could be heard resonating throughout the arena. When the time ran out, the lights faded, the sound of a deep bass began to rumble the floor and the backing band rose out of the stage flooded by hazy blue lights. Moments later, lead singer and front man Brendon Urie shot out of the stage floor into the air and landed to screaming applause. It’s difficult to encapsulate a show like Panic! At The Disco’s. It has all the intensity of Circ Du Soleil and all the panache of a broadway musical. Urie, the only original member of P!ATD still in the band’s lineup, amplifies the depth of shows with insane vocal per-

formances and theatrics that would leave even the most seasoned concert goer speechless. Friday night’s show in Indianapolis was no different. Urie drove the wildly diverse evening setlist with passion and intensity — the likes of which he has come to be known by — from start to finish. From the opening song “(F*** A) Silver Lining” off the band’s newest album “Pray for the Wicked,” to a cover of Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody,” the show had everything. Urie made sure one thing was very, very clear throughout the set: he has ridiculous range. While the show marched with purpose, it was the unexpected moments that made the night memorable. After Urie performed 13 songs while dancing back and forth on stage alongside a relatively modest-sized band made up of guitar, bass, drums, strings and a three-piece brass section, he made his way through the crowd singing “Death of a Bachelor.” It was during this song he shook hands with fans, signed outstretched CDs and t-shirts and even hugged a young girl who was left beaming as

he continued on his path towards the back of the venue. Through the entire route, Urie couldn’t help but smile and tell the crowd in a pure, unequivocal tone, “I love all of you.” It’s moments like these that make Urie so likable. Seconds later, Urie approached a white piano that was uncovered at the back of the venue, sat down and informed the audience he was going to play a song his mother played for him when he was a child. He began playing a short cover of Bonnie Raitt’s “I Can’t Make You Love Me,” and the piano platform lifted into the air and hovered over the crowd before gliding overhead back toward the stage. Urie’s undeniable chemistry with his fans adds fuel to the fire of his shows. Once he arrived back on stage, he took a moment to talk with the fans who inspire him. “I look at you guys, a lot of you younger people, and you encourage and inspire me to mobilize,” he said. “The passion you guys have for being who you are, I didn’t have that at your age. So, thank you for instilling my

confidence in myself.” During the song “Girls/Girls/Boys” Urie grabbed two pride flags from audience members and held them while performing. Early in July, Urie confirmed in an interview with Paper magazine that he is pansexual, a term for attraction to people that is not limited to a particular gender identity or sexual orientation. “If a person is great, then a person is great,” he said in the interview. “I just like good people, if your heart’s in the right place.” Regardless of who you are or where you come from, Urie makes it a point to create an atmosphere that is both electric and inviting. He creates a place where, for an hour and 45 minutes, a person can be exactly who they are among others who share the same passion for music, life and love. Before commencing the final song, Urie replaced his in-ear monitor and told the crowd he couldn’t wait to be back again and until then, “Be kind to each other.”

7


the care and services you need to stay healthy at idsnews.com/health

Health Spotlight

Dr. Mary Ann Bough Office Manager: Mary Baker Chiropractic Assistants: Melinda Chandler, Whitney Scherschel, Denice Stonier, Jennifer Wilson

Mon., Wed., Fri.: 8:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. Tue.: 1 - 6 p.m.

3901 Hagan St., Suite C 812-336-7552 Emergency: 812-219-4927 drmaryann.com

Discover Chiropractic for the entire family! We are a state-of-the-art chiropractic facility using computerized analysis and adjustment techniques. We specialize in gentle “no-Twist-Turn” adjusting of infants to seniors! We are close to campus and near major bus routes. New patients are welcome and most insurance plans accepted. Call today and find out how you and your family can stay naturally healthy with chiropractic care.

Oral/Dental Care

Oral/Dental Care

Optometry

Chiropractic

Behavioral/Mentall

L. Figen M.D. Psychiatry

• Eye Exams • Contact Lens Exams • IU Student & Employee insurance

Matthew L. Rasche, D.D.S., M.S.D.

provider

Certified, American Board of Pediatric Dentistry

Southern Indiana Pediatric Dentistry with Dr. Matt Rasche specializes in providing comprehensive dental care for infants, children and adolescents, including those with special needs. We provide quality dental care and an exceptional experience for each patient. We welcome new patients! All insurance plans and private pay accepted. Our office is located near College Mall in Bloomington, at 828 Auto Mall Road in Bloomington. 812-333-KIDS. Call today!

Welcome IU Students and Staff! We strive to provide you with the highest-quality care in a relaxed and attentive atmosphere. WE OFFER: • I.V. Sedation • Wisdom Tooth Removal • Dental Implants Make your appointment today!

Mon. - Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Fri.: By appointment 828 Auto Mall Road 812-333-KIDS (5437) sipediatricdentistry.com

J. Blue Davis, D.D.S.

David J. Howell, D.D.S. Timothy A. Pliske, D.D.S. Mon. - Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Fri.: 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.

2911 E. Covenanter Drive 812-333-2614 IndianaOralSurgery.com

The Center for Dental Wellness A privately owned, peopleoriented practice located next to the College Mall. Dr. Davis provides cosmetic, restorative, family and emergency dentistry in a comfortable, relaxed atmosphere with a caring, knowledgeable and experienced staff. We use Cerec technology, allowing us to make restorations in one visit. Dr. Davis is a provider for Invisalign, Zoom! and Under Armour Performance Mouth Guards. Also offering other advanced services. We look forward to getting to know you and take care of you and your entire family with the goal of improving your smile and dental health. Mon. - Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 2909 Buick Cadillac Blvd. 812-339-3427 dentalwellness.com

Jackson Creek Dental

Mon. - Fri.: 7 a. m. - 5 p.m. 1124 S. College Mall Rd. 812-336-5525 jcdsmiles.com

Our Designer Frames and Sunglasses include: Nautica Flexon Nike Ray-Ban Bebe Calvin Klein Lacoste

Nine West Burberry Coach Anne Klein Vogue Prada Ralph Lauren

2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS!

Mon. - Wed.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. (Closed 1-2 p.m. for lunch) Thu.: 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. 409 S. Dunn St. 812-339-6272 campusfamilydental.com

Mon.-Tue., Thu.-Fri.: 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. Mon., Wed., Thurs.: 9 a.m. - noon, 2-7 p.m. Tue., Fri.: 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Bloomington

1710 W. Third St. 812-336-BACK bloomingtonchiropractor.com

413 W. Howe St. 812-334-2394 lindafigen@gmail.com

Physicians

1105 S. College Mall Road Located just Left of Kroger and Plato’s Closet Ellettsville Mon. - Fri.: 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. 812-876-2020 4719 West State Road 46 Located across from True Value Hardware

Dr. Gregory Velligan, Crystal Lynn, Shanna Yarnell, Krista Sears, Brandi Mosier, Ejay Rippy & Julie Waymire Campus Family Dental is the preferred choice for dental care among many IU students and professors. We will work with your schedule to provide the highest quality of general dentistry services. We pride ourselves in our professionalism and hightech equipment to make your appointments as comfortable and efficient as possible. Enjoy the convenience of walking to our office. We are located near the southeast corner of campus and accept many forms of insurance.

Gentle, effective pain relief helping students reduce back and neck pain, stress, headaches, migraines, carpal tunnel, shoulder pain, nerve pain, whiplash injury, sports injury and TMJ. Our office is well equipped with the most modern equipment and student friendly staff. Special Discounts for IU Students. We accept all insurance plans. Give us a call today!

Tue. - Fri.: 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sat.: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 812-333-2020

HoosierEyeDoctor.com

Ryan D. Tschetter, D.D.S. Jackson Creek Dental is a privately owned dental practice conveniently located on South College Mall Road. Most insurances accepted, including the Indiana University Aetna and Cigna Insurance plans as well as the Aetna Graduate Student plan, and IU Fellowship Anthem. Dr. Tschetter offers state of the art dental technology such as Zoom whitening, same day crown appointments, and Invisalign. Dr. Tschetter also provides restorative, cosmetic and emergency care. We pride ourselves in giving the best care to our patients while offering a pleasant yet professional atmosphere.

• 24-hour Emergency Service (call 812-340-3937)

Dr. Andrew Pitcher Dr. Crystal Gray

Dr. Figen treats patients in a quiet and confidential setting, near campus. She has 40 years experience helping students, using both psychotherapy and medication. She sees people with adjustment problems, family problems, stress, anxiety, panic, depression and eating disorders. At this time Dr. Figen is not treating people with ADD. She does not bill insurance companies, but will give you a receipt which you can send to your insurance company for reimbursement.

Dr. Brandy Deckard, O.D., F.A.A.O. Dr. Derek Bailey, O.D. Precision Eye Group specializes in comprehensive vision health. We offer examinations and treatment for a wide array of eye diseases, conditions, and problems, with advanced diagnostic and vision care technologies. We help our patients achieve and maintain good eye health for life. You can shop our wide variety of designer frames including Ray-Ban, Barton Perreira, Tom Ford, Burberry, Kate Spade and many more! Schedule your appointment now by calling the office or online at our website, and see your world with the best vision possible.

Dr. Mary Ann Bough Office Manager: Mary Baker Chiropractic Assistants: Melinda Chandler, Whitney Scherschel, Denice Stonier, Jennifer Wilson Discover Chiropractic for the entire family! We are a stateof-the-art chiropractic facility using computerized analysis and adjustment techniques. We specialize in gentle “no-TwistTurn” adjusting of infants to seniors! We are close to campus and near major bus routes. New patients are welcome and most insurance plans accepted. Call today and find out how you and your family can stay naturally healthy with chiropractic care. Mon., Wed., Fri.: 8:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. Tue.: 1 - 6 p.m. 3901 Hagan St., Suite C 812-336-7552 Emergency: 812-219-4927 drmaryann.com

Brian Logue, M.D. Eric Smith, M.D. Dave Elkins, P.A.C. Board certified physicians with over 70 years combined experience. Services include: kidney stones, urinary tract infections, urinary incontinence, prostate problems, same day emergency appointments, vasectomy. Mon. - Wed.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Thu.: 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. Fri.: 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. 2907 McIntire Drive 812-332-8765 summiturology.com Or visit us at our other location. Dr. Warren L. Gray 2200 John R. Wooden Drive Suite 207 Martinsville, IN 46151 765-342-8427

Mon. - Fri.: 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sat.: 9 a.m. - noon 322 S. Woodscrest Drive 812-332-2020 precisioneye.com

Timothy J. Devitt, D.M.D.

We provide a full scope of oral surgery procedures in a caring and comfortable manner. Our services include dental implants, IV sedation and wisdom teeth removal. We’re a provider for most insurance plans, including IU and Medicaid. No referral necessary Conveniently located on S. College Mall Road, across from Kroger and Five Guys.

Check

Mon. - Fri.: 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

the IDS every Monday for your directory of local health care services, or go online anytime at idsnews.com/health

1116 S. College Mall Rd. 812-332-2204 oralsurgeryofbloomington.com

For membership in the Indiana Daily Student Health Directory, please contact us at ads@idsnews.com. Your deadline for next Monday’s Health Directory is 5 p.m. Wednesday.

The Health Directory is your guide to health and wellness in the Bloomington area.

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Monday, July 15, 2018  

The Indiana Daily Student is an independent student newspaper covering Indiana University, IU sports and the city of Bloomington, Indiana.

Monday, July 15, 2018  

The Indiana Daily Student is an independent student newspaper covering Indiana University, IU sports and the city of Bloomington, Indiana.