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Monday, July 23, 2018 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

IDS ‘This is the greatest show’ Members of Best Buddies International gathered this weekend in Bloomington on the IU campus to be honored and inspired at the Best Buddies Leadership Conference.

PHOTOS BY MATT BEGALA | IDS

Top Performers stand during the final moments of the opening song of the Best Buddies Leadership Conference on Friday evening in the IU Auditorium. The conference opened to the song “The Greatest Show” from the movie “The Greatest Showman.” Best Buddies International is a nonprofit organization advocating for the physical, social and economic well-being of people with disabilities. Top Left Students from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill accept the award for Overall Outstanding College Chapter for the 2017-2018 academic year at the Best Buddies Leadership Conference on Friday evening in the IU Auditorium. Top Right Jack Mayor, a global ambassador for Best Buddies, gives a thumbs-up at the end of his speech during the Best Buddies Leadership Conference on Friday in the IU Auditorium. According to the Best Buddies website, in addition to being an active public speaker, Mayor has competed in Special Olympics Basketball and Swimming. Bottom Left Performers and audience members hold orange glow sticks above their heads for 17 seconds of silence Friday evening in the IU Auditorium to remember the 17 people killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Feb. 14. Three students representing the Best Buddies chapter at MSD spoke during the Best Buddies Leadership Conference about the effect the organization has had on them, and their intention to continue the legacy of two former members who were victims of the shooting. Bottom Right Mia Freeman, left, Madeline Dwyer, center, and Alexis Nilsson, right, pause after an audience member shouts “we’re here for you” during their speech at the Best Buddies Leadership Conference on Friday evening in the IU Auditorium. All three girls are students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School where, on Feb. 14, a gunman opened fire, killing 17 people. Two of the students killed in the attack were members of the MSD Best Buddies program. See page 3 for related photos.

Musician Diplo to perform at Block Party From IDS reports

Diplo, Whethan and Teenage Wrist will perform at this year’s Welcome Week Block Party on Aug. 18, according to a tweet posted by the IU Union Board. Thomas Wesley Pentz, or Diplo, is an American DJ who first found success as a producer and co-writer on M.I.A.’s 2007 album, “Kala,” which included the hit “Paper Planes.” His work on the album got him a Grammy Award nomination for Record of the Year. Since then, he has worked with artists such as Chris Brown, Britney Spears, Gwen Stefani, Snopp Dogg, Kid Cudi, Shakira, Ariana Grande and Beyoncé. Under his self-created record label, Mad Decent, Diplo signed a dance-funk group Bonde do Rolê, which went on to define the funk carioca genre in the United States. Diplo’s first collaborative, fulllength record was with English DJ Switch, under the name Major Lazer. Its 2009 release, “Guns Don’t Kill People... Lazers Do” focused on subgenres of Jamaican dancehall music. Pitchfork gave the album an 8.1. The group’s second album, “Free the Universe,” came out in 2013, with guest artists such as Ezra Koenig and Bruno Mars. Diplo and Skrillex made up duo Jack Ü and released “Skrillex and Diploe Present Jack Ü.” The album won the group Best Dance/

Arrests made in Days Inn robbery By Dominick Jean drjean@indiana.edu | @Domino_Jean

COURTESY PHOTO

Diplo performs at the Utopia Festival in 2016. Diplo, Whethan and Teenage Wrist will perform at this year’s Welcome Week Block Party on Aug. 18.

Electronic Album at the 58th Annual Grammy Awards in 2015. On Nov. 11, 2015, the group’s song “Lean On” became Spotify’s Most Streamed Song of All Time, with 1,140,913,782 streams as of July 22. A song from the album, “Where Are Ü Now,” won Best Dance Recording the same year. Diplo performed the song

alongside Skrillex and Justin Bieber at the award ceremony. Aside from Justin Bieber, Major Lazer has collaborated with Ty Dolla $ign, Ellie Goulding, Nicki Minaj and more. He also has eight Grammy Awards nominations, ranging from Producer of the Year, NonClassical in 2012 and 2013, and 2016’s Album of the Year for

“Lemonade” and “Purpose.” Diplo also co-founded the non-profit organization Heaps Descent, an Australia-based arts organization that provides educational support programs for students and artists from marginalized and disadvantaged communities. SEE DIPLO, PAGE 3

A man was robbed July 16 at the Days Inn located at E. State Road, 200 Indiana 45/46 Bypasss, according to Bloomington Police. Over the course of the past week, police located the three men who beat the man up and stole his clothes. The 32-year-old victim checked into the Days Inn on Monday with a 23-year-old woman. The man told police he attempted to find narcotics throughout the day, and there were multiple people who came in and out of the room. One of those people was Jeremy New, 23, who offered to give the victim drugs in exchange for his shirt and backpack, according to what the victim told police. Dakota Elsmore and Miles Sealy, both 21 years old, were also with New. New claimed he was there to give the 32-year-old a tattoo and, while he was setting up his equipSEE POLICE, PAGE 3


Indiana Daily Student

2

NEWS

Monday, July 23, 2018 idsnews.com

Editor Dominick Jean news@idsnews.com

COURTESY PHOTO

Students in Tabitha Bow's Clear Creek Elementary School class use BioSim technology to help researcher gather data May 14.

A BioSim wearable bee can be placed on the hand and forearm of a subject to interact with stations and gather data.

IU researchers develop wearable technology Dominick Jean drjean@indiana.edu | @Domino_Jean

IU researchers are encouraging elementary students, especially first and second graders, to play with bees and ants. Except the bees and ants are actually just 3D sensors the kids can wear to help them learn about biology. These sensors are part of a system invented by IU

researchers Kylie Peppler, Joshua Danish and Armin Moczek, called BioSim. Peppler said in an IU press release BioSim was created to help students understand complex systems and how they work. An example of two systems working together is how a bee spreads the pollen from a flower, a process required for both. BioSim allows students

to either wear bee puppets on their wrists or play with ant-shaped plush toys during class. Students are able to take the perspective of the insect while they play. "Their goal is to collect food as efficiently as possible and communicate with the community to make sure others can also collect food efficiently," Peppler said in the release. "There's lots of smiling, giggling, exclaiming

and collaborating. At other times, the students watch simulations on a projection screen, pointing out things they are noticing and explaining why they are happening." Peppler said even adults can have a difficult time grasping the full complexity of systems operating around them and the bee- and antshaped sensors are just another way to try and learn

about biology and other specific systems. "Introducing these ideas through cool topics like insects and incorporating embodiment and perspectivetaking can set the stage for these students to be able to learn about complex systems more deeply throughout their lives," she said. Peppler, Danish and Moczek are writing papers for peer-reviewed journals and

analyzing the effectiveness of BioSim. "We find that the addition of these puppets and plush toys creates opportunities for high-quality learning and engagement," Peppler said. "Not only have elementary students learned about social insects, but they are beginning to think about complex systems and apply this understanding in other areas."

IU Fort Wayne becomes part of IU system of campuses Dominick Jean drjean@indiana.edu | @Domino_Jean

The IU-Purdue partnership in Fort Wayne, Indiana, has officially changed after longdiscussed plans to split Indiana University–Purdue University Fort Wayne into different universities took effect July 1. While both universities will share the same buildings and remain on the original campus, they are now separate entities. Back in June 2017, the IU Board of Trustees and the Purdue University Board of Trustees approved an agreement to realign the university and create separate universities. What to know The regional education center is based in Neff Hall on the south of campus. Most of the programs are

housed in the basement and first floor of the building. The majority of nursing students will still attend classes and lectures on the third floor of the Liberal Arts Building, and the IU School of Medicine will remain on its own on the north side of campus. Around 300 freshmen are expected to start at IU Fort Wayne this fall, joining 150 students entering into the professional programs at the school. IU Fort Wayne students can use all facilities and services on the campus along with their fellow Purdue students, and on-campus housing will contain both IU and Purdue students on the Fort Wayne campus. IU undergrads will not be able to compete in NCAA Division I athletics. Currently enrolled juniors and seniors at IU dental and mental imaging programs,

as well as Purdue nursing students, will still be enrolled at Purdue Fort Wayne, but will be taught by IU Fort Wayne faculty. Students will also have access to some new facilities that are under construction. A new Student Success Center and computer lab are being built in the basement of Neff Hall, according to an IU press release. At the beginning of June, IU Fort Wayne Student Central completed construction on the first floor of Neff Hall. Faculty and Staff IU Fort Wayne, according to an IU press release, employs 44 full-time undergraduate faculty and 25 staff members. There are also 16 fulltime graduate faculty and

COURTESY PHOTO

The IU School of Medicine building will remain on the north end of campus as part of IU Fort Wayne. As of July 1, the IU-Purdue Fort Wayne University was split into two separate entities.

several staff employed in the schools of social work and medicine. Upcoming events Aug. 14: IU Fort Wayne

and Purdue Fort Wayne partnership picnic. Aug. 17: First-year student orientation. Aug. 20: First day of classes.

Social Media IU Fort Wayne is on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter with the @IUFortWayne handle for social media users.

Unknown man steals butt plug and vibrators Dominick Jean drjean@indiana.edu | @Domino_Jean

An unknown man stole three California Exotic vibrators and a black butt plug with a cat tail from Lovers Playground, an adult entertainment store located at 1013 N. College Ave. early Wednesday morning. Bloomington Police Sgt. Dana Cole said the man broke into the store

MATT BEGALA | IDS

Cameron Drummond Editor-in-Chief

The Sample Gates are located on Indiana Avenue next to Franklin Hall.

Five things to know about the Sample Gates at IU From IDS reports

Referred to as the door to campus, the Sample Gates sit between Franklin Hall and Bryan Hall. Looking onto Kirkwood Avenue to the west and campus to the east, these iconic gates were constructed and dedicated in 1987. Here are five things to know about the Sample Gates:

1. The gates were funded by former Director of the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aids, Edson Sample. Sample wanted to fund and dedicate the gates to his parents, who were both present at the June 1987 dedication ceremony. 2. The classes of 1899-1902 began the University Arch Fund to erect a gate at the edge

of the campus. Eventually, the classes agreed to use the funds to purchase chimes in the Student Building. 3. In 1931, Newell Sanders proposed the gateway again by submitting multiple designs for the potential gates. The Board of Trustees denied her proposal. 4. The place where the current Sample Gates sit used to

be a continuation of Kirkwood Avenue. The through street was closed for the erection of the gates in the 1980s. 5. The gates are constructed of Indiana limestone, surrounded by a brick path that flows into campus with landscaping that changes each season.

around 1 a.m. and was described as 5 feet, 5 inches tall with brown hairw. When he robbed the store he had a fedora on, along with green sunglasses, a black t-shirt and dark pants. Cole said the butt plug was valued at $37.99 and each of the vibrators cost approximately $40. The case is active, and the police are working on getting a picture of the suspect from the store.

Murphy Wheeler Managing Editor

Vol. 151, No. 41 © 2018

www.idsnews.com Newsroom: 812-855-0760 Business Office: 812-855-0763 Fax: 812-855-8009

Roger Hartwell Advertising Director Matthew Brookshire Circulation Manager

The Indiana Daily Student publishes Mondays and Thursdays throughout the year while University classes are in session. Part of IU Student Media, the IDS is a self-supporting auxiliary University enterprise. Founded on Feb. 22, 1867, the IDS is chartered by the IU Board of Trustees, with the editor-in-chief as final content authority. The IDS welcomes reader feedback, letters to the editor and online comments. Advertising policies are availale on the current rate card. Readers are entitled to single copies. Taking multiple copies may constitute theft of IU property, subject to prosecution. Paid subscriptions are entered through third-class postage (USPS No. 261960) at Bloomington, IN 47405.

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Matt Rasnic


3

Monday, July 23, 2018 | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

PHOTOS BY MATT BEGALA | IDS

Left Rebecca Black sings her song “Friday” at the Best Buddies Leadership Conference on Friday evening in the IU Auditorium. In addition to Black, the group Larger Than Life also performed at the conference. Right The music group Larger Than Life performs during its set at the Best Buddies Leadership Conference on Friday evening in the IU Auditorium. Larger Than Life, Rebecca Black and singer Kechi Okwuchi were among the evening’s performers.

» DIPLO

Garage Band application on his iPad. From there, he gained recognition after remixing “XE3” by Mssingo. The Block Party is presented by the Union Board, Residential Programs and Services and the Residence Hall Association. The Residence Hall Association and Union Board will also be having a free carnival at 13th Street and Fee Lane, complete with attractions, activity booths, food trucks and more. Students can get their tickets starting at 10 a.m. July 23. The tickets are $35, and are first-come, first-serve.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Diplo will close out the block party, according to the IU Auditorium website. Teenage Wrist, a threeman alternative rock band from Los Angeles, will open the block party. The band’s first album, “Chrome Neon Jesus,” came out this year. The band performed at Emo Nite Day in December 2017. Following Teenage Wrist will be 19-year-old Ethan Snoreck, who performs as Whethan. Whethan’s first experimentations with music were on the

Hannah Reed and Clark Gudas

» POLICE

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 ment, the 32-year-old man went into the bathroom with the woman. According to police, New claimed the woman left the bathroom for a minute and told police the man she was with had touched her inappropriately. Sealy broke down the door and dragged the 32-year-old out of the bathroom and, according to the probable cause affidavits for Sealy and New, began to beat the man up, take his things and throw him out of the hotel room. New and the other men stole the victim’s shirt, Nike Jordan shoes and watch. Later when police were talk-

ing to the woman involved in the case, she said Elsmore had also pointed a silver .25 caliber gun at the victim and threatened to kill him. Sealy and New both confirmed that with police. Bloomington Police Captain Steve Kellams said the victim had bruises on his arms and back, among other injuries. The victim then left to avoid being beaten further. He told police he went to a nearby gas station to clean up, where he ran into more friends and went to another motel where he spent the evening. The victim came back the next day to the Days Inn and told BPD he wanted to check on the female he left the

night before. When he got there he saw the room had been damaged, the TV stolen and everyone was gone. Before calling police he paid off the damages to the room, which amounted to $350. Once he called the police, he explained how he had done drugs and how he had been robbed. He also identified his attackers by name and picked them out of a lineup. Police then located and arrested New on charges of robbery and theft. Police located Sealy on July 18 and Elsmore on July 20 as part of a different call. When police responded to a call about possible drug activity they arrived at the 200 block of South Kimble

Drive to find several people, including Elsmore, in a tan, 2004 Dodge Ram 1500 series truck. When police investigated, they found a syringe, a crystal-like substance and a silver handgun that matched the description of the one used in the Days Inn robbery. Elsmore was arrested on charges of robbery, while those with him — Wilbur Butler, Amy Hackney, 39, and Zoe O’Sullivan, 26, — were arrested on other charges. Elsmore, New and Sealy were all booked into the Monroe County Correctional Center. Cameron Drummond contributed reporting

BASEBALL

IU adds Scott Rolen as director of player development tive Scott Rolen will serve as IU’s director of player development. Rolen played 17 seasons in the MLB, spending time with the Philadelphia Phillies, St. Louis Cardinals, Toronto Blue Jays and Cincinnati Reds before calling it a career. In those 17 seasons,

From IDS reports

On July 11, IU announced three members of new coach Jeff Mercer’s staff, but on July 18, there was another addition to the staff. Long-time MLB third baseman and Indiana na-

Horoscope

Rolen played in seven allstar games and won a World Series with the Cardinals in 2006. He hit over 300 home runs with a career batting average of .281. Rolen was one of the first players in the Indiana Bulls travel ball organization, which has become one of

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Today is a 9 — Relax and enjoy. Spend time with people you love. They keep you humble as your personal star sparkles this month, with the Leo Sun.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Today is an 8 — Get to the heart of the story. Create a persuasive pitch. Team projects get satisfying results this month. The Leo Sun favors public relations.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Today is a 7 — Savor peaceful privacy at home. Create a restorative sanctuary. Meditate on what you want. Create future plans and visions this month, with Sun in Leo.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Today is an 8 — Today and tomorrow get profitable. Discipline with your career provides lucrative benefit this month, with the Sun in Leo. Your influence and status are rising.

BLISS

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — Today is a 9 — You’re especially strong and creative. Plot a trip or academic exploration for this month, with the Sun in Leo. Adventures reveal exciting discoveries. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Today is a 7 — Rest and recuperate through tomorrow. Adjust plans and priorities. Shared accounts rise in value under the Leo Sun this month. Collaborate for mutual benefit.

HARRY BLISS

the more notable programs in the state. After moving on, Rolen would keep his ties to the program, serving as a guest instructor during his playing days. Mercer and IU recruiting coordinator Dan Held also have ties to Indiana Bulls. During Rolen’s time in

the minor leagues, he was teammates with Held for three years, and later, the pair would reunite in St. Louis, where Held served as an assistant bullpen coach during the team’s World Series run. Before his big league career, Rolen was a multi-

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Today is an 8 — Social connections lead to solutions. Develop strategic partnerships this month, with the Leo Sun. Collaboration creates entirely new possibilities. Weave tighter bonds together.

Aries (March 21-April 19) — Today is a 7 — Obstacles materialize between you and your destination. Fun and romance are favored under the Leo Sun this month. You’re on the right path.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) — Today is an 8 — Schedule work carefully. Allow time for transitions. You’re physically energized this month, with the Sun in Leo. Pick up the pace for strength and health.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Today is an 8 — Put up provisions for the future. Family comes first this month, with the Sun in Leo. Avoid distractions and fantasies to focus on practical priorities.

sport star at Jasper High School in Jasper, Indiana. He played tennis for the Wildcats, was the runnerup for Indiana Mr. Basketball in 1993 and was named Indiana Mr. Baseball that same year. Auston Matricardi Gemini (May 21-June 20) — Today is a 7 — Resolve a misunderstanding with your partner. Clarify what’s obscure. Communication comes easily this month under the Leo Sun. Write, record and express. Share possibilities. Cancer (June 21-July 22) — Today is a 7 — Stress takes a toll on your health. Rest and recharge. Your profit potential rises this month, with the Sun in Leo. Pace yourself.

© 2018 By Nancy Black Distributed by Tribune Media Services, INC. All Rights Reserved

Crossword

L.A. Times Daily Crossword

22 26 27 28 29 31 32 33 34 35 36 40 41 46 47 48 49 50 51 53 54 55 56

Publish your comic on this page. The IDS is accepting applications for student comic strips for the fall 2018 semesters. Email five samples and a brief description of your idea to adviser@indiana.edu by August 30. Submissions will be reviewed and selections will be made by the editor-in-chief.

register Starting at Back muscles, briefly Film-rating org. “The Purple People Eater” singer Wooley Brazilian soccer immortal Bloom with edible seeds “Take __ a challenge” One of a D.C. 100 Business maj. USNA part: Abbr. South Carolina athlete Jimmy on sausage labels Howling canines Oklahoma city Jeff of ELO Played a part Plane flier Fed. security Dancer de Mille Pulled tight Bar mitzvah, for one __ Sutra Toy store __ Schwarz

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

su do ku

ACROSS

Difficulty Rating: How to play: Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 grid contains the digits 1 through 9, without repeating a number in any one row, column or 3x3 grid.

Answer to previous puzzle

© Puzzles by Pappocom

1 6 10 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 23 24 25 27 28 30 31 35 37 38 39 42 43 44 45 47 49

Gelatin garnish Bio course components Blue-roofed eatery Fabric At rest Gramma Donald’s second ex Highlands native Tiny fraction of a min. Toasted breakfast breads Pig’s home Small songbirds Apply more lubrication to One-thousandth of a gig Letters indicating a sellout Kissing on a busy ave., say Eggy breakfast dish Lago contents Dutch Golden Age artist Rogues Ham-like breakfast meat Bowling initials USN rank Chaney of old chillers American rival Lord’s partner School support org.

52 Rural cuisine ... and what 20-, 31- and 39- Across are examples of? 56 Duck or goose 57 “It __ over till it’s over”: Berra 58 Eagle claw 59 Non-returnable serves 60 __ Reader 61 Overact 62 Cajun veggie 63 Propped (up), as a golf ball 64 Fills completely

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 21

Pinnacles Journalist’s angle Lover of Bess, in Gershwin “__ never work!” Indian spiced drink Illumination President between Washington and Jefferson Cheese couleur Word before portrait or pity Type of navel Is unprepared Like a landslide win __-12 Conference Records one’s arrival on a

Look for the crossword daily in the comics section of the Indiana Daily Student. Find the solution for the daily crossword here. Answer to previous puzzle


Indiana Daily Student

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15’ Riot Kayak. Good cond., includes lots of amenities. $900. rellenso@indiana.edu

Furniture

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Misc. for Sale 12 pc. dinnerware set w/4 dinner & salad plates, bowls + 12 pc silverware. $15 yafwang@hotmail.com

Phillips 32 inch HD TV with dark wood TV stand. Like new. $100 for both. kaeldrid@indiana.edu

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

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Instruments 5 String Banjo. Excellent cond., comes w/ hard case. $160. mhouston@indiana.edu

Nikon D3100 SLR Camera. Gently used, great cond. $200. samritt@indiana.edu

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Indiana Daily Student

SPORTS

Monday, July 23, 2018 idsnews.com

Editor Murphy Wheeler sports@idsnews.com

5

BASEBALL

IDS FILE PHOTO | IDS

Then-sophomore Aaron Slegers pitches against Valparaiso during a game May 31, 2013, at Bart Kaufman Field. Slegers is currently playing professionally with the Minnesota Twins and the Rochester Red Wings.

Multiple Hoosiers showing promise in pros Auston Matricardi amatrica@iu.edu | a_mat24

With the recent rise of the IU baseball program, there has been an influx of Hoosier alumni playing professional baseball across all levels. From the major leagues to rookie ball, there are former Hoosiers all across the country chasing their professional dreams as the second half of the season gets underway. The highest profile IU alumnus in Major League Baseball is Chicago Cubs outfielder Kyle Schwarber. One of the heroes of the 2016 World Series, Schwarber is having a bounce-back year after an up-and-down campaign last year. The former catcher is hitting nearly .250 this year with 18 home runs and 43 RBIs, putting him on pace to put up career highs in both statistics. He’s also drawn 54 walks on the season. For reference, his career high is 59 walks drawn in 2017. Schwarber has also improved his play in the outfield, where he was once considered a defensive liability. He’s committed just one error in 121 fielding chances this season, compared to the five errors he committed in 153 chances last season. The slugger also competed in the Home Run Derby during MLB’s All-Star festivities, finishing second behind Bryce Harper of the Washington Nationals. Meanwhile, Schwarber’s former IU teammate, Sam Travis, has been trying to break into the MLB this summer. The first baseman has spent most of the season with AAA Pawtucket Red Sox, where he’s hit .236 with six home runs and 22 RBIs, but he played for the Boston Red Sox on July 13, going 1-4 with a double and a walk as Boston’s designated hitter in a loss to the Toronto Blue Jays. That was the fifth time Travis has suited up for the Red Sox in 2018. Overall, the slugger has gone 3-16 with a double, three RBIs and two walks compared to four strikeouts for the big league club. After making his major league debut in 2017, former Hoosier pitcher Aaron Slegers has returned to the Minnesota Twins roster and reached a significant milestone. He performed well for the AAA Rochester Red Wings for much of the first half of the season, in which he pitched to a 5-6 record and a 3.55 ERA with 55 strikeouts in over 83 innings, and got the call to join the Twins on July 4. It was his second call-up on the season. He had previously

PETER STEVENSON | IDS

IU third baseman Micah Johnson hits a double during the Hoosiers' 7-3 win over Taylor University on March 27, 2010, at Sembower Field.

MICHAEL WILLIAMS | IDS

Then-senior Craig Dedelow hits a grand slam against Maryland during the 2017 season. Dedelow has been playing in the Chicago White Sox organization with the single-A Kannapolis Intimidators.

pitched in relief for the Twins in late May before getting sent back down to Rochester. On July 5, Slegers went six innings against the Baltimore Orioles, giving up one run on three hits to earn his first MLB win. After making a second start for the Twins, a loss against the Kansas City Royals, Slegers was put on the 10-day disabled list with shoulder inflammation July 14. He should be activated in the coming days. Another Hoosier on the DL, outfielder Alex Dickerson, has missed all of 2018 with an injury and is expected to miss the rest of the season as well. After undergoing back surgery and missing the entire 2017 season, fans hoped that Dickerson would return to the San Diego Padres this year, but he underwent Tommy John surgery to repair a sprained UCL in his left elbow in March.

These injury issues come after Dickerson played in over half of San Diego’s games in 2016, hitting .257 with 10 home runs and 37 runs batted in. The California native should return to action in the 2019 season. The last IU alumnus to get time in the MLB this season is Josh Phegley of the Oakland Athletics. The catcher has played in 14 games for the A’s this season, going back and forth between Oakland and AAA Sacramento River Cats. During his time in the MLB, Phegley has hit .225 with a pair of homers and three doubles. While playing for the River Cats, Phegley has fared a bit better, hitting .235 with three home runs, six doubles and a trio of triples. He’s also driven in 18 runs for Sacramento. Phegley has dealt with injuries as well, as he hit the disabled list with two broken fingers early in

the season. After bouncing around between a couple of teams on waivers this off-season, former Hoosier Micah Johnson found a home with the Tampa Bay Rays organization. The utilityman has spent the entire season with the AAA Durham Bulls, but hasn’t played since June 15 due to an injury. In 39 games for the Bulls this season, the Indianapolis native has hit .197 with 11 extra base hits and 13 RBI's. Johnson should be returning to action soon for Durham, as he was activated from the disabled list Saturday. Former Hoosier lefthanded pitcher Kyle Hart has faced an up and down season for the AA Portland Sea Dogs in the Boston Red Sox organization. After dominating rookie ball, Aball and high-A over the last two years, posting a sub-2.50

ERA at each level, he hasn’t had the same amount of success in 2018. With Portland, Hart has pitched to a 6-6 record and a 4.37 ERA in 16 starts. In over 90 innings, he’s struck out 62 batters and walked 35. Another former Hoosier that made the jump to AA this season is Cubs organization reliever Scott Effross. As a member of the Tennessee Smokies bullpen this season, Effross has recorded a 2-4 record with a 6.50 ERA in 31 games. In over 45 innings of work, the right-hander has struck out 43 batters, walked 15 and recorded a save. Left-hander Caleb Baragar has bounced around the San Francisco Giants organization this season. After starting the season with the high-A San Jose Giants, Baragar was called up to AAA Sacramento and after a pair of appearances for the River Cats, he was sent back to San Jose before being sent down again, this time to the single-A Augusta Greenjackets. Overall this season, Baragar has pitched to a 1-3 record, recording a 4.87 ERA with 43 strikeouts in over 44 innings. Baragar’s Giants organization compatriot Ryan Halstead has had a strong performance in 2018. Outside of a brief stint with AAA Sacramento, the right-hander has spent the season in AA with the Richmond Flying Squirrels. With Richmond, the California native has worked to a 3-2 record and owns a 1.76 ERA in over 30 innings. He’s struck out 26 batters and walked six. His results during his time in AAA were much worse. In almost four innings for the River Cats he gave up nine runs, five of those earned and struck out four. Another former Hoosier hurler, New York Yankees organization right-hander Christian Morris, started the season with the high-A Tampa Tarpons before being sent to extended spring training on April 28. In June, the 24-year-old was reassigned to the Staten Island Yankees. With Staten Island, Morris has had a good season, he owns a 0-1 record in nine appearances, but has a ERA of 1.13 in 16 innings. He’s struck out 22 batters and walked just two. Following his domination of rookie ball in Great Falls, Montana, last season, Craig Dedelow has moved up a step in the Chicago White Sox organizational ladder. The outfielder has spent the entire season in A-ball with the Kannapolis Intimidators. With Kannapolis, Dedelow is hitting .267 with seven home runs and 53 RBIs. The former ninth-

round pick also has 25 doubles and six triples on the season. Former Hoosier Logan Sowers may be joining Dedelow in Kannapolis before too long. In his first season of professional baseball, he’s putting up some impressive numbers. In 31 games since being drafted in the 28th round, the outfielder has hit .346 with four homers, seven doubles and 19 RBIs. He’s also kept his solid approach at the plate from his senior season with IU, drawing 20 walks to boost his on base percentage to .453. The Lafayette, Indiana, native is also perfect in the field. He’s yet to make an error through 44 fielding chances as a pro. There’s another IU alumnus in Great Falls making a strong pro debut alongside Sowers — right-hander Jonathan Stiever. After electing to leave IU early as a fifthround draft pick, the former Hoosier ace has continued to pitch well. In six starts for the Voyagers, Stiever has yet to earn his first professional win, but he’s struck out 23 batters in 15 innings and recorded an ERA of 2.40. Opponents are hitting just .102 against Stiever and he’s walked just four hitters. Another early departure from IU, third baseman Luke Miller has been playing in rookie ball as well since the draft. In eight appearances for the Philadelphia Phillies' Gulf Coast League affiliate, Miller has hit .276 with a home run and four RBI's. IU’s fourth and final draftee from 2018, Tim Herrin, has had a strong start to his pro career as a reliever. The big lefty didn’t give up a run until his fourth appearance for the Cleveland Indians' Arizona League affiliate and had only given up two earned runs until July 16. In that appearance, Herrin gave up six earned runs in just under two innings, which was enough to balloon his ERA to 6.75. In over 10 innings, Herrin has struck out 12 batters and walked four. Former IU reliever B.J. Sabol’s pro career has started in a similar way to Herrin’s. The lefty has been solid for the Washington Wild Things of the Frontier League, outside of an appearance in which he gave up five runs without recording an out. Those are the only five earned runs the sidewinder has allowed in his independent league career, as in four other appearances, he’s allowed just one unearned run. Overall, Sabol has a 7.10 ERA and has struck out six hitters in just over six innings without recording a decision.


Indiana Daily Student

6

ARTS

Monday, July 23, 2018 idsnews.com

Editors Hannah Reed and Clark Gudas arts@idsnews.com

Tig Notaro, John Popper to play at Buskirk-Chumley from IDS reports

Comedian Tig Notaro and musician John Popper will perform at the BuskirkChumley Theater this fall. Notaro will perform Sept. 19 and Popper will perform Sept. 25. Tickets for both shows will be available 11 a.m. Friday, July 13. Tickets start at $35 for Notaro and $40 for Popper. Both shows start at 8 p.m. A harmonica player, guitarist and vocalist, Popper formed his band, Blues Traveler, with his high school friends in the late 1980s in New York City. Their 1994 release, “Four,” brought them mainstream success. In 1995, Popper won a Grammy Award for Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal for “Run Around.” Popper went on to release a solo album, “Zygote,” in 1999, and has continued to tour with Blues Traveler and as a solo performer. Singer songwriter Katrina Woolverton will open for Popper. She first received attention for her 2011 album, “Blink of an Eye,” which features “Shame on Me,” “OPM” and “So Eden,” all of which appeared on iHeartRadio or

Billboard charts. Woolverton released an EP in 2017 titled “Better Now,” featuring the single “Hold Me Down,” which charted on the Billboard Adult Top 40 at No. 38. Woolverton has participated in tours with singersongwriter Jon McLaughlin and John Rzeznik of the Goo Goo Dolls. A comedian, actor and writer, Notaro will perform the following week. In 2017, Rolling Stone named Notaro one of the 50 best stand-up comics of all time. Her work includes writing, production and acting in the semi-autobiographical Amazon series, “One Mississippi.” Her 2016 HBO special, “Boyish Girl Interrupted,” was nominated for an Emmy and a Grammy Award. She also received GLAAD Media Award nominations for the Netflix original documentary, “Tig,” and her memoir, “I’m Just a Person,” is a New York Times Best Seller. Her other awards include a 2013 and 2016 nomination for Gay and Lesbian Entertainment Critics Association Wilde Artist of the Year. Clark Gudas

PHOTO COURTESY OF TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Creator and IU alumnus Ryan Murphy is nominated in two categories for the 70th Emmy Awards. The awards will take place Sept. 17.

Alumni nominees for Emmys from IDS reports

Producer and director Ryan Murphy, as well as writer and comedian Brian Stack — two IU alumni — were recently announced as nominees for the 70th Emmy Awards. Murphy majored in journalism at IU in the mid1980s, and Stack, a former Indiana Daily Student employee who studied tele-

communications, received his BA in 1986. Stack is nominated for Outstanding Writing for a Variety Series for his work on “The Late Show With Stephen Colbert,” which he has been writing for since 2015, according to an IU press release. Stack, who used to write for Conan O’Brien, has been nominated for an Emmy Award

in writing every year since 1998 and won an Emmy for Outstanding Writing for a Variety, Music or Comedy Program in 2007. Murphy is nominated in two categories — Outstanding Short-Form Nonfiction or Reality Series and Directing for a Limited Series, Movie or Dramatic Special. He has worked many projects, including “The

People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story,” “Glee,” “Nip/Tuck” and “American Horror Story,” according to the press release. The Emmy Awards will air at 8 p.m. Monday, Sept. 17, on NBC. The event will take place in the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles. Hannah Reed

Buskirk-Chumley to present artist Buskirk-Chumley to stage vaudeville Five for Fighting from IDS reports

from IDS reports

Even with a hundred years to live, only one of them will feature John Ondrasik, as Five for Fighting, performing with a string quartet at 8 p.m. Sept. 22 at the Buskirk-Chumley Theater. Tickets start at $30. Five for Fighting is behind the 2001 Grammynominated hit “Superman (It’s Not Easy),” which reached No. 1 on the Billboard Adult Top 40 Chart. The song hit No. 1 the same week his daughter Olivia was born. “Adding more fuel to the emotional fire, the mega-hit served as sort of an unofficial anthem following the 9/11 attacks on American soil,” according to the BCT press release. “Naturally, he performed it at The Concert For New York City.”

He also created the album “Battle for Everything” in 2004, which contains the 2x platinum “100 Years.” “While he doesn’t wear tights and fight crime as his breakthrough track ‘Superman’ suggests, his songs could bring any maniacal villain to their knees (and tears) with his poignantly sharp lyrics that cut deeper than a Ginsu knife,” according to the press release. Ondrasik has sold over 2.5 million albums, and his music has been featured in 350 films, TV shows and advertisements, according to the press release. When not writing music, Ondrasik has been a sports commentator for the Los Angeles Kings hockey team, and has been a guest on ESPN’s SportsCenter. Clark Gudas

The Buskirk-Chumley Theater will return with a vaudeville-style variety show, Va-Va-Va-Vaudeville, on Aug. 18. A matinee for kids will be performed at 2 p.m., and an adult-focused evening show at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $7, and are available through BCT Box Office. “This variety show extravaganza of Bloomington performers harkens back to early twentieth-century vaudeville troupes that crisscrossed the country by train, entertaining young and old alike,” according to the Dance Network Alliance press release. Last year, Va-Va-VaVaudeville featured performers such as comedians, jugglers, acrobatic dancers, magicians and drag queen Argenta Perón. Accompanied by the Stardusters Little Big Band, performers presented their

MARLIE BRUNS | IDS

AsaBela WINGS Aerial Academy’s Isla Burrell Weber, Erica Bexell and Mia Langley perform as “The Turkish Mermaids” in the children’s matinee performance of “Va-Va-Va-Vaudeville.” The performance was Aug. 19 at the Buskirk-Chumley Theater.

acts to ragtime, jazz and big band music. This year will feature acts including unicycling juggler Kai Smith, drag queen Jai-

mee Spangle and burlesque performances by Vanity Peron and Verna Vendetta. In the lobby, attendees will be greeted by Joe Lee’s

Flea Circus and Bloomington’s own Charlie the Parrot. Clark Gudas

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IDS Personalized News Updates

Unitarian Universalist Church of Bloomington 2120 N. Fee Lane 812-332-3695 • www.uubloomington.org www.facebook.com/uubloomington Sundays: 9:15 a.m. & 11:15 a.m. A liberal congregation celebrating community, promoting social justice, and seeking the truth whatever its source. Our vision is Seeking the Spirit, Building Community, Changing the World. A LGBTQ+ Welcoming Congregation and a certified Green Sanctuary. Reverend Mary Ann Macklin, Senior Minister Reverend Scott McNeill, Associate Minister Ann LeDuc, Young Adult/Campus Ministry Coordinator

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Indiana Daily Student

OPINION

Monday, July 23, 2018 idsnews.com

Editor Hannah Reed opinion@idsnews.com

ANSWERS WITH ANNE

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY MADDIE LUCIA | IDS

Unpaid internships are classist Unpaid internships exploit young people trying to get their foot in the door, and are only attainable for those who do not rely on paid work to survive. Anne Anderson is a senior majoring in international law.

For many college students, now is the time at which internships and job experience is crucial to building a decent resume. Unfortunately, with the majority of internships being unpaid, they are virtually unattainable for adolescents who rely on income for food, shelter, transportation — the list goes on. While internships do provide experience that not only can pad a resume but genuinely foster growth of professional skills, not everyone can take “experience” as payment without suffering greatly. Many argue the experience qualifying you as a better job candidate is worth the free labor, but for others, it is not even an option. Unpaid internships favor middle- to upper-class people who can afford to take time that could be spent at a paid job and use it to work for free. While it might

be possible for some, for the rest of young people, there is not enough time to split between a paid job — or two — and class, and an unpaid internship. Internships typically require 10-15 hours a week. However, most internship opportunities have typical business hours that take up most of the day, for example a 9-to-5, and for many that just does not coincide with even the minimum of course hours. This is why so many financially independent students take daytime classes, so they are able to work evening hours at a paid job in order to make rent, buy groceries and pay bills. On top of class schedules potentially ruling out an internship, we need to shift focus back to the biggest deterrent in accepting unpaid internships — the dough. Everyone seems to have an opinion on how to not be poor except for people who have never really been poor. As someone who has a past of financial tur-

moil and depravity, it was impossible for me to accept an unpaid internship. I have been financially independent since I was 16, paying for everything from phone bills, to car insurance, to gas. If it cost money, I was buying it. The worst part is, I was still very fortunate compared to some of my peers. I financially could not afford to trade hours at my paid service job to spend at an unpaid internship — no matter how good the reference would look on my resume. People who are privileged enough to have had unpaid internships often tell people to “save your money” but neglect to realize that saving money when you are living paycheck to paycheck is an oxymoron. The two do not coexist. This is the reality for the majority of college students, and, more importantly, people who will not have a college degree to try and enter a salaried position. At the base level, any form of un-

paid labor is unjust and perpetuates the wealth inequality we see more and more of each day. Unpaid labor is exploitation of people, and lack of compensation for time spent on a job is perhaps one of the most insulting, disrespectful actions that a company can take — especially under the guise of helping build a better resume. For those financially independent people who make it work with a paid job, unpaid internship and full class load, I tip my hat to you. I do not know how you make it work, but that kind of dedication is admirable to say the least. For the people giving unwelcome advice about how unpaid internships are worth it and are available to everyone — take a step back and realize that not everyone has family helping financially and not everyone has the kind of luxury to pick between paid and unpaid work. I have yet to meet a bill collector who takes “valuable field experience” as a valid form of payment.

SIDE WITH SMITH

PHOTO COURTESY OF TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Chicago is set to spark a financial and moral crisis Ethan Smith is a junior in political science and philosophy.

Chicago alderman Ameya Pawar recently introduced a piece of legislation that would make Chicago the largest municipality in the U.S. to test out universal basic income (UBI) with aspirations of solving the poverty crisis in the city. UBI schemes entail giving a standard cash allowance to people, regardless of need, no questions asked. This specific program would henceforth provide 1,000 families with at least $500 per month. The families can do whatever they want with the cash; it is truly the closest one can get to free money. Chicago is home to roughly 2.7 million people, yet somehow giving just 1,000 people a monthly allowance is going to fix the poverty rate. The text of the legislation does not even specify the means by which the city would choose those who will benefit from the program. Chicago is not actually the first

city to experiment with giving people free money. Stockton, California, also recently introduced a similar program in which it will give 100 people $500 per month in order to ensure no one in its city of roughly 300,000 people live in poverty. Even though these programs are primarily funded by private individuals, Chicago is obtaining portions of the money from city funds — tax payers. These programs are inarguably the first signs of an American socialist mindset. Margaret Thatcher once said, “The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people’s money,” and she was absolutely correct. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, government officials took part in a social experiment to see what people would do when promised money, known as the Denver Income Maintenance Experiment (DIME). The primary results of the experiment were that people’s lives were ruined

or made much more difficult after it was all said and done. The government promised families a monthly allowance of taxpayer dollars for the next 20 years. The government ran out of funding before the 20 years was up, and ceased to give the families any more money. During the short time the families were receiving the money, they changed their lives rather dramatically. Some people went back to school, some bought nicer houses and cars, some even had children with the knowledge of financial stability. However, at the same time, some people quit their jobs and lived off of the relatively small amount of money they received from the government. Although this program seemed to benefit some from the start, they all suffered once they ceased to receive any more money. The original purpose of the social experiment was to better understand what people would do with free money, however, the biggest findings were how peo-

ple were affected once withheld the promised money. With a perception of future financial stability, families made radical decisions, did not save money for emergencies and often fell into a deeper level of poverty after the experiment was over. Neither taxpayers nor private companies will be able to permanently fund a free-money welfare system, and similar results from DIME will ensue in places like Chicago. There is a significantly simpler solution to solving poverty crises across the country: jobs. Free money will not supplement a person’s financial or moral wealth. The only way to build dignity and financial stability is through honest, hard work. Chicago and similar cities need to focus on rebuilding their financial and employment infrastructures instead of further diminishing it by essentially writing checks in other people’s names.

7


the care and services you need to stay healthy at idsnews.com/health

Health Spotlight

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The Center for Dental Wellness A privately owned, peopleoriented practice located next to the College Mall. Dr. Davis provides cosmetic, restorative, family and emergency dentistry in a comfortable, relaxed atmosphere with a caring, knowledgeable and experienced staff. We use Cerec technology, allowing us to make restorations in one visit. Dr. Davis is a provider for Invisalign, Zoom! and Under Armour Performance Mouth Guards. Also offering other advanced services. We look forward to getting to know you and take care of you and your entire family with the goal of improving your smile and dental health. Mon. - Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 2909 Buick Cadillac Blvd. 812-339-3427 dentalwellness.com

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Physicians

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Dr. Gregory Velligan, Crystal Lynn, Shanna Yarnell, Krista Sears, Brandi Mosier, Ejay Rippy & Julie Waymire Campus Family Dental is the preferred choice for dental care among many IU students and professors. We will work with your schedule to provide the highest quality of general dentistry services. We pride ourselves in our professionalism and hightech equipment to make your appointments as comfortable and efficient as possible. Enjoy the convenience of walking to our office. We are located near the southeast corner of campus and accept many forms of insurance.

Gentle, effective pain relief helping students reduce back and neck pain, stress, headaches, migraines, carpal tunnel, shoulder pain, nerve pain, whiplash injury, sports injury and TMJ. Our office is well equipped with the most modern equipment and student friendly staff. Special Discounts for IU Students. We accept all insurance plans. Give us a call today!

Tue. - Fri.: 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sat.: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 812-333-2020

HoosierEyeDoctor.com

Ryan D. Tschetter, D.D.S. Jackson Creek Dental is a privately owned dental practice conveniently located on South College Mall Road. Most insurances accepted, including the Indiana University Aetna and Cigna Insurance plans as well as the Aetna Graduate Student plan, and IU Fellowship Anthem. Dr. Tschetter offers state of the art dental technology such as Zoom whitening, same day crown appointments, and Invisalign. Dr. Tschetter also provides restorative, cosmetic and emergency care. We pride ourselves in giving the best care to our patients while offering a pleasant yet professional atmosphere.

• 24-hour Emergency Service (call 812-340-3937)

Dr. Andrew Pitcher Dr. Crystal Gray

Dr. Figen treats patients in a quiet and confidential setting, near campus. She has 40 years experience helping students, using both psychotherapy and medication. She sees people with adjustment problems, family problems, stress, anxiety, panic, depression and eating disorders. At this time Dr. Figen is not treating people with ADD. She does not bill insurance companies, but will give you a receipt which you can send to your insurance company for reimbursement.

Dr. Brandy Deckard, O.D., F.A.A.O. Dr. Derek Bailey, O.D. Precision Eye Group specializes in comprehensive vision health. We offer examinations and treatment for a wide array of eye diseases, conditions, and problems, with advanced diagnostic and vision care technologies. We help our patients achieve and maintain good eye health for life. You can shop our wide variety of designer frames including Ray-Ban, Barton Perreira, Tom Ford, Burberry, Kate Spade and many more! Schedule your appointment now by calling the office or online at our website, and see your world with the best vision possible.

Dr. Mary Ann Bough Office Manager: Mary Baker Chiropractic Assistants: Melinda Chandler, Whitney Scherschel, Denice Stonier, Jennifer Wilson Discover Chiropractic for the entire family! We are a stateof-the-art chiropractic facility using computerized analysis and adjustment techniques. We specialize in gentle “no-TwistTurn” adjusting of infants to seniors! We are close to campus and near major bus routes. New patients are welcome and most insurance plans accepted. Call today and find out how you and your family can stay naturally healthy with chiropractic care. Mon., Wed., Fri.: 8:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. Tue.: 1 - 6 p.m. 3901 Hagan St., Suite C 812-336-7552 Emergency: 812-219-4927 drmaryann.com

Brian Logue, M.D. Eric Smith, M.D. Dave Elkins, P.A.C. Board certified physicians with over 70 years combined experience. Services include: kidney stones, urinary tract infections, urinary incontinence, prostate problems, same day emergency appointments, vasectomy. Mon. - Wed.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Thu.: 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. Fri.: 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. 2907 McIntire Drive 812-332-8765 summiturology.com Or visit us at our other location. Dr. Warren L. Gray 2200 John R. Wooden Drive Suite 207 Martinsville, IN 46151 765-342-8427

Mon. - Fri.: 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sat.: 9 a.m. - noon 322 S. Woodscrest Drive 812-332-2020 precisioneye.com

Timothy J. Devitt, D.M.D.

We provide a full scope of oral surgery procedures in a caring and comfortable manner. Our services include dental implants, IV sedation and wisdom teeth removal. We’re a provider for most insurance plans, including IU and Medicaid. No referral necessary Conveniently located on S. College Mall Road, across from Kroger and Five Guys.

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1116 S. College Mall Rd. 812-332-2204 oralsurgeryofbloomington.com

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Monday, July 23, 2018  

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The Indiana Daily Student is an independent student newspaper covering Indiana University, IU sports and the city of Bloomington, Indiana.