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IDS TUESDAY, APRIL 8, 2014

INDIANA DAILY STUDENT | IDSNEWS.COM

To barracks and back: one student’s struggle, page 7

MARGARET KISPERT | THE DAILY IOWAN

Hoosier first baseman Sam Travis celebrates a home run against Iowa in the first game series at Iowa’s Duane Banks Field Saturday. IU defeated the Hawkeyes 6-3.

Sweeping up

Hoosier bats stay hot, sweep second consecutive conference opponent BY EVAN HOOPFER | ehoopfer@indiana.edu @EvanHoopfer

For the second straight weekend, IU baseball swept a Big Ten foe on the road. Following up the dismantling of Ohio State last weekend, where the Hoosiers outhit the Buckeyes 4219, the Hoosier bats picked up right where they left off against the Hawkeyes. IU (18-10, 8-1) beat Iowa (16-12, 3-6) in the final game of the series 5-3 thanks to a late game rally. “When we got our pitches to hit,” junior catcher Kyle Schwarber said, “we didn’t miss them.” In the first two games against Iowa, IU hit a total of eight home runs and never trailed. The Hoosiers

outscored the Hawkeyes 20-6 in the first two games. The series was moved to a Saturday-Sunday-Monday format because of rain showers on Friday, giving IU the chance to sweep the Hawkeyes on Monday. In game three, IU’s offense was stagnant. Despite a solid combined outing from sophomores Will Coursen-Carr and Evan Bell, who threw a combined seven innings while giving up one run, the Hoosiers trailed Iowa 1-0 heading to the top of the eighth. But the dormant Hoosier bats came alive in the eighth. Junior preseason all-American

Sam Travis recorded an RBI single to score one run, making it a 1-1 affair. After Scott Donley’s sacrifice bunt, Dustin DeMuth stepped up to bat. Iowa elected to intentionally walk DeMuth, and in the process snapped his 16-game hitting streak as the senior went 0-2 on the day with two walks. That left a pivotal opportunity for junior Brad Hartong — bases loaded, one out, tie game in the eighth inning. Hartong, a junior college transfer playing in his first year for the Hoosiers, said he was ready to make a play for this team. In the sixth inning the Hawkeyes had also intentionally

walked DeMuth. Hartong grounded out when the Hawkeyes intentionally walked DeMuth, squandering the potential scoring opportunity. “I knew I just had to get a pitch elevated,” Hartong said. “Hopefully deep enough to get a sac fly or something.” Hartong sharply hit a curveball between the third baseman and the foul line. The stand up double for the Long Beach, Calif., native plated two runs, giving IU the 3-1 lead. IU would score twice more in the frame, pushing the lead to 5-1. SEE BASEBALL, PAGE 6

County treasurer’s credit card expenses prompt court inquiry BY DENNIS BARBOSA dbarbosa@indiana.edu @DennisBarbosa86

The Monroe County Circuit Court is seeking a special prosecutor to look into questionable travel expenses charged to Catherine the county by Trea- Smith surer Catherine Smith. Smith is currently running for the office of Monroe County sheriff. The Monroe County Auditor notified the commissioner’s office of reimbursement claims that were a cause for concern, Chalfant said, for trips made to Indianapolis by Smith and Treasurer Chief Deputy Hans Huffman. Smith submitted a reimbursement claim of $414.19 for hotel and meal expenses in Indianapolis for an Association of Indiana Counties conference Feb. 4 and 5 that was cancelled the day before it was slated to take place. “As per personnel policy, all employees who are seeking reimbursement must strive to incur the lowest possible amount of expense,” Chalfant said. The Monroe County Prosecutor’s Office requested a special prosecutor as soon as it was notified about Smith’s reimbursement claims, Monroe County Chief Deputy Prosecutor Bob Miller said, citing Smith’s candidacy for sheriff, status as an elected public official and affiliation with the Democratic Party, which is the same as the elected prosecuting attorney. Smith also requested reimbursement for the AIC conference, which was rescheduled for SEE CHARGES, PAGE 6

Where did the money go? Monroe County Treasurer Cathy Smith spent money on a county credit card at the Association of Indiana Counties — 2014 Legislative Conference in February. The Board of Commissioners spoke with the AIC and learned that Smith had not actually registered for the conference, making the charges Smith made on the county card illegitimate. Here is a breakdown of Smith’s questionable travel expenses.

ADAM KIEFER | IDS

Ben Tamir Rothenberger is a participant in the IU Campus MovieFest. He created an infomercial for musical toilet paper called “SheetWOW.”

Student films travel to Cannes festival BY ALISON GRAHAM akgraham@indiana.edu @AlisonGraham218

$408 HOTEL STAYS

$222.40 MEALS $32.70 CHEESECAKE

$22 PARKING

$12.81 STARBUCKS GRAPHIC BY MADISON BORGMANN SOURCE MONROE COUNTY BOARD COMMISSIONERS

For 144 hours, student filmmakers shoot and edit their videos, ones they have been preparing for months, writing scripts and working with actors and musicians. Students are given six days to complete a five-minute video for the IU Campus MovieFest competition every spring. These 144 hours are the only time the students can work on filming or editing for the competition. IU student filmmaker Chandler Swan and his partner Brendan Elmore took turns sleeping on a makeshift bed of three chairs in Wells Library while the two edited their video for last year’s competition. Their movie, “Under Euclid’s Watch,” is a drama about a young prodigy who is on the verge of a mathematical discovery. In the same library where the drama was being edited, IU student Ben Tamir Rothenberger was creating a very different production — an infomercial for musical

“I showed it to my grandma and she said, ‘Ben, I love you, but you’re not winning anything there.’” Ben Tamir Rothenberger, IU student

toilet paper called “SheetWOW.” Little did these filmmakers know, the two movies would both be selected for a screening at the Cannes Film Festival in France this summer. At the film showing for Campus MovieFest a few days after the videographers finished editing, “Under Euclid’s Watch” won Best Picture and Best Cinematography. “SheetWow” won Best Comedy. Four films from each campus are selected to be shown in Hollywood after every competition. Because of their awards, Rothenberger, Swan and Elmore traveled to California for the screening. It was here that Swan and Elmore met Rothenberger. The three were recentSEE CANNES, PAGE 6


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CAMPUS

Little 500 step show has been canceled This year’s Little 500 Step Show has been canceled. Juan Jose Jaramillo, the Union Board Campus Unity director, said the cancellation was due to a lack of interest by teams and

EDITORS: ASHLEY JENKINS & ANICKA SLACHTA | CAMPUS@IDSNEWS.COM

lack of funds. Jaramillo said they are looking to have the show on a smaller scale next semester, but Union Board will not be involved in the planning.

Quidditch named new Rec Sports intramural sport BY SUZANNE GROSSMAN spgrossm@indiana.edu @suzannepaige6

PHOTO BY ADAM KIEFER | IDS

IU Fulbright Professor and former Hungarian Chair Laslo Borhi speaks about the collapse of the Hungarian single-party system during his lecture Monday at the Indiana Memorial Union.

Borhi talks socialist control IU Professor chronicles the evolution of the Eastern European life throughout the fall of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War BY ALLISON WAGNER allmwagn@indiana.edu @allmwagn

The people of Hungary have always been taught they belong to a country that does not fear rebellion. That’s according to Laslo Borhi, IU Fulbright Professor and former Hungarian Chair, who spoke at the Indiana Memorial Union Monday. His lecture, “1989 in Hungary: The Hidden Threads of History,” was the fourth in a series of lectures held by the Hungarian Culture Association. In it, Borhi discussed the events that led to the collapse of the Hungarian single-party system. ”In fact, someone once said, ‘If you want to destroy NATO, bring the Hungarians in,’” he said. In 1989, as the single party system controlled by the Hungarian Socialist Workers’ Party collapsed, this concept became reality. The dissolving of the single-party system led to the liberation of Eastern European countries and

catapulted the collapse of the Soviet Union, which happened in 1991. “The events in Eastern Europe changed the environment in which the Soviet Union operated and assured peaceful change in the Soviet Union was indeed possible,” Borhi said. The Hungarian Socialist Workers’ Party’s domination in Hungary started to decline when the country’s economy entered a bad state, he said. “In 1989, as the comrades discovered the deficit was so huge, they feared in a few years it would become unserviceable and the country would become bankrupt,” Borhi said. While the country’s unrest grew and the power of the communist party was questioned, Borhi said the party recognized their domination could not last forever. Hungary has always feared national death, he said. “In February 1989, the communist party officially agreed to end its constitutional right to being the only party in Hungary,” he

IU School of Ed grads are ranked highly statewide FROM IDS REPORTS

The results of Indiana teacher evaluations were released Monday, and IU graduates ranked high, according to an IU press release. This is the first study of its kind the Indiana Department of Education has done and the data they used was from a survey of teachers in their first three years of classroom teaching. “These results clearly show that new teachers and university-based teacher preparation programs in the state are performing exceedingly well,” Dean of the School of Education, Gerardo Gonzalez, said in the release. “They also confirm our own internal studies about the preparation and effectiveness of Indiana University School of Education graduates.” Out of the 281 graduates from IU Bloomington School of Education, 97 percent were rated as “effective” or “highly effective” as teachers. Ninety-seven percent of 237 graduates of IU-Purdue University Indianapolis School of Education were rated “highly effective” or “effective,” according to the release. “The statewide teacher evaluation data also showed

a correlation between teacher effectiveness and experience,” Gonzalez said in the release. “The group of teachers with three years of experience had a larger proportion of highly effective teachers than the group of teachers with two years of experience, which had a larger proportion than the group with one year of experience.” Gonzalez suggested the data be looked at carefully to see if recent teacher evaluation policies that discourage giving credit for experience in determination of the salary should be revised. The evaluation provided more evidence the School of Education doesn’t need to lower its standards of preparation in order to attract effective teachers to the profession. “Put simply, these data do not align with critics of teacher preparation who have been saying that the system is broken,” he said in the release. “We need to celebrate these results and stop creating a crisis that’s discouraging young, bright students like these teachers in Indiana from choosing teaching as a profession.”

said. He said the Hungarian Socialist Workers’ Party gave up power, still believing it would win every election, and the other parties would support them. It said it would negotiate the removal of Soviet Union troops in Hungary. And it believed the removal of troops would possibly dissolve the Warsaw Pact. Following the lead of the Hungarian nation, Eastern Europe began to call for change to the communist regime, as well, Borhi said. “The collapse of the Soviet Union did not happen in and of itself,” he said. The Soviet Union’s loss of Eastern Europe, he said, shaped the unwinding Cold War. “It was the single party system that had to be dismantled first,” he said. Borhi said it wouldn’t be enough for the Soviet Union to lose Eastern Europe and pull out its troops. The Warsaw Pact would have to dissolve, as well. “In a nutshell, there was no big bang,” Borhi said. “There was no Soviet-American agreement for the

“The collapse of the Soviet Union did not happen in and of itself ... it was the single party system that had to be dismantled first.” Laslo Borhi, IU Fulbright Professor and former Hungarian Chair

liberation of Eastern Europe.” Eventually, the Soviet Union would fall, as would the Warsaw Pact, but Borhi said the world must understand the importance of dissolving of the Warsaw Pact. As Vladimir Putin’s power in Russia increases, he said the effects of the end of the Soviet Union’s control of Eastern Europe and dissolving of the Warsaw Pact are increasingly pertinent. “If the Warsaw pact still existed, Putin would be in the position to undo everything that happened prior to 1991,” Borhi said.

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VERSACE VARILUX CRIZAL LACOSTE MODO DKNY

NIKE OAKLEY RAY BAN ESPIRIT ELLE POLO

VERA BRADLEY RANDY JACKSON GIORGIO ARMANI EMPORIO ARMANI RALPH LAUREN BANANA REPUBLIC

PRADA DOLCE NAUTICA CHANEL TIFFANY GUESS

CORRECTIONS There were two errors in Monday’s IDS. Phi Delta Theta rider Ryan Romenesko finished fifth in the men’s Individual Time Trials. Kappa Alpha Theta rider Brenna McGinn finished fifth in the women’s ITTs. The IDS regrets the errors. There were there were three errors in Friday’s IDS. Rachel Tolen was awarded the Terri Nation Outstanding Advisor Award, and is a professional staff member. Elizabeth Guertin is with the Office of the Vice Parovost for Undergraduate Education. The IDS regrets the errors.

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TED BAKER SEAN JOHN CALVIN KLEIN BABY PHAT SILHOUETTE JIMMY CHOO

Quidditch teams will storm Dunn Meadow with their brooms Saturday for the firstever Campus Recreational Sports quidditch tournament. After a year of deliberation CRS decided to make quidditch, a sport adapted from the Harry Potter books and films, into an official intramural sport. “Every year all our team members and student leaders give consideration to information from surveys, focus groups and participant feedback to help find what activities students would enjoy having on the calendar,” CRS Director, Kathy Bayless, said. “One of the ideas, about a year ago, was quidditch.” Ever since the Harry Potter films premiered, there has been an interest in the game, which has spawned the International Quidditch Association, Bayless said. The IQA has a governing board with rules, regulations, competitions and clinics, causing teams to sprout up across the country. “It’s novel,” Bayless said. Since quidditch is a relatively new sport on college campuses, Bayless said she hopes it will attract more students. “It’s non-traditional in that there aren’t a lot of traditions around it yet to frame peoples’ understanding about skill level,” Bayless said. “It’s very accessible in peoples’ thinking whereas football or basketball, the media images sometimes make it difficult to feel like you belong.” As an intramural sport, quidditch will start with one

tournament to determine how much student interest there is, CRS assistant director and quidditch tournament organizer, Satoshi Kido, said. The tournament will occur at the Woodlawn fields, with the first game starting Saturday at 2:15 p.m. The teams will be put into a pool and play a couple of different teams, then break into single elimination, Kido said. Today is the final day for teams to register. So far, Kido estimates six or seven teams have already signed up. The Midnight Snipes Quidditch team is currently a student life and learning club and was founded in 2011. Bayless said they have been a huge help in determining rules and regulations for CRS to use in the tournament. “Rec Sports asked us for help putting the tournament on,” Co-President of the Midnight Snipes, Caroline Alexander, said. “It’s not so much our club is becoming an intramural as it is we are helping adapt the rules for intramurals.” Alexander said the team isn’t afraid the sport becoming intramural will diminish the Midnight Snipes club. “I think it’s a great opportunity for us because not many people know about us,” Alexander said. “People are starting to realize we’re a presence on campus, and Rec Sports is giving us a chance to market out team. I think it’ll bring in more people, so I’m pretty excited about it.” “I hope people can realize it’s a legitimate sport,” Alexander said. “We play a combination of rugby, basketball and soccer, so it’s pretty intense. I think if we get anything from this, it’s that people would realize that more.”

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For more info, see www.indiana.edu/~frithome or email Karolina Serafin at kserafin@indiana.edu.

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IUSA travels to D.C. BY DANI CASTONZO dcastonz@indiana.edu

The IU Student Association executives will meet with all the Indiana representatives and senators in Washington, D.C., today to discuss issues affecting higher education in Indiana. The executives will join representatives from Purdue’s student government to discuss issues such as sexual assault, college affordability, textbooks and undocumented college students. “We’re able to give feedback to representatives from government agencies and our respective states on what’s going on from

our perspectives in higher education, so they can hear it from the students themselves,” Kauffman said. They will meet these representatives as a part of the Association of Big Ten Student’s annual trip to Washington, D.C. This event allows representatives from Big Ten student governments to talk to representatives from their respective states about important issues in higher education. Big Ten student governments went to the White House Monday for a briefing from representatives from the president’s office to gain the perspective on what is happening in higher education.

Later, they met with the IU Head of Federal Relations and a representative from the Department of Education for meetings that centered around changes in the Department of Education and college affordability. Kauffman said this meeting of student government and national government is a powerful tool in getting student voices heard, from the campus level to a national level. “These concerns are not just unique to IU students,” Kauffman said. “The collective voice of student governments coming together at a place like Capital Hill can be really effective.”

PHOTOS BY MATAILONG DU | IDS

THE ART OF YOGA

Participants stand in the warrior pose during the IU Art of Living group yoga lesson at the Indiana Memorial Union on Monday.

Entrepreneurial project stems from GLOWFest BY GRACE PALMIERI gpalmier@indiana.edu Grace_Palmieri

With shows like “Shark Tank” and movies like “The Social Network” released in the late 2000s, young entrepreneurs across the country were inspired to make their ideas a reality. Deuce Thevenow and Jack Shannon, former IU students from the Kelley School of Business, saw the emergence of entrepreneurship among college students and wanted to help. The two created RECESS, a touring college music festival that includes performances, a speaker series and interactive networking opportunities. “The whole point of it is that we’re bringing all these companies to campus essentially to promote entrepreneurship, to get students excited about potentially going to work for a start-up or being an intern,” Shannon said. “In general we’re just trying to make students more aware of all these cool opportunities to work at these really exciting young companies.” RECESS came to IU for an all-day event Monday. The idea for RECESS stemmed from Thevenow and Shannon’s first startup, GLOWfest, which began four years ago. GLOWfest was started at IU, but eventually brought artists like Avicii, Pretty Lights and Deadmau5 to colleges across the country. Thevenow said though they loved what they were doing, it was missing a purpose. “We were noticing that entrepreneurship on campus was exploding,” he said.

“So we were like, ‘OK let’s take GLOWFest, the musical component, and put a positive message on it and figure out how to help these kids launch a business.’” RECESS was launched last year with a number of smaller events, but this is a part of their first real tour. About 200 students signed up to attend, and walk-ins were also accepted. RECESS’ visit to IU Monday was the second stop on a cross-country tour of seven campuses. It was a fourpart event including interactive networking, a speaker series, pitch competition and concert. Jake Udell, the manager of Krewella, and Tony Conrad, the Founder and CEO of About.me were among the speakers. Shannon said he and Thevenow wanted to base the speaker series off of TED Talks. “We wanted to take that general concept of 10-minute-long speakers sharing their experience and their story but make it relatable to college students and actually give practical advice,” he said. RECESS was put on with the help of Union Board. Brett Bassock, UB Live Entertainment Director, said he didn’t have to think twice about bringing the event to IU. “Deuce came to me asking for Union Board to be involved and explained to me the concept,” he said. “I immediately thought it was an incredible idea what they were trying to do. I love their vision. I love their mission.” Before a Paper Diamond concert at the Bluebird Monday night, the day ended with a pitch competition

where students with startups could pitch their ideas to a panel of judges. Five businesses were chosen by Shannon and Thevenow from around 30 online submissions. Those students were given five minutes to pitch their business and then had five minutes of Q&A. Haley Gedek and Max Birckman, founders of Clean Slate, won the pitch competition. Clean Slate is a cheating prevention tool with specially made scantron sheets that are unreadable from either side. The two will be one of 10 chosen businesses to travel to Las Vegas to compete in the final competition. “This is unbelievable, just the experience of being able to go pitch to investors, go to Las Vegas and be able to get some funding from that,” Gedek said. “This could really change the course of our product right now and allow us to do something we obviously wouldn’t have been able to do without it.” Although there is no cash prize for the overall winner, the final competition provides an opportunity for Gedek and Birckman, as well as the other finalists, to network with entrepreneurs from around the world. Shannon said ultimately he’s glad that, after years of building their company, they could finally give back — especially to IU. “For us, we loved the concert element of it, but this is the stuff that will have an impact and will actually change students’ lives potentially, for the better,” he said. “That’s the stuff that we’re the most excited about.”

IU Art of Living Group Yoga Instructor Amy Lifton gives a yoga lesson at the Indiana Memorial Union on Monday.

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REGION EDITORS: REBECCA KIMBERLY & MARY KATHERINE WILDEMAN REGION@IDSNEWS.COM

S.R. 37 to have one northbound lane Wed. The Indiana Department of Transportation will close the northbound right lane of State Road 37 at the Walnut Street ramp construction site 7 p.m. Wednesday evening, according to a press release from the Indiana Department of

IDOE releases teacher grades for 2012-2013

State sets new recycling goal BY MICHAEL AUSLEN mauslen@indiana.edu @MichaelAuslen

Indiana has set a goal to recycle half of all municipal waste. There is no deadline, and no one’s quite sure how far along the state is already, but legislation passed and signed this session seeks to make the 50-percent goal a reality. “The legislature agreed that Indiana should strive to achieve 50 percent, which many others states have set a goal at,” said Carey Hamilton, executive director of Indiana Recycling Coalition. “We do have a lot of work to do. We’ve got to make recycling more convenient to all Hoosiers.” Indiana Recycling Coalition has been pushing the legislature for a 50-percent goal over the course of the past few years. The group was founded in 1989 as a lobbying and education group for issues regarding recycling and waste reduction. The goal itself was chosen because other states

had already identified it and because the coalition and other supporters saw it as a way to strive for more recycling in Indiana, Hamilton said. Although the coalition has been pushing for the goal for some time, at this session it gained traction. The bill passed both houses unanimously and was signed into law by Gov. Mike Pence on March 25. State Sen. Mark Stoops, D-Bloomington, was one of the bill’s sponsors. He identified it as one of his priorities at the beginning of the legislative session. “Indiana doesn’t do a very good job at turning a lot of recyclables into markets that could recycle them,” Stoops said in January. “This is something that could create a number of jobs in Indiana.” Moving forward, the legislature is tasked with putting together a study committee to set out a plan, according to the legislation. This could include a number of policy initiatives geared toward increasing recycling in the state,

FROM IDS REPORTS

IDS FILE PHOTO

The Downtown Bloomington Recycling Center’s hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. It is recommended that recyclers divide their waste into paper, cardboard, glass and plastic before driving to the Center. Center. IU is ranked 45th in sustainability among colleges worldwide.

Hamilton said. One of the biggest obstacles, though, is that no one is sure how much recycling is happening now. Hamilton said the coalition estimates about 20 to 25 percent of the state’s municipal waste is being recycled. “We don’t really know because we haven’t required reporting from all sectors that recycle,” she

said. But the new law does require this reporting, so the state can gain a better understanding of the current state of waste reduction. “Where we are today, we know that’s going to take some work,” Hamilton said. “We know we’re not close to 50.”

High schoolers to train in Krav Maga BY BRIAN SEYMOUR briseymo@indiana.edu

The senior class of Edgemont Junior-Senior High School will be taught the Israeli self-defense art of Krav Maga. The school is the former high school of Lauren Spierer, an IU student who went missing almost three years ago. The program is largely in thanks to Julia Haber, a senior at the high school. Last year she won Andy Grammer’s “Miss Me” Lip Sync/Lyric Video Contest in which she had to submit a video of herself lip syncing the popular song. The contest also called for video promotion and the video

with the most popular views on YouTube would win. The prize for winning was a concert by Andy Grammer in Haber’s hometown. The concert turned into a fundraiser, with proceeds going to the Find Lauren Fund. Charlene Spierer, Lauren’s mother, asked that the money go to Lauren’s high school instead, under the stipulation that the money go towards a program in her honor. “I think that the biggest thing is awareness,” Charlene Spierer said. “The more young people are aware of making right choices, and being careful and trying to support their friends, the better off everyone will be.”

The self-defense classes will be taught by Steve Sohn’s Krav Maga Worldwide Training Center. Though the students will be learning martial arts, the goal is not to make them martial artists, Sohn said. The goal is to make the students more aware of the dangers around them, he said. The idea behind the training is to apply handson learning as opposed to just verbal education. “It’s kind of like driving a car in the snow,” he said. “If you’ve had some practice driving in the snow and skidding, when it really does happen to you, then you have an idea of what to do.” The lessons will

expand beyond the scope of violence. The students will tackle a variety of situations including going out with friends and drinkingalcohol. “Teenagers are always experimenting,” Sohn said. “You don’t want to leave your drink alone. Somebody could put something in it.” Though violence does occur today, it is not as prevalent as it was in previous generations. According to the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report, violent crimes have been steadily declining since 1993. “It could be very dangerous out there today,” he said. “It’s just that it’s hidden.”

Pickup truck crashes into house FROM IDS REPORTS

A Bloomington man crashed his pickup truck into a house Sunday while speeding on State Road 48. Nicholas Sexton, 29, lost control of his truck at the S.R. 48 and Kirby Road intersection, careening off the road and into a house on the 100-block of South Kirby Road, according to an Indiana State Police press release. No one was home when

The Indiana Department of Education released the results of the 2012-2013 new teacher evaluations yesterday. The 2012-2013 school year was the first time this new model was implemented, which rates teachers at four levels: highly effective, effective, improvement necessary and ineffective. According to an Indiana State Teacher’s Association press release, more than 87 percent of teachers in Indiana received a rating of highly effective or effective. There is no information listed for the Monroe County Community School Corporation. MCCSC has 839 teachers listed as employed, but no schools reported to the IDOE. State law states “each school corporation shall provide the disaggregated results of staff performance evaluations.” MCCSC was one of six school corporations in Indiana that failed to report for the 2012-2013 academic year. There are 318 school corporations in Indiana. Information about MCCSC teachers is not currently available. Beverly Smith, director of school and community services, said the new teacher evaluation model coincides with collective bargaining agreements within corporations. Collective bargaining agreements are negotiations between an employer and a group of employees to decide on the conditions of employment. The MCCSC agreement with teachers remains in effect through 2015, when it expires and

the new evaluation model will become relevant to MCCSC teachers, Smith said. According to an IDOE press release, only three percent of teachers were ranked as “needs improvement” or “ineffective.” “Hopefully these results show what we have known to be true for some time,” ISTA President Teresa Meredith said in a press release. “For the most part our teachers are doing a superior job in Indiana schools. Now educators can stop holding their breath and take a look at the results themselves.” Indiana Superintendent of Public Instruction Glenda Ritz also said in the press release that the results show success in Indiana schools. “I am encouraged by these numbers,” Ritz said in an IDOE press release. “For the most part, they confirm what we already knew: that public schools throughout Indiana are filled with effective and highly effective teachers.” Ritz said the evaluation also shows where Indiana can make improvements. She said there is disparity between low and high-performing schools. Thirty-two percent of teachers in “A” schools were rated highly effective, while 11 percent of teachers in “F” schools were rated as highly effective. The Monroe County Community School Corporation received an “A” rating for the 2012-2013 school year. “Highly effective educators are vital to school turnaround and my department will be working to address this gap moving forward,” Ritz said in the IDOE release. Sydney Murray

Teachers evaluated by IDOE School corporations that received higher grades overall from the Department of Education had a higher percentage of teachers graded as highly effective. Corporations with lower grades had slightly greater numbers of teachers Highly effective Ineffective graded as ineffective.

A

Sexton crashed into the house. He was taken to IUHealth Bloomington Hospital for minor injuries. The hospital had no information about Sexton’s status as of Monday, which means he has been released or chose to keep his information private. Police cited Sexton for speeding too fast to avoid a collision, according to the release. Dennis Barbosa

Transportation. Traffic will be restricted to a single lane through the construction zone overnight and is expected to resume normal operations by 6 a.m. Thursday.

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COURTESY PHOTO A pickup truck crashed into a house on the 100-block of South Kirby Road. The driver was taken to the hospital.

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I N D I A N A D A I LY S T U D E N T | T U E S D AY, A P R I L 8 , 2 0 1 4 | I D S N E W S . C O M

OPINION

EDITORS: CONNOR RILEY & EDUARDO SALAS | OPINION@IDSNEWS.COM

Supreme Court declines to hear anti-gay case The U.S. Supreme Court rejected an appeal by a New Mexico photographer who refused to photograph a same-sex ceremony in 2006. New Mexico’s Supreme Court found Elane Photography’s refusal in violation of state

anti-discrimination laws. Had the Supreme Court decided to take the case and sided with Elane, existing antidiscrimination laws would have been made vulnerable and wide open for challenge.

EDDIE’S INDIANA

EDITORIAL BOARD

RILED UP

The rise of Normcore

A new day for IUSA

Safe sex in the media

EDUARDO SALAS is a junior majoring in public management.

Hipster subculture is mainstream. From skinny jeans, ironic glasses, pictures of space nebulas and a signature disdain for, ironically, the mainstream, hipsters have become cliché. But what’s often overlooked when discussing the rise of hipsterdom is it can be attributed to newfound complexities of growing up in the information age. Having access to the Internet and social media opened our eyes to the fact that our likes are dictated for us by the market, celebrities or some other higher cultural entity we were previously oblivious to. So when the Internet allowed us to connect and see just how similar we were with others everywhere, we created a deep craving for individuality that was filled by a subculture obsessed with individuality at all costs — hipsters. My freshman year I lived in the Collins LivingLearning Center. It was a campus Mecca for individualists and hipsters alike. But as Collins showed me, when everyone tries to be different, everyone starts becoming the same. It is here that “Normcore”— the heir apparent to the hipster movement — comes into play. In February, New York Magazine hit the nail on the head in a piece analyzing the trend titled, “Normcore: Fashion for Those Who Realize They’re One in 7 Billion.” The piece goes on to describe not just the fashion, but the attitude of the new trend. Where it was once empirical to strive for authenticity and individuality, as our hipster forefathers did circa the turn of the decade, normcore runs on the idea that deliberately embracing sameness is the new cool. The difference between this and past trends, however, is the desire for sameness stems not from wanting to fit in, but from a cynical self-awareness that genuine individuality is impossible in the digital age. This sort of exhaustion with trying to be different has even bled into high fashion. In March, Chanel’s Karl Lagerfeld turned the usual catwalk into a fully stocked, ultra-luxury supermarket where he paraded Chanel’s 2014 fall/ winter collection, shopping carts and all. Thus, the normcore attitude translates into meticulously ordinary fashion — plain T-shirts, non-descriptive fleece, comfortable sneakers, turtlenecks, stonewash jeans and Birkenstocks — that has crossed the threshold from tacky to cool in normcore street style. Though it might be another instance of fashion turning things we hated into things we now love, the larger implication that is driving the rise of this trend says more about us than the clothes themselves. Growing up with the Internet will be a defining part of our generation. It has made us more selfaware, understanding of difference and more cognizant of our own place in society. Normcore, for better or worse, is a reflection of all of that. edsalas@indiana.edu

JORDAN RILEY is a sophomore majoring in comparative lit.

THE EMERALD CITY OF EFFECTIVE POLITICS

ILLUSTRATION BY CONNOR RILEY | IDS

WE SAY: The incoming administration shows legitimate promise. The Editorial Board likes to keep actors both on and off our campus accountable, which is why we’ve hit hard on the responsiveness of our student government this semester. The administration of Jose Mitjavila, the IUSA President for 2013-14, has repeatedly disappointed students. The outgoing administration has few significant accomplishments to show, despite their somewhat self-congratulatory tone at the conclusion of last year’s election. We’ve seen Mitjavila push for what we’ve lovingly dubbed an Applebee’s (it’s not an actual Applebee’s) in the Indiana Memorial Union and lobby for Lifeline Law amendments similar to those from Hoosiers 4 Solutions, one of the tickets that opposed Mitjavila in the 2013 IUSA election. The announcement that Plus for IUSA was running unopposed all but eliminated any hope we had for our

student government. Plus went on to win the executive ticket, as well as every congressional seat for which they put up candidates. The Editorial Board, however, has seen evidence to suggest that the incoming administration might actually bring the change we’ve been waiting for. On March 30, IUSA voted to make elections more equitable and less biased. The resolution moves the Election Commission from the executive branch to the judicial branch, which houses the IUSA Supreme Court. The student body president appoints the supreme court justices as spots open up, and justices serve a term for the entirety of their time at IU. The polling stations are also no longer going to be staffed by members of the individual campaigns, but rather by members of the Election Commission. In addition, members campaigning for

tickets must stand 300 feet away from polling locations. Students will start being alerted when voting is open via a campus-wide email, and the next year’s election dates will be set at the end of the prior administration. The Editorial Board sincerely applauds and approves of these changes by IUSA, which passed these changes with only one member voting against them. It’s a huge step forward. In the past, IUSA has been plagued by what could be considered nepotism and inside knowledge. For the past three years, IUSA administrations have consisted mainly of recycled, handpicked members of the previous administration. With their experience in the previous administration, these tickets have prior knowledge as to how to run an IUSA campaign and when election dates will be set. And while we can’t fix the nepotism that results in

handpicked administrations, the step towards giving all tickets equal notice to the election dates is a great one. This year, Unify IU, the ticket that was originally slotted to run against Plus, dropped out of the race because they felt Plus had more time to prepare. We have struggled over the past year with our trust in IUSA and then our trust of Plus. However, Plus has been receptive and clearly supportive of these election reforms, for which this Board has been advocating for years. While the elections process is still not perfect and IUSA still needs improvements, this is a step in the right direction. IUSA is moving towards becoming a legitimate student government once again, and we applaud this transition and those who support it. Opinion@idsnews.com @IDS_Opinion

THE JW FOSTER CHILD

Apple’s imitators Whoever said imitation is the highest form of flattery must have worked for Apple. The release of Amazon’s Fire TV is just another example of an original Apple concept that has been ripped off. It has been slightly redesigned and advertised in an attempt for other companies to be competitive. There will be competition in any industry. Apple products wouldn’t be as revolutionary without the motivational drive of competitive performance. However, companies such as Samsung, Amazon and Microsoft wait for Apple to create a new product,

then they imitate it as closely as possible and sell it under some sort of advertisement heading like low cost or a newer version. Whether or not it works, I can’t understand the strategy these companies are OK with using. Yeah, it’s about making money, but when companies are using their competitor’s ideas, I wouldn’t be satisfied with the apathetic creativity and mediocrity. My problem doesn’t lie with Amazon creating a competitive spin off a product that’s popular with consumers. That’s just the nature of the market.

I just don’t understand how or why Amazon would design the device to look identical to Apple’s. With the exception of size, the products are exact down to the color, shape and home screen. Even the little remote control is similar. As a consumer, there is no chance I would buy a spin-off Apple product if it looks exactly the same. Steve Jobs created Apple by imitating an already created product, true enough. However, what Jobs did differently, and what still sets Apple apart from the competitors, are creative elements and designs each

CLAIARE MCELWAIN is a freshman majoring in journalism.

Apple model applies and defies. After copying most of Apple’s original ideas and selling them for profit, it seems Microsoft, Samsung and Amazon are OK with the fact that it’s Apple’s technological world, and they’re just living in it. cnmcelwa@indiana.edu @clairemc_IDS

LETTER TO THE EDITOR POLICY The IDS encourages and accepts letters to be printed daily from IU students, faculty and staff and the public. Letters should not exceed 350 words and may be edited for length and style. Submissions must include the person’s name, address and telephone number for verification.

Letters without those requirements will not be considered for publication. Letters can be mailed or dropped off at the IDS, 120 Ernie Pyle Hall, 940 E. Seventh St., Bloomington, Ind., 47405. Submissions can also be sent via e-mail to letters@idsnews. com. Questions can be directed to the IDS at 855-0760.

Indiana Daily Student, Est. 1867 Website: idsnews.com

The opinions expressed by the editorial board do not necessarily represent the opinions of the IDS news staff, student body, faculty or staff members or the Board of Trustees. The editorial board comprises columnists contributing to the Opinion page and the Opinion editors.

Media can be a mirror for reality. People take what they see and apply it to their lives. It’s where behavioral norms in our culture are established, but that isn’t always a good thing. The casual and unsafe depictions of sex in most media could have realworld consequences. In the real world, there has been more talk about what constitutes an appropriate sexual encounter — including consent and protection. The importance of both should be obvious. Obtaining consent before entering into a sexual encounter with someone is paramount. Explicitly knowing the comfort level of everyone involved relieves any possibility of accidentally crossing boundaries. Listening to your partner’s wants and feelings about the situation is the only way to be respectful and appropriate in vulnerable situations. As for being safe and healthy in these situations, protection is important as well. Sexually transmitted infections are a scary and growing problem among college students. One in every four college students has an STI, while only 54 percent of students use condoms regularly. The lack of media representation of healthy sexual practices can lead people to believe that asking for consent or protection is not sexy. It perpetuates the myth that they ruin the romantic mood portrayed on screen in Hollywood films or TV shows. People look to these media outlets as an escape, and it’s unfair to assume people can’t separate what’s on screen from what needs to be done in real life. But it is also naïve to assume what happens on screen doesn’t affect how people see the world around them. People look toward these media outlets as reflective of the culture around them, and right now the media is telling them there is no room for safe sex in the romantics’ bedroom. Try to think of the last fictionalized television show you watched that didn’t involve a sexual situation. Personally, I’m drawing a blank. More than 67 percent of television shows talk about or show sex. The number of television shows that promote safesex practices only amounts to 15 percent. This means the majority of sexual situations depicted on television are done without reference to healthy and mature sexual practices. Both consent and protection are extremely important to the health of every sexual partner. That is why it is so important to get rid of the stigmas surrounding the obtaining of both. It’s not that asking isn’t sexy, it’s just that the media hasn’t been including it in its depictions of sex. If the media are so dedicated to portraying these situations and have a vested interest in remaining the mirror to our culture, it needs to start getting conversations about sex right. jordrile@indiana.edu


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» BASEBALL

» CHARGES

IU Coach Tracy Smith said he “toyed around” with the idea of pinch-hitting for Hartong but ultimately left him in the game. “We let him in there to get the job done,” Smith said. “And he got it done.” In the bottom of the ninth, sophomore closer Scott Effross was having trouble putting the game away. He opened up the inning by giving up three straight singles to load the bases with no outs. Effross then struck out the next batter looking for the key out. Iowa ended up scoring two in the frame, but it was not enough to prevent the Hoosier sweep. IU is currently riding a sixgame winning streak, all on the road, and boast a plus 30 run differential in that span, but Smith said he isn’t content. “We still have better baseball left to play,” he said.

Feb. 19 and 20, amounting to $287.07 for hotel and meal expenses plus $39.98 for car charges. “Only expenses which are reasonably necessary in order to conduct county business and which are incurred while in travel status shall be reimbursable,” according to the Monroe County Personnel Policy Handbook. Expenses claimed by Smith on Feb. 3 and 18 do not meet the criteria in the policy handbook, according to a letter to Smith from the Monroe County Commissioners’ President Patrick Stoffers. The county will not reimburse employees for meals unless authorization is given for reimbursement of lodging, according to the policy handbook. Smith cited a letter from Ronald G. Watson, First

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

MARGARET KISPERT | THE DAILY IOWAN

Indiana pitcher Christian Morris pitches the ball against Iowa in the second game series at Iowa’s Duane Banks Field Sunday. The Hoosiers defeated the Hawkeyes 14-3.

» CANNES

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 ly informed that their films will screen at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. This film festival is one of the most prestigious in the world and shows films from Meryl Streep, George Clooney and Steven Spielberg, Swan said. Only one film created by 21- and 22 year-olds has been shown at the Cannes Film Festival before, Swan said, so this screening is a huge accomplishment for the student filmmakers. Swan and Elmore first met through their fraternity, Sigma Phi Epsilon, when Swan had been selected to receive an award for cinematography work he completed with his father. Elmore interviewed him about the award and the two started working together soon after that. Both filmmakers began creating videos from a young age. Swan began making films when he was given a Digital Blue camera at the age of eight. His father works for a news channel, he said, and his mother works for

Paramount Pictures, so the interest was always there. Elmore remembers shooting videos with his uncle’s camera before shooting a horror movie with his brother in second grade. His freshman year at IU, Elmore met a senior in his fraternity that was participating in Campus MovieFest. “I had no idea what I was getting into,” he said. “But it was a great learning experience.” These experiences helped lead up to the success of “Under Euclid’s Watch.” The two met many challenges reserving spaces and lighting their scenes when making the movie, but Elmore said it was all worth it when they finally saw it screen at the Buskirk-Chumley Theater and eventually in Hollywood. Rothenberger said he watched hundreds of infomercials every day in order to prepare for the six days of shooting. “The film gives the viewer this weird feeling because it looks really professional, but it’s about poop,” Rothenberger said. Most of the movies he makes are graphic, he said,

and showing them to his family always makes for interesting responses. “I showed it to my grandma and she said, ‘Ben, I love you, but you’re not winning anything there,’” Rothenberger said. All of the work Rothenberger put in made for an award-winning film, but it didn’t come without dedication. “If you want to make a good film, you just have to stop going to school,” Rothenberger said. “I just stopped going to classes eventually. It was more important to me.” Rothenberger was a telecommunications major, where he said he learned all of his video-shooting skills. Although IU doesn’t have a film school, Rothenberger is now pursuing his passion through a general studies major. “One thing that’s really cool about these films’ success is that it shows what IU is doing without even having a film school,” he said. “We’ve won the past four years.” Now that the campus festival and Hollywood screening are over, Rothenberger, Swan and Elmore are looking toward their prepara-

tion for Cannes. Attending the festival and paying for expenses in France will cost each student upwards of $5,000. The three are trying to propose to have some of these costs subsidized by the University as well as starting their own Kickstarter campaign. The group is also working to get a variety of actors and production companies to come to the screening of their films, so they can get more publicity while they are in France. Although the costs can be high, the group feels it is worthwhile. “We didn’t want to miss out on an opportunity to represent IU,” Rothenberger said. “We are proud Hoosiers.” Despite the festival plans hovering over the filmmakers, all three have continued to work on other projects. Elmore said he just finished a short film script that he hopes to begin shooting in the next few weeks and send on to other film festivals. Swan said he has begun a script about a newscaster and the psychological effects that reporting stories about events like school shootings

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Financial Bank vice president of treasury management, claiming she had attended an annual meeting Feb. 3 to discuss treasury management issues, according to Stoffers’ letter. Watson told Chalfant he did not meet with Smith and Huffman that day. Smith also cited a letter from MainSource Bank that claimed Smith and Huffman attended a morning meeting Feb. 4 that concluded at 12:30 p.m. Chalfant emailed Melanie Schlegelmilch at Thomson Reuters Tax & Accounting, according to Stoffers’ letter. They had met her on Feb. 4 from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The Monroe County Circuit Court will choose a special investigator to look into whether Smith committed any crimes, Miller said, but as of Monday, one had not

ADAM KIEFER | IDS

Chandler Swan is a participant in the IU Campus MovieFest. He created a movie called “Under Euclid’s Watch.”

can have on the character and his family. Rothenberger said he recently completed his film for this year’s Campus MovieFest called “The Rebound,” which won Best Comedy and Best Soundtrack at this year’s awards ceremony. The musical is about a young woman who breaks up with her cheating boyfriend and hits the town with her friends. Rothenberger is also working on a documentary called “Art Heals,” he said, which follows his mother, an artist working in St. Vincent’s Hospital. She works with can-

cer patients and helps them use art to communicate with people about their sickness and disabilities. “To make a good film, you have to have good actors, good production and a good story,” Rothenberger said. “A lot of films will be missing one of them, but the good ones have all three.” To get all three assets, the students said they look to their fellow Hoosiers. “Because we’re students, the community really wants to help us make films,” Rothenberger said. “We want to be representing Hoosiers.”

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GLORY SHEELY | IDS

Minkyu Chan poses in the sanctuary of St. Paul's Catholic Center, where he attends church. Chan returned to the United States in September from South Korea, where he completed military service requisite of South Korean citizens. He said his church community made it easy for him to readjust to America and student life.

To the barracks and back South Korean students return to Bloomington after military service BY JANICA KANESHIRO | jkaneshi@indiana.edu | @janicakaneshiro

As his plane descended, Minkyu Kim had only one thought: “Am I really going back?” He sat between two women, which was strange, he remembers thinking, because he had almost no contact with women for close to two years. He kept reminding himself this was not, in fact, a dream. He really was on his way home — or what used to be home. As he stepped off the plane in Indianapolis and entered the terminal, he froze. The walls were covered with advertisements in English. People around him were hurrying off the plane and into America, but Minkyu stood still. “Oh, shit,” he said. His life as a student at an American university two years ago came flooding back. “Everything was odd,” he recalled. “It was all new and somehow old at the same time.” But Minkyu isn’t unlike any other South Korean man his age who lives abroad. All South Korean male citizens between the ages of 19 and 34 must return home no matter where they are in the world to fulfill their conscription duty to the Korean military. Though South Korean citizens have grown accustomed to taking those two years out of their lives, the process is especially complicated for people like Minkyu who come to America to study, go home after a year or two to serve in the military and then face the struggle of assimilating back into American life when they return. IU is home to about 40,000 students, including almost 5,500 from other countries. More than 900 students are South Korean, and half of them leave at some point during their college career to spend time in the military of their home country. For these students, shifts between cultures and roles — between soldier and civilian life — can be disorienting.

The hardest part of returning for some is realizing life in the U.S. has moved on without them. For others, it’s getting back in the swing of living in a culture in which they were not raised. In the time he was gone, Minkyu said so much changed for him that he had a difficult time imagining what his life would be like when he returned to the United States. “On the day I was discharged, I didn’t feel anything,” Minkyu said. “I felt a little like I was leaving home. Leaving such a place is exciting and sad at the same time. I thought, ‘Where do I go from here?’” LIFE BEFORE SERVICE Minkyu enrolled at IU in 2009 as an ambitious 18-year-old business major. Though his parents, South Korean natives, live and work in India, he said he came to the U.S. because he prefers American business and hopes to work here after he graduates. Deciding to move half a world away and start a new life separate from his parents was not as difficult, he said, as having to make the inevitable decision to return to Korea for his service. About 30,000 U.S. troops stationed in South Korea today help maintain the armistice between North and South Korea. Minkyu first tried to join the U.S. branch of the military — the Korean Augmentation to the United States Army, also colloquially known as KATUSA . This specific branch is for Korean citizens highly proficient in English who wish to carry out their conscription duties with Americans. But it’s very competitive, and few Korean citizens are accepted. Minkyu was already a sophomore in college when he was denied entry to KATUSA. His time to join the military was ticking away. Korean men have until age 34 to complete their military service, according to the government

notification they all get following high school graduation. Mandatory service for South Korean men began in 1948 after the division of Korea. The war that separated the North and South never really ended, though the two sides aren’t actively fighting on the battlefield. Minkyu knew he had to leave, but before he could, he had to go through a lengthy process to unenroll at IU. Tehanee Ratwatte, student advisor for the Office of International Services, is one staff member who helps students through the process. The process includes a significant amount of paperwork, speaking with an academic adviser and eventually terminating the student’s records within the U.S. government database until he wishes to reinstate his status as an international student. Some students come for just one semester before they leave and others finish all but one, Ratwatte said. Nevertheless, the process remains the same. Minkyu went into the Army unquestioningly, partly because Korean citizens will face jail time if they refuse service, but also because he understands the political climate in his home country. Once he left his American university behind, Minkyu’s service officially began. His world expanded to much more than just his understanding of duty — his physical, emotional and even religious strength was tested over the course of the next two years. On Oct. 4, 2011, Minkyu boarded his plane to Seoul. BASIC TRAINING New recruits go through a sixweek intensive training camp. There, they learn to shoot an automatic rifle, a first for most. They learn to march, to salute and to endure physical exhaustion. The first thing Minkyu

remembers is the physical pain of training camp. He had never been tested in that way before. “The hardest thing was the overnight march,” Minkyu said, referencing a 25-mile march in his fourth week of training during which he had to carry a 55-pound bag the entire time. “It was the most challenging thing I ever experienced,” he said. What kept him marching through what he called the longest night of his life was camaraderie, one of the things he remembers most fondly about the military. As he felt his body faltering, watching his fellow soldiers around him going through the same experience motivated him to continue. “In the first hours, my shoulders ached so badly, I thought, ‘The pain is too much,’” Minkyu said. “I didn’t want to keep marching, but there was this peer factor. There was a guy in front of me and a guy behind me, and I thought, ‘If they can do it, so can I.’” After he graduated from basic training, Minkyu was relocated and given the number of a basic foot soldier — 111,101. Minkyu said he loved his work in the army, though that isn’t necessarily the case for all soldiers. Many begrudgingly do their service and count the days until they are released. Some even commit suicide, Minkyu said. Minkyu liked doing the same job every day. As a human resources clerk, he was an expert in his position. Even so, he encountered problems with the disconnect between military service and Korean society. In his culture, Minkyu explained, age is everything. Someone even just a year or two older must be given the respect of an elder. But in the military, rank wins reverence. Having grown up learning to SEE SOLDIER, PAGE8


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» SOLDIER

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 respect elders, learning to respect people his own age in a position of authority was taxing. “I had problems between me and my superiors,” Minkyu said. “Age matters in Korea, but not in the military. Rank matters, so no matter what I was doing, whether I liked it or not, I had to do what they said ... You don’t stand up to them. There’s just a clear line you can never cross.” There were bad days and good, Minkyu said, and inner struggles built in the time in between. He said he got through some of his tougher mental battles not by turning inward for reassurance, but to God. “I’m a Roman Catholic,” Minkyu said as he fingered a white beaded bracelet on his left arm with a pearly cross at the center — a parting gift from his comrades and the only reminder of his service he brought back with him to the U.S. “I went to a Roman Catholic church while I was there and actually served as a Catholic officer. When things were bad, it gave me peace of mind.” The 21 months felt both long and short to Minkyu when it was time to leave. When he was officially discharged, he received a photo album and his cross bracelet from his officers. They threw him a small going-away party, and the next day he left. He took a bus to Seoul, where his family is from, and lived for a month by himself in their old apartment. “I was used to always being in a room with soldiers,” Minkyu said. “When we would turn the lights out at night, we would talk. Everyone sleeps together in one room. Then all the sudden, I was all alone. I was empty.” Throughout that month, Minkyu considered re-enrolling in the military. He lived on that base almost as long as he had been in the U.S., and the intersection between his duty to finish his degree and the familiarity of home left him torn.

COMING BACK When it’s time for students like Minkyu to re-enroll, they must re-establish international student status — yet another extensive process. It involves meeting with another academic adviser, re-establishing status as an international student and re-instating any scholarships they were receiving prior to their departure. Ratwatte said she works with students when they return to get back into classes and re-assimilate. Returning students must prove their English proficiency — difficult for soldiers who have not spoken English in two years. But beyond the paperwork, Ratwattee said getting used to the culture again is difficult, a fact she knows well as a former international student from Sri Lanka. “I know how easy it is to stay with your pack,” Ratwattee said. “What’s comfortable, who speaks the same language, who understands you and goes through the same transitions as you. It’s very easy to do that. And to break out of it is very hard and very unique.” RE-ADJUSTING Minkyu still struggles with his English proficiency, but he gets better every day. As a junior and business student, he said he feels like he is sometimes too old to be at such a disadvantage. “I hadn’t spoken a single word of English for two years,” Minkyu said. “I feel bad that I’m not able to speak to my proficient level. I tried to go to the career fair and it wasn’t good.” In some ways, he said it feels like his military service was in his distant past. He is still surprised when he tells people he returned to the U.S. in August. “I’ve only been back for ...” Minkyu paused as he counted on his fingers. “Wow, only three months,” he said at the time, which was in early November. Since he has been back, he decided to take a full course load of 17 credits to try to catch up to where he

was before he left. There is the added pressure of his age and finding a job after college. Now, seven months removed from his time serving in the military, Minkyu has joined the Kelley Korean Finance Seminar, a club at the Kelley School of Business. He has gained confidence in his courses and has picked up a third major in technology management, in addition to his majors in finance and supply chain management. He applied for summer internships and is patiently awaiting a response. If not, he’ll return to South Korea and complete an internship there. As his senior year approaches, Minkyu said he feels ready. “I’m actually really enjoying my accounting courses,” Minkyu said. “I’m feeling confident that for applications next fall, I will be able to get what I want, though I wasn’t able to last year.” Though he’s spent considerable time regaining his bearings at IU, Minkyu maintains his time in the military wasn’t a waste. He learned critical skills, which he considers important for his future. He said he takes the good with the bad when it comes to his service. “I think I actually improved by going into the army because I became more active,” Minkyu said. “I was shy before, and then I got to know more people. I learned not to procrastinate in the army.” Most of Minkyu’s friends have moved on as well — either graduated or married — but Minkyu has merged his two worlds by bringing back an aspect of his service. “I actually met my girlfriend now at the Catholic church here,” Minkyu said as a smile spread across his face. “I guess that time spent in the military paid off.” TWO WORLDS MERGE Everyone takes their seats as the priest enters the chapel. He walks along the wall of stained-glass windows toward the soft purple stage set with a wooden cross and a flowing fabric backdrop.

He speaks briefly with members of the choir and dons his purple robe for service at St. Paul’s Catholic Church. Minkyu strides comfortably into his pew. Several of his peers turn around in the red cushioned booth ahead and chat with him in Korean about what is going on in their lives as finals approach, and about the free meal offered at the end of the service. He laughs with them as he lays out his materials for church — a Bible and papers with song lyrics and announcements all in Korean. Members of Bloomington’s Korean Roman Catholic community offer this Korean language service twice a month. A girl in a striped sweater walks up to the podium as service officially begins. The audience falls into silence as she leans in to the microphone to give the day’s announcements. Her short ponytail bobs up and down as she speaks. “That’s her, my girlfriend,” Minkyu said, pointing and waving to her on the stage. She smiles. “She’s great at this.” Not long after, the priest begins the day’s message. He tells the congregation they must prepare themselves both mentally and physically for hardships in their lives. It is imperative for them to deal with their sins. He then steps back and invites them to sing. Minkyu holds his leather bound Korean Bible and sings along under his breath in solidarity with the rest of the community he has gotten to know in the months since he has been back. After the service is over, he waits among the pews for his girlfriend and helps clean up the materials from the service. Together now, they walk to the church basement where they enjoy a meal of rice, kimchi and stewed vegetables. They sit across from each other and laugh about inside jokes, mutual friends and a world entirely theirs.

Indiana University President, Michael McRobbie, took a bold step this past December in withdrawing Indiana University as a member of the American Studies Association. President McRobbie stated: “Indiana University joins other leading research universities in condemning in the strongest possible terms the boycott of institutions of higher education in Israel as proposed by the American Studies Association and other organizations… Indiana University values its academic relationships with colleagues and institutions around the world, including many important ones with institutions in Israel, and will not allow political considerations such as those behind this ill-conceived boycott to weaken those relationships or undermine the principle of academic freedom in this way.” Over the past month, students across the country have continued to pressure student governments by asking university leaders to accept boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) against Israel. The Indiana Israel Public Affairs Committee (IIPAC) along with 25 prominent student leaders on our campus stand with President McRobbie to proudly combat BDS.

We, the undersigned, support Indiana University’s rejection of the American Studies Association’s academic boycott of Israel. We concur with the administration of Indiana University that by ending collaboration with Israeli institutions, the boycott directly contradicts the values of academic freedom and scholarship for which Indiana proudly stands. We thank President McRobbie for establishing extensive and successful partnerships with Israeli institutions that promote the holistic educational development of our student body. We also support President McRobbie’s decision to withdraw from the American Studies Association and for preserving Indiana University’s strong relationship with Israeli institutions.

A brief history of two Koreas 1945 Korea divided at the Postdam Conference following World War 2. 1948 South Korean enlistment policy begins.

1950-1953 Korean War: ends with a cease-fire treaty 1991 The Democratic Republic of Korea (North) and the Republic of Korea (South) join the United Nations. 2000 A summit held between North and South Korean leaders ends propaganda, reopens border liaison offices and reunites relatives separated in the divide. 2003 Jan. North Korea backs out of the Nuclear NonProliferation Treaty, which aims to prevent the spread of atomic weapons.

Aug. Six-nation talks in Beijing on North Korea’s nuclear program fails to aid the connection between Washington and Pyongyang.

2005 Sept. The fourth round of sixnation talks concludes. North Korea agrees to relinquish its nuclear weapons in exchange for aid, but later demands a civilian nuclear reactor. 2006 July North Korea test-fires missiles, claiming some can reach the United States. The international community responds with outrage.

Oct. North Korea announces it is testing nuclear weapons.

2007 May Passenger trains pass the North-South boarder for the first time in 56 years.

Nov. North and South Korean leaders meet for the first time in 15 years to formally discuss ending the Korean War. 2008

March-April North and South Korean relations sharply decline.

July North Korean soldier shoots a South Korean tourist in a special tourism area.

Nov. North Korean threatens to cut off overland travel to and from South Korea.

2009 May North Korea announces it no longer agrees with the terms of the 1953 treaty that ended the Korean War.

Aug. North Korea sends a delegation to the funeral of the South Korean President. It also agrees to resume a family reunion program. 2010

If you would like to learn more about the Indiana Israel Public Affairs Committee or the U.S.–Israel relationship, please contact alcmiche@indiana.edu The views expressed by the individuals who have signed this statement are their personal views and not necessarily those of their respective organizations.

March The sinking of a South Korean warship is blamed on North Korea.

March North Korea continues to offer family reunion programs and accepts flood damage aid from South Korea. 2011

Jose Mitjavila Indiana University Student Association President

Chris Kauffman Indiana University Student Association Vice President

Hillary Anderson College Democrats of Indiana

Riley Parr College Republicans

Jack Dooling Indiana University Dance Marathon 2014

Katie Speer Indiana University Dance Marathon 2013

Sydney Robinson Alpha Epsilon Phi

Jose Furman Alpha Epsilon Pi

Jason Dubro Business Leadership Initiative

Brandon Myers Civic Leaders LLC

Michael Bruell Greek Jewish Council

Adam Blue Hillel

Josh Sacks Indiana Israel Public Affairs Committee

Allie Michel Indiana Israel Public Affairs Committee

Mitch Ennis Investment Banking Workship

Alex Nevill IU Judicial Board

Frankie Salzman Keshet

Ayesha Syed Muslim Student Union

Dennis Grishin Off Campus Council Hutton Honors Council

Noah Shaffer Sigma Alpha Mu

Alex Wilson Student Alliance for National Security

Krista Corrigan Student Business Ambassadors

Katharine Finn Women in Business

Dec. North Korean leader Kim Jong il dies. His son, Kim Jong-un is named his successor. 2013

Allie Rosen Sigma Delta Tau

April North Korea announces it will reopen a nuclear complex and removes its workers from a South Korean funded industrial park.

Sept. Despite tension, North Korea and South Korea reopen the industrial park, which closed in April.

2014 Mason Reiter Zeta Beta Tau

April North and South Korea exchange artillery fire across their disputed sea border.

SOURCE BBC NEWS JENNIFER SUBLETTE | IDS


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ARTS

Daughter of Bob Geldof dies at 25

EDITORS: RACHEL OSMAN & SARAH ZINN | ARTS@IDSNEWS.COM

Peaches Geldof, the daughter of Irish musician Bob Geldof and British TV presenter Paula Yates, died Monday at the age of 25. Geldof’s body was found in her Kent, England, home. Police called her death

“unexplained and sudden.” Paying tribute to his daughter, Bob Geldof said, “She was the wildest, funniest, cleverest, wittiest and the most bonkers of all of us.”

POSTCARD FROM PARIS

Bobos, a.k.a. the French hipsters ANU KUMAR is a junior majoring in journalism.

One of the more entertaining stereotypes I have heard about the French is how, to Americans, most French people seem hipster. Of course, I wasn’t too surprised when I found out the French have their own way to classify the term “hipster.” They call hipsters

“bobo,” short for “bourgeois bohemian.” Bourgeois describes the socioeconomic status of the label, while bohemian describes their free-minded, left-winged attitude. I’ve never been 100-percent sure exactly how one is or isn’t identified as a hipster, but there seems to be some basic characteristics most people agree on that fit the label. In America, the contemporary subculture that

enjoys things ironically, chooses to listen to alternative or non-mainstream music and dresses in vintage or thrift-bought clothes is typically, at surface level, labeled as hipster. Though, the key characteristic most people seem to agree on is the fact that hipsters will never actually willingly identify with the label. The first time I heard the term “bobo” was in my SEE BOBOS, PAGE 14

COURTESY PHOTO | IDS

Country singer Sturgill Simpson will perform at 8 today at the Bluebird. Tickets are $10 to $15.

Sturgill Simpson to perform at Bluebird FROM IDS REPORTS

Country musician Sturgill Simpson’s new album “Metamodern Sounds in Country Music” is set to release May 13. Simpson, a 35-year-old songwriter with bluegrass roots, is back on the road less than a year after the release of his debut album, “High Top Mountain.” Contrasting Simpson’s first album with the upcoming, the musician has alluded to a change in style. Whereas “High Top Mountain” was claimed to have linked Simpson with traditional country musicians like Waylon Jennings and Merle Haggard, the new album delves into psychedelic elements

Simpson incorporated in his music. “I think that there is a lot of room in country music for progression and sonic oscillation which is what I wanted to explore,” Simpson said on his profile for Sacks & Co. regarding his new album. He said his musical inspiration is derived from religious texts, new and old, as well as a variation of other books and some films. After performing at the Bluebird, Simpson will continue his tour in Louisville, Ky., the following day. His live performances, according to Sack & Co.’s website, are in part influential to the new album, which was recorded on the road.

STURGILL SIMPSON

When 8 p.m. today Where Bluebird Nightclub Cost $10 to $15. Audience must be 21 years old. Simpson has pulled from a variety of inspirational outlets, but love remains the focal point of his music. “Myriad worldly offerings — religion, drugs and more — all claim to be the omnipotent universal truth, but in my experience, love is the only certainty,” Simpson said. Christian Kemp

Iranian film director shares life, work at IU Cinema BY BRANDON COOK brancook@indiana.edu

Legendary Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami spoke about his life and work Monday afternoon at IU Cinema as part of the Jorgensen Guest Filmmaker Lecture Series. Introducing the director, IU Cinema Director Jon Vickers lauded him as the “pinnacle to IU Cinema’s existence” and referred to him as “one of the world’s leading artists.” Vickers’ praise is not without precedent. French director Jean-Luc Goddard once said, “Film begins with D.W. Griffith and ends with Abbas Kiarostami.” Martin Scorsese, to the humble embarrassment of Kiarostami, said, “Kiarostami

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ADAM KIEFER | IDS

Film director Abbas Kiarostami answers interview questions about his recent work in filmmaking during the “Abbas Kiarostami in Indiana” event Monday at the IU Cinema.

represents the highest level of artistry in the cinema.” Since Kiarostami began making films in the early 1970s, the director has exhibited ability for unconventional technique.

However, it was not until after the 1979 Iranian Revolution that he emerged with the individualistic style he is known for. SEE CINEMA, PAGE 14

Master the art of public speaking!

COLL-P155: Public Oral Communication college.indiana.edu/undergrad A new hybrid course (both online and in the classroom) designed to help students develop proficiency in public speaking, one of the most sought-after skills in today’s job market. COLL-P155 is a great choice for all students who wish to

WEST SIDE STORY

Go to idsnews.com/survey and take our quick, four-question social media survey for a chance to win one of two pairs of tickets to see West Side Story.

learn to speak and listen effectively

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speak more persuasively in class presentations, meetings, job interviews, public forums, and more.

COLL-P155 Public Oral Communication is required for students in the College of Arts and Sciences, and open to all students who want to be great public speakers. A new approach to acquiring the speaking and listening skills needed for college and career, this course has an online lecture component delivered via leading-edge virtual classroom technology. Students practice their skills and receive intensive instruction in twice-weekly discussion sections. Some sections are general in their content, and others include topics from Biotechnology, Gender Studies, French and Italian, Geography, History, Fine Arts, Sociology, and many more. Check out all the options in the Schedule of Classes. Don’t be shy! COLL-P155 can help you learn to speak effectively in front of a group of people, improve your college experience, and build an impressive résumé.

April 22, 8 p.m. IUauditorium.com PULSE

Contest ends at midnight Sunday, April 13. Visit idsnews.com/rules for full contest details.


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SPORTS EDITORS: ANDY WITTRY, ALDEN WOODS & SAM BEISHUIZEN SPORTS@IDSNEWS.COM

Hoosier baseball rises to No. 23 in polls Before the IU baseball team completed its three-game sweep against Iowa on Monday, the Hoosiers moved up to No. 23 in the Baseball America Top 25 rankings. IU began the season ranked No. 3 in the

Gerardot set to play in China FROM IDS REPORTS

IU women’s basketball senior forward Tabitha Gerardot has been chosen to play for the USA Women’s All-Star Basketball Team in a pair of international tournaments starting April 20 in China. The All-Star Team is made up of 10 college women’s basketball players who have completed their collegiate eligibility. The team will play a three-game round-robin tournament in three cities in China. Among the competitors will be women’s teams from New Zealand, Denmark, China, Australia and Slovenia. NetScouts Basketball organizes and coaches AllStar Men’s and Women’s teams, like the one Gerardot will play for, to represent the United States in international basketball competition. The goal of the national teams is to allow successful basketball players who have recently ended their college careers a chance to experience international

competition, representing their country while also being able to experience overseas travel. Gerardot is the second Hoosier to earn a spot on the team in as many years. IU graduate Aulani Sinclair played in the games in China last summer for the same organization. Fellow Big Ten player Amber Moore of Illinois will join Gerardot on the team USA squad. Gerardot transferred to IU to use her final year of playing eligibility after earning her undergraduate degree from Valparaiso in three years. During her senior season as a Hoosier, Gerardot averaged 8.8 points and 5.5 rebounds per game. The Fort Wayne native finished her four-year college career having played in 127 games, starting in 122 of those games. She finished her college tenure with a combined 1,512 points and 910 rebounds during her time at Valparaiso and IU. Sam Beishuizen

preseason poll, but the Hoosiers struggled coming out of the gate, at one point falling out of the Top 25. The Hoosiers are currently on a six-game winning streak.

IU’s Snodgrass selected to swim for Canada team FROM IDS REPORTS

IDS FILE PHOTO

Senior forward Tabitha Gerardot attempts a shot against Georgetown Oct. 29, 2013, at Assembly Hall. Gerardot will represent the United States this Summer in international competitions in China.

IU sophomore swimmer Brooklynn Snodgrass was named to Canada’s national team for the 2014 Commonwealth Games and the 2014 Pan Pacific Championships. At last week’s Canadian Trials, Snodgrass placed second in the 100-meter backstroke with a time of 1:00.23. She needed to finish under 1:01.25 to be selected. Snodgrass also finished second in the 50-meter backstroke and fifth in the 200-meter backstroke races in the meet. Swimming Canada changed selection policies this year. It focused on choosing swimmers who had the best opportunity to compete internationally throughout their careers. “Our selection policies this year for both teams

were based on world standards,” Swimming Canada High Performance Director John Atkinson said in a press release. “We set criteria for both teams based on the 16th-fastest time in each event from the Barcelona 2013 FINA World Championships.” Snodgrass will compete against 20 others at the Pan Pacific Championships Aug. 21-25 in Queensland, Australia. The Commonwealth Games will be held July 24 through 29 in Glasgow, Scotland, where Snodgrass will be one of 20 female swimmers. Three weeks ago, Snodgrass won the 200-yard backstroke at the NCAA Championships to become the second NCAA Champion in IU Swimming history. Grace Palmieri

the care and services you need to stay health at idsnews.com/health Chiropractic

Health Spotlight

Chiropractic

Anderson Chiropractic Dr. Trent M. Anderson Dr. Trent Anderson’s philosophy is to get you in, get you adjusted, and get you moving again. Since acquiring his doctorate in 1996, he has established two large practices offering multiple services and procedures. Throughout those years he’s discovered where he personally gets the best and quickest result is simply through his skills as a chiropractic adjuster. Conveniently schedule yourself straight from his website and get adjusted today!

Dr. Fox has 29 years of helping students reduce back and neck pain, stress, headaches, migraines, carpal tunnel, shoulder pain, nerve pain, whiplash injury, sports injury and TMJ. Our office is well equipped with the most modern equipment and student friendly staff. We enjoy treating students from all over the world. We accept all insurance plans. Give us a call today! Mon. - Fri.: 9 a.m. - noon & 2 - 6 p.m.

Mon., Wed. - Thu.: 9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Fri.: 9:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

1710 W. Third St. 812-336-BACK bloomingtonchiropractor.com Allergy/Asthma

Acupuncture

Behavioral/Mentall

101 W. Kirkwood Ave., Suite 123 (Fountain Square Mall) 812-322-3567 thedowntownchiro.com

Dr. Matt Schulz, DC CHIROPRACTIC WORKS! Experienced chiropractor and IU alumnus Dr. Matt Schulz is offering help to all IU students, faculty and staff with: headaches, migraines, back & neck pain, joint pain, arthritis, stiffness, radiating pain, numbness, acute & chronic pain, auto accident injuries, sports injuries, etc. Most insurance accepted. HSA/Flex Spending cards accepted, WalkIns Welcome. Feel better instantly! Mon. - Fri.: 9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 1101 N. College Ave. (15th and College) 812-333-8780 mypremierchiro.com

General General Health Health

Elizabeth A. York, LCSW

Dr. Rajan Mehta, M.D. Board certified and re-certified in allergy and clinical immunology. Specializing in the treatment of adult and pediatric asthma and allergic problems such as hay fever, chronic sinusitis, chronic sore throats, laryngitis, food allergies, drug allergies, insect allergies and other allergy problems. Mon.: 10 a.m. - noon, 2 - 5 p.m. Tue.: 10 a.m. - noon, 2 - 7 p.m. Wed.: Noon - 6 p.m. Thu.: 10 a.m. - noon, 2 - 5 p.m. 110 E. 10th St. 812-336-3881

Acupuncture

Dr. Brandon Osmon, CSCS Kellie Osmon, M.S., L.Ac.

The Osmon Chiropractic Center is a state-of-the-art facility offering the latest advancements in chiropractic care, acupuncture, rehabilitation, nutrition, herbal therapy, massage therapy and smoking cessation. Our mission is to provide patients high quality, professional health care in a comfortable and compassionate environment. We were recently presented with the 5-Star Service Award for patient satisfaction. At the Osmon Chiropractic Center you are more than just a patient, you are a part of our family. Located conveniently off of West Second Street behind Buffalo Wild Wings.

Counseling Assessment for those who have received: A Minor Consumption & Possession, Public Intoxication or OWI You may need a substance abuse assessment. I will work to help you and/or your attorney before you are involved in the justice system. I have worked with local attorneys and have the Indiana state certification to work with the court system. You will be welcomed in a respectful and comfortable atmosphere rather than a large impersonal setting. Your assessment will be individualized to your needs. You will not be pigeonholed into a long course of treatment. I also provide other mental health counseling services for issues such as depression and anxiety. I take most insurances and I accept private payment.

Southern Indiana Family Practice Center

Dr. Fox has 29 years of helping students reduce back and neck pain, stress, headaches, migraines, carpal tunnel, shoulder pain, nerve pain, whiplash injury, sports injury and TMJ. Our office is well equipped with the most modern equipment and student friendly staff. We enjoy treating students from all over the world. We accept all insurance plans. Give us a call today! Mon. - Fri.: 9 a.m. - noon & 2 - 6 p.m. 1710 W. Third St. 812-336-BACK bloomingtonchiropractor.com

Mon. - Fri.: 11 a.m. - 8 p.m. Sat. - Sun.: By appointment 205 S. Walnut St. Suite 21 812-322-2788 elizabethayorklcsw.com

Mon. - Fri.: 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Dr. Matt Schulz, LAc ACUPUNCTURE WORKS! Experienced acupuncturist and IU alumnus Dr. Matt Schulz is offering help to all IU students, faculty and staff with: pain, digestive problems, headaches, migraines, pre-menstrual and menopausal symptoms, infertility, asthma, sinus problems, anxiety, depression, insomnia, tinnitus, blood pressure, chronic fatigue, immune boost, etc. Treatments cost $45. HSA/Flex Spending cards accepted. Walk-Ins Welcome. Feel better instantly! Mon. - Fri.: 9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 1101 N. College Ave. (15th and College) 812-333-8780 theAlternativeHealthCenter.com/ testimonials.jsp

1332 W. Arch Haven Ave., Suite C 812-333-7447 DrOsmon.com

Behavioral/Mentall

Williamson Counseling Providing individual and couples counseling in a safe, supportive and confidential setting. Offering treatment for depression, anxiety, grief/loss and stress management. Accepting most insurance plans. Conveniently located in Fountain Square Mall in downtown Bloomington. 101 W. Kirkwood Ave., Suite 121 812-322-4109 nickiwilliamson.com

Family Center Karen Reid-Renner, M.D., MHP Jody Root, MSN, FNP-C Bridget Rund, MSN, FNP-C SIFPC is a family practice that offers family health & wellness, CDL exams, women’s health services, diabetes management, sports physicals, cholesterol & blood pressure monitoring, weight analysis and Medicare wellness exams. Coming soon, our new walk-in clinic. Mon.: 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Tue. - Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Fri.: 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. 3209 W. Fullerton Pike, Suite A 812-339-6744 sifpchealth.com

Massage Therapy General Health

New Outlook Counseling Center, Inc. Cheryl L. Mansell, LCSW Erin Coram, LMFT, CSAYC Kate Minelli, MSMFT Gloria Thompson, LCSW

Provides mental health treatment that empowers individuals and families to achieve recovery, and serves to promote personal and community wellness. We want to help ensure that individuals can better manage, achieve their hopes, dreams and quality life goals and live, work and participate in their community. We value the strengths and assets and strive to tailor treatment to each individual and family. Mon. - Fri.: 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. Sat.: By appointment 1136 W. 17th St., Suite B 812-929-2193 newoutlook.vpweb.com

Dr. Mary Ann Bough, Sue Bough Delia Igo, Jennifer Wilson, Sue Jacobs

Discover Chiropractic for the Entire Family! We are a stateof-the-art chiropractic facility using computerized analysis and adjustment techniques. We specialize in gentle “no-TwistTurn” adjusting of infants to seniors! We are close to campus and near major bus routes. New patients are welcomed and most insurance plans accepted. Call today and find out how you and your family can stay naturally healthy with chiropractic care. Mon., Wed., Fri: 8:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. Tue.: 1 - 6 p.m. 3901 Hagan St., Suite C 812-336-7552 Emergency: 812-219-4927 drmaryann.com

The Health Directory is your guide to health and wellness in the Bloomington area.

People are becoming increasingly motivated to make choices that have a beneficial impact on their health and quality of life. Making such choices on a daily basis gradually shapes a new lifestyle. At Touchstone, we call this a “wellness lifestyle.” Therapeutic massage and mindful yoga provide many health benefits, and are excellent additions to your wellness lifestyle. At Touchstone, you’ll find a comfortable setting and caring atmosphere to support the wellness lifestyle you are creating. Mon. - Fri.: 9 a.m. - 8 p.m. Sat.: 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. Sun.: 1 p.m. - 6 p.m. 2864 E. Buick Cadillac 812-337-3529 touchstonewellness.com


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Thompson puts IU on short list of destinations FROM IDS REPORTS

Former Virginia Tech forward Trevor Thompson trimmed his list of possible college destinations to three schools Monday morning. Thompson, a freshman who announced his decision to transfer after last season, will decide between IU, Ohio State and Purdue. Thompson tweeted that his top three picks are Indiana, Ohio State and Purdue, but not necessarily in that order. He said he will

announce his final decision within the next couple weeks. Thompson averaged 5.0 points and 4.7 rebounds in 16.2 minutes per game last season for Virginia Tech. He will have to sit out next season regardless of what school he chooses because of NCAA transfer rules. Thompson will be able to start playing again once he sits out for a season without losing any of his future eligibility. IDS FILE PHOTO

Andy Wittry

IU defender Amanda Redfern prepares to shoot the ball, away from an attacking opponent, during the Fluid Four tournament between IU and Michigan Feb. 22 at the Counsilman-Billingsley Aquatic Center. Hoosiers beat the Wolverines 12-5.

IU remains perfect in CWPA

Women’s golf has winning weekend FROM IDS REPORTS

The IU women’s golf team went 2-1 during the Liz Murphey Collegiate tournament at the UGA Golf Club in Athens, Ga., during the weekend after a 3-2 win Sunday against host team Georgia. IU opened the match

The No. 14 IU water polo team went an undefeated 4-0 during the weekend in the first set of CWPA Western Division Round Robin matches held at Hartwick College in Oneonta, N.Y. In IU’s first game Saturday, the Hoosiers recorded the second most points in a single game en route to defeating Gannon 22-3. Leading the way in the

play event on Saturday with a loss to Iowa State 4.5-0.5. In that match, only sophomore Maria Mancini managed to halve against her Hawkeye opponent. The Hoosiers

Radiology General Health

win was junior Summer Creighton, who tallied four goals, scoring more than the entire Gannon team by herself. In the second game, IU defeated the host team, No. 19 Hartwick, 12-9. IU had three players score multiple goals. The team was led by senior attacker Shae Fournier, who scored four goals. After the close game against Hartwick, the Hoosiers had little trouble

FROM IDS REPORTS

SEE GOLF, PAGE 14

Optometry

Oral/Dental Care

against Marist, defeating the Red Foxes 15-3 Sunday in their early game. IU’s defense limited Marist’s opportunities. Sophomore goalie Mary Campbell had three saves, and the Hoosier defense allowed just three goals. In IU’s final game of the weekend, IU trampled Notre Dame 19-1 to move to 16-5 on the year. IU allowed just one goal in the fourth period and had seven

Oral/Dental Care

players score multiple goals. IU is now a perfect 9-0 in CWPA play. The Hoosiers have never finished an entire season in the CWPA without a loss. IU will next be in action in the Western Division Round Robin No. 2 next weekend in Ann Arbor, Mich., where the Hoosiers will play Gannon for the second time. Sam Beishuizen

Oral/Dental Care

Jackson Creek Dental Ryan D. Tschetter, D.D.S.

Indiana MRI offers patients a relaxing, professional setting for out-patient MRI. Open MRI is also available for patients who are claustrophobic or weigh more than 300 lbs. Flexible appointments include evenings and Saturdays. Most insurances accepted and payment plans are available. Care Credit participant. Mon. - Fri.: 8 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sat.: 8 a.m. - noon 3802 Industrial Blvd., Suite 4 812-331-7727 indianamri.com

Women’s Health

Joe DeSpirito O.D., Bethany Russell, O.D., Kelsey Bell, O.D., Grazyna Tondel, Ph.D.

• Eye Exams • Contact Lens Exams • IU Student & Employee insurance provider

• 24-hour Emergency Service (call 812-340-3937) Our Designer Frames and Sunglasses include: Vogue Nine West Coach D&G Fendi Nike DKNY

Prada Maui-Jim Ray-Ban Burberry Calvin Klein Christian Dior and more...

NOW IN TWO LOCATIONS! Bloomington 1105 S. College Mall Road Located just Left of Kroger and Plato’s Closet

812-333-2020 John Labban, MD Donna Cutshall, CNM

Ellettsville 4719 West State Road 46

Understanding and caring for a woman is an innate ability and I feel I can provide women with the best care they deserve! Wellness exams, prenatal care, and all gynecological problems, including infertility. Solo practice and Board certified. Associate Clinical Professor at IU School of Medicine. Speaks: English, Spanish, French and Arabic.

812-876-2020 www.HoosierEyeDoctor.com

As part of his commitment to providing women with the best care possible, Dr. John Labban is pleased to announce that Donna Cutshall, Certified Nurse Midwife, will be joining his practice as of July 1, 2013, bringing with her more than 20 years of experience as a Labor and Delivery nurse. Donna shares Dr. Labban’s conviction that women deserve options and quality care. They look forward to working together to deliver exceptional Women’s Healthcare! Mon. - Fri.: 8:30 am. - 4:30 p.m. 650 S. Walker St. 812-334-0698 drlabbanwomendoc.com

Between McDonalds & Jiffy Treet

i-care bloomington John F. Walton, O.D. Mark A. Houser, O.D. LOCATED IN WALMART VISION CENTER Your Wal-Mart Vision Center eye doctors, providing quality eye care at affordable prices. Glasses and contact lens exams 7 days per week for your convenience. Ask about same day appointments, ocular health screening, red eye treatment and dry eye evaluation. Mon. - Fri.: 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. Sat.: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Sun.: noon – 4 p.m. 3313 W. State Rd. 45 812-335-1788

Board Certified Specialist in all phases of oral and maxillofacial surgery, especially the removal of wisdom teeth, IV sedation and dental implants. Bloomington’s only IU trained Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon serving IU students, faculty and their families and Indiana residents. Provider for most insurance plans, including IU and Medicaid. New patients welcome, no referral necessary. Discover, MasterCard, and Visa accepted. Office is located just south of College Mall next to Pier 1 Imports. Mon., Tue. & Thu.: 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Wed.: 8 a.m. - noon Fri.: 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Mon. - Tue.: 7 a.m. - 5 p.m. Wed.: 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Fri.: 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. 1124 S. College Mall Road 812-336-5525 jcdsmiles.com

857 Auto Mall Road 812-332-2204 oralsurgeryofbloomington.com

Oral/Dental Care

The Center for Dental Wellness J. Blue Davis, D.D.S. A privately owned, people-oriented practice located next to the College Mall. Dr. Davis provides cosmetic, restorative, family and emergency dentistry in a comfortable, relaxed atmosphere with a caring, knowledgeable and experienced staff. We use Cerec technology, allowing us to make restorations in one visit. Dr. Davis is a provider for Invisalign, Zoom! and Under Armour Performance Mouth Guards. Also offering other advanced services. We look forward to getting to know you and take care of you and your entire family with the goal of improving your smile and dental health.

Matthew L. Rasche, D.D.S., M.S.D.

2909 Buick Cadillac Blvd. 812-339-3427 dentalwellness.com

Dental Care Center Jill Reitmeyer, D.D.S. We provide quality, affordable general dentistry to all ages. We can accept insurance and Medicaid. Discounts are available to student and student family members. Call for an appointment. Mon., Tue., Thu.: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 1602 W. Third St., Suite A 812-339-7700

Ann Shackelford, DDS Julie Waymire, RDH

Located adjacent to the campus just off Atwater. Convenient off-street parking. We provide complete family dental services in a caring atmosphere. Emergencies Welcome University Dental Ins. Accepted Cosmetic Treatments Root Canals Extractions Mon. - Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Dr. Suzanne Allmand, D.D.S. Dr. Kurush Savabi, D.D.S. At Southern Indiana Smiles, our excellent service, friendly team and state-of-the-art facility will ensure you receive the highest quality dental care in the most calm, relaxing environment possible. Dr. Allmand and Dr. Savabi provide cosmetic, general and restorative dentistry. We are open five days a week, offering extended hours at the convenience of our patients. 457 S. Landmark Ave. 812-336-2459 bloomingtonindentist.com

South Central Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, LLC David J. Howell, D.D.S. Timothy A. Pliske, D.D.S.

Certified, American Board of Pediatric Dentistry

Mon. - Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Optometry

Timothy J. Devitt, D.M.D.

Jackson Creek Dental is a privately owned dental practice conveniently located on South College Mall Road. Most insurances accepted, including the Indiana University Aetna and Cigna Insurance plans as well as the Aetna Graduate Student plan. Dr. Tschetter offers state of the art dental technology such as Zoom in office professional whitening, same day crown appointments with Cerec, and Invisalign Orthodontics. Dr. Tschetter also provides restorative, cosmetic and emergency care. We pride ourselves in giving the best care to our patients while offering a pleasant yet professional atmosphere.

Southern Indiana Pediatric Dentistry with Dr. Matt Rasche specializes in providing comprehensive dental care for infants, children and adolescents, including th ose with special needs. We provide quality dental care and an exceptional experience for each patient. We welcome new patients! All insurance plans and private pay accepted. Our office is centrally located near the College Mall, next to Goodwill, at 828 Auto Mall Road in Bloomington. 812-333-KIDS. Call today! Mon. - Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Fri.: By appointment

409 S. Dunn St. 812-339-6272 campusfamilydental.com

828 Auto Mall Road 812-333-KIDS (5437) sipediatricdentistry.com

Board Certified Surgeons, providing friendly and compassionate health care for more than 25 years. Administer a full range of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Services Including: • IV Sedation • CT Scanning • Bone & Tissue Grafting • TMJ Disorder • Oral Pathology

• Dental Implants • Wisdom Teeth Removal • Facial Trauma • Reconstructive Facial & Jaw Surgery

We file all insurance. We accept Care Credit, Visa, Discover & MasterCard. Mon. - Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Fri.: 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. 2911 E. Covenanter Drive 812-333-2614 indianaoralsurgery.com

Health Spotlight

The Center for Dental Wellness J. Blue Davis, D.D.S. A privately owned, people-oriented practice located next to the College Mall. Dr. Davis provides cosmetic, restorative, family and emergency dentistry in a comfortable, relaxed atmosphere with a caring, knowledgeable and experienced staff. We use Cerec technology, allowing us to make restorations in one visit. Dr. Davis is a provider for Invisalign, Zoom! and Under Armour Performance Mouth Guards. Also offering other advanced services. We look forward to getting to know you and take care of you and your entire family with the goal of improving your smile and dental health.

Mon. - Thu.: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 2909 Buick Cadillac Blvd. 812-339-3427 dentalwellness.com

PAID ADVERTISING


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I N D I A N A D A I LY S T U D E N T | T U E S D AY, A P R I L 8 , 2 0 1 4 | I D S N E W S . C O M To place an ad: go online, call 812-855-0763 or stop by Ernie Pyle Hall 120 from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday - Friday.

CLASSIFIEDS

Full advertising policies are available online.

15 hours per week.

jsabbagh@homefinder.org

Flexibility with class schedule.

1 & 4 BR apts. Near 3rd/Fess. NS. No pets. No kegs! 336-6898

Brownstone Terrace

All Majors Accepted. Great Resume Addition

110

New Course Offering:

P

14th and Dunn St. 1, 2, 3 BR Flats & Townhomes w/ Pool

235 210

1 BR, 301 E. 20th, $465. Located near Stadium. Avail. August, 2014. Costley & Co. Rental Management, 812-330-7509

Restaurant & Bar

www.costleycompany.com

1-4 BR Furnished or unfurnished, close to campus. 333-9579

220

Grant Properties

305

Apartment Furnished

1, 2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Outstanding locations near campus at great prices Call Today 812-333-9579 GrantProps.com

Smallwood, THE ADDRESS IN BLOOMINGTON TO LIVE – now leasing for August, 2014. $200 deposit TOTAL for all units for the entire month of March.

3 BR, 1209 N. Grant. Located near Stadium. $1050 for 3; $900 for 2. for August, 2014. C/A, D/W, on-site laundry. Costley & Co. Rental Management. 812-330-7509

310

www.smallwoodapts.com

www.costleycompany.com

Apt. Unfurnished

304 E. 20th Located near Stadium. 1 BR, $430. Avail. August, 2014. Costley & Co. Rental Management. 812-330-7509

*** 1 & 2 BR apts.*** Avail. Fall, 2014. 2 blks. from Sample Gates. www.bryanrental.com 812-345-1005

www.costleycompany.com

20

2, 3, & 4 BR Great Location Pet Friendly!

Cedar Creek

The Mercury 212 N. Morton 1-2 BR apts • $635/bed

LIVE

325

20

BY THE

TADIUM. S812.334.0333

COM

Fairview Terrace 615 W. 15th St. 1 BR apt • $495

Leasing for Fall, 2014. 1 & 2 BR apts. Hunter Ridge. 812-334-2880

211 N. Grant SED! 1LEBRA house

1, 2, & 3 BR Individual Baths Covered Patios

TADIUM. S812.334.0333

COM

************************ 3 BR, 2.5 BA, 3 level, 1400 square feet. Stadium Crossing (formerly Varsity Villas) $500 VISA Gift Card given to Renter upon signing lease. $975/month. Available August, 2014. Call or text: 317-997-0672.

3 BED 1 1/2 BATH TOWNHOME 1209 Grant by the stadium • off-street parking • laundry room facilities •

$750 - 2 people

812-330-7509 $995 - 3 people

444 E. Third St. Suite 1

OLYPROP.com

Brownstone Terrace 14th and Dunn St. 1, 2, 3 BR Flats & Townhomes w/ Pool

FREE

CLASSIFIED AD Place an ad 812-855-0763 for more information: www.idsnews.com/classifieds

1315 S. Grant, 3 BR, $975/ mo. 1404 S. Grant, 3 BR, 2 BA, $1155/ mo. 906 S. Fess, 3 BR, very nice, $1620/ mo. 310 E. Smith Ave., 5 BR, $2500/ mo. Avail. Aug. 327-3238

3 BR houses- A/C,W/D, D/W. 319 N. Maple, 801 W 11th. for Aug. ‘14. $975/mo. No pets. Off street parking, free WiFi. 317- 490-3101

Willow Court Now leasing for August – reserve your spot today great rates, limited availability. 812.339.0799

3 BR/ 3 BA. S Park. NS. No pets. No kegs! 336-6898

Condos & Townhouses

*2 master suites avail. by Stadium & busline. Avail. Aug. $1030/mo. Call 812-333-5300. www.northgatetownhouses.info

Luxury Downtown Condos. Now leasing for August, 2014. THE MORTON 400 solid cherry hardwood floors, high ceilings, upgraded everything. Only 3 left. Each lease signer will receive an Ipad Mini! 812.331.8500

COM

HOOSIER STATION – Where You Need To Be! Beautifully remodeled apts. with a view of the Stadium. Now renting 1 & 3 BR apts. Call 339-0951.

111 E. 9th St. Avail. Aug., 2014. 5 BR, 3 BA, 2 kitchens, front porch. $2500/mo. plus utils. and deposit. No pets. 812-824-8609

The Willows Condos Great rates, limited availability – updated, modern feel. Now leasing for Summer, 2014. 812.339.0799

BROWNSTONE ERRACE. T812.332.3609 Hickory Grove now leasing for August – reserve your spot today. Great rates, limited availability. 812.339.0799

www.costleycompany.com

3 and 5 BR houses avail. on campus. All amenities included. 812-360-9689

Office 2620 N. Walnut

Continental Terrace Now leasing for August – reserve your spot today. Great rates, limited availability. 812.339.0799

1-5 BR houses & apts. Avail. Aug., 2014. Close to campus. 812-336-6246

Room Avail. 10th and College, $865/mo., utils. included. djposner@indiana.edu

812-334-8200

Campus Walk Apts. 1 & 2 BR avail. summer and 2014-15. 812-332-1509 cwalk@crerentals.com

1-3 BR Luxury Home near Music & Ed School 333-9579

Now renting for August, 2014. 1 & 2 BR. Great location next to campus. 812-334-2646

812-339-8300

Park North 2620 N. Walnut Studios • $470 (short term leases avail)

***Fantastic, 2 & 3 BR apts. set deep in the woods w/ rainforest views, yet still in the city!! Huge island kit./ family rm. + living rm. w/ vaulted ceilings & fireplace. Lg. BA with garden tub + extra BA/ half BA. Many closets & built in shelving. Large deck, W/D, optional garage. Pets ok. Call for web site. $895-$1295. 812-219-2027. Grad student discount.

2 blks. to Campus. (1) Nice 3 BR house, $1440. (2) 1 garden efficiency, $415. (3) 2 BR apt., $995. Includes H2O, sewer & heat. Near 3rd & Indiana. No pets. Call 334-1100 or email zinmanlaw@aol.com

burnhamrentals.com

Rosebowl 415 S. Dunn 1 BR apts • $485

Sell your stuff with a

BY THE

APARTMENT & HOUSE LEASING SINCE 1942

Sassafras 10th & Indiana 1 BR apts • $630

10

Varsity Court

LIVE

Aug., 2014: near campus. 1, 2, 3 BR apartments. thunderboltproperty.com AVAIL IMMED, 1 BR Apt, close to Bus & Informatics, Neg. terms & rent. 333-9579

2 BR 1.5 Bath Outdoor Pool Cat Friendly!

Costley & Company Rental Management, Inc.

S

1-2 BR Apt, behind Informatics & next to Business school. 333-9579

Furn. rms. All utils. incl. Avail. now. (812) 336-8082

Must be avail. M-F, 8-5. For approx. 15 hrs./wk., 1 YR. (3 sem.) commitment, includes Summer. To apply for this paid opportunity: Send resume & samples: gmenkedi@indiana.edu Ernie Pyle Hall, Rm.120.

E

Apply in person at: Ernie Pyle Hall,RM 120.

Stadium Crossing

Great opportunity for IU undergrads to expand your portfolio & resume. Must have experience in Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. Video and Flash experience a plus.

I

Stadium View 20th & Dunn 1 BR apts • $600

1 block to campus. Utilities and internet included. Newly remolded/hardwood floors. 812-219-5510

Now Hiring

T

www.costleycompany.com

HOUSING

Graphic Designers

R

Must be able to work summer, 2014.

2-3 BR Apt, btwn campus & dntwn. Great location and value. 333-9579

NOW HIRING Sales Associates at Once Upon A Child. Come to open interviews Tues., April 8, 11am-5pm or send info to: ouaclafevor@aol.com

E

Burnham Rentals

WANTED-Rec Ranger’s!

Brown County State Park now hiring 8 lifeguards for summer. Applicants apply at www.in.gov/jobs. Pool Lifeguard 588410. Pool Captain 588408. Head Lifeguard 588407. Work from Memorial Day to Labor Day. Options for year-round. With questions, call Kevin at 812929-0865. Applicants should be certified.

P

Redmen bldg 116 N. Walnut 2 BR apts • $720/bed

Opie Taylor’s Now Hiring! Kitchen bussers avail. AM/PM shifts avail. Apply @ 110 N. Walnut St.

** Part Time Leasing Agent ** Must be enthusiastic, outgoing and reliable. Inquire within: 400 E. 3rd St., Suite 1.

O

1 BR at 1216 Stull. Near Bryan Park. $405/mo. Avail. Aug., 2014. Costley & Co. Rental Mgmt. 812-330-7509

for a complete job description. EOE

General Employment

R

1, 2, & 3 BR Individual Baths Covered Patios

2615 E. 5th SED! 3LEBRA house

Email:

Create great family memories with us. Email: dlowe@ lakemonroejellystone. com for more details, or apply in person at 9396 S. Strain Ridge Rd. Bloomington,IN 47401.

2 BR 1.5 Bath Outdoor Pool Cat Friendly!

Now leasing for fall: Park Doral Apartments. Eff., 2 & 3 BR. apts. Contact: 812-336-8208.

COM

rhartwel@indiana.com

Camp Staff

Cedar Creek

OLYMPUS

BROWNSTONE ERRACE. T812.332.3609

EMPLOYMENT

2, 3, & 4 BR Great Location Pet Friendly!

Varsity Court

Seeking students with good organization, time management, and communication skills to work in advertising sales. Previous sales experience preferred but not required. Must own reliable transportation and be able to work through May, 2015.

Tales of Hans Christian Andersen First Four-Week Summer - Germanic Studies, E363/K507

!!!308 E. 12th!!! 3 BR, close to campus. (812) 219-5212

10

2 BR. New appliances. Close to Opt. & Law Schools. FREE parking. 812-219-5212

NO WEEKENDS!

Announcements

Apt. Unfurnished

rentbloomington.net

Stadium Crossing

Batchelor Heights Nice 3 & 4 bedrooms available now. Also pre-leasing for August and summer months. Great location! 812.339.0799

Houses !!!! Need a place to Rent?

www.brownpropertymgt.com

**HENDERSON CROSSING**

Real-world Experience.

Fun married couple wishing to adopt a baby. Exp. pd. 1-888-57-ADOPT www.ourspecialwish.info.

Text 812-345-1771 for showing.

315

Adoption

www.platinumdevelopmentllc.com

Stella Ridge 2 & 3 BR, 2.5 BA, $1140. Oaklawn Park 3 BR, 2.5 BA, $990. Avail. Aug., 2014. Costley & Co. 336-6246 $100 oof of Aug., 2014 rent if lease is signed by March 31, 2014. www.costleycompany.com

The Hamptons. 3 BR, 3.5 BA luxury townhomes. 2 blks. W. of IU Stadium. Parking free. Avail. Aug., ‘14. Call anytime: 812-322-1886. 325

105

General Employment

Apt. Unfurnished Leasing August, 2014. Updated 1 BR. Great price and location. 812-361-1021

Award Winning! Lavish Downtown Apts. View at:

ONLINE POSTING: All classified line ads are posted online at idsnews.com/classifieds at no additional charge.

The IDS is accepting applications for Advertising Account Executives to start April, 2014.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Apt. Unfurnished

10

220

REFUNDS: If you cancel your ad before the final run date, the IDS will refund the difference in price. A minimum of one day will be charged.

PAYMENT: All advertising is done on a cash in advance basis unless credit has been established. The IDS accepts Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, cash, check or money order.

COPY ERRORS: The IDS must be notified of errors before 3 p.m. the date of the first publication of your ad. The IDS is only responsible for errors published on the first insertion date. The IDS will rerun your ad 1 day when notified before 3 p.m. of the first insertion date.

10

HOUSING ADS: All advertised housing is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act. Refer to idsnews.com for more info.

COPY CHANGES: Ad copy can be changed at no additional charge when the same number of lines are maintained. If the total number of lines changes, a new ad will be started at the first day rate.

310

AD ACCEPTANCE: All advertising is subject to approval by the IDS.

310

CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING POLICIES

310

idsnews.com/classifieds

Houses

!! Available August, 2014. 3 BR homes. ALL UTIL. INCL. IN RENT PRICE. 203 S. Clark, & 2618 East 7th 812-360-2628 www.iurent.com

goodrents.homestead.com

4 BR - 5 BA 5 BR - 6 BA HOUSES All Appliances Included 2 Car Garage W/D & D/W 2,500 Sq. Ft.

336-6900 www.shaw-rentals.com 3-4 BR luxury home, newly remodeled, btwn. campus & dntwn. 333-9579 4 and 5 BR, $1400-$2k. A/C, D/W, W/D, with pics at www.iu4rent.com 4 BR house. Close to campus. Central air, big back yard. Aug lease. 812-477-1275 4 BR, 2 BA, 6 blks. from Campus, no pets, W/D, A/C. $1400/mo. + utils. Avail. 8/01/14. 332-5644

“Everywhere you want to be!” NOW LEASING

FOR 2014

1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 BR Houses, Townhouses and Apartments Quality campus locations

339-2859

Office: 14th & Walnut www.elkinsapts.com


13

Houses

4 BR, 2.5 BA, garage, fenced yard, WD/DW. 1 mi. from Stadium. $1600/mo. 812-345-1081

Housing Wanted

420

I N D I A N A D A I LY S T U D E N T | T U E S D AY, A P R I L 8 , 2 0 1 4 | I D S N E W S . C O M 330

***DOWNTOWN*** Ultimate 1 BR loft next to the Bluebird with 2-story atrium living/dining room. Pets ok, grad disc. avail. $1050. Call or text 812-219-2027.

Sublet Apt. Furnished ***Sublease now through July 31st. 1 block to campus. Utilities and internet included. Newly remolded/hardwood floors. 812-219-5510

Aug. 2014, near campus. 2, 3, 4, and 5 BR houses. thunderboltproperty.com

345

Aug. 3 & 4 BR homes. w/ garages. Applns. Yard. Near IU. 812-325-6748

FOR SALE: Queen size bed set, incl. box spring, mattress & frame. $200. Avail. May. 561-350-0907 435

340

5 BR house, Aug. 1203 S. Fess. $1850/ mo. Free Aug. rent with lease signing by April 15th. Text 812-340-0133.

Sublet Apt. Unfurn.

For Fall, on campus. 3 BR, 2 BA. Newly remodeled. 2400 E. 7th. 4 BR, 2 BA, 806 E. 11th & 115 S. Union. No Pets. 812-336-4553

Sublet Houses

465

355

bestrentsrdw@yahoo.com

406 E. 6th St. 5 BR, 2 BA, $500/mo. + utils. Contact: aplanera@indiana.edu Sublet May - end of July. $350 plus utilities. Minutes from the bars! 4 BR, 2 BA house. Contact: mprofeta@indiana.edu 360

House for rent: 417 E. 15th 3 BR, 2 BA, 1500/ mo., water included, W/D, D/W. Avail. August, 2014. 317-225-0972 Houses/Twnhs./Flats Avail. Aug., 2014. Call for pricing: 812-287-8036.

Misc. for Sale PULSE

Buying/selling portable window A/C and dorm refridgerators. Any size. Cash paid. 812-320-1789 auldoc11@gmail.com

Sublets avail. All locations, neg. terms & rent. 333-9579

Available August 3 BR, 1 or 2 BA, W/D, D/W, A/C, parking. $975/mo. plus utils.

Furniture FOR SALE: Large couch, good cond. and 2 side tables, $75. Call 913.660.8483.

Clothing Plato’s Closet pays cash on the spot for trendy, gently used clothing. 812-333-4442

441

325

CLASSIFIEDS

We are the IU students' lifeline to campus events, coupons, contests, promotions and more.

Music Equipment Cort strat guitar with deluxe case & more. Perfect. $185. Call 812-929-8996.

Sublet Rooms/Rmmte. Located at 9th & Grant, roommate wanted. Avail. immediately. 812-333-9579

NEW REMODEL 3 BR, W/D, D/W, A/C, & basement. Located at 5th & Bryan. $395/ea.322-0931

MERCHANDISE 420

WISEN RENTALS 2-8 BR houses for rent. Prime S. locations. $450-$850/mo. 812-334-3893 mwisen@att.net or text 812-361-6154.

Aries (March 21-April 19) — Today is a 6 — You’re especially lucky in love today and tomorrow. It’s your light-hearted demeanor. Talk about what’s most important, and discover something new about yourself. Play with friends and family, and learn a new game. Share your appreciations. Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Today is a 5 — Household issues demand attention today and tomorrow. Fix something that doesn’t work as you’d like. Desires align with the energy to fulfill them. Dig in

Automobiles

Furniture FOR SALE: Headboard, dresser/mirror + side table, $100, obo. 765.418.3870

Horoscope

505

TRANSPORTATION

Upscale 3 BR, 2 BA. Built in 2013. $1650/mo. 812-335-9553

‘05 Pontiac Grand Prix. Black, V6, 3.8, auto, new tires, $8500. 248-894-6927

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. the garden, and sow seeds for the future. Someone’s happy to help. Gemini (May 21-June 20) — Today is a 6 — Get into the books. Study new developments, and check all angles. Compare notes. A new assignment’s coming. Watch out for hidden agendas. Present confidence in your communications. Talk, rather than action, gets farther. Get your data together. Cancer (June 21-July 22) — Today is a 7 — Today and tomorrow could get profitable... gentle persistence

BEST IN SHOW

works better than force. Enlist some help with a project. Lay a new foundation. Stay out of somebody else’s argument. Your efforts could seem blocked... try a charm offense. Move slowly and prepare. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Today is a 7 — Consider consequences of actions. Use your power responsibly and with compassion. Don’t strain or push. Keep your goals in mind. Avoid expensive distractions and time-sucks. Go for practical, achievable outcomes. Say what you want and your network provides.

PHIL JULIANO

BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!

twitter.com/IDSpulse Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Today is a 5 — Stick close to home, and have some quiet time. Consider a loved one’s wishes. Handle old jobs to make way for new. Let go of some distracting baggage. Pick it up later if you want. Or not. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Today is a 6 — Your efforts could seem stuck. Push too hard and there’s breakage. Your friends are a big help today and tomorrow; they come to the rescue. Align your new course with your core values and principles. Rely on the team. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Today is a 6 — Work takes priority.. You may overstep bounds. There’s still

Crossword

a way to win. Flexibility and humor advance your cause. Anticipate changes, and roll with them. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — Today is a 6 — Make time for an outing over the next few days. It’s a good time to set long-term goals. Rather than launching into action, consider different strategies first. Study, research, and enjoy fascinating conversation with someone who enjoys the same subject. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Today is a 6 — For the next days, track calls. Review financial arrangements, keep paperwork current, and rely on your schedule. Consider an investment in educa-

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

su do ku

Difficulty Rating: How to play: Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 grid contains the digits 1 through 9, without repeating a number in any one row, column or 3x3 grid.

Answer to previous puzzle

© Puzzles by Pappocom

NON SEQUITUR

1 Parking lot attendant 6 False friends 11 Brillo competitor 14 St. Teresa’s home 15 Just beginning to learn 16 Demolition need 17 Highmaintenance Gonzales? 19 Native Nebraskan 20 Power co. service 21 Pitcher Maglie 22 Dove call 23 Off-the-cuff stuff 26 Took a chance on 28 Cinque e uno 29 Naps, say 33 Versatile bean 34 Fond du __, Wisconsin 35 Like a blue moon, in old Rome 36 Hand-holding group dances 39 Sacred synagogue cabinets 41 Muse of poetry 43 Forum robe 44 Rahm Emanuel, vis-à-vis Chicago 46 Felipe or Matty of baseball

tion. Speculate, and get feedback. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Today is a 6 — A new associate could become a valuable partner. Keep promises, and get work done. Avoid scandals, gossip or controversy. Someone’s willing to help, so create a win-win situation. Trade, barter and negotiate for solutions. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) - Today is a 5 - Actions may seem blocked. Put your heads together. Review what needs to be done before the pace quickens. Breathe deep.

© 2013 By Nancy Black Distributed by Tribune Media Services, INC. All Rights Reserved

L.A. Times Daily Crossword

TIM RICKARD

ACROSS

PULSE

47 Outdated PC monitor 48 Curly tormentor 49 December dropin 51 __ to the city 52 Bee bites 55 One in the game 57 Curved part 58 Feverish 60 In need of sharpening 61 Round-bottomed cooker 62 Overeating bird tempting Sylvester? 67 Eden outcast 68 Spooky 69 “Sesame Street” roommate 70 “L.A. Law” co-star Susan 71 Sports page data 72 Sporty sunroofs

8 Meadow moms 9 Storm-tracking device 10 In vogue 11 Bullwinkle pal who’s been working out? 12 En pointe, in ballet 13 Waited in line, say 18 Harsh 23 Muslim religion 24 Stiller’s partner 25 Fussy Disney mouse? 27 Smudge on 49- Across’s suit 30 Poet Teasdale et al. 31 Refrain syllables 32 Kept under wraps 37 Shake hands (on) 38 Mythical mangoat 40 “It won’t be long” 42 Yield 45 Periods of power 50 Way off base 52 Cut, as logs 53 Valuable stash 54 Driving hazard 56 Bright-eyed 59 Actress __ Flynn Boyle 60 Salon supplies 63 __ for tat 64 Record producer Brian 65 Gratuity 66 “Right!”

Look for the crossword daily in the comics section of the Indiana Daily Student. Find the solution for the daily crossword here.

Answer to previous puzzle

DOWN 1 Airport shuttle, often 2 Many a Monopoly prop. 3 More than a fib 4 Respected village figure 5 President after Polk 6 Like “stewardess” nowadays, briefly 7 “I __ what you did there”

WILEY


14

I N D I A N A D A I LY S T U D E N T | T U E S D AY, A P R I L 8 , 2 0 1 4 | I D S N E W S . C O M

» BOBOS

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

IDS FILE PHOTO

Then-sophomore Elizabeth Tong hits the ball out of a bunker Sept. 8, 2013, at the IU Women’s Golf Fall Kickoff at the IU Golf Course. Tong picked up the decisive point on Sunday for the Hoosiers to pick up a match play win against Georgetown.

» GOLF

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 rebounded in the afternoon with a 3-0 win against Georgetown, winning all three of the matches that managed to be completed.

Freshman Ana Sanjuan picked up the most decisive win of the day, defeating her opponent 7-and-5. Junior Elizabeth Tong picked up the decisive point Sunday, defeating her opponent 4-and-3.

She joined Sanjuan and Mancini, who also picked up wins. The Hoosiers will be back in action April 19 on the first day of the two-day Lady Buckeye Invitational in Columbus, Ohio.

The Buckeye Invitational will be IU’s final tune-up before the Hoosiers compete in the Big Ten Championships in French Lick starting April 25. Sam Beishuizen

RECREATIONAL SPORTS

QUIDDITCH

language and culture class. Oddly enough, it was actually a full topic of conversation in class that day. French singer Renaud has a whole song solely describing this subculture of people. The song describes habits like living uptown or in a loft, having well-behaved kids who attend private school, and liking Japanese and Korean cinema. In the music video, a variety of people are represented in regard to gender, race and age. This made it clear the label defined a lifestyle and taste rather than a specific aesthetic. Meanwhile, in the United States, it usually only takes a pair of black squareframed glasses before you are pinned as a hipster. Of course, the pretentious and aloof attitude helps the label stick. Bobos in French culture appear to identify with an upper-class standing but adopt different political standings from their families. According to an article in the French cultural magazine Les Inrockuptibles, bobos have the cultural resources and education of the bourgeois but seek to distinguish themselves from the traditional, mainstream bourgeois. This description in some ways seems to ring true with the label in the United States, as well. I have heard multiple people criticize those who shop at stores such as Urban Outfitters, seeking that

vintage look while paying for the brand name quality and establishing a look that is perhaps considered “alternative” while still maintaining a certain quality standard. So, how exactly do you spot a bobo? Well, if you are looking for individuals with thickframed glasses who read and dress “alternatively,” you’ll fail miserably. Mostly everyone in France tends to carry a magazine, newspaper or book. European fashion, in general, might be classified as “hipster” by American standards. A few times, when I have been dining at smaller, lesscommercialized Indian restaurants, I was fairly certain I spotted a bobo or two. They had dreadlocks or headscarves, but did not seem to be native to a country where that would be the tradition. They carried on long conversations about French literature with their partners and seemed to have fairly carefree attitudes. It’s hard to put a finger on who exactly is a bobo, because it seems to be more of an overall attitude or lifestyle that is being described by the term, not just an aesthetic. And of course, it’s a social phenomena free from a scientific, well-defined origin. So while the average French person might qualify as a hipster under American standards, be forewarned there is an entire subculture of individuals the French call bobos. anukumar@indiana.edu @AnuKumar23

ADAM KIEFER | IDS

Film director, Abbas Kiarostami, answers interview questions about his recent work in filmmaking during the “Abbas Kiarostami in Indiana” event Monday at the IU Cinema.

» CINEMA

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

Today is the last day to register for Intramural Quidditch! w $135?@>-@5;:211? _Z<1><1>?;: _XZ<1>@1-9 w &1-9?/;:?5?@;2\<8-E1>?;:@41ŋ180 -@ 81-?@@C;;21-/431:01> w "8-E/;:?5?@?;2-@;A>:1E@41C1171:0;2 <>58VW

Sign up today at the WIC or SRSC Member Services Suite! 812.855.SRSC recsports.indiana.edu

The films that Kiarostami made following the revolution introduced themes and styles the director would pursue and develop later in his career, such as the use of unprofessional “non-actors,” thematic complexity and settings in rural Iranian villages. In an interview with Film Comment in 2000, the director acknowledged that his innovations were rooted in the desire to cultivate a “deeply poetic cinema.” “In my mind, the abstraction we accept in other forms of art — painting, sculpture, music, poetry — can also enter the cinema,” he said. “I feel cinema is the seventh art, and supposedly it should be the most complete since it combines the other arts. But it has become just storytelling, rather than the art it should really be. I want to create the type of cinema that shows by not showing.” Kiarostami addressed the abundance of narrative in contemporary cinema as well as his creative process and philosophy of using ”non-actors.” “Once I have an idea, the first thing I do is find the character,” he said using a translator. “I draw my idea from the crew or characters. I tailor my idea to the character in front of me. I do not alter the character. His physique, I do not change.” His unconventional techniques have garnered him significant praise, including a Palme d’Or at the 50th International Cannes Film Festival and an officership of the Légion d’honneur from the Ministry of Culture and Art of

“I feel cinema is the seventh art, and supposedly it should be the most complete since it combines the other arts. But it has become just storytelling, rather than the art it should really be. I want to create the type of cinema that shows by not showing.” Abbas Kiarostami, director

France. “There’s a simplicity, an authenticity to the concepts,” said Ali Ghazinejad, an IU Ph.D. student and Iranian native. Nevertheless, critics such as the late Roger Ebert have not spared the director from blows. “I thought I had seen an emperor without any clothes,” the critic wrote about “Taste of Cherry,” Kiarostami’s Cannes prizewinner. “Is ‘Taste of Cherry’ a worthwhile viewing experience? I say it is not.” Richard Peña, professor of film at Columbia University and Kiarostami’s interviewer, did not bring the director’s criticism into the conversation. His questions centered on his minimalist cinematography, Kiarostami’s relationship with his crew and his feelings about his own role as director. “The most important part of my directing is choosing the character. Once I’ve chosen them, I follow them,” Kiarostami said. “If you allow yourself to work with non-actors, you will find another dimension.”

Tues., Apr. 8, 2014  

The Indiana Daily Student, Indiana University's independent student newspaper, is published Monday through Friday when IU classes are in ses...

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