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IDS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2014

The art of falling

IU tower divers strive for perfection PAGE 9

INDIANA DAILY STUDENT | IDSNEWS.COM

PHOTOS BY CAITLIN O’HARA | IDS

Kevin "Yogi" Ferrell shoots over University of Michigan defenders in Sunday's 63-52 win against the Wolverines at Assembly Hall. Ferrell scored 27 points of the Hoosiers' final score.

IU shows renewed dedication to defense BY ALDEN WOODS aldwoods@indiana.edu

Lost in the chaos of IU’s stunning upset against the nation’s No. 10 team, in the steady stream of 3-pointers and raucous Assembly Hall crowd, a Hoosier squad that had seen star opponent after star opponent score almost at will grew up. Coming into Sunday’s 63-52 victory over Michigan, IU had allowed big points to nearly every opposing star player. Michigan State’s Gary Harris scored 50 in his two games against IU. Illinois’ Rayvonte Rice tallied 49 in his two matchups. Penn State’s D.J. Newbill scored 24 and Northwestern’s Drew Crawford recorded 17 points in Bloomington. Michigan’s Nik Stauskas and Glenn Robinson III entered Assembly Hall on Sunday averaging 31.8 points per game between them. The two had carried Michigan offensively, leading the Wolverines to eight consecutive Big Ten wins and 10 straight overall. That changed Sunday. With sophomore guard

BEATING BLUE 63 - 52

The student section cheers on the Hoosiers during Sunday's win against the No. 10 Wolverines at Assembly Hall.

MORE BASKETBALL CONTENT INSIDE Columnist Evan Hoopfer spreads the love for Kevin “Yogi” Ferrell’s game performance. PAGE 9

Hoosiers upset No. 10 Michigan BY JOHN BAUERNFEIND jogbauer@indiana.edu

The unpredictability of the Hoosier’s Big Ten play continued Sunday as the IU men’s basketball team (14-8, 4-5) stunned the No. 10 Michigan Wolverines (16-5, 8-1) 63-52. It was Michigan’s first conference loss of the season, and it ends their 10game winning streak. There were two stories that played out in Assembly Hall, one of which involved Indiana’s defense and the other, Kevin “Yogi” Ferrell. The latter scored a game-high 27 points on 8-of-10 shooting. Ferrell also made a career-best seven 3-pointers, shooting 7-of-8 from beyond the arc. The sophomore guard made four more 3-pointers than the entire Michigan team that, entering Sunday’s contest, led the Big Ten in 3-point field goals made and 3-point field goal percentage. Three of Ferrell’s made 3-pointers came when there was less than five seconds left on the shot clock. Ferrell said he felt good about his shots after his first few went in. “You know, once I hit the first couple, they all felt good,” Ferrell said. “Once I had an opening, I

SEE DEFENSE, PAGE 6

SEE WIN, PAGE 6

International students weigh in on health care options BY HANNAH ALANI halani@indiana.edu

As his floor mates packed goggles and scarves for their January ski trip, international student Jack Cuthbertson worried about health insurance. Students from other countries are required to purchase health insurance through IU upon enrollment, but many think the cost is too high and being forced to pay it is unfair. “It’s a bit strange that you can be charged several grand for a broken bone,” Cuthbertson said. “Insurance in America is scarier than it is in England.” Cuthbertson is an exchange student from England who came to IU from the University of Kent in Canterbury, England. He paid a precautionary $770 when he

enrolled in IU’s International Services Office’s spring health care plan, supplied by Aetna Student Health group. Spring and summer plans are bundled for the roughly 75 percent of international students who go through IU and Aetna for insurance. The $770 fee pays for insurance during the summer months when most students go home, said Christan Royer, the manager of health care program services at IU Health Insurance Human Resources. “This is to ensure all international students have adequate coverage, as some remain in the U.S. or travel over the summer before returning to the IU campus,” Royer said. “The Aetna plans provide coverage nationally and internationally, so students are able to use the plan

during their summer travels.” Although the bundling of spring and summer is inconvenient for those who travel back to their home country in the summer, it’s not the biggest problem, Junshuo Tan, senior and president of IU’s Kappa Eta Phi business fraternity, said. “Most of international students’ families prepare that amount of money when they decide to come here,” Tan said. “The real issue here is tuition.” Tan traveled from Malaysia four years ago to attend the Kelley School of Business, a program highly regarded in his home country. He said he is dissatisfied with how expensive an American education is, but is grateful his tuition matches that of out-of-state students. “My friends from Michigan pay

as much as I do for tuition,” Tan said. Royer said although most international students pay for IU’s Aetna insurance, arrangements can be made so the requirement may be waived. “We sponsor a plan that meets federal regulations for students and scholars here on certain visa types,” Royer said. “Students are welcome to purchase other coverage if they find something comparable and receive information about waivers from the International Services Office.” Cuthbertson said he has accepted the reality of paying for health insurance during the summer months. “IU is one of the better colleges when it comes to health insurance,” SEE INSURANCE, PAGE 6

By the numbers

$485

Cost of fall insurance

$770

Cost of spring insurance

75%

Students using IU Aetna

25%

Students using approved plans outside IU


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CAMPUS

EDITORS: ASHLEY JENKINS & ANICKA SLACHTA | CAMPUS@IDSNEWS.COM

Music found to help cancer patients cope Researchers at IUPUI discovered writing song lyrics and producing videos helps young adults and adolescents undergoing cancer treatment gain coping skills and resilience-related outcomes, according to a press release.

Few techniques have been able to make a difference in the psychological health of patients, said IU School of Nursing faculty members Joan Haase and Sheri Robb. However, music therapy is providing psychological support.

ACC luncheon promotes student activism the ACC to put on these discussions. DiMatteo said this semester, no one has asked to. He said he suspects this may be why fewer students attended Friday’s event. “I was pleased with amount of participation from the group,” DiMatteo said. “Little bit of a disappointment on how many students came, but with so many things happening on campus, it’s hard to get people to attend different events.” Third-year doctoral student Morgane Flahault said she thinks it’s important for students to attend these events, and doesn’t want cultural differences to get in the way of students attending events outside their comfort zones. “I go to ACC events or La Casa and even though I’m not Latino,” Flahault said. “You feel like you don’t belong to the group, but when you go to the events, the people who organize them make you feel like you’re home.” Flahault said she thought the most important thing Boggs promoted was the idea that everyone is a leader. “She tells people to be their own leaders,” Flahault said. “It helps us to feel empowered. We can do things locally that help rather than be overwhelmed by the larger goals.” DiMatteo said Boggs’ point of starting small is what is going to make a difference in our culture. “There’s a sense of complacency and powerlessness,” DiMatteo said. “It’s

BY SUZANNE GROSSMAN spgrossm@indiana.edu

Students gathered around pizza Friday to learn methods that may, someday, help them change the world. The group crammed into a small room at the Asian Culture Center, huddled around a laptop to watch a short documentary about Grace Lee Boggs. The video showed Boggs, an Asian-American activist who fought for change during the civil rights movement, promoting local activism. “It’s important to have a space where we can talk about things that sometimes are a little bit uncomfortable or discussions you wouldn’t necessarily have with friends,” event co-chair Derek DiMatteo said. The author of five books, Boggs wrote her most recent book, “The Next American Revolution: Sustainable Activism for the Twenty-First Century,” at the age of 95. She’s now 98. Fellow co-chair Lisa Kwong said events like Friday’s promote dialogue between different groups of people, which can create a better community. As an Asian-American, Kwong said she believes it helps with forming a sense of identity. “Growing up in Virginia we didn’t have these discussions, so I didn’t know about people like Grace Lee Boggs,” Kwong said. “It’s awesome to talk about these issues and feel safe.” Last semester, many student groups paired up with

MICHAELA SIMONE | IDS

Graduate students Derek DiMatteo and Lisa Kwong discuss Grace Lee Boggs, a lifelong social activist and feminist, Friday at the Asian Culture Center. Students watched a film about Boggs and then discussed with the graduate students. The event was part of a “Who Are Asian Pacific Americans? Luncheon Talk Series.”

inspiring that you don’t have to lead a revolution or be a figure like MLK. You can lead a revolution in a smaller way by doing something like a community garden.”

DiMatteo said making goals more achievable is less overwhelming for people. A documentary about Boggs’ life and activism will play at 7 p.m. March 28 at IU

Cinema. “Boggs points out that we need to think about interracial activism,” Flahault said. “We all feel the same effects of oppression. Racial minorities are built up

against each other. We need to smash this discourse.” Follow reporter Suzanne Grossman on Twitter @suzannepaige6.

University announces location of proposed medical school receiving a $2 million planning fund from the Indiana General Assembly, according to Vice President for Capital Planning and Facilities Tom Morrison. The campus is proposed to sit between Southeast Fourth, Cherry, Southeast Sixth and Locust Streets, according to Evansville’s 14 WFIE News. Two businesses, Townsquare Media and car dealership D-Patrick Ford,

FROM IDS REPORTS

A six-block plot of land in Evansville now has the IU Medical School’s name on it. The proposed location of the University’s 10th medical school campus was announced last Friday after plans were submitted through December and January by several different companies. IU started directing the planning process after

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will be demolished to make room for the facility. Mayor Lloyd Winnecke said the School will make up for those losses with potential economic growth of $340 million by 2020. About half of Indiana’s physicians received medical training from the IU School of Medicine, according to its website. The expansion in Evansville will only further that trend. The school is

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If the board approves the proposals, IU will schedule interviews with potential construction firms, according to WFIE. The center will take about two years to build and may open for business in summer of 2017. The administration will release a synopsis of the proposals on the school’s website within a week. — Ashley Jenkins

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An analysis of the proposals, which, according to a Dec. 13 IDS article, are rumored to be from entities including University of Southern Indiana, University of Evansville and Ivy Tech Community College, will be submitted to the Board of Trustees in April. Criteria for a proposal included plans for a facility that spans a minimum of 170,000 square feet with room to expand.

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expected to raise the number of resident students from 20 to 150, a 650-percent increase. It will also create 3,000 new jobs, WFIE reported. The Medical School already has more than 60 clinical departments and specialty divisions. Starting in 2030, the facility will reel in about $560 million to $580 million a year, according to an Oct. 30 WFIE article.

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READ& RECYCLE Promote a healthy environment. Share your IDS with a friend and when you’re done, please drop it in a recycling bin.

Vol. 146, No. 163 © 2014

www.idsnews.com Newsroom: 812-855-0760 Business Office: 812-855-0763 Fax: 812-855-8009

Gage Bentley Editor-in-Chief Tori Fater, Kate Thacker Managing Editors Emma Grdina Managing Editor of Presentation Ryan Drotar and Roger Hartwell Advertising Account Executives Timmy Kawiecki, Mary Prusha Creative/Marketing Managers Tyler Fosnaugh Circulation Manager

The Indiana Daily Student and idsnews.com publish weekdays during fall and spring semesters, except exam periods and University breaks. From May-July, it publishes Monday and Thursday. Part of IU Student Media, the IDS is a self-supporting auxiliary University enterprise. Founded on Feb. 22, 1867, the IDS is chartered by the IU Board of Trustees, with the editor-in-chief as final content authority. The IDS welcomes reader feedback, letters to the editor and online comments. Advertising policies are available on the current rate card. Readers are entitled to single copies. Taking multiple copies may constitute theft of IU property, subject to prosecution. Paid subscriptions are entered through third-class postage (USPS No. 261960) at Bloomington, IN 47405.

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Speaker series begins with former diplomat FROM IDS REPORTS

Former Pakistani Ambassador Husain Haqqani began the Global Perspective Speaker Series with a speech Friday in the Indiana Memorial Union State Room. Haqqani served as Pakistan’s ambassador to the United States from 2008-2011 and is now a professor of the practice of international relations at Boston University.

His talk, “Magnificent Delusions: Pakistan, the United States, and an Epic History of Misunderstanding,” is also the title of his most recent book published in November. Following the lecture was a book signing by the former ambassador. The Global Perspectives Speaker Series, presented by the School of Global and International Studies, features public servants, scholars, ac-

tivists and leaders. Speakers can be seen making a difference on the world stage or offer insight into global affairs, according to its website. Shauna Singh Baldwin, a Canadian novelist with Indian heritage, will give the next talk, presented by the Madhusudan and Kiran C. Dhar India Studies Program. — Anna Hyzy

Global Perspectives Speaker Series dates

MICHAELA SIMONE | IDS

Ambassador Husain Haqqani speaks about the relationship between Pakistan and America during the School of Global and International Studies Global Perspectives Speaker Series Friday at the Indiana Memorial Union. Haqqani was Pakistan’s ambassador to the United States from 2008 to 2011, and he is a professor of international relations at Boston University.

Culture on campus: events this week MONDAY Henna 101 5 to 6 p.m. Asian Culture Center Experience the artistry of Indian henna through hands-on experience at the ACC. Participants will learn basic henna technique and designs and are encouraged to bring their friends. African American Read-In and College Panel 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Grand Hall of the NealMarshall Black Culture Center The Neal-Marshall Black Culture Center is kicking off Black History Month with this event. Read-ins consist of a gathering of the IU community to read excerpts, literary works and poems of African-American authors. TUESDAY FNECC Craft Night and Potluck Dinner 6 to 8:30 p.m. First Nations Educational and Cultural Center FNECC is organizing a craft night and dinner Tuesday. The craft will be creating leather pendant pouches, and all craft

materials will be provided. WEDNESDAY Russian Fulbrighters 6:30 to 8 p.m. Global Village, Foster Quadrangle The Global LivingLearning Center residents will play host to Russian Fulbrighters this Wednesday. The Fulbright Program is an international educational exchange program which aims to increase understanding between people in the US and people from other countries. THURSDAY Meeting on GLBT Issues for International Students 6 to 7 p.m. Charter Room, Indiana Memorial Union According to a recent IU survey, the University lacks a support group for international students who identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender or allies. This meeting is the response to that complaint and may initiate a new support group.

Need a great way to kick off your Valentine’s Day?

FRIDAY Calligraphy Lessons 5 to 6:30 p.m. Asian Culture Center Every Friday, Vanessa Niu teaches an informal class on the practice of writing in calligraphy, an ancient East Asian form of writing. Classes are free and open to the public. Portuguese Coffee Hour 4 to 6 p.m. IMU Gallery, by Starbucks The Brazilian Association at IU coordinates this informal event at the IMU every Friday. Students can stop by to practice the language and learn about the culture. Celebrating the Year of the Horse 5 to 9 p.m. IU Auditorium The IU Chinese Scholars and Students Association is organizing a gala to commemorate Chinese New Year. The Spring Festival Gala will include Chinese food, musical guests and comedic performances in Mandarin. — Anicka Slachta

SHAUNA SINGH BALDWIN Singh Baldwin is the author of several books, including “What the Body Remembers,” the story of two women sharing a polygamous marriage and living in occupied India. It received the Commonwealth Prize for Best Book in 2002. Baldwin is also the coeditor of “A Foreign Visitor’s Guide to America”. Her talk will take place at 4 p.m. Feb. 18 in the Indiana Memorial Union State Room East.

JONATHAN JANSEN Jansen is the vice president of the South African Academy of Science and vice chancellor and rector of the University of the Free State, also located in South Africa. He will speak about the topic, “How to Use Global(ized) Thinking in Breaking Down Barriers to Human Togetherness in a Former White University.” His talk is scheduled for noon, March 7, in the School of Education auditorium.

OTHER SPEAKERS Thomas Carothers, vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for Peace, and Richard Lugar, former U.S. senator and a professor of practice in the IU School of Global and International Studies, will also visit IU as part of this series. The time and location of these talks are to be determined. Schedule details about other talks in the series are available now on the SGIS website. —Ashley Jenkins

IU Surplus Stores recycles electronics, saves money FROM IDS REPORTS

One IU organization is saving the environment, one outdated computer at a time. IU Surplus collects piles of unwanted electronic parts, cartridges, computers and cables from IU departments. Instead of throwing them away, IU Surplus either resells or recycles these items. By recycling the parts, IU departments can fix their electronic problems without further harming the environment in the making of new parts or the buying of completely new products. “The production of each computer and monitor can require up to 530 pounds of oil, 48 pounds of chemicals and one and a half tons of water,” Noma Maier, UITS Sustainable IU Services project manager, said in a press release. “Each used computer sold or recycled means those resources do not have to be newly refined, mined

or created. When you think of the number of computers that we’re repurposing, it’s a huge cumulative effect.” Last year alone, IU Surplus resold 9,000 computers, generating $194,000 for the University in the process. In addition to those computers that were sold, countless other computers were recycled, marketing manager for IU Surplus Stores and IU Warehouse Todd Reid said in a press release. IU Surplus encourages University IT professionals to get their hands on the Surplus Stores’ recycled parts rather than buying completely new products. “We have an entire area where computers we can’t refurbish are being torn apart screw by screw for recycling, so anything they need is probably here,” Reid said. “We have cables, wiring, all sorts of things.” IU Surplus doesn’t only serve IU faculty, but also caters to students and the

general Bloomington public. Their inventory is everchanging, but not limited to electronics. Industrial equipment and apartment furniture are among some of the items available, according to the organization’s website. In addition to their website, IU Surplus has a Facebook page where they keep updated information on odds and ends for sale. Information on the page sums up their mission as a company. “Surplus Stores plays an important part in the sustainability efforts of Indiana University,” it reads. “Through sales and recycling programs, Surplus Stores is committed to limiting the University’s environmental foot print, which is beneficial to not only the campus, but the community as a whole.” — Anicka Slachta

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REGION

EDITORS: REBECCA KIMBERLY & MARY KATHERINE WILDEMAN | REGION@IDSNEWS.COM

Purdue professor shot, in fair condition The Methodist Hospital in Indianapolis reported that Purdue professor Marcia Gentry is in fair condition after she was shot by her husband Thursday night. Gentry’s husband apparently committed suicide after shooting his wife.

She was initially in serious condition when she was transported to the hospital. She was shot multiple times in her lower extremities, according to a report by the Indianapolis Star. Gentry is a professor in Purdue’s Department of Educational Studies.

Committee works to develop retail in downtown area BY KATE STARR

kastarr@indiana.edu Members of a new retail committee formed to keep Bloomington’s downtown thriving have met for the last six months to discuss possible new shop front businesses that will best appeal to Bloomington locals and IU students. The committee was organized by Downtown Bloomington Inc. Executive Director Talisha Coppock and Miah Michaelsen, assistant director for the arts for Economic and Sustainable Development. Coppock said the retail committee is comprised of a variety of members representing different interests, from property owners to realtors. “It really is the community coming together to help retail, which helps make the community vibrant and also serves needs,” Coppock said. Michaelsen said the committee hopes to figure out what mix of retailers is optimal for Bloomington’s community. The committee is in its beginning stages, Coppock said, and has not had a chance to start significant reform. “The idea is to identify what we might be looking for and to help make sure that potential retail, as well as current retail businesses, have the right information about demographics,” Michaelsen said. “Who’s shopping downtown, what do they want to spend, what products, what hours are best for them?” Michaelsen also said the committee hopes to facilitate communication between city government, management companies and downtown retailers, both prospective businesses and those that are already established. The board thinks the committee will help draw in potential investors and give them incentive to buy, she added. The committee will provide research and possibly some workshops for retail businesses focused on changing business environments in Bloomington and

in general. “Up until now, we really have relied on word of mouth, someone coming into town seeing a sign in a window for a lease or going to talk to the property owners on their own,” Coppock said. “With this new economy, with Internet competition and with retail continuing to be a tough business, we really need to have savvy owners. They need data.” The retail committee hopes to provide prospective investors with all the information they need to make the best financial decisions for themselves and for Bloomington, Michaelsen said. Michaelsen and Coppock also spoke about the health of the food sector. Though the committee wants to attract new restaurants, it also wants to balance the different types of services downtown has to offer. The city is on board with the committee’s approaching initiatives, Michaelsen said. “I think that there is really a lot of interest and focus on the retail environment downtown,” Michaelsen said. “I think that people are highly motivated. They know that we need only a strong mix of entertainment, restaurant and bar options. “There’s a new commitment and new interest in being much more engaged in that process than there has been in the past,” she added. Both Michaelsen and Coppock said they think the committee will be successful in creating a popular array of retail businesses while appealing to a good number of downtown residents and visitors. However, Coppock said it will not be a quick process. “It’s more of a culture and system of referral. It’s showing spaces and finding people able to plan for those spaces and knowing what spaces might become open,” Coppock said. “We just want to make sure that we have a good balance of different types of services in retail.” —Kate Starr

First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 205 E. Kirkwood Ave. 812-332-4459 fccbloomington.org Sunday: 8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Wednesday: 9 p.m., Disciples Student Fellowship: worship, group discussion and fellowship As God has welcomed us, we welcome you. With all our differences – in age, ability and physical condition, in race, cultural background and economic status, in sexual orientation, gender identity and family structure – God has received each one with loving kindness, patience and joy. All that we are together and all that we hope to be is made more perfect as the richness of varied lives meets the mystery of God’s unifying Spirit, and we become the Body of Christ. Helen Hempfling, Pastor

Check

the IDS every Friday for your directory of local religious organizations, or go online anytime at idsnews.com/religious.

BRIANA PETTY | IDS

Interpretive Naturalist Jill Vance explains the history of bald eagle resurgence during a hike Sunday morning at Stillwater Marsh. Sunday was World Wetlands Day, and the hike aimed to explain wildlife management strategy and wetland ecology.

Hike commemorates wetlands BY MARY KATHERINE WILDEMAN

marwilde@indiana.edu

About ten pairs of boots squished along the half frozen, half waterlogged path in 30-degree weather at Stillwater Marsh on Monroe Lake early Sunday morning. Naturalist Jill Vance led a 1.75-mile hike through the seasonal wetland area, which is managed by the reservoir’s staff. Sunday was World Wetlands Day, an annual international event marking the anniversary of the adoption of the Convention on Wetlands. The convention was signed in Ramsar, Iran, in 1971, and was originally signed by 18 parties. Since then, the number of signatures has increased to 168

participating countries. There are 2,177 Wetlands of International Importance, according to the Ramsar Convention website. “The primary intention of this hike is to showcase what we do as far as managing the land for the wetland complex,” Vance said. The Paynetown Activity Center, also on Monroe Lake, organized activities for children from 1 to 4:30 p.m. in honor of World Wetlands Day. Children could assemble their own 3-D wetland animals and watch films about wetland wildlife while munching on popcorn. The levee path is closed to visitors October through mid-April to create a resting area for the birds. That said,

the birds’ winter won’t be entirely peaceful. “We do provide some limited opportunities for hunters to come in here,” Vance said. “All the funds that we get to manage the habitat and support these wildlife populations actually comes from hunting dollars.” Dolores and Jason Francis, mother and son, said they usually hike throughout the winter and around their home — though not as much as they would have liked in the month of January because of the inclement weather. It was their first visit to Stillwater Marsh. “This is the first time I’ve ever been here, but I’ve been on a good many of Jill’s hikes,” Dolores said. “I just

enjoy these kind of hikes. I always learn something.” The Indiana Wetlands website estimates there are 14,416 acres of wetlands in Monroe County and 1,007,194 acres statewide. “Wetlands are among the world’s most productive environments,” the website for the Convention on Wetlands explains. “They are cradles of biological diversity, providing the water and productivity upon which countless species of plants and animals depend for survival.” Stillwater Marsh is one of Lake Monroe’s seasonal wetlands. Contained by a man-made levee wall, Stillwater is flooded into SEE WETLANDS, PAGE 5


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I N D I A N A D A I LY S T U D E N T | M O N D AY, F E B . 3 , 2 0 1 4 | I D S N E W S . C O M

Market thrives despite weather

Man found in attic with bag of meth and gun

BY CLAIRE WAGGONER

waggonec@indiana.edu Warm temperatures during the weekend brought more people than usual to the Bloomington Winter Farmers’ Market at the Harmony School However, some vendors said the cold weather from the previous weekends has not especially affected customer turnout. Market vendor Julie Thomas of Flower Power said that some days have had less people, but overall there’s still a steady flow of people coming to the market each week. “It isn’t always as busy as today,” Thomas said. “But it’s never been a ghost town, so to speak.” Open from 9 a.m. to noon every Saturday at the Harmony School, the market offers a variety of local vendors selling goods ranging from homemade pies to fresh arugula. Christina Hunter, owner of Hunter’s Honey Farm, said her sales have been fairly regular this winter. Since first selling at the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market in 1984, she’s become accustomed to how the winter market operates. “The summer market is definitely a lot larger, but I still have a lot of people come through,” she said. “The people of Bloomington are very faithful customers.” The atmosphere of the winter market is much dif-

» WETLANDS

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4 one continuous wetland area in the winter months and is closed to visitors from Oct. 1 to April 15. “We have a bunch of different habitats, like a patchwork through this area, so we can support a variety of needs that wildlife are going

FROM IDS REPORTS

LUKE SCHRAM | IDS

Chris Stultz from Living Roots stands with produce Saturday at the Bloomington Winter Farmers’ Market.

ferent than that of the summer market. Enclosed in the gym of the Harmony School, the scents and sounds of the winter market are amplified in the small space. For Saturday’s entertainment, the Eastern European Ensemble performed and featured a singer and various instrumentalists. Loyal customer and Bloomington local Samantha Ezzo said she comes to the farmer’s market every week. She said she loves the market because she’s been able to get to know some of the vendors very well. “You really get to know

to have,” Vance said. Vance said the Monroe Lake reservoir was established in 1974. As the lake was put in, some wetlands were created as well. She added that Stillwater is by far the biggest area in the reservoir. “The intent was — after the lake went in — to create not just a wetland

people here,” she said. “It’s all part of the experience. It’s just so nice to know who’s growing your food and selling it to you.” Bloomington residents Bill and Cindy Walters also said that the vendors are part of why the winter market is so special. “The people here are cooks as well as produce vendors,” Bill said. “They always give great advice on what foods we should make.” The couple decided to stay indoors last weekend because of the cold weather and said that some of the vendors told them that only

area, but a true wetlandmanaged complex,” Vance said. The purpose of Stillwater is primarily to attract wildlife, specifically water fowl, Vance explained. In the summer, fields in Stillwater are planted with corn, millet and other crops. When the area is flooded with water, the birds are

a quarter of the number of people who usually come to the market showed up last Saturday. “Today is about as busy as I’ve seen it,” Cindy said. Julie Thomas said that people are willing to risk the cold in order to come buy the high-quality produce. She said the winter market is especially great for prepared food vendors like herself because they are more easily accessible in the smaller space. “People come because they want to try new products,” she said. “Our customers are foodies, after all.”

provided with an easily accessible source of food and a respite from predators who won’t follow them into the water. Pumps flood the reservoirs in early October, Vance said. The largest pump is 24 inches in diameter, and runs constantly for about ten days, moving 18 to 20 thousand gallons every

Bloomington Police Department used its tactical response team early last Friday morning to find a violent felon hiding in an attic. BPD Sgt. Joe Crider said the Critical Incident Response Team served an arrest warrant for Jeremy Dalton, a 36-year-old man, on a previous charge of possession of a firearm as a serious violent offender. A bag containing more than three grams of methamphetaminewas found on Dalton’s person, as well as a loaded .45-caliber semiautomatic handgun under a bed, with additional boxes of ammunition. BPD detectives used a confidential informant earlier in the week to purchase a handgun from Dalton. After evacuating a residence in the 3000 block of

West Vernal Pike, the CIRT was able to determine that Dalton had secluded himself in the attic. BPD’s response team is a multi-jurisdictional task force trained to handle emergencies such as hostage or barricaded suspect situations, according to the City of Bloomington’s website. Dalton later admitted to being in possession of the drugs and handgun. A prior 2010 conviction of dealing methamphetamine enhanced Dalton’s preliminary charges, Crider said. Dalton faces preliminary charges of possession of methamphetamine with intent to sell, a class A felony, and two counts of possession of a firearm as a serious violent offender, a class B felony, with bond set at $50,000 surety and $1,000 cash. —Dennis Barbosa

Man attempts to rob Journey’s at College Mall FROM IDS REPORTS

A man attempted to rob Journeys in College Mall at 12:57 p.m. Friday. Bloomington Police Department reported the suspect was a 5-foot-7-inch black man in his early- to mid-20s. He was wearing an indigo blue hooded sweatshirt and had his face covered with a gray headband.

minute. The Environmental Protection Agency estimated that Indiana lost 87 percent of its wetlands by the 1980s. “We don’t have nearly as many as we used to,” Vance said. “Although our numbers have trended slightly back up.” Natural wetlands are important to preserve not only

One of two store clerks said she would call security after he demanded money. The suspect pulled out a handgun. The clerks ran to the back of the store, and the suspect fled. There were no injuries and nothing was stolen. The case will be investigated by the BPD. — M.K. Wildeman

for wildlife, but also because they act as a filter for water. World Wetlands Day works to raise awareness of the importance of these reserves. “It’s a celebration of wetlands and what they do for people and animals all around the world,” Vance said. — M.K. Wildeman

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Âť INSURANCE

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Cuthbertson said. “It’s a hassle in general to get insurance.� While he is only at IU for a one-year exchange program, Cuthbertson said he understands the frustrations of the bundled health care plan. “If you come here fulltime from a foreign country, I imagine that’s a lot more frustrating to go back home over the summer and pay needless insurance here,� Cuthbertson said. But he acknowledged that most international students who have the financial means to travel here for school also have the funds for the pricey health plan, he said. “If they’re from developing countries and they can afford tuition, you can assume they’re from wealthier families who can afford health insurance,� he said. “It’s not like they suddenly got burdened with this fee. They knew about it coming here.�

Âť WIN

Tan said he hopes his academic and cultural education at IU will be worth the investment. “It’s really tough for an international student to get a job here,� Tan said. “I’m working my best because I love America.� Even though Cutherbertson will return to England in May, his $770 will pay for American insurance through the month of August. Still, he said he thought it was the best option available. “It’s so much easier to use IU’s plan because you know it is legitimate,� Cuthbertson said. But with the security of legitimacy comes responsibility, he said. “If you are a foreigner here, you are completely in charge of your health,� he said. “The government will not help you.� Follow reporter Hannah Alani on Twitter @hannahalani.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Kevin “Yogi� Ferrell guarding Stauskas and freshman forward Noah Vonleh on Robinson III, the two Wolverines combined to score only 15 points while shooting 5-of15 from the field. As a team, Michigan shot just 40 percent from the field and struggled even more from long range — 3-of-13 on 3-point attempts. Michigan Coach John Beilein said IU’s defensive play prevented his team from finding an offensive flow. “We didn’t get many good shots today and credit their defense,� he said. “They played really good defense. Part plan, part long, athletic kids that were very quick on us.� The Hoosiers’ performance highlighted their renewed devotion to defense. After allowing 80, 73, 76 and 72 points in its first four Big Ten games, IU has smothered its last five opponents, allowing an average 56.6 points per game over that stretch. That defensive performance has allowed IU to go 2-3 in those games despite scoring only 57.4 points per game. Vonleh said the Hoosiers’ defensive prowess has been a result of a return to fundamentals. “We’re just trying to go to the best matchups, be sound, move our feet, talk and communicate, and just play defense really well,� he said. Graduate student guard Evan Gordon added that IU’s mental philosophy on the defensive end helped shut down the Wolverine attack. “I think the key was the communication throughout the game,� Gordon said. “Guys stepped up and made sure that we covered our matchups and did our concepts that we wanted to get to in our game, and you know, we kept our chest in front so they weren’t driving many lanes. I think we did a good job with it.� As the Hoosiers move deeper into Big Ten play, their commitment to defense will be tested even further. Seven of the conference’s top 10 scorers remain on IU’s regular-season schedule, including a rematch with Stauskas, Robinson III and the Wolverines on March 8 in Ann Arbor, Mich. For IU Coach Tom Crean, his team’s energy and ability to stay committed will prove vital to whether its improvement on the defensive end remains. “I think energy wears itself a lot of different ways,� he said. “I think it comes in the activity that you have with your hands, I think it’s the moving feet. “The hardest thing for any of them is that you’ve got to continue to play through it when you’re not having a great game offensively or you’re not getting that confidence from your shot. But the hard part defensively is that every game is different, and you have to understand how that other team wants to win. Today, we understood it for the entire game, and we were successful.�

wasn’t really going to force it. Once I had an opening I was just going to let it fly.� Michigan Coach John Beilein said Ferrell’s play was about as good as a point guard can play. “He’s terrific,� Beilein said. “He only took 10 shots, had 27 points and ran his team. “We had no answers for Yogi.� Ferrell also led Indiana’s defensive charge, which held the Wolverines to 18 made field goals and 40 percent shooting, nine percent below its season average. Ferrell played 37 of 40 total minutes, and spent the majority of his time defending Michigan’s Nik Stauskas. Stauskas, who had scored in double-digit points in 12 straight games, was limited to six points on 1-of-6 shooting from the field. Stauskas was also held without a 3-pointer, and his lone basket of the game came on a layup late in the first half. IU Coach Tom Crean said Ferrell’s level of play and his leadership have taken off this season. “Yogi Ferrell is playing at an extremely high level,� Crean said. “The approach that he takes to it, the leadership that he’s displaying over the last couple weeks, the improvement has been some of the best I’ve seen around.� Michigan’s 52 points Sunday was its lowest offensive output of the season. Beilein said he had never seen anything like Indiana’s defensive strategy in his seven years at Michigan. “Tom and his staff did a really good job,� Beilein said. “The defensive game plan was outstanding. We have never seen anything like it since I’ve been here and we ended up trying to adjust on the fly, and we’ve got to learn from it.� In addition to Ferrell, Indiana had solid contributions from the rest of its team. Freshman forward Noah Vonleh recorded his Big Ten-best ninth doubledouble of the season with 10 points and 12 rebounds. Vonleh helped put the game away in the final minute, scoring four points and pulling in three rebounds. He also showed off his athleticism by jumping up and grabbing a Caris LeVert jumper right out of mid-air, to the delight of the home crowd. With Sunday’s win, Indiana has now won 10 games against Top-10 teams in the last three seasons, tied for most in the country. Three of those wins have come against Michigan, who is 16-1 at Assembly Hall dating back to 1996. The Hoosiers are now tied for fifth in the Big Ten with Ohio State, Wisconsin and Minnesota. Ferrell said afterwards that this win was great for the Hoosiers, especially moving forward in Big Ten play. “This is a great win because Michigan is such a great team,� Ferrell said. “But we got this win with our resilience on defense, and especially the fans cheering us on. It just shows how well we’ve been practicing from the loss to Nebraska. We were very disappointed in the way that we came out the second half, so we didn’t want to have that same letdown, so we wanted to have the same energy for all 40 minutes.� This game, like seemingly every Big Ten conference game this year, could have gone either way. Graduate student guard Evan Gordon wasn’t cleared to play until Sunday morning. Senior wing Will Sheehey fouled out after captaining Indiana’s defense all game. Crean said afterwards that his team had good contributions from the entire unit. “We got a lot of great efforts from a lot of really good young men,� he said. “People that came in the game continued to play hard, impacted the game, so we’re proud of it.�

Follow reporter Alden Woods on Twitter @acw9293.

Follow reporter John Bauernfeind on Twitter @JohnBauernfeind.

CAITLIN O’HARA | IDS

Noah Vonleh grabs a rebound during Sunday's 63-52 win against the Wolverines at Assembly Hall. Vonleh had 10 of the Hoosiers final points, making him the second-highest scorer behind Kevin "Yogi" Ferrell.

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I N D I A N A D A I LY S T U D E N T | M O N D AY, F E B . 3 , 2 0 1 4 | I D S N E W S . C O M

OPINION

EDITORS: CONNOR RILEY & EDUARDO SALAS | OPINION@IDSNEWS.COM

WALK THE LINE

Dylan Farrow pens open letter about abuse Dylan Farrow, adopted daughter of Actress Mia Farrow and Director Woody Allen, recently detailed her history of sexual assault at the hands of her father in an open letter published by the New York Times.

Allen’s representation claims a response from the Director is forthcoming, and that he found the letter to be “untrue and disgraceful.”

EDITORIAL BOARD

WORLD CLASS

At least we’re not Fox News

Indiana’s lethargic legislature

CAROLINE ELLERT is a sophomore majoring in English.

ANDREW GUENTHER is a freshman majoring in political science.

A salon.com writer spent a month using Fox News as his primary news source when reporting. Or, as he put it, “My personal Fox News nightmare: Inside a month of self-induced torture.” Even if you’re one of the many Americans who uses Facebook to receive news, most of us could spend a few minutes watching any Fox News program and immediately be able to identify its political alignment. If you’re conservative, Fox News is gold. If you’re a liberal, like the author of the article, it’s “torture.” I don’t understand how “news” has become so clearly biased. Fox News is an easy target. I almost feel cheap bringing it up. The only people who would argue with me are the people who regularly consume Fox News as a real news source and, of course, the people at Fox News. Fox News makes me cringe. I don’t agree with their views, and much of the content just makes me angry. For example, the hosts of “Fox and Friends” say ridiculous things. In a guest interview they said feminism demonizes men and therefore somehow affects our national security. The fact checkers are still trying to figure that one out. And I can’t help but see links to these stories. Admittedly, Twitter does tend to pick out the stupidest, most Saturday Night Live-worthy clips for me. It’s interesting because I’m actually in a similar position to those at Fox News. As a columnist, I’m basically allowed to write what I want. I will openly confess that I can be just as biased as Fox News anchors. There’s a reason, though, that articles such as this are published with “Opinion” written at the top. Our arguments are supposed to be supported by legitimate facts, not Fox News-style ones. But they are still our biased opinions on everything from politics to pop culture, which we will readily admit. Too bad Fox News doesn’t. Maybe the difference is the clear distinction between news and editorials in publications such as the Indiana Daily Student. Fox News blurs those lines. I suppose you can learn something about the world, but mostly you’ll have to suffer through listening to a bunch of white men and blonde women talk about how President Barack Obama is a socialist. They may have facts, but only the facts that support their agenda — facts that do not support this can be easily omitted. It’s probably the same things readers do with opinion columns. Before I wrote here myself, I tended to follow the columnists whose views were most aligned with mine. I wasn’t altogether interested in hearing a different take on something, but I am now, because I know that my fellow columnists are intelligent writers who will not make baseless arguments. We may have biases, but that is why we encourage people who disagree to email us, follow us on Twitter, or write a letter to the editor. We don’t write these columns to force you to agree with us. We write them to make you think. Hopefully, the biggest difference between IDS Opinion and Fox News is that reading this column was slightly better than “self-induced torture.” — cjellert@indiana.edu Follow columnist Caroline Ellert on Twitter @cjellert.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY ZACK WORCEL

Frat and balanced

Greek life at IU generally draws two opinions from the student population — you love it, or you hate it. With men’s spring recruitment kicking off today, those viewpoints are likely to be cemented once the process concludes for greek hopefuls. More than 5,000 students are involved in 65 different greekrelated organizations. It’s pretty unavoidable around campus. Most students form an opinion on the system one way or another, and usually the viewpoints are pretty black and white. If you’re in it, you support it. If you’re not, well, you don’t. The non-greek population on campus has less than positive things to say about fraternities in particular. Although there are many instances in which judgments are made off of cold hard facts and personal experiences, many of the stories spread about the greek system can be pinned to a small percentage of fraternities and sororities, making the criticism a blanket judgment. Yes, fraternities get a bad rap for supporting an “eat, sleep, drink” lifestyle. But it’s also important to keep in mind IU’s greek system presents more than that. Students involved in a

fraternity or sorority consistently earn higher GPAs than non-greek undergraduate students. In 2011, the average sorority and fraternity GPA was a 3.2, compared to a non-greek undergraduate average GPA of a 3.1. In addition to scholarship, the greek system at IU focuses on involvement in philanthropy and volunteer work. Thousands of dollars are raised annually by the sororities and fraternities on IU’s campus to support charitable causes. Zeta Tau Alpha in particular raises almost $200,000 each year for the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. This isn’t a sales pitch. It’s an honest evaluation of what is commonly overlooked when analyzing fraternities. However, while fraternities do plenty of good, some also display severe issues in their culture that can’t be overlooked by how much money is raised at IU’s Dance Marathon. Hazing, cultural insensitivity, increased risk of sexual assault, sexism, a tacit belligerence toward progressive ideology, homophobia and a childish contempt for the larger non-greek population are all reasons many have a negative view of fraternities, even if it’s just a small pool that actually has a hand in this.

Though some may say it is questionable to use any sort of allencompassing criticism of greek life — since so much varies from chapter to chapter — the fact is that these things do happen in at least one chapter on our campus. And one chapter is one too much. If the greek system itself can’t or won’t keep them accountable, we will. Becoming a part of greek life is a personal choice, and deciding either way isn’t right or wrong. But being greek is a privilege, not a right. Any group that hampers progress on our campus will continue to hear from the Editorial Board. Still, we must keep in mind that even though there are unpleasant frat boys and rude sorority girls, there are also unpleasant and rude people across campus who don’t wear greek letters. Most importantly, there are fraternities and sororities that are actively leading the way in making the greek system a safer and more inclusive space. And they should know they have the Editorial Board’s unilateral and continuing support in doing so. — opinion@idsnews.com Follow the Editorial Board on Twitter @ids_opinion.

SIDEBAR WITH SYDNEY

Disinfecting the Internet Freelance journalist Amanda Hess kicked off the New Year with a fiery essay in the Pacific Standard magazine about her experience with online harassment. She recounted an instance during which she received a series of sexual and hostile tweets, culminating in this threat — “You are going to die and I am the one who is going to kill you. I promise you this.” When I read Hess’ article for the first time, I was horrified and completely taken by surprise. I know that misogynistic creeps lurk around the Internet, and sometimes they stalk and harass people. However, I had never considered the possibility that this harassment could lead to threats of violence, rape and even death. Of all the people who experience online harassment, the vast majority are women. A whopping 72.5 percent of people who reported online abuse between 2000 and 2012 were

women. Most high-profile victims of online harassment are female journalists, reporters, bloggers and editors. However, other women in the public sphere are not free from the attention of these creeps, either. Texas state Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, received a particularly vile string of tweets from the former Executive Director of South Carolina’s Republican Party, Todd Kincannon. Included in the barrage of insults was “The best thing about the Wendy Davis fiasco is this: It proves that you can still call a whore a whore. Feminazis ain’t won yet, my friends.” And “In other news, Wendy Davis took a short break from blowing ‘campaign contributors’ today to condemn remarks made by Mike Huckabee ...” Vitriol expressed toward women is nothing new, and name-calling and hateful language has been around since we can remember. However, that doesn’t make

it acceptable for society to tell the victims of online harassment to just “ignore” threatening or offensive comments or tweets they receive. Unfortunately, that is exactly the response Amanda Hess received after reporting her experience of harassment on Twitter to the authorities. Back in the days before the Internet, when people made threats to rape or kill someone, it was usually possible to get a restraining order against them. But because the legal system has yet to evolve with the technology and figure out a way to respond productively to anonymous online threats, victims of harassment on the Internet are especially vulnerable. Misogynistic slime on the Internet comes from deep, dark and isolated crevices that breed hatred and choke out tolerance. It’s our job in an interconnected society to shine a light on this scum and

SYDNEY HOFFERTH is a senior majoring in political science.

make it widely known that harassing people online, female or otherwise, is unacceptable. As former Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis said, “Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants.” I want to be part of an Internet that doesn’t accept harassment as a fact of life. I want to feel safe and comfortable having a public online presence, even though I am a woman. In order for these things to happen, we have to shine our collective high beam headlights on the creeps, and watch the sunlight disinfect the Internet of its intolerance and hatred. —sydhoffe@indiana.edu Follow columnist Sydney Hofferth on Twitter @squidhoff10.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR POLICY The IDS encourages and accepts letters to be printed daily from IU students, faculty and staff and the public. Letters should not exceed 350 words and may be edited for length and style. Submissions must include the person’s name, address and telephone number for verification.

Letters without those requirements will not be considered for publication. Letters can be mailed or dropped off at the IDS, 120 Ernie Pyle Hall, 940 E. Seventh St., Bloomington, Ind., 47405. Submissions can also be sent via e-mail to letters@idsnews. com. Questions can be directed to the IDS at 855-0760.

Indiana Daily Student, Est. 1867 Website: idsnews.com

The opinions expressed by the editorial board do not necessarily represent the opinions of the IDS news staff, student body, faculty or staff members or the Board of Trustees. The editorial board comprises columnists contributing to the Opinion page and the Opinion editors.

Indiana has a habit of stepping backward instead of forward. The Hoosier state has been in the news for treating gay men and women like they aren’t people, restricting women’s access to abortion or pushing for education reform that doesn’t do anything. When we elect legislators we expect them to legislate. We expect them, additionally, to legislate effectively. Unfortunately, our representatives and senators in Indianapolis aren’t being effective. Nor do they even seem to be in touch with what Indiana residents need from their government. Our legislature is instead so lethargic and so self-involved that they’ve seemingly decided that their job doesn’t affect those of us who put them into office in the first place. Indiana and her residents face a myriad of problems and challenges every single day. Problems such as how Indiana education has been continually falling in national rankings since 2010. We’re continually one of the least healthy states, with some of the highest rates of obesity, smoking, diabetes and lack of child immunizations. Perhaps the state legislature would be interested to know that, according to the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Assault Committee, one in five women in Indiana have been raped. Maybe the fiscal conservatives would like to know that Indiana is one of the worst states for entrepreneurs, too. Every two years, the Indiana Legislature is in session for only 91 scheduled days, with 61 of those days being dedicated to the state budget and the remaining 30 in short session years. Logically, and perhaps a bit naively, we’d like to think our government would, in this short amount of time, be passing meaningful education reform, effective health programs, sexual assault prevention strategies or fiscal stimulus for small business owners. And of course, we’d be wrong. Instead, the Indiana Statehouse has been busy tackling issues they feel are much more important then educating our children or preventing rape. House Joint Resolution 3, the constitutional amendment to ban gay marriage in Indiana, has taken up a large amount of time in the statehouse. Sen. Jean Leising R-Oldenburg has decided that cursive is so important to Indiana education that she’s proposed the same law — which mandates cursive be taught in all Indiana schools — for the third year in a row. State Rep. Jim Lucas RSeymour has proposed a bill to allow licensed gun owners to keep firearms locked in their vehicles on school campuses. The bill died in committee within a few days of proposal. I am sick of our Indiana Legislature mirroring the U.S. Congress. Our legislature has a only short amount of time to make a positive change in the lives of Hoosiers. And regardless of your opinion on gay marriage, cursive or guns on college campuses, they won’t solve our problems. The news is always reporting on big bills meant to solve issues about energy, education, healthcare or drugreform in other states. Meanwhile, Indiana only gets in the news for moving backwards and wasting time. We deserve better. — ajguenth@indiana.edu Follow columnist Andrew Guenther on Twitter @GuentherAndrew.


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PHOTOS BY CAITLIN O’HARA | IDS

Jessica Parratto practices a back one and a half with one and a half twists off the five-meter platform Jan. 27 at the Counsilman-Billingsley Aquatic Center. Parratto is on track to compete in the qualifications for the Summer 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janero, Brazil. She finished 9th in the Olympic Trials for London in 2012 when she was 17.

THE ART of

BY MICHAEL MAJCHROWICZ mmajchro@indiana.edu

The diver climbs the stairs to the top of the tower, bracing for the three-story leap. She’s trained most of her life in this sport. But every time she ascends, the buried fear remains. She reaches the platform, buries her face into her hands and disappears into her thoughts. Thirty-three feet above the water, she scans her surroundings. Her pool, on her campus. In the diver’s mind, her training center in Bloomington transforms into the Olympic arena in Rio de Janeiro, where she hopes to compete in 2016. The three-time national champion sees herself standing on the tower before the judges. In her head, the announcer calls her name over the loud speaker. “Jessica Parratto.” The diver steps to the end of the platform, looks forward and opens her arms wide, counting down. With one swift motion, she’s airborne, leaping into a reverse dive. She feels herself falling — flying — for three seconds. Parratto folds into a tight “V” shape reaching past her toes, then stretching for the blue surface. Her taut body pierces the water with a rip, like the sound of a paper sheet being torn in two. If she’s going to make it to Rio, every dive — every rip — counts. *** At Indiana, a university rich with Olympic history, the tower divers push themselves toward something they know cannot be attained: perfection. The summer Olympics are a mere two years away, close to no time at all for athletes like Parratto, 19, a freshman fighting to secure a bid in the 2016 games. Through the decades, more than a dozen IU divers have earned a place on the Olympic team. The walls behind the towers are covered in large posters, god-like images of former IU Olympians who loom over the divers as they train. The greats who flew from the same tower are here. Above the pool, the Olympic banner hangs high beside the American flag, a constant reminder of what’s at stake. Coach Drew Johansen stands near the water’s edge, assessing

FALLING

a diver flipping from the springboard. The pair of eyes tattooed on his right calf tell the divers that even when his back is turned, he’s still watching. Now 44 years old, Johansen’s life has revolved around this sport. As a diver at Arizona State University, his mentors — the people he looked up to most — were diving coaches. Even his wife is a twotime Olympic diver. Johansen coached the U.S. Olympic Team to four medals in London in 2012. If he retains the position come 2016, he’s hoping at least one of his IU divers will be there with him. He molds his coaching around the psyches of each of his divers. On the tower, divers surrender apprehension, placing their trust in the coach who put them up there. Their relationship builds a little each day. “It takes a while,” Johansen says, “especially when you’re telling these kids to do things that are quite literally terrifying.” Otherwise, hesitation leads to mistakes. Mistakes lead to injuries. It’s hard not to feel intimidated looking down from the top of the 10-meter tower. When descending toward the water at about 30 miles per hour, perfect execution is crucial. A faulty takeoff from the diving tower can be dangerous, even deadly. Thirty-one years ago, during the World University Games, a 21-year-old Soviet diver hit his head after he failed to clear enough space between his body and the tower. He slipped into a week-long coma and died of his injuries. Five years later, an Australian diver was killed during practice when he, too, failed to clear the tower during takeoff — smashing his head on the platform, then crashing into the water below. All divers, says Coach Johansen, face fear every time they climb the tower. Even Olympic champions. “It’s how they use that fear that determines whether they can perform or not,” says the coach. “It’s a constant part of this sport.” Fear isn’t the only constant. Habit and ritual keep the divers disciplined, which creates consistency. The athletes adapt. Throughout their training, the tower divers practice the art of illusion. While in competition, judges SEE DIVE, PAGE 10

TOP Conor Murphy, Kate Hillman and Parratto laugh about something that happened the weekend before after practice Jan. 27 at the Counsilman-Billingsley Aquatic Center. MIDDLE Parratto approaches the ten meter diving tower during afternoon practice Jan. 15 at the Counsilman-Billingsley Aquatic Center. The center is plastered with posters of past IU Olympians, including the poster pictured here of swimmer Jim Montgomery, who won three gold medals at the 1976 Summer Olympic Games in Montreal. BOTTOM Head Coach Drew Johansen critiques Murphy’s dive and offers advice for his next round during the Hoosiers’ meet against University of Lousiville on Jan. 31 at the Counsilman-Billingsley Aquatic Center.


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HOOSIER OLYMPIANS 2012 CHRISTINA LOUKAS Springboard diving - 8th

2008 CHRISTINA LOUKAS Springboard Diving - 9th

2004 CASSANDRA CARDINELL 10m Synchronized platform diving - 7th SARA HILDEBRAND 10m Synchronized P\platform diving - 7th 10m Platform diving - 10th KIMIKO SOLDATI Springboard diving - 21st

2000

PHOTOS BY CAITLIN O’HARA | IDS

TOP Parratto walks to the ten-meter platform during practice Jan. 27. As she approaches the end of the platform, she pictures successfully completing her dive in her mind. BOTTOM George Andrews and Murphy laugh with Swimming and Diving Athletic Trainer, Jen Hamilton, after morning practice on Jan. 31. Murphy tweaked his back during practice the week before and was receiving electrical muscle stimulation and ice treatment.

» DIVE

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9 view a dive from only a single vantage point. Judges, for example, will never see a diver’s split tuck or pike position in a somersault — a method used to increase the rotation and momentum of certain dives. The judges have their own ideas of what perfection means in this sport. Some might place more emphasis on the diver’s entry. Another might look more closely at the diver’s form in the air. The divers can never be perfect. They can only master the illusion of perfection. They try to learn these ideals of perfection and reflect that for the judges. As Johansen says, the divers put on a show. “They’re kind of like magicians.” *** At afternoon practice, the coach stands watching his divers pick over the contents of a pink box. Inside are red velvet cookies drizzled with cream cheese frosting, a late birthday celebration for Conor Murphy. Murphy, 22, last year’s Big Ten champion on tower, will retire from the sport after he graduates in May. He isn’t vying for an Olympic bid, but there is still work to be done. This isn’t the time to lose focus or discipline. Not so close to championship season. The cookie is a sweet indulgence. “I don’t even want to look at you guys eating those things,” Johansen says, only half joking. The divers each take just one cookie. They eat quickly and immediately continue the workout, practicing somersaults, running laps and walking the length of the pool deck performing high kicks. Murphy climbs the stairs. “Alright, birthday boy,” says the coach, “you gonna rip something for us today?” On the tower, there’s room for multiple divers to stand. Parratto watches from behind as Murphy prepares for his dive. “Let’s go, Conor!” she shouts. On the ledge, Murphy looks ahead, taking a deep breath — his body upright, standing exactly three paces from the edge. Exactly three paces. His back faces the water. He runs his fingertips through his red

hair, pushing it back. He rubs his palms together and brushes them down his waist. Hair, palms, waist, in that order. Always. Parratto doesn’t laugh at his ritual. Nobody does, because the divers all have rituals of their own. With repetition, these movements and gestures have become a part of each dive. Murphy stands facing the water, thinking about just one part of his dive to avoid becoming overwhelmed. He blocks out everything else. Leaping forward, away from the tower, he somersaults backwards. Having not performed the dive regularly yet, a reverse three and a half somersault — once called “the dive of death” after the Soviet diver was killed — makes a splashy entry. Before the diver can surface, the coach is ready with his corrections. Murphy tries the dive at least two more times during that practice. But between each attempt, he rises up out of the water, and walks toward the showers behind the diving towers. The showers remain on during the entire practice, even when nobody is under them. Murphy stands in the shower until his muscles relax under the hot water. He climbs the staircase to the tower for another dive, his feet slapping against the slick concrete stairway. Once a diver reaches the top, there’s no turning back. The only respectable way down is by dive. If a diver freezes during competition and is unable to complete a dive, he or she is forced to walk down, passing the other competitors that congregate in the staircase. Coach Johansen calls it the “walk of shame.” *** At night, as Johansen’s magicians sleep, elite teams from countries on the other side of the world are training. In diving, countries such as China, Great Britain and Russia are home to some of the fiercest competitors this sport has seen. In China — a nation known for raising world diving champions — hand-picked child athletes train at state schools where competing isn’t solely a passion, but a duty. For families, a child working his or her way to national champion status is a road to certain fame and wealth. In the 2008 Olympics, China

clinched all but one diving gold medal. The United States came through in 2012, winning gold in the men’s platform event. The IU divers begin and end their days at the pool, twice a day, six days a week. They begin as early as 6:30 a.m. with afternoon practices concluding at 5 p.m. The amount of hours spent training equate to a full-time job. Parratto is a member of the Olympic performance squad, a tier of the U.S. national team composed of specially-selected Olympian hopefuls. She’s always in competition. Mostly with herself. “I don’t want to think about outcome,” she says. “I want to think about what I have to do at that moment.” She grew up on the pool deck. At 14, Parratto uprooted her life in New Hampshire and moved across the country to Indianapolis to train at USA Diving’s National Training Center. Her training regimen doubled, and she lived with a family she’d never met. She was 17 when she placed ninth in her first Olympic trials. As the winter Olympics begin this month, Parratto sees the five rings everywhere — stories of victors and underdogs on television and countdown posts on her Twitter feed. *** On an afternoon in January, spectators crowd around a window outside the practice, gawking as Parratto and Murphy jet off the tower, one after the other. “They’re so ripped,” a girl says, “it’s not funny.” Lost in concentration, the divers don’t even notice the onlookers anymore. They joke and dance with one another between turns as R. Kelly’s “Ignition” remix blares above from the training mix tape. “It’s the remix to ignition / Hot and fresh out the kitchen.” The divers sing along and laugh at stories from the weekend, poking fun at one another. Then suddenly, practice stops. An 18-year-old freshman diver, Alex Davis, somersaults backwards from a lower tower. He threw his head back on takeoff, performing a layout. He was practicing the somersault as a lead-up skill for a bigger dive. On the way down, he hits his head, bashing it into the tower. The coach remains still, standing at the edge of the pool as he

waits for the man to surface. “Are you OK, Alex?” Johansen calls out. The coach doesn’t run or yell or plunge into the pool. He’s learned the key is to never overreact. The diver pulls himself out of the pool as the lifeguard springs from his high chair and runs to meet him standing beneath the towers. The diver places his hands on top of his head. No blood or even a gash, just pain and a stiff neck. The others look below from on top of the tower, talking among one another, debating whether or not they think an ambulance would be called. Johansen and the lifeguard walk the freshman to a bench. The fallen diver sits back on the bench leaning against the wall as the staffers surround him. His pillow is an ice pack. They jot notes as the freshman walks them through the dive that went wrong. Following that day’s practice, the team gathers around the video replay system and watches the accident unfold on the monitor. Rewind. Pause. Play. Rewind. Pause. Play. The divers laugh, not out of ridicule, but to make light of the mishap they know could have been worse. The video loops back and forth. Standing in the back, her laughter mingling with the others, Parratto looks at the picture of her teammate colliding with the tower. But inside, she’s shaken. She’s reminded of the time she hit the tower while kicking out of a back one and a half somersault. She wasn’t seriously injured, but the moment still lingers in her mind. She has never made the mistake since. It’s hard to forget the sensation of kicking a cement block midair. *** Parratto arrives back at her dorm after practice and prepares a bowl of mac and cheese. The SpongeBob-shaped noodles are her favorite. In her room, she glances at the poster featuring divers from the 2005 World Cup, a gift from her 16th birthday. This spring, she’ll compete at Beijing and London for the world series against divers she’s likely to encounter one day in Rio. She hopes that one day she’ll be on someone else’s poster. At night, as Parratto lays in bed, her thoughts return to diving. She counts the 29 months that remain until the Olympic trials. Sometimes, her thoughts drift to her fears — getting lost in the air mid-somersault and flopping into the pool. Even in her dreams, Parratto sees herself flying from the tower, sometimes performing the “dive of death.” Perfection. She never knows whether she’s dreaming until she hits the water and twitches awake. She wakes by 5:45 a.m. the next morning and gathers her things for practice. Before dawn, while most of the city sleeps, the diver climbs the tower staircase. The metal handrails are slick and cold under her wrinkled palms. When she makes it to the top, the Olympic gods on the wall are still watching over her. Follow reporter Michael Majchrowicz on Twitter @mjmajchrowicz.

SARA REILING Platform diving - 13rd

1996 MARK LENZI Springboard diving 3rd

1992 MARK LENZI Springboard diving 1st NIKI STAJKOVIC (AUSTRIA) Springboard diving

1980 NIKI STAJKOVIC (AUSTRIA) Platform diving - 8th Springboard diving

1976 NIKI STAJKOVIC (AUSTRIA) Platform diving

CYNTHIA POTTER Springboard diving 3rd SCOTT CRANHAM (CANADA) Platform diving Springboard diving

1972 RICK EARLEY Platform diving - 6th NIKI STAJKOVIC (AUSTRIA) Platform diving SCOTT CRANHAM (CANADA) Platform diving Springsboard diving CYNTHIA POTTER Springboard diving - 7th

1968 JIM HENRY Springboard diving 3rd WIN YOUNG Platform diving 3rd RICK GILBERT Platform diving CYNTHIA POTTER Springboard diving LUIS NINO DE RIVERA (MEXICO)

Springboard diving - 4th Platform diving LESLEY BUSH HICKCOX Platform diving

1964 LESLEY BUSH Platform diving 1st TOM DINSLEY (CANADA) Platform diving Springboard diving LUIS NINO DE RIVERA (MEXICO)

Platform diving - 10th Springboard diving KEVIN SITZBERGER Springsboard diving 1st


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I N D I A N A D A I LY S T U D E N T | M O N D AY, F E B . 3 , 2 0 1 4 | I D S N E W S . C O M

HOOPS WITH HOOP

Ode to Yogi Ferrell We are not worthy. Sophomore guard Kevin “Yogi” Ferrell put on a virtuoso performance Sunday. It was maybe the best two-way showing an IU player has had this season. This season’s team, burdened by inconsistent play that makes fans want to pull their hair out, shocked the college basketball world again. IU (14-8, 4-5) defeated No. 10 Michigan (16-5, 8-1) yesterday 63-52. When IU knocked off Michigan, previously undefeated in the Big Ten, Ferrell carried the team on his back. Both on offense and defense, Ferrell played out of his mind. He was 7-of-8 from behind the arc en route to a gamehigh 27 points. Michigan Coach John Beilein adjusted to a 1-3-1 zone late in the game to try and cool down Ferrell, but it didn’t work. “We had no answers for Yogi,” Beilein said. “He wasn’t passing it. They only had six assists today. It wasn’t an assist game. It was, ‘Get the ball into Yogi’s hands.’” No defensive scheme could defeat Ferrell. If he had been playing NBA JAM, the ball would have been flaming the entire second half. Perhaps even more impressive was his defense. Ferrell had the job of guarding the 6-foot-6 sharpshooter Nik Stauskas, who was averaging 18.6 points a game in the Big Ten. Stauskas finished with six points. Four of those points came from free throws. He shot 1-of6 from the field. So not only was Ferrell keeping the Hoosiers afloat on offense, he was suffocating one of the conference’s best scorers on defense. Ferrell needs the credit he deserves. Freshman forward Noah Vonleh is the team’s most NBA-ready player. And he was no scrub either Sunday, boasting 10 points and 12 rebounds in 30 minutes.

EVAN HOOPFER is a sophomore majoring in journalism.

But this is Ferrell’s team. Hell, this is Ferrell’s state. Coming into this season, Ferrell needed to become the No. 1 scoring option. And he did. Last year, he was a 30 percent 3-point shooter. This year he’s an absurd 44 percent from behind the arc. That number is even more staggering when you consider he’s taken the bulk of shots, and teams’ game plans revolve around stopping the Indianapolis native. And don’t forget about his mad handles. With a little more than 12 minutes remaining, Ferrell crossed his defender up at the top of the key so bad Assembly Hall was filled with “ooh’s” and “ahh’s.” He finished at the rim to give IU a 37-31 lead. Ferrell is the perfect leader for this team. He’s a scrappy, hard-nosed hustler who exudes confidence. He is the player IU fans identify with. If you walk past a court where guys are playing pickup basketball, they emulate his moves and yell, “Yogi!” as they attempt a pull-up 3-pointer. He’s the player your mom remembers, partly because she likes rooting for the little guy — he’s 6-feet tall — and partly because he has a cool name. He’s the player little kids in Indiana watch and then go out in 40 degree weather to practice their crossover. To be just like Yogi. He’s the player who won this game. Although Vonleh may be the most talented Hoosier, Ferrell is the most valuable. Nobody can come to a consensus on what a Hoosier actually is. But everybody knows Yogi Ferrell is a Hoosier in the truest sense of the word. — ehooopfer@indiana.edu

FOLAKE OSIBODU | THE DAILY ILLINI

Freshman guard Larryn Brooks guards Illinois' Sarah Hartwell during the game at the State Farm Center in Champaign, Il. on Sunday. The Hoosiers won 77-58, ending a streak of 22 consecutive Big Ten losses on the road.

Hoosiers defeat Illini 77-58 BY SAM BEISHUIZEN sbeishui@indiana.edu

The streak is over. IU defeated Illinois 77-58 in Champaign, Ill., on Sunday. The win snaps a streak of 22 consecutive Big Ten losses on the road — a string of defeats that extended back to Feb. 10, 2011. It’s the first time that a Hoosier team led by IU Coach Curt Miller has won a Big Ten game away from Assembly Hall. “It’s one of the monkeys we wanted to get off our backs as a program as I’ve taken over,” he said. “We’re proud to finally stop talking about no road wins for a long time for this program in our building stage.” Two days after a six-point loss to Northwestern caused Miller to question his team’s confidence, IU opened with one of their best offensive halves of the season.

IU shot 15-of-29, 51.7 percent, from the field and hit six 3-pointers in the opening 20 minutes of play. A layup from senior forward Simone Deloach, followed by a 3-pointer from freshman guard Taylor Agler, sparked a 17-1 run between the 14:45-10:54 marks in the first half. The 16-point swing gave the Hoosiers a commanding 34-15 lead and, more importantly, confidence. “Tonight’s key was our start,” Miller said. “We made shots early after the shooting performance that we had in our last game. For us to start that way in the first five or six minutes really gave us more confidence that we could play with this team.” Both offenses went cold in the closing minutes of the opening half. The Hoosiers and Illini combined to go nearly four minutes without registering

a single point in the closing stretch of the first half, but as the second half got underway, the Hoosier offense heated up once again. IU went on a 16-5 run to extend its lead to 59-36 with 12:13 remaining in the game. Their lead would get as high as 26 points after a 3-pointer from Taylor Agler with just under five minutes remaining. Freshman guard Alexis Gassion shot 8-of-10 from the field — including 4-of-5 from behind the 3-point line — to register a career-high 22 points to lead IU’s offense. Illinois’ mixture of manto-man and “Buzz” defenses led to IU turning the ball over 21 times. Miller said IU struggled at times with holding onto the ball, but said the game was an improvement when compared to the 25 turnovers IU had against Illinois last season. “We weren’t perfect

tonight against the ‘Buzz’ defense and their zone,” Miller said. “But we were much better than we were last year.” IU made up for its inability to hold onto the ball on the glass, out-rebounding Illinois 45-26. IU’s win snaps a threegame losing streak during which the team was beaten by an average of 9.3 points per game. IU will return home to Assembly Hall for four of its next five games. With the Big Ten season far from over, Miller said the win against the Illini gave the Hoosiers a boost of confidence heading down the final stretch of the season. “Tonight, against a team that we view ourselves a lot alike — rebuilding — a team in the rebuilding stage, that’s a big win for us,” Miller said. Follow reporter Sam Beishuizen on Twitter @Sam_Beishuizen.

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ARTS

Seth Meyers leaves Saturday Night Live Saturday night was actor and comedian Seth Meyers’ final night on “Saturday Night Live.” Former co-stars Amy Poehler, Tina Fey, Bill Hader, Fred Armisen and Andy Samburg

EDITORS: RACHEL OSMAN & SARAH ZINN | ARTS@IDSNEWS.COM

returned and joined him in saying goodbye. Meyers is set to replace Jimmy Fallon on NBC’s talk show “Late Night.” The actor spent 12 years on SNL, and five as the anchor for the “Weekend Update” sketch.

University tWits perform sketch comedy BY SARAH ZINN sjzinn@indiana.edu

Before their performances, members of the student comedy group the University tWits always huddle in a circle to get psyched for the show, junior and cast member Eli Magers said. This, combined with the energy and excitement from the audience, creates an atmosphere similar to the one he said they felt last Friday, when the group performed for the first time this semester. The show, “The University tWits Save the Day,” began at 9 p.m. in the Fine Arts building and was superherothemed. “A lot of people came out — it was great,” Magers said. The student group, consisting of eight members, writes and acts out short comedic sketches they work on before each monthly performance. They perform a series of sketches on the last Friday of every month. Adding a new aspect to its set last Friday, the tWits had IU student Jordan Mather-Licht open with a 20-minute-stand up routine. Magers said it helped loosen up the crowd. “Some people end up

acting more, some people end up writing more,” Magers said. Magers said he loves the people he works with, but also just loves comedy. “I love comedy because it’s fun and can lead to a compelling story,” he said. Magers said he loves constructing a story with the element of humor. “My favorite part about being in the tWits is writing, honestly,” Magers said. He wrote two of the sketches that were chosen to be performed. One was a monologue by an immigrant worker named Brock, who had a new, frustrating business. Another was a robot love story. “I try not to perform in my sketches because I want an outside perspective of how it’s going. So I always attempt to write my characters for other people,” he said. Magers said performing in front of people is fantastic. “It’s just being able to put a lot of time and effort into a project, putting it out there and having a positive reaction,” Magers said. Follow reporter Sarah Zinn on Twitter @sarah_zinn.

ASHLEY SPESAR | IDS

The University tWits take a bow after their show Friday. Performers Erin Corcoran, Marc Ranucci, Shelby Plummer, Amy Corson, Maggie Scudder, Eli Magers, Lilah Taber and Joe Cadiff stand left to right.

Burroughs Century festival begins IU alums, faculty Cultural subversion was a way of life for novelist William Burroughs. Challenging the social, moral and political systems in America, the writer was one of the leading voices of the Beat Generation during the mid-20th century, along with renowned authors Jack Kerouac and Allan Ginsberg. Preachers of nonconformity and spontaneous creativity, the Beat Generation had a pervasive effect on cultural ideas in the post-Word War II era, which is hypothesized to have been the basis of later hippie and counter-culture movement. In honor of what would have been Burroughs’ 100th birthday, Bloomington created “Burroughs Century,” a festival celebrating his influence. It will run Wednesday through Sunday, and will feature film screenings, performances and other ceremonial events.

LYDIA LUNCH FILM SCREENING A film screening of “Performance, Sex and Punk Feminism: 1970s to Present,” will be shown at 1 p.m. Wednesday at the IU Cinema. Admission is free.

ILLUSTRATION BY CONNOR RILEY

EVERYTHING IS PERMITTED: THE LIFE AND WORK OF WILLIAM S. BURROUGHS Manuscripts and correspondence from the Burroughs Archive at Ohio State will be on display Monday at the Lilly Library. The following Thursday there will be a lecture with John Bennett and Geoff Smith at 12:30 p.m. Admission is free.

PULSE

WILLIAM S. BURROUGHS BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION The celebration will be from 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday at the Grunwald Gallery. Admission is $25. MARK HOSLER AT THE BISHOP The singer, a member of culture jamming band Negativland, will perform 9 p.m. Wednesday at the Bishop. Admission is $5. HOLOGRAPHIC PERFORMANCE An evening of chamber music performed by HOLOGRAPHIC will take place at 9 p.m. Thursday at The Bluebird Nightclub.

TERRY RILEY AT THE BCT Musician Terry Riley will play “In C” at 9 p.m. Thursday at the Buskirk-Chumley Theater. Admission is $10. LYDIA LUNCH READS BURROUGHS Feminist speaker Lydia Lunch will read works by Burroughs 9 p.m. Friday at the Bishop. Admission is $12. CLOSING NIGHT BALL The ball will take place at 9 p.m. Saturday at The Back Door. BURROUGHS FILM SERIES The series will include the Burroughs Balch Films, and will be showed from Thursday through Sunday at the IU Cinema. BURROUGHS SYMPOSIUM The symposium will take place Thursday at various locations listed on the festival’s website, burroughscentury.org. — Sarah Zinn

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release indie album ‘Life Songs’ Jan. 20 KATIE HOGUE kkhogue@indiana.edu

B-Town House Band, a band comprised of several IU students and alumni recently released their indie album, “Life Songs.” Released on Jan. 20, the album consists of a mix of folk, pop, rock, blues and some Latin songs, IU faculty and band member Ann Elsner said. Elsner said the band first formed when she wanted to record a song she had written for her niece’s daughter, who was going to have surgery. Elsner had other relatives contribute to the track and then gave it to girl. “It really did help,” Elsner said. “It was a case where music really did help.” Since then, Elsner has had other relatives and friends contribute to the album, she said. IU graduate Ben Fowler also had a leading role in helping compile the album. “Everyone on the album is someone I knew or a friend of Ben’s,” Elsner said. “The band got its name after the fact that the first meeting was in Ben Fowler’s house.” Elsner said she first got into writing songs after taking drum lessons from Fowler. At her first recital, she noticed that many students had written their own songs, so she decided to

write one for her next recital. “The song wasn’t very good, but it got better and turned into the track ‘Saturday’ on the album,” Elsner said. During the next 20 months, the songs came to her one by one, she said. Now, she has enough material for a second album. Several people sing on “Life Songs,” such as IU School of Optometry graduate student Andrea Walker, Jacobs School of Music graduate student Durand Jones and Joe Mellencamp, John Mellencamp’s older brother. Even though there were a lot of members in the band, Elsner said it wasn’t hard to choose who sang each song. “Everyone agreed Durand was so wonderful,” Elsner said. “It was not hard to recognize his talent. He could sing the phone book.” Jones said he hadn’t expected to sing on the album. “I play with a group, and the leader is Ann’s drum teacher,” he said. “She was looking for a sax player and Ben said, ‘You know, Durand sings, too,’ and she said, ‘Oh I’ll write a song for him.’” Jones said he sang and played the saxophone for several songs on the album. “My ultimate goal as a

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I N D I A N A D A I LY S T U D E N T | M O N D AY, F E B . 3 , 2 0 1 4 | I D S N E W S . C O M

Mathers exhibit displays traditional ‘Ojibwe’ art BY ANTHONY BRODERICK aebroder@indiana.edu

ADAM KIEFER | IDS

CLASSIC QUARTET

Simin Ganatra, Sibbi Bernhardsson, Brandon Vamos and Masumi Per Rostad play various classical pieces during the Pacifica Quartet performance at the Jacobs School of Music concert Friday. Ganatra and Bernhardsson play the violin, Vamos plays the cello and Rostad plays the viola.

Museum docent leads ‘the Eyes Have It’ tour BY ALISON GRAHAM akgraham@indiana.edu

IU Art Museum Docent Monica Jensen presented this month’s thematic tour Saturday, focusing on the role of eyes in both art and culture. “Sight and the idea of seeing is hugely important,” she said. “Eyes can show a sense of real power.” Jensen began “The Eyes Have It” tour on the third floor, centered on African art. Many African pieces feature what are called coffee bean eyes, which are almond shaped with a slit down the middle. Other sculptures have eyes that pop out from the face and are depicted to be wide open, a symbol of an all-seeing being to protect others. In art, eyes can reveal a lot about the piece being viewed, Jensen said.

Jensen also focused on the materials the eyes were made from, specifically iridescent seashells. When the light from the fire would hit them in ancient temples, the eyes would flicker and give life to the piece. “When these sculptures were created, the eyes were so important and treated in a specific way,” Jensen said. Eyes were made to symbolize power and protection in Africa, seen in the various pieces in the museum. These traditions spread into later cultures in Asia and the Western world as well. In Egyptian culture, people are often portrayed with a heavy black cosmetic surrounding their eyes, which has often been thought of as only a decorative detail. Jensen explained it’s actually a way of preventing the “curse of the evil eye.” It was used especially on infants and small children, which

dates back to the protective uses of eyes in Africa. In more modern art, Jensen explained that viewers can see artists begin to learn about the eye itself. They started to put that knowledge into the way they made pieces and how they were meant to be seen by others. She described the way artists painted portraits so that the eyes of the subject seem to follow the viewer around the room. This is achieved by painting their gaze straight out of the painting and keeping other variables constant. Ending her tour, Jensen told of a historic fad. Europeans from about 1780-1830 would request small portraits of their eyes to be attached to jewelry and given as gifts to their loved ones. “People actually exchanged these and commissioned artists to create them,” Jensen said. “But they led to something else.”

When Bloomington native and social worker Scott Miller stepped into the Mathers Museum of World Cultures, he saw pieces that seemed to illustrate the art and love of his Native American ethnicity. “I have a few pieces of art passed down from my family and ancestors, and they are extremely reminiscent to the Ojibwe art,” he said. The Mathers Museum opened “Ojibwe Public Art, Ostrom Private Lives” last Friday. The exhibit was organized by a group of IU graduate students. The exhibit was free to the public and explored different works from late 20th century Ojibwe artists of Manitoulin Island, located in Lake Huron off the coast of Ontario. They were all collected after IU economists Elinor and Vincent Ostrom spent years there researching. Ojibwe artists, including Eleanor Kanasawe, Stanley Panamick and Martin Panamick, were featured in the gallery. Each piece included aspects of Native American

» ALBUM

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12

musician is to walk into any setting and be comfortable singing or playing music,” he said. “Ann really gave me an outlet to explore that a little more.” Walker, who rapped on several of the songs on the album, said Elsner has made something for everyone. The song “Blamin’ It on the ACA” is directly related to optometry students at IU, Elsner said. She said she wrote the song about the effect the Affordable

culture inspired by nature, such as animal prints, old photos of specific Ojibwe figures and their fashion and woven objects such as boxes and baskets. Crystal Migwans, a doctoral student in art history at Columbia University, gave a presentation titled “Spirit Island Renaissance: Ojibwe Artists, White Patrons and the Manitoulin Cultural Revival.” The presentation focused on traditional art within the context of colonization and resistance of each Ojibwe piece. “The Ojibwe Public Art and Ostrom Private Lives Gallery features Ojibwe art and material cultures collected by Elinor and Vincent Ostrom during their many summers on Manitoulin Island, Ontario, Canada,” Migwans said. Migwans also discussed the history of the Ojibwe tribe, and how they are the largest group of first nation Native Americans from northern Mexico. “The cultural revitalization movement of the 1960s and 1970s included Ojibwe artists who infused their energy into tourist art economy,” Migwans said. All the pieces Care Act had on her lab’s research assistants last summer. She said that because of the act, the students had their hours reduced to twenty-nine hours per week. She said this was despite the fact that she had promised them a full work week all summer and had the money to pay them. “The confusion is that they are considered temporary employees,” Elsner said. “It’s unfair and a big mess, and there is no solution. Next summer is coming up, and there is still no solution.”

‘OJIBWE PUBLIC ART, OSTROM PRIVATE LIVES’ 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday 1 to 4:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday Jan. 31 through June 22 Mathers Museum of World Cultures presented were gifts to the museum from the Ostrom estate. The Ostroms collected art and artifacts from all around the world, but took a special interest in traditional and contemporary work from Native Americans. They collected specific sets of Ojibwe art with the goal of building their own collection to display in Bloomington. After their deaths in 2012, the Ostroms left their all of their art collection and values to the Mathers Museum. The Mathers Museum is dedicated to displaying the art of different cultures around the world. For more information visit their website, indiana.edu/~mathers. Follow Anthony Broderick on Twitter @aebrodakirck. While the future of her summer lab research assistants is uncertain, Elsner said she does plan to make another album. For now, Elsner said she wants to see the album do something for her commercially. “I’m hoping someone will want the songs for their wedding or play them in an advertisement,” Elsner said. “But I want to see it do something for the student talents as well.” Follow reporter Katie Hogue on Twitter @KatieKay_91.

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I N D I A N A D A I LY S T U D E N T | M O N D AY, F E B . 3 , 2 0 1 4 | I D S N E W S . C O M To place an ad: go online, call 812-855-0763 or stop by Ernie Pyle Hall 120 from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday - Friday.

CLASSIFIEDS

Full advertising policies are available online.

AD ACCEPTANCE: All advertising is subject to approval by the IDS. HOUSING ADS: All advertised housing is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act. Refer to idsnews.com for more info. REFUNDS: If you cancel your ad before the final run date, the IDS will refund the difference in price. A minimum of one day will be charged.

COPY CHANGES: Ad copy can be changed at no additional charge when the same number of lines are maintained. If the total number of lines changes, a new ad will be started at the first day rate. PAYMENT: All advertising is done on a cash in advance basis unless credit has been established. The IDS accepts Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, cash, check or money order.

COPY ERRORS: The IDS must be notified of errors before 3 p.m. the date of the first publication of your ad. The IDS is only responsible for errors published on the first insertion date. The IDS will rerun your ad 1 day when notified before 3 p.m. of the first insertion date. ONLINE POSTING: All classified line ads are posted online at idsnews.com/classifieds at no additional charge.

Apt. Unfurnished Avail. now. Close to IU or downtown. 1 BR with W/D. $450/mo. plus electric. 520 S. Washington St. Call 812-825-5579 or www.deckardhomes.com

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Fight the Freshman 15 Pleasesee my offerfor successful weight loss! TheNutritionPath.com Free giftcard w/ 1st order!

General Employment

New Donors Receive $100!! for their first 2 donations. Join our life-saving program & schedule a Plasma Donation at 430 S. Landmark Ave., Bloomington. Call 812-334-1405 or visit www.biolifeplasma.com to make an appointment and download a coupon.

1, 2, 3 & 4 Bedroom HUGE Floorplans Hardwood Floors

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Great Resume Addition Seeking students with good organization, time management, and communication skills to work in advertising sales. Previous sales experience preferred but not required. Must own reliable transportation and be able to work through May, 2015. Apply in person at: Ernie Pyle Hall,RM 120.

for a complete job description. EOE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

4, and 5 BR on campus. All amenities incl. 3317797 Elkinspropertiesrent.com

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Apt. Unfurnished

*Parking onsite included. 3 ($1500) & 6 ($3000) BR (only 2 left). NS, full compliment of appliances, W/D, ice maker, self-cleaning oven. Lg. gathering decks, close proximity to IU, dining, bars, dwntwn. 627 N.Morton St. Call Sheila: 812-327-0675. 1-5 BR apts. and homes. Aug., 2014. Close to campus and dwntwn. 333-9579

336-6900 www.shaw-rentals.com 5 BR, 2BA & 3 BR,2 BA. Avail. 08/14. 2 blks. to campus & Kirkwood. 412 Smith Ave. On-site prkg. $570/mo. per BR. 317-636-3848 5 BR, 3 BA, front & rear deck. Huge kitchen, dining rm. & living rm. $300/mo. ea. plus utils. bestrentsrdw@yahoo.com

Amazing promotions available for 2nd semester leases. $200 flat security deposit gets you in the door! Call today at 812-331-8500 for more info. or visit www.smallwoodapts.com Aug., 2014: near campus. 1, 2, 3 BR apartments. thunderboltproperty.com

Hickory Grove now leasing for August – reserve your spot today. Great rates, limited availability. 812.339.0799 Ideal for senior and grad. students. Close to campus. No pets. Parking. 812-332-2520 Leasing for Fall, 2014. 1, 2, & 3 BR apts. Hunter Ridge. 812-334-2880 Now leasing for fall: Park Doral Apartments. Eff., 1, 2, & 3 BR. apts. Contact: 812-336-8208. Now renting for August, 2014. 1 & 2 BR. Great location next to campus. 812-334-2646 OMG! ONE block to campus, IU Law and sciences. 4 BR, HUGE 2 BA, BIG closets, A/C, DW, parking. No smoking, no pets. $510 w/ utilities. 812-336-6898 417 S. Fess Ave The Willows Condos Great rates, limited availability – updated, modern feel. Now leasing for Summer, 2014. 812.339.0799

Burnham Rentals

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444 E. Third St. Suite 1

burnhamrentals.com

812-339-8300 Willow Court Now leasing for August – reserve your spot today great rates, limited availability. 812.339.0799

www.campnockamixon.com

to schedule on campus interview for Feb. 12.

3 BR house for rent, close to everything. $1450, all utilities included. Call 317-376-2186 or

315

812-333-0995 Condos & Townhouses

3 BR houses- A/C,W/D, D/W. 319 N. Maple, 801 W 11th. for Aug. ‘14. $325/mo. per person No pets. 317- 490-3101

4, and 5 BR on campus. All amenities incl. 3317797 Elkinspropertiesrent.com

4 and 5 BR, $1400-$2k. A/C, D/W, W/D, with pics at www.iu4rent.com

Luxury Downtown Condos. Now leasing for August, 2014. THE MORTON 400 solid cherry hardwood floors, high ceilings, upgraded everything. Only 3 left. 812.331.8500

5 bedroom house 2 blks to Music School. Under $550 per person. 812-330-1501 gtrentalgroup.com

Stella Ridge 2 & 3 BR, 2.5 BA, $1140. Oaklawn Park 3 BR, 2.5 BA, $990. Avail. Aug., 2014. Costley & Co. 336-6246 $100 off of Aug., 2014 rent if lease is signed by March 31, 2014.

6-8 BR dntwn. & IU. Super nice, all ammenities. 334-0094

5 BR, 2 BA. $3000/mo. 609 N. Dunn 812-360-6800

www.costleycompany.com

812-327-0800

HOUSING ***1 blk. S of Campus.*** 3, 4 BR apts. All utils. pd. except elec. W/D, D/W, trash, prkg. incl. $470/mo. each.

omegabloomington.com

Ready Aug. 2014 Stylish & Spacious 4 BD/3.5 BA < $450/person Easy Access to IU Pool and café onsite

3-4 BR, Aug., 2014. Located at 9th and Grant btwn. campus and dwntwn. 333-9579

3 and 5 BR houses avail. on campus. All amenities included. 812-360-9689

creamandcrimsonproperties.com

Continental Terrace Now leasing for August – reserve your spot today. Great rates, limited availability. 812.339.0799

3 BR luxury house. Aug., 2014. Near 3rd on east side of campus. 333-9579

All Majors Accepted.

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210

2 blocks to Downtown Close to campus

2, 3, 4, & 5 BR houses. Close to campus. All w/ W/D, D/W, A/C, stove & refrig. Prices: $880-$2500. 327-3238

goodrents.homestead.com

Free TV if you sign in January or February

Email:

Amazing Summer at PA coed children’s overnight camp. Men & women wanted for all activities & counselor positions. Good salary. Internships avail. We provide campers w/ a safe, quality experience that will stay w/ them forever.Let us do the same for you. Visit us at:

M I D TO W N LOFTS

Houses

House Listings Available at

Campus Walk Apts. 2 and 3 BR avail. now and 2014-15. 812-332-1509 cwalk@crerentals.com

15 hours per week.

rhartwel@indiana.com

A awesome summer job in Maine! If you’re looking to spend this summer outdoors, have fun while you work, and make lifelong friends, then look no further. Camp Mataponi, a children’s summer camp, has positions available in Land Sports (lacrosse, soccer, basketball, softball, volleyball, field hockey), Waterfront (sailing, canoeing, waterskiing, life guarding, WSI, boat drivers), Ropes Course, Tennis, H.B. Riding, Arts & Crafts, Theater, Dance, Gymnastics, Video, Photography, Nurses, Maintenance, Cooking and more. Top salaries plus room/board & travel provided. Call us today, 561-748-3684 or apply online at www.campmataponi.com

2 BR large duplex. Aug., 2014. Near Music/ Education. 333-9579

2 BR. Huge, luxury twnhs. Dntwn. Aug. 2014. Parking incl. 333-9579

NO WEEKENDS!

Camp Staff

2 BR apts., $1000/mo. Gas, water, trash & parking incl. 1/2 blk. from new Bloomingfoods. 812-330-1501, gtrentalgroup.com

Batchelor Heights Nice 3 & 4 bedrooms available now. Also pre-leasing for August and summer months. Great location! 812.339.0799

M I D TO W N L O F T S I U . C O M

Real-world Experience.

EMPLOYMENT

2 BR / 1.5 BA

Apt. Unfurnished

The IDS is accepting applications for Advertising Account Executives to start Feb. 2014.

Flexibility with class schedule.

The District

325

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

Have the summer of your life at a prestigious coed sleepaway camp in the beautiful Pocono Mtns. of PA, 2/5 hours from NYC. We’re seeking counselors who can teach any Team & Individual Sports, Tennis, Gymnastics, Horseback Riding, Mt. Biking, Skate Park, Theatre, Tech Theatre, Circus, Magic, Arts & Crafts, Pioneering, Climbing Tower, Water Sports, Music or Dance. Great salaries and perks. Plenty of free time. Internships available for many majors. On-campus interviews on Feb 25. Apply online at www. islandlake.com. Call 800869-6083 between 9 and 5 eastern time on weekdays for more information: info@islandlake.com

310

210

Text 812-345-1771 for showing.

Camp Staff

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2 BR apt. Aug., 2014. Next to Business school. 333-9579

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!! Available August, 2014. 3 BR homes. ALL UTIL. INCL. IN RENT PRICE. 203 S. Clark, & 2618 East 7th 812-360-2628 www.iurent.com !!!! Need a place to Rent? rentbloomington.net

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5 BR, 3 BA, 2 kitchen. 24’ x 24’ rec. rm., W/D, D/W. On bus line, B-trail. $300/mo. ea. 2 blks. W. of Upland Brewery. bestrentsrdw@yahoo.com

AUGUST 2014-15 Apt. Listings Available at

omegabloomington.com

812-333-0995 ***Fantastic, 2 & 3 BR apts. set deep in the woods w/ rainforest views, yet still in the city!! Huge island kit./ family rm. + living rm. w/ vaulted ceilings & fireplace. Lg. BA with garden tub + extra BA/ half BA. Many closets & built in shelving. Large deck, W/D, optional garage. Pets ok. Call for web site. $895-$1295. 812-219-2027. Grad student discount. *Very near IU & town. *810 N. Washington. 4 BR/2 BA, $2200/mo. W/D, D/W, C/A. Yard care. Low heat. Well maintained. 360-4517 www.rentdowntown.biz 1-5 BR houses & apts. Avail. Aug., 2014. Close to campus. 812-336-6246 www.costleycompany.com

Aug. 2014, near campus. 2, 3, 4, and 5 BR houses. thunderboltproperty.com Close to IU. 3 houses for rent. 1) 5 BR, 3 BA, 902 E. 14th St., $2300/ mo., 3 blks. to Geology & SPEA, off-street prkg. 2) 4 BR, 2 BA, 900 E. 14th St., $1500/mo. 3 blks. to Geology and SPEA, approved for 5 occupants. All houses: A/C, free W/D, 12 mo. leases, Aug., ‘14-’15. No pets. Call 812-333-5333. Houses for rent close to the B-line trail and switch yard park. 2 BR, 1 BA, W/D, central air, offstreet parking, $950 / mo. plus utils. Call Monon Rentals: 333-9233. Houses near IU. gtrentalgroup.com 812-330-1501 Two 5 BR/ 3 BA houses. $1800. See our video on cotyrentalservice.com Call 574-232-4527 or 574-340-1844.

APARTMENTS & TOWNHOUSES

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Office: 14th & Walnut www.elkinsapts.com


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***DOWNTOWN*** Ultimate 1 BR loft next to the Bluebird with 2-story atrium living/dining room. Pets ok, grad disc. avail. $1050. Call or text 812-219-2027.

435

Misc. for Sale Buying/selling portable window A/C and dorm refridgerators. Any size. Cash paid. 812-320-1789 auldoc11@gmail.com Veritas Prep. Complete Set of GMAT books for sale. $50. Good cond. & lightly used. 6102487825

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5 BR house. Near campus, on bus line, $1300/ mo. 1 mo. free rent. Avail. Aug. 812-876-3257 335

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MERCHANDISE

4 BR w/ basement. Close to campus. Avail. Aug. $1200/mo. 1 mo. rent free. 812-876-3257

Rooms/Roommates

SKILLS YOU NEED

Clothing

RIGHT HERE ON CAMPUS.

Plato’s Closet pays cash on the spot for trendy, gently used clothing. 812-333-4442 441

1 room in 2 BR apt. 2036 N. Walnut St. $425/month, everything included. 313-443-7450 360

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I N D I A N A D A I LY S T U D E N T | M O N D AY, F E B . 3 , 2 0 1 4 | I D S N E W S . C O M

Sublet Rooms/Rmmte.

Music Equipment Full size acoustic guitar, very nice, high quality. $90. Call 812-929-8996.

Subleasing avail. Neg. terms and rent. 333-9579 Grant Properties.

SAVE $150

The Indiana Daily Student is a learning environment where students have the chance to develop skills that distinguish them from other candidates in future careers. As a member of the IDS Advertising Sales Team you will have the opportunity to develop your own business, learn networking skills, develop communication skills and gain real world marketing experience working with local and national businesses. Applicants must own a reliable vehicle, must be able to work through May 2015 and work a minimum of 15 hours per week (no weekends or evenings). Sales experience is preferred but not required.

WITH ZERO DEPOSIT

APPLY TODAY FOR FALL 2014

Email advertise@idsnews.com for a complete job description and to apply. Deadline Feb. 28.

N O W A P E T F R I E N D LY CO M M U N I T Y

EOE

CAMPUSCORNERLIVING.COM Fees are subject to change. Limited time only.

Horoscope Aries (March 21-April 19) — Today is a 9 — You’re confident and eager to go for the next two days. Keep an eye out for hidden treasure. Make new contacts while filling present orders. An unexpected development leads to a startling discovery. Keep digging. Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Today is a 7 — You can complete projects with ease. Slow down and think it over. Start by cleaning closets and discover a treasure. Others find the answer you’ve been seeking. A friend has a brilliant idea.

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Gemini (May 21-June 20) — Today is an 8 — Circumstances control your actions today and tomorrow. A startling change in command could disrupt things. Appearances deceive. Gather input from others. Associates deliver the data. A surprise project comes your way. Encourage someone’s creativity. Cancer (June 21-July 22) — Today is a 7 — Career opportunities arise today and tomorrow. Use your imagination to take advantage. Focus attention and stay alert to jump at the right moment. Make

BEST IN SHOW

contact. Be respectful. Your consultant provides legal insight. Keep the rules, and move. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Today is an 8 — Travel conditions look good today and tomorrow. A startling revelation propels your plans. The financial situation could be unstable. And household matters need attention. Still, don’t limit your imagination. Travel seems appealing, but it’s not without peril. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Today is a 7 — Organize your financial

PHIL JULIANO

BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!

plans today and tomorrow. Look into the future, and imagine what you want. Talk it over and gain surprising insight into your partner’s desires. With purchases, invest in the highest long-lasting quality. Build your nest. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Today is an 8 — Spend time with your partner, and anticipate surprises. Let somebody else direct the show for a couple of days. Imagine perfection. Upgrade the technology. Push yourself forward. Surprise! Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Today is a 9 — It’s busy, so let intuition steer you in the right direction. Work matters are on the front

Crossword

burner. Break out of your shell! Risk a little and discover a lucky break. Entertain new ideas. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — Today is a 7 — It’s okay to get a little wild, even revolutionary. Get ready to party, and invite your network. Clear up any confusion before broadcasting. Play with friends and family, and encourage the fun. Celebrate being together. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Today is a 6 — Stick close to home for the next days, where the house and family require more attention. Upgrade the space and personal comfort level. Domestic bliss rejuvenates. Share it.

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

su do ku

Difficulty Rating: How to play: Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 grid contains the digits 1 through 9, without repeating a number in any one row, column or 3x3 grid.

Answer to previous puzzle

© Puzzles by Pappocom

NON SEQUITUR

1 NetZero and AOL 5 Winter precipitation 9 “Poison” plant 14 NBAer O’Neal 15 Classic film character whose last word was “Rosebud” 16 “The Devil Wears __” 17 Linus’ trademark in “Pe nuts” comics 20 Bone: Pref. 21 U-shaped river bend 22 USN rank 23 NYC dance troupe 25 Daunting duty 27 1959 Hudson/Day film 33 Emulated Michael Phelps 36 School subj. with a lab 37 Link with 38 Stable newborns 39 Chatter 40 Mistaken 42 Wine, on le menu 43 Increasing in vol., musically 45 __ firma 46 Decline 47 Rope material

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) — Today is a 9 — There’s money coming and going. Follow your inner voice when choosing direction. Or hold off, and let things simmer. Be patient with those who are confused. The answer surprises.

© 2013 By Nancy Back distributed by Tribune Media Services, INC. All rights

L.A. Times Daily Crossword

TIM RICKARD

ACROSS

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Today is a 7 — Your concentration and communication flows extraordinarily well. This gets handy, with unexpected costs arising. Study the issue for solutions. Take this opportunity to go for the prize. Shop carefully for supplies.

48 Song publisher’s output 50 Othello’s confidant 52 Barnyard clucker 53 Former Texas governor Richards 55 Church keyboard 59 Say 63 Waistline concern 66 Without a break 67 “Not a problem” 68 Sky bear 69 Fizzy fountain drinks 70 Lowly laborer 71 CPR pros

DOWN 1 “That __ last week!” 2 Females 3 War-ending agreement 4 Rat on the gang 5 Hit the slopes 6 Belg.-based peacekeeping gp. 7 Black stone 8 Jack who played Sgt. Joe Friday 9 Breed, as salmon 10 Keats’ Grecian vase 11 Disturbs the status quo

12 Port in Yemen 13 Litter box users 18 Like some hightech machines 19 Search (for) 24 Bed with a mate 26 GI show gp. 27 TV show about a consultant thought to have ESP 28 “As if __!” 29 Having similar opinions 30 Canines and molars 31 “But only God can make __”: Kilmer 32 “The Maltese Falcon” actor Peter 34 Suspect’s story 35 “Hardball” airer 38 Case of false incrimination 41 Surg. branch 44 Restful retreat 48 Achy 49 False 51 Olympians’ dreams 53 “Famous” cookie guy 54 Chile boy 56 Surprised sound 57 Fluish feeling 58 Wolfe of detective fiction 60 Time in office 61 Sunrise direction 62 Nutritional stds. 64 Forensic ID 65 D.C. bigwig Look for the crossword daily in the comics section of the Indiana Daily Student. Find the solution for the daily crossword here.

Answer to previous puzzle

WILEY


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I N D I A N A D A I LY S T U D E N T | M O N D AY, F E B . 3 , 2 0 1 4 | I D S N E W S . C O M

Hoosier offense comes alive for win BY STUART JACKSON stuajack@indiana.edu

Facing another team from Illinois, there would be no shooting struggles from the field this time for the IU women’s basketball team. After suffering one of its poorest shooting performances of the season last Thursday against Northwestern, IU had one of its best days from the field in a 77-58 win. “I got a very excited locker room tonight that stuck to the game plan and, more importantly, believed in each other and believed that they could make shots and a lot of shots they missed the other night in a close loss to Northwestern,” IU Coach Curt Miller said. The Hoosiers shot 47.5 percent from the field yesterday afternoon after shooting 30 percent Thursday against Northwestern. The shooting percentage is IU’s second-best in the Big Ten since shooting 50 percent from the field at Iowa . Individually, freshman guard Alexis Gassion had a career night. The Fairborn, Ohio, native shot 4-of-5 from 3-point range and 8-of-10 overall from the field en route to a careerhigh 22 points. IU made five of its first seven field goals, which led to an early 14-9 lead in the first half. Gassion was responsible for half of those points. “Our start was talked about,” Miller said. “We needed it for our confidence because our team had hit rock bottom with the way we shot. I mean, we were 3-for-15 from the foul line in the second half against Northwestern and lost in the final minute.” A 3-pointer at the 8:12 mark in the second half by the freshman guard sparked an 11-5 IU run in which the Hoosiers connected on 3-of-4 3-point attempts. The hot shooting from the perimeter led to the largest lead of the game for IU, 75-

IDS FILE PHOTO

IU Women’s Tennis Coach Lin Loring speaks with his team. Loring has earned a record 800 career victories.

IU Women’s Tennis Coach earns 800th career victory at Western Mich.

FOLAKE OSIBODU | THE DAILY ILLINI

Freshman guard Alexis Gassion attempts to block Illinois' Alexis Smith's shot during the game at the State Farm Center in Champaign, Il. on Sunday. The Hoosiers won 77-58.

49 with 4:59 remaining in the game. Gassion also grabbed five rebounds, part of 45 total rebounds. The Hoosiers dismantled the Illini on the boards, winning the rebounding battle 45-26. The 45 team rebounds marked the third-highest rebounding performance for IU in Big Ten play this season. It’s only the sixth time this season the Hoosiers have grabbed 45 or more rebounds in a game. Freshman forward Lyndsey Leikem had the best individual rebounding effort for IU, grabbing 10 rebounds and 10 points to earn a doubledouble. Leikem’s offensive rebound with 11 minutes and

one second remaining in the first half led to a 3-pointer by Gassion and gave the Hoosiers a 34-15 lead. That lead was built on a 20-6 IU run. Eleven of those 20 points came from second-chance points on four offensive rebounds. Miller said he was proud of his team’s performance. “We’ve shot the ball well, we’ve scored the ball well,” Miller said. “We were over 80 points 10 times this year, and so we’ve had some good production scoring the basketball.”

IU Coach Lin Loring became the first coach in women’s tennis history to record 800 match wins as the Hoosiers defeated Western Michigan 5-2 on Friday. In the win against Western Michigan, IU lost the doubles point but won all but one of the singles matches. In the No. 2 singles matchup, junior Carolyn Chupa upset No. 55 ranked Kathleen Hawkins. Loring has accumulated a career record of 800-309 and is now in his 37th season leading the women’s tennis program. During his 37 years at IU, Loring guided the Hoosiers to 12 undefeated seasons, 28 national tournament appearances and 16 Big Ten titles. Between 1978-1985, Loring was at the helm of a Hoosier program that had 104 consecutive victories against Big Ten opponents. That string was capped in 1982 when IU won the national championship. Under Loring, the Hoosiers have had 71 players named to the All-Big Ten team and 25 All-Americans.

Follow reporter Stuart Jackson on Twitter @Stuart_Jackson1.

37th

season at IU

#1

all-time in women’s college tennis career wins

41st

1982

season coaching women’s college tennis

National Champion

28

25

national tournament appearaces

All-Americans

16

.722

Big Ten titles

career-winning percentage

—Sam Beishuizen

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