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AL 2018 ANNU REPORT


INFECTIOUS DISEASES SOCIETY OF AMERICA FOUNDATION TABLE OF CONTENTS MESSAGE FROM LEADERSHIP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 WAYS TO SUPPORT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ONE KEY TO STOPPING EPIDEMICS IS TO RECOGNIZE “WHAT’S NEXT.”: DR. DANIEL LUCEY. . . . . . . 4 THE IDSA FOUNDATION’S IMPACT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 THE TOP 9 INFECTIOUS DISEASES OUTBREAKS OF 2018. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 TRUE PIONEERS IN RESEARCH: DR. & MRS. LESLIE AND RAINEY NORINS . . . . . . . . . . . 10 FINANCIAL INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 2018 DONORS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND STAFF. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16


Dear IDSA Foundation Supporters, Your IDSA Foundation is hard at work to becoming the nation’s premier resource for Building the Future of Infectious Diseases. This year, the IDSA Foundation shined a light on the power of mentorship, and the incredible leaders in the field who have helped cultivate the ID Detectives of today – and tomorrow. The IDSA Foundation knows the next generation of ID Detectives will become the drivers of scientific discoveries, the leaders of public health programs throughout the world, and the astute clinicians on the front lines providing life-saving care. It is up to all of us to ensure we are equipped with the knowledge of how infectious diseases impacts our everyday lives. We’re committed to making this happen. This report outlines some of the major steps we’ve taken to reduce the devastating impact of infectious diseases by empowering the next generation of ID Detectives, investing in research, and advocating for patient care. The power of our mission begins with YOU! Whether your role is related to research, patient care, advocacy, public health, or philanthropy, we can only realize this vision together. There are many ways you can get involved with the IDSA Foundation and make an impact. Let’s work together to achieve our vision of a world free from the burdens of infectious diseases. On behalf of the IDSA Foundation and the lives we impact daily, thank you for your continued support! Warmest regards,

CHRISTOPHER D. BUSKY, CAE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER IDSA FOUNDATION

WILLIAM G. POWDERLY, MD, FIDSA IDSA FOUNDATION CHAIR

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THE ROOTS OF EDUCATION ARE BITTER, BUT THE FRUIT IS SWEET. ARISTOTLE


WAYS TO SUPPORT The IDSA Foundation is driven by a mission to Build the Future of ID. We are deeply grateful for others who share in this mission, from individuals across the globe, to corporations and foundations standing to make a changed in the world. The support each gives is making it possible to provide research and travel grants to medical students, expand the conversation of ID to patients, caregivers, and parents, and to create innovative approaches to combating the world’s deadliest infectious diseases. Your gift will truly make a difference. We are counting on your support. Visit IDSAFoundation.org today and support the next generation of ID Detectives!

CORPORATE SUPPORTERS

GIVING SOCIETIES Individual donors like you are uniquely positioned to partner with us by making a significant investment in helping to free the world from infectious diseases that claim over 17 million lives a year. Without the generosity of our donors, we cannot boldly fund strategies that allow for groundbreaking research, develop new and innovative programs and expand those that have proven to inspire brilliant minds in ID.

The partnerships we attain from corporations worldwide ensure the IDSA Foundation is sustainable and able to provide innovative programs for the future of ID. Our Corporate Partners have generously funded our ongoing programs or created new funding opportunities for medical students, researchers, and specialists in the field of infectious diseases.

DONATING INVESTMENTS

LEAVING A LEGACY An important part of life is spending time with our family and friends to decide what we leave this world when we are gone. Many make the choice to leave a legacy for the cause they care about most. If your passion is envisioning a world free from infectious diseases, the IDSA Foundation is here to provide an outlet for you to continue this dream.

Making a charitable gift from an investment portfolio will help the IDSA Foundation create sustainable programming and truly make an impact worldwide. There are several options for you to consider when donating stocks, bonds, or other investments.

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DR. DANIEL LUCEY, MD, MPH, FIDSA INFECTIOUS DISEASES DETECTIVE, PROFESSOR, AND MENTOR

ONE KEY TO STOPPING EPIDEMICS IS TO RECOGNIZE “WHAT’S NEXT.”

Dr. Daniel R. Lucey is a senior scholar with the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law. He is also an adjunct professor of Medicine-Infectious Diseases at Georgetown University Medical Center, where he has taught for 17 years about outbreaks, panepidemics, and pandemics. Since 2001, he has been involved on the ground with anthrax, smallpox vaccination, SARS (China, Canada), H5N1 avian flu (Thailand, Vietnam, Indonesia, Egypt), pandemic flu (USA, Egypt), MERS (Middle East, Korea), Ebola (Sierra Leone, Liberia with MSF at ELWA3), Zika (Brazil, USA), yellow fever (Kinshasa, Beijing), chikungunya (Karachi, Islamabad), H7N9 (China), and plague (Madagascar). Dr. Lucey received his training and MPH at Harvard University (1985–1988) after his medical residency at UCSF and San Francisco General Hospitals and receiving undergraduate and medical degrees at Dartmouth College. He served as an attending physician in infectious diseases in San Antonio, Texas, and at the National Institutes of Health, and as ID chief at the 900-bed Washington Hospital Center in Washington, DC, from 1998–2002 during 9/11 and anthrax scare of 2011.

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Q: WHAT DREW YOU TO THE FIELD OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES? DR. LUCEY: I did my residency in San

Francisco. It was 1982, and the beginning of the recognition of the AIDS epidemic. I was going to go into neurology, but within two or three months there, I completely converted to infectious disease, largely because of the AIDS epidemic. At the time, we didn’t know the cause. The HIV virus wasn’t discovered until 1983.

Q: WHAT HAS BEEN THE BIGGEST CHANGE IN THE PROFESSION? DR. LUCEY: One of the big milestones

has been the attention on raising global concern that we’re not prepared to handle pandemics — especially something more deadly than a new “Disease X or Y” more deadly than the 2009-2010 influenza pandemic.

“WHAT’S NEXT IS ALREADY HERE. WE JUST HAVEN’T RECOGNIZED IT YET.” DR. DANIEL LUCEY

Q: YOU BROUGHT AN IDEA TO THE SMITHSONIAN FOR AN EXHIBIT ON EPIDEMICS. WHAT WAS THE GENESIS OF THAT PROJECT? DR. LUCEY: The idea came to me in

2003 after traveling to Hong Kong, Guangzhou, and Toronto for the severe acute respiratory (SARS) epidemic. SARS is still the best example of what can happen on any day: a brand-new virus transmitted through the air that causes a high degree of illness and death. In just over a few weeks, SARS travelled to 30 countries around the world. As serendipity would have it, in 2014 one of my graduate students at Georgetown knew someone at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History who has oversight for new exhibits. I met with them and proposed an exhibit on multiple outbreaks including SARS, Ebola, HIV, and influenza. The exhibit was timely because we were approaching the 100-year commemoration of the 1918 pandemic.

Q: WHY IS THERE A NEED FOR THIS EXHIBIT? DR. LUCEY: The exhibit is intended

to decrease the harmful excessive fear of epidemics. For example, if you look at the the United States reaction to the Ebola epidemic of 2014 in contrast with the actual


“ONE OF THE BIG MILESTONES HAS BEEN RAISING GLOBAL CONCERN THAT WE’RE NOT PREPARED TO HANDLE PANDEMICS...” DR. DANIEL LUCEY DR. LUCEY WITH HIS SONS ALEX (L) AND ABE (R) AT THE OPENING OF THE SMITHSONIAN EXHIBIT.

epidemic in West Africa, our fear was far out of proportion to the actual danger. An important part of addressing that fear is global response. At the end of the exhibit, there is a large visual that says, “What’s next?” That’s what matters most. Unbeknownst to me, they included a quote from me: “What’s next is already here. We just haven’t recognized it yet.” That’s the core of my philosophy about epidemics. Note: The exhibit debuted in May 2018 and will remain open until 2021. Q: CAN YOU SHARE MORE INSIGHTS ON THE VALUE OF THIS EXHIBIT TO THE PUBLIC? DR. LUCEY: The public should be

better informed about the realities of epidemics – many of which start in other countries. There is excessive fear about epidemics overseas. Fear is normal, and it’s appropriate. If there’s no fear, there’s no epidemic — and if I don’t feel fear when I go to an epidemic, I shouldn’t be there.

Q: WHAT ARE SOME PRACTICAL WAYS THAT WE CAN GLOBALLY ANTICIPATE, RECOGNIZE, AND ACT? IS GLOBAL RESPONSIVENESS PART OF THE EXHIBIT? DR. LUCEY: The exhibit includes an

interactive display panel where

visitors can explore the Program for Monitoring Emerging Diseases, ProMED. Every day for the past 25 years, anyone in the world can send information to ProMED. It can be a newspaper report from Nigeria, China, Brazil, or news from the World Health Organization. ProMED’s team reviews everything that comes in and posts selected information online. With 81,000 subscribers, ProMED gets the news out about what’s out there now, what’s next, and what we need to prepare for, which allows us to respond more effectively and faster than ever before. Q: THROUGHOUT YOUR CAREER, YOU’VE MENTORED MANY COLLEAGUES. WHAT LED YOU TO GET INVOLVED WITH MENTORING? DR. LUCEY: I received wonderful

mentoring as a medical student at Dartmouth and in Soweto, South Africa 1979 and 1982, and in San Francisco and Boston. Receiving mentoring during that time was incredibly formative in my career choice and pathway.

diseases. Importantly, in the process of mentoring younger colleagues we also can learn, both in the USA and internationally. Q: WHAT IS THE SINGLE BIGGEST AREA OF OPPORTUNITY IN THE FIELD OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE? DR. LUCEY: The biggest opportunity

is the spectrum of opportunities. You can do clinical care, laboratory research, clinical research, infection prevention and control, regulatory work, military work, and public health service. As an ID Detective, you can literally travel the world responding to epidemics, furthering the reach of ID knowledge and educating the public. Writing a paper or giving a talk is important, but it’s not enough. We must take action to fight epidemics, including influencing policy, to prepare and respond better. Then always anticipate, “what’s next?”

Q: WHAT IS YOUR PERSPECTIVE ON THE MENTORING RELATIONSHIP? DR. LUCEY: When I finished formal

training, I started passing on what I had learned – not just specific facts, but a way of thinking, an algorithm for the care of patients across the spectrum of well-known to unknown

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NOTHING HAS SUCH POWER TO BROADEN THE MIND AS THE ABILITY TO INVESTIGATE SYSTEMATICALLY AND TRULY ALL THAT COMES UNDER THY OBSERVATION IN LIFE. MARCUS AURELIUS


THE IDSA FOUNDATION’S IMPACT IN 2018 BUILDING THE FUTURE OF ID The IDSA Foundation is dedicated to ensuring the availability of funds necessary for the full exploration of all the scientific possibilities that infectious diseases research is generating.

WE COULDN’T DO THIS WITHOUT YOU! HERE’S HOW YOUR INVESTMENT HAS HELPED THE NEXT GENERATION OF ID DETECTIVES!

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HIVMA Medical Student Grants

MORE THAN

50

Foundation Medical Scholar Awards

The IDSA Foundation launched its first Public Awareness Campaign on Flu Awareness with more than

12M VIEWS

MORE THAN

1M

Towards ID research

MORE THAN

300 Medical Students and Residents Mentored through our IDWeek Mentorship Program

80 Travel Awards

2 HIVMA Clinical Fellowships awarded

90M

The IDSA Foundation launched its Women of ID campaign highlighting four phenomenal Women of ID who have made a profound impact on the field of ID.

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2018 ID Detectives Were On the Case!

TOP 9 INFECTIOUS DISEASE OUTBREAKS Acute Flaccid Myelitis

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The US Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continue to monitor an increase in cases of acute flaccid myelitis that sprang up across the United States. As of December 14, 2018 165 cases of AFM have been confirmed in 36 states.

Listeria In 2018, South Africa continued to battle the nation’s largest listeria outbreak which sickened 1,600 people and claimed the lives of 216 individuals. The outbreak, which was linked to ready-to-eat sausage products, was resolved in June 2018. SOURCE: WORLD HEALTH

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SOURCE: U.S. FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION

ORGANIZATION

Cholera E coli

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Health officials in 28 US states continue to investigate an E coli outbreak linked to ground beef, which sickened more than 330 people and led to a recall of more than 12 million pounds of ground beef as of December 12, 2018. SOURCE: WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION

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A cholera outbreak in Zimbabwe, which began in September, led the Ministry of Health to declare a state of emergency. The most recent case counts include 8340 infections and 50 deaths. SOURCE: WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION


Cyclospora

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Measles

Between May and July, 511 individuals were sickened with Cyclospora in 16 states. The traceback investigation linked the outbreak to Fresh Express Salads sold at fast food establishments.

The European Center for Disease Prevention and Control continues to track measles cases throughout the European Union and European Economic Area. A total of 9189 cases of infection have been confirmed so far, with Greece, France, and Italy reporting the highest number of cases.

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SOURCE: WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION

Ebola Ebola reappeared in the Democratic Republic of Congo in August, primarily impacting individuals in the North Kivu Province. More than 500 cases have been confirmed, making this the second largest Ebola outbreak in world history.

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SOURCE: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

Hepatitis A Hepatitis A outbreaks ran rampant in the United States this year. Fourteen states are currently experiencing outbreaks with Kentucky reporting the most infections with more than 3000 cases.

SOURCE: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

SOURCE: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

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E coli

1 AND OP THE T REAK OUTB E OF TH YEAR?

A large E coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce remains under investigation by US and Canadian health agencies.The outbreak was first announced in November, when the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advised all Americans to avoid eating any romaine.The initial outbreak investigation has identified a Santa Barbara, California, farm as one source of the outbreak, but investigators expect more sources to be identified. The latest case counts from the CDC include 59 cases across 23 US states. SOURCE: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

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DR. LESLIE C. NORINS, MD, PHD, FIDSA AND MRS. ANN “RAINEY” NORINS VISIONARY, PHILANTHROPIST, AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES DETECTIVE

TRUE PIONEERS IN RESEARCH

After earning undergraduate, medical and doctoral degrees at some of the most prestigious universities in the world, doing postdoctoral research with a Nobel Laureate, directing a major lab at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and then going on to run a successful medical publishing business for more than 40 years, many people would spend their well-earned retirement relaxing. Instead, when Dr. Leslie Norins and his wife, Rainey moved to Florida, a state known for its high population of residents 65 and older, Dr. Norins felt compelled to become better informed about a disease that not only impacted many members of his new community, but also claimed Rainey’s mother and grandmother: Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). As Dr. Norins delved deeper into the medical literature about AD, he began to notice a striking number of similarities between elements of Alzheimer’s research and those of infectious diseases. Could it be possible that an infectious agent could be a root cause of AD? We spoke with Dr. Leslie and Rainey Norins about how this hypothesis led him to publish a white paper calling for the elevation of Alzheimer’s research to “the highest priority of emergency microbiological search,” and the couple’s subsequent establishment of the Alzheimer’s Germ Quest.

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Q: WHAT IS YOUR ELEVATOR PITCH ABOUT WHAT YOU DO AND WHERE YOUR FOCUS IS? DR. NORINS: When Rainey and I moved

to Florida, joining a community with a high retiree population, I began to hear more and more about AD. It was a disease that Rainey already had personal experience with, watching first her grandmother, then her mother die of the disease.

“WHAT BEGAN AS A SIMPLE REVIEW OF THE MEDICAL LITERATURE YIELDED WHAT I FOUND TO BE A SURPRISING NUMBER OF SIMILARITIES BETWEEN AD AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES” DR. LESLIE NORINS

Back when I was in medical school in the early 1960s, the only thing we were taught about the suspected cause of AD was amyloid plaques. Since that time and despite the huge sums of money being poured into Alzheimer’s research grants, there has been very little progress in understanding the disease and littler still that’s helpful to patients.

I figured that I surely wasn’t the only one struck by the similarities between AD and infectious diseases, yet the more I looked for research on what seemed to me to be obvious similarities between the two conditions, I was shocked to find hardly any published papers exploring this angle. I thought maybe at some point research into antibiotics or antiviral drugs had been tried and had been shown ineffective, but it turns out that neither had been tried. By and large, except for a few pioneers, hardly any research had been dedicated to my hypothesis. I decided to write a white paper making the case for the fact that, based on my two-year intensive review of the scientific literature, I believe it’s now clear that just one germ—identity not yet specified, and possibly not yet discovered—is the root cause of most AD. I used the umbrella term “germ” so as to not exclude any possibility, such as bacterium, virus, fungus, parasite, prion, or something new, and referred to it in that white paper as the “Alzheimer’s Germ.” Q: WE’VE BEEN TOLD THAT YOU ARE A VALUED SUPPORTER OF THE IDSA FOUNDATION AND THAT YOU HAVE A LOVE FOR RESEARCH. CAN YOU SHARE WHY YOU CHOSE THE IDSA FOUNDATION FOR RESEARCH GRANT SUPPORT? DR. NORINS: The field of immunology

is very intertwined with ID—most ID specialists have grounding in


“AD/ID RESEARCH MAY BE THE DAWN OF A NEW ERA OF FINDING LINKS BETWEEN AND POTENTIALLY CURES FOR OTHER DISEASES.” DR. LESLIE NORINS

immunology. I earned a PhD from the University of Melbourne, where I studied immunology with Sir Macfarlane Burnet, Nobel Laureate. That experience first exposed me to the tie between immunology and ID. I also directed the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory at the CDC, then took a 40-year detour into medical publishing. A few years ago, I connected with the head of AD research at Johns Hopkins and mentioned my interest in the tie between AD and ID; that led to an introduction to their head of ID, who happened to be Dr. Paul Auwaerter, ISDA’s president at the time. As if that wasn’t serendipitous enough, ISDA’s president elect also happened to be Paul’s colleague, and the result of that chance encounter at Hopkins was IDSA sponsoring two grants of $50,000 each. Q: MRS. NORINS, AD HAS IMPACTED YOU PERSONALLY. WOULD YOU CARE TO ELABORATE ON YOUR JOURNEY WITH AD? MRS. NORINS: AD has had a profound

impact on my own life; as Leslie mentioned, I lost both my grandmother and my mother to AD. In addition to losing close family members to the disease, almost every close friend of mine is currently dealing with a family member suffering from the disease. So not only has AD had a profound impact on me personally, I think that overall it’s critically important to humanity because AD can impact everyone.

Q: UNDERSTANDING YOUR PASSION FOR ADVANCING AD RESEARCH, CAN YOU TALK A BIT MORE ABOUT YOUR ROLE WITH ALZHEIMER’S GERM QUEST? MRS. NORINS: Leslie and I have been

together since the 1990s, both in life and in business. I had been in business for myself and Leslie was starting a medical publishing business. Since then, we have always worked and traveled together—our offices are even right next to each other at home. This endeavor is a labor of love and I’m grateful not only for the continued opportunity for us to work together, but also because AD research has such a personal meaning for me. With my family history, it’s likely that at some point I’ll be facing AD. My hope is that AD is eradicated by the time my kids and grandkids ever have to face the pain and suffering it causes everyone that it impacts.

Q: DO YOU THINK WE ARE CLOSE TO IDENTIFYING AN INFECTIOUS AGENT THAT IS THE ROOT CAUSE OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE? DR. NORINS: There are currently about

seven plausible candidates, but they haven’t been thoroughly investigated. There may also be undiscovered agents. I like to say “we have persons of interest but not enough for a formal indictment yet, much less an arrest and conviction.” Rainey adds to this, “It might not

even be a single suspect, it might be a gang.” Q: IS THERE ANYTHING ADDITIONAL YOU’D LIKE TO SHARE ON PHILANTHROPY, RESEARCH OR YOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH THE IDSA FOUNDATION? DR. NORINS: As I’ve become engaged

with the IDSA Foundation and have been attending IDSA events, I’ve been fortunate to meet ID professionals worldwide who share my belief in the link between AD and ID. Many of these pioneers—or “converts”—who have also been studying the germ/AD link confirmed my suspicion that only a minimal amount of grant funding has been available to pursue this important line of research. My hope is that if the increased funding for ID/AD research does show a link between the two, a similar public outcry and demand for a cure will spark additional recognition of the importance of ID as it relates to the demand for a cure to AD. AD/ID research may be the dawn of a new era of finding links between and potential cures for other diseases. That would truly be an important new frontier for ID specialists.

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THE MEANING OF LIFE IS TO FIND YOUR GIFT. THE PURPOSE OF LIFE IS TO GIVE IT AWAY. PABLO PICASSO


2018 FINANCIAL INFORMATION 2018 REVENUES

The IDSA Foundation is driven by a mission to Build the Future of Infectious Diseases. By investing in the brilliant minds of the ID professionals of tomorrow, along with our efforts to expand the reach of the clinicians who work daily to provide life-saving care, together we will reduce the impact of infectious diseases! We know by increasing the number of well-trained ID professionals for tomorrow, we are ENSURING there will be enough ID specialists equipped to take on the next infectious disease threat.

$1,602,706

Grant Income $968,790

IDSA $370,613

Individual Income $259,725 Interest $3,578

The 2018 financial overview of the IDSA Foundation is presented here. The charts present revenue and expenses for the Foundation and may not be consistent with financial statements, which must be based on generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP).

2018 EXPENSES $1,602,706

Career Development $791,736

Education $400,828

Fundraising $249,195 Interest $3,578

These are unaudited figures.

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WE ARE GRATEFUL TO OUR DONORS WHO ARE INVESTING IN THE NEXT GENERATION OF ID DETECTIVES J. William Campbell, MD

William Gardner, MD, MACP

Edward E. Leonard, MD

Julio Cardenas, MD, FIDSA

David Gilbert, MD, FIDSA

Donald P. Levine, MD

Christopher F. Carpenter, MD, MHA

Peter A. Gross, MD

Alvaro Lopez, MD

Karen C. Carroll, MD

Ashley Haase, MD, FIDSA

Eddie Louie, MD

Jane Cecil, MD

Dafer Haddadin, MD

Jeffery S. Loutit, MD

Carlos Cervera, MD

John H. Hammer, MD

Daniel Lucey, MD, MPH, FIDSA

$100-$499

Bruce N. Chamovitz, MD

W. David Hardy, MD

Sheila Lukehart, PhD, FIDSA

Michael T. Charney, MD

Chawki Harfouch

Tammy S. Lundstrom, MD

Lilian M. Abbo, MD

Chester Choi, MD

Barry J. Hartman, MD

Ruth Lynfield, MD

Oluwatoyin Adeyemi, MD

Kulkanya Chokephaibulkit, MD

Dial Hewlett, MD, FIDSA

Ricardo Maldonado, MD

Lem Aigbivbalu, MD

Hanumara R. Chowdri, MD

Claudia Hildreth

Farrin A. Manian, MD

Thamer Alenazi, MD

Susan Coffin, MD, MPH, FIDSA

Martin S. Hirsch, MD

Kendall Marcus, MD

Ogechika K. Alozie, MD, MPH

Keith Collins, MD

John L. Ho, MD

Edgar Marcuse, MD, MPH, FIDSA

Bishr Al-Ujayli, MD

Miguel Colon-Perez, MD, FIDSA

Tobias M. Hohl, MD, PhD

Harold S. Margolis, MD, FIDSA

David Andes, MD, FIDSA

Daria Colombo & Tobias M. Hohl

David C. Hooper, MD

Aileen M. Marty, MD

Michael P. Angarone, DO

Sara E. Cosgrove, MD, MS

Thomas M. Hooton, MD

Wilbert H. Mason, MD

Robert Arbeit, MD, FIDSA

Mark A. Crislip, MD

Michael Horberg, MD, FIDSA

David A. Mayorga, MD

Cesar A. Arias, MD, PHD

Alan Cross, MD, FIDSA

Michael K. Hori, MD

Dana Mazo, MD

Michael S. Ashton, MD

Frederick A. Cruickshank, MD

James M. Horton, MD

J. Ian McMillen, MD

Hilary M. Babcock, MD, MPH

Judith Currier, MD, MSC, FIDSA

Stephen W. Hosea, MD

Andre G. Melendez, MD, MSC

David A. Balling, MD, FIDSA

Susan Cu-Uvin, MD

Alexander Huang, MS

Michael T. Melia, MD

Brent Barber, MD

Joseph Dalovisio, MD, FIDSA

Nicole Iovine, MD, PhD, FIDSA

Brian S. Metzger, MD, MPH

Donna L. Barrera

David S. Davenport, MD

Michael G. Ison, MD, MS, FIDSA

Eric Milefchik, MD

Jason Barreto, PharmD

Margaret de St Aubin

Eric Jacobson, MD, PhD, FIDSA

Daniel Morgan, MD, FIDSA

John Bartlett, MD, FIDSA

Del DeHart, MD, FIDSA

Mamta K. Jain, MD

Andrew Morris, MD

Anusha Belani, MD

Alberto Dolara, MD

Chandy John, MD

Darilyn V. Moyer, MD

Aldith Bellonie-Bespole

John Douglas, MD

Patrick Joseph, MD, FIDSA

Kathleen M. Mullane, DO, PharmD

Debra Benator, MD, FIDSA

Marylene J. Duah, MD

Manisha Juthani-Mehta, MD, FIDSA

Sheila Murphey, MD

Luiz Bermudez, MD

Jeffrey Duchin, MD, FIDSA

Mohammad Kabbesh, MD

Daniel M. Musher, MD

Constance A. Benson, MD

Robert A. Duncan, MD, MPH

Elizabeth Kailath, MD

Martin and Beverly Myers, MD, FIDSA

Mary T. Bessesen, MD

Michael Durkin, MD, MPH

Samuel Katz, MD, FIDSA

Patrick Njoku, MD

Nikhil K. Bhayani, MD

Nnaemeka Egwuatu, MD

Carol A. Kauffman, MD

Obiefuna Okoye, MD

Thomas Bleck, MD, FIDSA

Wilfred Ellis, MD

Erica E. Kaufman West, MD

Sean OLeary, MD, MPH

Douglas D. Blevins, MD

Janet A. Englund, MD

Carol A. Kemper, MD

Margaret Olsen, MPH, PhD

Emily A. Blumberg, MD

Monica Farley, MD, FIDSA

Hyun Kyun Ki

Catherine O’Neal, MD

John M. Boggs, MD

Farhan Fazal, MD

Peter H. Kilmarx, MD

Jacob Oommen, MD

Robert Bonomo, MD, FIDSA

Judith Feinberg, MD, FIDSA

Shirley Klein, MD

Luis Ostrosky-Zeichner, MD, FIDSA

Carol L. Brosgart, MD

Julio E. Figueroa, MD

Corinne Klein, MD

Tara N. Palmore, MD

Martha Buitrago, MD

Mark Finch, MD

Palaniandy K. Kogulan, MD

Demosthenes Pappagianis, MD, PHD

Steven D. Burdette, MD

Neil Fishman, MD, FIDSA

Susan Koletar, MD, FIDSA

Kathleen Paranada

Michael Butera, MD, FIDSA

Michael Fitzgibbons, MD

Tsun Sheng Ku

Steven W. Parker, MD

Jay C. Butler, MD

Henry Fraimow, MD

Jennie Kwon, DO, MS

Andrew T. Pavia, MD

Richard G. Byrd, MD

Joseph J. Gadbaw, MD

Katherine Laessig, MD

Stephen I. Pelton, MD

Michael S. Calderwood, MD, MPH

Alison Galdys, MD

Maryrose R. Laguio-Vila, MD

Rosalie Pepe, MD

David P. Calfee, MD, MS

Joel Gallant, MD, MPH, FIDSA

Ebbing Lautenbach, MD, MPH, MS, FIDSA

Trish M. Perl, MD, MSC

2018 DONORS

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Anna K. Person, MD

Vidya Sundareshan

Eskild A. Petersen, DMsc, DTM&H, MBA, MD Ronaldo B. Supena, MD

Carlos Del Rio, MD, FIDSA

Spencer Seufert

Alfred DeMaria, MD, FIDSA, FSHEA

John Sherris, MD, FIDSA

AnnKatrin Peterson Jappelli, MD, MSC

Martha H. Tanner, MD, FIDSA

Joan L. Drucker, MD

Steven Sperber, MD, FIDSA

Eva Piessens, MD

Joao Tavares, MD

David Drutz, MD, FIDSA

Kent Stock, DO, MBA

Andrea Polesky, MD

Patrick Tennican, MD

Michael W. Dunne, MD

Marvin Tenenbaum, MD, FIDSA

Richard Pollard, MD

Robert Thompson, MD

Simintha Esson, MA

David Lee Thomas, MD, FIDSA

Paul S. Pottinger, MD

Maureen R. Tierney-Brennan, MD, MSC

Thomas File, MD, FIDSA

Allen Tunkel, MD, FIDSA

Harold S. Raucher, MD

Bhatraphol Tingpej, MD

David N. Fredricks, MD, FIDSA

Richard Whitley, MD, FIDSA

Susan Ray, MD, FIDSA

Gregg Tolliver, MD, MPH

Anne Gershon, MD, FIDSA

Ricardo R. Reyes, MD

Townson Tsai, MD

Jeannette Guarner, MD, FIDSA

Frank S. Rhame, MD

Trevor Van Schooneveld, MD

Cathy Hardalo, MD

Gunter K. Rieg, MD

Mary Vogler, MD, FIDSA

Mary Hayden, MD, FIDSA, FSHEA

Paul Auwaerter, MD, MBA, FIDSA

Noah Robbins, MD

Kathleen Wairimu, MD

David Hong, MD

Helen Boucher, MD, FIDSA

Elizabeth Robilotti, MD, MPH

Richard Watkins, MD, MS, FIDSA

Eric R. Houpt, MD, FIDSA

Chris Busky, CAE

Patrick Robinson, MD, FIDSA

Scott Weisenberg, DTM&H, MD, MSC

James Hughes, MD, FIDSA

Thomas Fekete, MD, FIDSA

Leon Robison, MD

Charles S Weiss, MD, MPH

Bach & Godofsky ID

Mary Jane Ferrero, PhD, FIDSA

Clare Rock, MD, MS

Thomas Wellems, MD, PhD

Ravi Jhaveri, MD, FIDSA

Eliot Godofsky, MD, FIDSA

Harry Rosado-Santos, MD

Soe S. Win, MBBS

Robert Kaplan, MD

Anne Rowley, MD

Dean L. Winslow, MD

Wendy Keitel, MD, FIDSA

Lucy Stuart Tompkins, MD, PHD, FIDSA, FSHEA

J. Kenyon Rupnik

Mallory D. Witt, MD

Mark Keroack, MD

Edward Ryan, MD, FIDSA

Laila E. Woc-Colburn, MD

Keith P. Klugman, MD, FIDSA

George Sakoulas, MD

Michael T. Wong, MD

Oliver Liesenfeld, MD

Jorge L. Santana Bagur, MD

Deborah S. Yokoe, MD, MPH

Jeanne M. Marrazzo, MD, FIDSA

Mary Schmidt, MD, MPH, FIDSA

Clarence Young, MD, FIDSA

Celia J. Maxwell, MD, FIDSA

Steven M. Schnittman, MD

Vincent B. Young, MD, PHD

Daniel P. McQuillen, MD, FIDSA

Robert Schooley, MD, FIDSA

Heather Yun, MD, FIDSA

Thomas Moore, MD, FIDSA Barbara Murray, MD, FIDSA

Jennifer Schranz, MD

$500-$4,999

Susanna Naggie, MD, FIDSA

Lucyann M. Sciandra, DO

Judith Aberg, MD, FIDSA

Ronald Lee Nichols, MD, FIDSA

Juan C. Sepulveda Arias, MD, PHD

Wendy Armstrong, MD, FIDSA

Josh Nosanchuk, MD, FIDSA

Dennis M. Shoemaker DO

Barbara A. Atkinson, DO, FIDSA

Ighovwerha Ofotokun, MD, FIDSA

Upinder Singh, MD

Carol Baker, MD, FIDSA

George Pankey, MD, FIDSA

Thomas G. Slama, MD

Johan Bakken, MD, PhD, FIDSA

Jan Patterson, MD, FIDSA, FSHEA

Dorothy Slavin, MD

Ellen Jo Baron, PhD, FIDSA

Thomas Patterson, MD, FIDSA

James Smith, MD

Nesli Basgoz, MD, FIDSA

Georges Peter, MD, FIDSA

Jeffrey Snedeker, MD

Frank Berkowitz, MD, MPH

Larry K. Pickering, MD, FIDSA

Graham M. Snyder, MD, MS

Susan Boruchoff, MD, FIDSA, FSHEA

Liise-anne Pirofski, MD, FIDSA

Stephen Sokalski, DO, FIDSA

Dale W. Bratzler, DO, MPH, FIDSA

Donald Poretz, MD, FIDSA

April Soto, MD

R. Michael Buckley, MD, FIDSA

Bill Powderly, MD, FIDSA

Paul M. Southern, MD

Angela M. Caliendo, MD, PHD, FIDSA

Susan Rehm, MD, FIDSA

Stanley M. Spinola, MD

Henry Chambers, MD, FIDSA

Alice Savage, MD, PhD

Joanne Stekler, MD, MPH, FIDSA

James Cherry, MD, FIDSA

Steven Schmitt, MD, FIDSA

Dennis L. Stevens, MD

James Cutrell, MD

John Scott, MD, FIDSA

Dennis Sula, MD, MD, FIDSA

Cornelia L. Dekker, MD, FIDSA

Cynthia Sears, MD, FIDSA

John C. Schwab Steven Schwimmer, DO

Ronald Nahass, MD, FIDSA, FSHEA

$5,000 +

Organizational Donors ALK The Allergan Foundation Alzheimer’s Germ Quest, Inc. Genentech Biotechnology Company Gilead Sciences, Inc. Janssen Pharmaceutical Company Pfizer Pharmaceutical Company ViiV Healthcare

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS William G. Powderly, MD, FIDSA [2019] Chair Washington University School of Medicine Thomas Fekete, MD, FIDSA [2020] Vice Chair Temple University Medical School Helen W. Boucher, MD, FIDSA [2021] Secretary/Treasurer Tufts Medical Center Eliot W. Godofsky MD, FIDSA [2020] Development Committee Chair Bach & Godofsky Russel Petrak MD, FIDSA [2020] Metro Infectious Disease Consultants Johan S. Bakken, MD, PhD, FIDSA [2019] (Retired) St. Luke’s ID Associates Barbara E. Murray, MD, FIDSA [2020] University of Texas Health Science Center Chris Busky, CAE Chief Executive Officer

IDSA FOUNDATION STAFF Arthinia Morgan, MBA Senior Fundraising Manager Katie Bourgoin Office Assistant

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2 0 1 8 A N N UA L R E P O RT


THE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SOCIETY OF AMERICA FOUNDATION IS THE PREMIER RESOURCE IN EDUCATING THE PUBLIC ON INFECTIOUS DISEASES, BUT IT’S OUR SUPPORTERS WHO FUEL THIS CRITICAL WORK.

THANK YOU!


1300 WILSON BOULEVARD, SUITE 300 ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA 22209 703-299-0200 WWW.IDSAFOUNDATION.ORG FOUNDATION@IDSOCIETY.ORG

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IDSA Foundation's 2018 Annual Report  

Your IDSA Foundation is hard at work to becoming the nation’s premier resource for Building the Future of Infectious Diseases. This year, th...

IDSA Foundation's 2018 Annual Report  

Your IDSA Foundation is hard at work to becoming the nation’s premier resource for Building the Future of Infectious Diseases. This year, th...

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