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TECH DIRECTORY 2015

plus

BEAT THE HEAT In Compressed Air Equipment

FATIGUE TESTING

COMPANY PROFILE

Closed-Loop ElectroHydraulic Control

A Certification Success Story Q+A


Imagine creative solutions that dare the viewer to expand their thinking, while you achieve brand recognition.

610.923.8000 | www.idpcreative.com CIRCLE 338


Yates is Everywhere From Georgia to Michigan to Alabama – from the Midwest to the Deep South – our three manufacturing plants allow us to ship new and repair cylinders at a moments notice, throughout North America.

NFPA/JIC Tie Rod Cylinders • Hydraulic and Pneumatic • 1½” up to 24” bore • Interchangeable with all brands

Custom Welded Cylinders • Hydraulic and Pneumatic • 1½” up to 50” bore, with strokes exceeding 300”

Heavy Duty Mill Cylinders • Hydraulic and Pneumatic • 1½” up to 50” bore, with strokes exceeding 300” As we continue to grow, we remain committed to accessibility. We want our customers to know they can call us anytime. Accidents are never convenient, which is why we offer emergency services 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Yates CYLINDeRs, INC.

Yates CYLINDeRs aLaBaMa

Yates CYLINDeRs GeORGIa

23050 Industrial Dr. E.

55 Refreshment Place

7750 The Bluffs

St. Clair Shores, MI 48080

Decatur, AL 35601

Austell, GA 30168

Phone: 586.778.7680

Phone: 256.351.8081

Phone: 678.355.2240

Fax: 586.778.6565

Fax: 256.351.8571

Fax: 678.355.2241

sales@yatesind.com

decatur@yatesind.com

salesga@yatesind.com

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In This Issue T E C H D I R E C TO RY 2 0 1 5 • VO L U M E 2 2 • I S S U E 9

20

16

5 10 16 20

DEPARTMENTS

Beating the Heat Air compressors and dryers produce lots of heat, which must be adequately dealt with or trouble will find your system. Find out how to remove the heat.

Closed-Loop Electro-hydraulic Control Fatigue analysis is a technique that is performed in R&D labs to understand the failure properties of a specimen. Closed-loop electro-hydraulic control aids this process.

Pump Drive Retrofit If the hydraulic systems driving your stamping press operate with less than optimum efficiency, there are multiple benefits that can be realized by considering the value of a hydraulic retrofit.

Company Profile: Hydraquip What makes Hydraquip unique in this industry, and why is IFPS certification an integral part of its success?

4 NOTABLE WORDS 6 ECONOMIC REPORT 7 FPEF UPDATES 8 CERTIFICATION SUCCESS PROFILE 9 WEB MARKETPLACE 12 IFPS UPDATES 22 NFPA UPDATES 25 AIR TEASER 26 INDUSTRY NEWS 27 IFPS CERTIFICATION SPOTLIGHT 28 DIRECTORY LISTING 37 PRODUCT REVIEW 38 DIRECTORY MATRIX 46 CLASSIFIEDS

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PUBLISHER’S NOTE: The information provided in this publication is for

informational purposes only. While all efforts have been taken to ensure the technical accuracy of the material enclosed, Fluid Power Journal is not responsible for the availability, accuracy, currency, or reliability of any information, statement, opinion, or advice contained in a third party’s material. Fluid Power Journal will not be liable for any loss or damage caused by reliance on information obtained in this publication.

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POWER UNDER CONTROL Allenair’s Cyl-Check

The Allenair Cyl-Check® is a self-contained® oil filled unit which can be used in any tool or work feeding application, eliminating chatter caused by vibrations in power thrust and irregular loads, providing smooth, uniform and precise feed control. The unit can be coupled with a Pneumatic Cylinder or other linear notion devices and proves the flexibility required in many applications, without the costly expense of a complete hydraulic system. The Allenair Cyl-Check® is a high quality unit carefully designed, produced, assembled, and tested to provide long trouble-free service.

Characteristics • Infinitely variable, easily adjustable speed rate in forward, reverse in both directions, Controlled Speeds from 1” to 600” per minute. • 3,000 lb. maximum thrust load capacity. • Optional stop and skip-check features. • Eliminates costly hydraulic systems. Allenair is here for you. Whether you need a little technical help specifying a standard unit or custom design for a special application. We are ready to help. 255 EAST SECOND ST. MINEOLA, NY 11501 USA TELEPHONE: 516-747-5481 FAX: 516-747-5481 Visit our website at www.allenair.com CIRCLE 328

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Notable Words

PUBLISHER

25 Years Strong in Promoting Certification and Industry Training

INNOVATIVE DESIGNS & PUBLISHING, INC. 3245 Freemansburg Avenue, Palmer, PA 18045-7118 Tel: 800-730-5904 or 610-923-0380 Fax: 610-923-0390 • Email: AskUs@ifps.org www.FluidPowerJournal.com Founders: Paul and Lisa Prass Associate Publisher: Marc Mitchell Editor: Kristine Coblitz Technical Editor: Dan Helgerson, CFPAI/AJPP, CFPS, CFPECS, CFPSD, CFPMT, CFPCC - CFPSOS LLC Account Executive: Bob McKinney Art Director: Quynh Vo Director of Creative Services: Erica Montes Accounting: Donna Bachman, Debbie Clune Digital Strategy Manager: Jeff Maile Publishing Assistant: Sharron Sandmaier Circulation Manager: Andrea Karges

INTERNATIONAL FLUID POWER SOCIETY

I was very saddened by the death of my good friend Ray Hanley, who passed away May 30 of this year. I got my first certification in 1987 and was introduced to several members as time went by, and in the early 1990s, I met Ray at an IFPS annual meeting. He was dedicated to educating everyone in the fluid power industry for the purpose of raising the bar of expertise and competency in our industry and providing a vehicle for attaining it. We worked together for many years on the certification committee of the IFPS, and he encouraged From left: Robert Sheaf and Ray Hanley me to the point of becoming the Society’s president in 2000. Ray and I would have long discussions about the lack of training in our industry and how to improve it. When I owned a repair business in the 1980s, I would receive a lot of hydraulic pumps for repair and rebuild. Over 50% of the units made me wonder why the customer sent them in to us. They were in good condition inside and should have functioned fine. When we contacted the customer, the predominating response was “lack of pressure” in the system. Pumps do not cause pressure; their job is to provide flow. Resistance in the system causes pressure. Invariably, we would get a bad cylinder or pressure control to repair after the customer installed the rebuilt pump, and it did not fix their original problem. When I was in the repair business, I put on a basic fluid power course one night a week for eight weeks. I got a lot of satisfaction out of helping our customers’ employees understand troubleshooting techniques and how their systems worked. This was probably why I started CFC 25 years ago, and I still enjoy it at the age of 70. Like Ray, I too felt that certification was a good tool to elevate the expertise and knowledge of our industry. I just wish more employers would see the value and return on investment that well-trained employees bring to the table in less downtime and fewer components purchased. Ray felt strongly that IFPS and its certification program would be a great vehicle to encourage and promote training. Over the 25 years CFC has been in business, I can say that a large number of fluid power distributors, power and light companies, as well as several OEMs have promoted training and the certification of their employees that might not have happened if it were not for the IFPS certification programs. I’m sure Ray is happy with how the IFPS has made such an impact on our industry and continues to do so.

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By Robert Sheaf, CFPAI/AJPP, CFPE, CFPS, CFPECS, CFPMT, CFPMIP, CFPMMH, CFPMIH, CFPMM

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1930 East Marlton Pike, Suite A-2, Cherry Hill, NJ 08003-2141 Tel: 856-489-8983 • Fax: 856-424-9248 Email: AskUs@ifps.org • Web: www.ifps.org 2015 BOARD OF DIRECTORS President & Chairperson Marti Wendel, CFPE, CFPS, CFPCC - Curtiss-Wright Sprague Products Immediate Past President Tom Blansett, CFPAI, CFPS, CFPIHT, CFPCC - Behco-MRM, Inc. First Vice President Rance Herren, CFPSD, CFPECS, CFPMT, CFPAI - National Oilwell Varco Vice President Education D. Dean Houdeshell, PE, CFPAI/AJPP, CFPE, CFPS, CFPIHT, CFPMHT, CFPMHM - Danfoss Treasurer Jose Garcia, CFPHS - Purdue University Vice President Membership & Chapter Support Richard Bullers, CFPPS - SMC Corp. of America Vice President Certification Timothy White, CFPAI/AJPP, CFPS, CFPECS, CFPMIH, CFPMMH, CFPMIP, CFPMT, CFPMM - The Boeing Company Vice President Marketing & Public Relations Justin Sergeant, CFPS, CFPMHM - Seven Stars Industries Vice President Educational Foundation Patrick Maluso, CFPAI/AJPP, CFPS, CFPMHM - Western Hydrostatics, Inc. DIRECTORS-AT-LARGE Kenneth Dulinski, CFPAI/AJPP, CFPECS, CFPHS, CFPMIH, CFPMMH Macomb Community College Frank Fetty, CFPMHM - JH Fletcher & Company Scott Sardina, PE, CFPHS - The Oilgear Company Scott Gower, CFPS - Gulf Controls Co., Inc. Jeffrey Hodges, CFPAI/AJPP, CFPMHM - Altec Industries, Inc. Bill Jordan, CFPAI/AJPP, CFPMHM, CFPMHT - Altec Industries, Inc. John Juhasz, CFPECS, CFPS - Kraft Fluid Systems, Inc. Jeff Kenney, CFPIHM, CFPMHM, CFPMHT - Coastal Hydraulics, Inc. Scott Nagro, CFPS - HydraForce, Inc. Sam Kaye, CFPS, CFPMT, CFPMM, CFPMIH, CFPMMH, CFPMIP - Ensign Drilling Rocky Phoenix, CFPMHT, CFPMHM - Open Loop Energy, Inc. HONORARY DIRECTORS John Groot Raymond Hanley, CFPE/AI-Emeritus Robert Sheaf, CFPAI/AJPP, CFPE, CFPS, CFPECS, CFPMT, CFPMIP, CFPMMH, CFPMIH, CFPMM IFPS STAFF Executive Director: Donna Pollander, ACA Communications Manager: Adele Kayser Business Development Manager: Jeffrey Morrow Assistant Director: Jeana Hoffman Membership Coordinator: Sue Dyson Certification Coordinator: Susan Apostle Bookkeeper: Diane McMahon Administrative Assistant: Beth Borodziuk Fluid Power Journal (ISSN# 1073-7898) is the official publication of the International Fluid Power Society published bi-monthly with four supplemental issues, including a Systems Integrator Directory, Off-Highway Suppliers Directory,Tech Directory, and Manufacturers Directory, by Innovative Designs & Publishing, Inc., 3245 Freemansburg Avenue, Palmer, PA 180457118. All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part of any material in this publication is acceptable with credit. Publishers assume no liability for any information published. We reserve the right to accept or reject all advertising material and will not guarantee the return or safety of unsolicited art, photographs or manuscripts.


Beating the

BY RON MARSHALL FOR THE COMPRESSED AIR CHALLENGE

SOME OF YOU may have noticed some challenging issues with your air compressors, dryers, or quality of the compressed air during the hot, steamy summer months. If measures are not taken to reduce the ambient temperatures around your air compressors, then problems will develop in the short term and long term that will hurt your pocketbook. In some ways, air compressors are their own worst enemies. A fully loaded 30-hp, 22-kW air compressor will produce about 22 kW of heat. This is equivalent to a furnace required for a large home during winter in the northern U.S. states. Of course if all this heat is confined to a small compressor room in the hot days of summer, some challenges may arise. But quite often, this heat is directed away from the compressor room in metal ductwork. Most of the heat a compressor produces comes out of the lubricant cooler and compressed air after-cooler. On air-cooled compressors, these coolers typically have some method of connecting to square ducting. But radiant losses from ductwork and heat expelled by compressor motors and air dryers can still cause room overheating. EXCESSIVE HEATING CAN HAVE NEGATIVE EFFECTS ON COMPRESSED AIR EQUIPMENT: ƒƒ The room air will be less dense, and as a result, the compressor will produce less air. ƒƒ The compressor motor will run at higher temperatures, increasing its losses and causing reduced insulation life. ƒƒ Electronic controls, such as variable-speed drives, can fail at high ambient conditions or cause problematic transient tripping. ƒƒ The compressor oil can age more quickly at elevated temperatures, losing its lubricating properties and causing reduced compressor-bearing life. ƒƒ The frequency of nuisance over-temperature trips can increase with higher temperatures, reducing system reliability. ƒƒ The compressed air produced by the compressor is hotter; as the temperature of the discharge air increases, it holds more moisture, with water content doubling approximately every 20°F. ƒƒ Air dryers that are sized for normal ambient conditions are not capable of handling higher moisture loads at high temperatures and may allow water contamination to pass into the facility’s piping system. ƒƒ Free water in steel piping systems can cause rusting, and this contaminated water can migrate into expensive tools and equipment connected to the compressed air system.

The solution to these problems is to ensure proper compressor room cooling is designed and installed when your compressor is installed. Air-cooled compressors and dryers need a plentiful supply of cool, clean, and dry ambient air to maintain adequate operating temperatures. The compressor manufacturer will have air flow requirements specified for adequate ventilation air; find these and ensure the ventilation is designed for at least the specification. Remember that skin losses heat the room by radiation, so cross ventilation fans are often required to remove this heat before it is ingested by the air compressor or dryer intake or cooling systems. Applying insulation to metal ductwork is also an excellent way to control radiant heat loss. Some buildings have an inherent negative pressure that will reduce the flow of ventilation air in ductwork that is connected to outdoors; in these cases, the onboard compressor cooling fans may not be enough on their own and additional booster fans may be required. Getting rid of the heat in summer to reduce your costs is important, but keeping the heat in winter is also a good way to reduce your costs if your plant needs additional space heating. Your compressor can be like a free electric furnace, displacing other heating energy and saving you money. Often additional control ducting can be placed in compressor room ventilation with a summer and winter position. In summer, the heat can be directed outside; in winter, it is sent into areas needing the heat. Some manufacturers even offer heat-recovery packages on compressors that can be used to recover the heat of compression to a flow of liquid that can be used in process loads, boilers, hot water tanks, and other devices. Use of these recovery packages takes the heat load off the compressor lubricant cooler and can actually help extra liquid cooling for an air-cooled compressor to help in extremely hot summer conditions. Air compressors and dryers produce lots of heat, which must be adequately dealt with or trouble will find your system. Proper removal of this heat will allow your compressed air system to last longer; remain more trouble free; and maintain a good, clean, and dry supply of compressed air for your facility. Learn more about heat recovery at one of the Compressed Air Challenge seminars. For a schedule of events, vist www.compressedairchallenge.org.

Reinforce your industry expertise with a Pneumatic Mechanic, Technician, or Specialist certification. Apply online at www.ifps.org.

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Economic Report

Global Manufacturing Update By Chad Moutray, Chief Economist, National Association of Manufacturers (NAM)

PERCENT GROWTH OF MANUFACTURED GOODS EXPORTS 2013 - 2015 (YTD)

6.7%

4.9% 5.6%

1.5% 1.3%

2.8%

1.9%

1.1%

1.7%

-0.4%

2.5%

2.0%

-1.7%

0.0% -2.0%

-2.0%

-2.5% -4.5%

-4.2%

-6.6%

-11.3%

CANADA

MEXICO

ASIA

EUROPE

SOUTH AMERICA

FREE TRADE AGREEMENT NATIONS

TOTAL

 2013  2014  2015 (YTD) August 2015 – Financial markets around the world are grappling with the fact that the Chinese economy is slowing, with the Bank of China acting to devalue the yuan. A number of economic statistics continue to reflect decelerating activity levels, particularly relative to the paces observed earlier in the year or last year. These include industrial production, fixed asset investments, and retail sales. Moreover, the Caixin China General Manufacturing PMI declined from 49.4 in June to 47.8 in July, its lowest level since July 2013. The headline PMI measure has now contracted in seven of the past eight months. While real GDP expanded by 7% in the second quarter, other measures seem to cast some doubt on that figure, with weaker growth anticipated moving forward. Beyond these economic statistics, the Shanghai Stock Exchange Composite Index has fallen nearly 25% since June 12 despite efforts by the government to prop up stock values. The events in China add an extra wrinkle to a global economy that has already been chal-

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lenged for much of this year. Manufacturers in the United States, for instance, have struggled to grow exports so far this year, with the strong U.S. dollar and weak economic growth abroad dampening international demand. According to the latest seasonally adjusted figures from TradeStats Express, U.S.-manufactured goods exports declined 4.16% year-to-date through the second quarter relative to the same time period in 2014. Manufactured goods exports increased strongly to the United Kingdom, our fifth-largest trading partner, up 12.50% year-to-date. However, this was counteracted by weaknesses in our top four trading markets: Canada (down 6.64%), Mexico (essentially flat, up just 0.03%), China (down 0.95%) and Japan down 0.69%). Moreover, net exports have served as a drag on economic growth in the United States, subtracting 1.92 percentage points from real GDP in the first quarter alone. In contrast, there have been some encouraging signs coming out of Europe despite uncertainties in Greece. The Markit Eurozone Manufacturing PMI declined ever so slight-

www.FluidPowerJournal.com • Tech Directory 2015 • www.IFPS.org

ly from 52.5 in June to 52.4 in July. The June reading was the fastest pace since April 2014, and that rate of expansion was mostly sustained in this latest survey. Indeed, Eurozone manufacturing activity has now expanded for 23 consecutive months. Real GDP rose 0.4% in the first quarter, or 1% year-over-year, and we expect that figure to tick slightly higher with new second quarter data out on August 14. The expectation is that the year-over-year pace will improve to 1.4% in the second quarter, which is also the forecast for 2015 as a whole. Deflation has been a concern in recent months, spurring quantitative easing moves by the European Central Bank, but the annual inflation rate was positive, albeit barely, for the third straight month. Overall, the global economy continued to expand slowly. The J.P. Morgan Global Manufacturing PMI continued to reflect relatively soft levels of expansion, with slowdowns in key markets weighing heavily on the headline number. In addition to “green shoots” in Europe, there was also some progress in North America, including the United States. The country-by-country analysis reflected similar trends. Manufacturing activity in four of the top 10 markets for U.S.-manufactured goods contracted in July, the same as in June but down from five in May and six in April. The four countries with contracting activity levels were Brazil, China, Hong Kong, and South Korea. Each of these nations has seen falling levels of demand and production for several months. In contrast, the other two markets continued to expand, but at differing rates of growth, with the Netherlands remaining as the bright spot in the top 10, with decent growth overall despite some easing in July.

Excerpt reprinted with permission. For the full report, visit www.nam.org.

The National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) represents small and large manufacturers in every industrial sector in all 50 states. For more information, visit www.nam.org.


FPEF Updates

Donation Dollars At Work Thanks to the generous donations, the following scholarships – along with 17 others – were awarded to high-caliber students who are pursuing fluid power careers. The Fluid Power Journal will print a series of these scholarship acknowledgments in upcoming issues.

Scholarship Underwritten by Bosch Rexroth Corp. “Paying to be a full-time student and working part-time makes money hard to come by. The gracious scholarship donation from the Fluid Power Educational Foundation, underwritten by Bosch Rexroth, was of great value towards continuing my education in the mechatronics field so I may pursue a career in fluid power following graduation. I would also like to thank my fluid power instructors, Mr. Steven Dick and Mr. James Simpson, for the knowledge I gained in fluid power.” Caleb Blankemeyer, Northwest State Community College

Scholarship Underwritten by J.H. Fletcher & Company “Receiving this scholarship is an outstanding honor, and it has given me further confidence to push myself in my fluid power program. I can now put complete focus into my schoolwork because of the financial support this scholarship gives me.” Daniel Barta, Hennepin Technical College

Scholarship Underwritten by Danfoss “Receiving this award is a great help in reducing my debt and gives me a real appreciation for the fluid power community. I look forward to participating in this industry and giving back just as it has given generously to me.” Andrew Hansen, Iowa State University

The Fluid Power Educational Foundation is a non-profit foundation committed to stimulate, advance, and support the science of hydraulic and pneumatic technology through educational initiatives at all levels. The FPEF is wholly supported by fluid power industry firms, associations, and individuals. For more information visit www.fpef.org or call 856-424-8998.

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Certification Success Profile

Profile Data

David Schneider David Schneider is an IFPS certified Mobile Hydraulic Mechanic (CFPMHM) and Mobile Hydraulic Technician (CFPMHT), a former Accredited Instructor (CFPAI), and has a Train the Trainer (TEREX) certification. His career began 30 plus years ago at Isson (John-Deere) in Monico, Wis., where he worked in hydraulics by servicing and repairing construction and logging equipment. He then started working as a road technician for DUECO in 1984. Mr. Schneider began his own repair business, Dependable Service Hydraulics LLC, in September 2012, opening the doors to his first shop in December 2014.

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WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO ENTER THE HYDRAULICS FIELD?

Northern Wisconsin had very few job opportunities in the early 1980s, and John Deere offered me a job upon getting an associates degree in Automotive Service. I enjoyed testing equipment after I worked on it and seeing what it could do. I have worked on engines, cylinders, pin and bushing track, rebuilds, radio-controlled units, construction equipment, logging equipment, concrete pumps, forklifts, self-propelled aerial lifts, track machines, cranes, aerial bucket trucks, and anything with wheels or tracks. The most unique piece of equipment I ever worked on was a 50-m concrete pump that had five booms with radio controls.

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WHEN DID YOU START WORKING ON THE ROAD, AND WHAT WAS THAT EXPERIENCE LIKE FOR YOU?

I started in 1986 while I was working at DUECO. Working on the road means dealing with a lot of extremes – the coldest temperature was 30 degrees below zero (70 below zero wind chill) working on a forklift; the hottest was 120 degrees in Texas working on a concrete pumper. I also worked under a track machine once fixing a pump in a 3-ft puddle. I generally drove about 300 miles a day and about 40,000 miles per year at least, if not more. The longest trip to a job driving was 400 miles one way. What I enjoyed was and still is the challenge of fixing the trucks where they break down, and getting them back up and working wherever that might be. One example is when I had a bucket truck stuck in the air with a blown hose. The unit was on a transmission line five miles off a back road, and I had to have my service truck pulled through the right of way for the five miles. I have had to, on occasion, replace chains and cables on bucket trucks with no cranes, had to figure out ways to remove the upper boom cylinder to replace cables using leverage and blocks and tackles and jacks, and assure my safety and the equipment from being damaged. As a road technician, the one drawback I had was being away from home more than I liked while my children were growing up.

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WHAT ARE THE BIGGEST PROBLEMS YOU ENCOUNTER IN THIS LINE OF WORK?

Operator error, blown hoses, and safety switch malfunctions. The most complicated repairs deal with the electronics and electrical systems or the intermittent issues from contamination. One humorous example was when I had a truck that would shut off at break time every day, but because the crew needed the truck during their shift, I couldn’t work on it until afternoon. Unfortunately, I was never able to get the unit to act up when I was troubleshooting the problem. After this happened three or four times, I finally showed up right before break time. I noticed that the truck would tilt when the boom was brought down, and from the

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guys getting into the truck, the truck shut off. I then ohmed out a switch in the tail shelf to find water would bounce around in the switch and ground out the truck, making it shut off.

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WHEN DID YOU DECIDE TO START YOUR OWN HYDRAULICS REPAIR SHOP, AND WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED?

I started thinking about my own shop about ten years ago, but with a young family at the time and the outlay of time and money, it was only a dream. What I have learned is because I am a one-man operation at this point, the biggest challenge is being able to do it all; from being the boss, the technician, the parts department, scheduling jobs and in charge of the administrative paperwork, it can be hard to juggle it all.

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IF YOU COULD CHANGE ONE THING ABOUT THE HYDRAULICS INDUSTRY, WHAT WOULD IT BE?

Having engineers create portholes big enough for my arms! Also, making hoses that last longer by being protected from UV light and having units operate better on biodegradable oil in cold climates.

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WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR INDIVIDUALS ENTERING THE HYDRAULICS FIELD?

It’s important to be careful around hydraulics under pressure and never get complacent about safety. Have a good understanding of how to read electrical and hydraulic schematics; if you can do that, you can figure out just about any problem. Know your customers on a personal level, and be honest about repairs and cost. Also, to work in the repair field, you need integrity and perseverance.

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IF YOU HAD TO DO IT ALL OVER AGAIN, WHAT WOULD YOU DO DIFFERENTLY?

I would have gone to a technical school for hydraulics/pneumatics/ electrical instead of learning by trial and error. For instance, in my early career, I once tried to pull a cylinder apart and found out it would not come apart until the pressure was released.

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WHAT IS ONE OF THE BIGGEST CHANGES YOU’VE SEEN IN THE INDUSTRY?

In the early 1970s, radio controls were tried and they were very unreliable; with today’s new electronics and integration into hydraulics, the reliability of electronic controls and radio controls is fantastic, and so is the ability to interface with a truck’s computer to control functions remotely. Some companies have the ability to troubleshoot equipment from an office that is hundreds of miles away. David Schneider can be reached at dshydraulics@me.com.


WEB MARKETPLACE

www.cw-industrial.com CURTISS-WRIGHT

www.cyber-tech.net

Circle 339

CYBER-TECH, INC.

Sprague air-driven high pressure pumps and power units have been providing reliable, energy efficient performance for over 60 years. Reaching pressures of 36,500 psi with just 100 psi drive air; Sprague’s equipment provides cost effective hydrostatic testing, bolt tensioning, chemical injection, work holding and clamping. Please visit our new website at www.cw-industrial. com to access all of the Sprague catalogs, installation instructions, maintenance manuals and troubleshooting guides. Curtiss-Wright Sprague 10195 Brecksville Rd. Brecksville, OH 44141 Ph: 440-838-7690

Circle 340

Cyber-Tech, Inc. designs and manufactures custom industrial grade control handles, control pendants, mechanical and proportional joysticks with a consistent reputation for being rugged and reliable, while delivering a level of customer service that is superior in the industry. Visit our website and give us a call so we can assist you in your control needs. www.cyber-tech.net 1.800.621.8754

www.yatesind.com YATES INDUSTRIES

http://us.essentracomponents.com

www.hannonhydraulics.com

ESSENTRA COMPONENTS

HANNON HYDRAULICS

Circle 341

Circle 342

Essentra Components manufactures and distributes small, essential components, such as protective plastic caps, workholding clamps, fasteners, handles & knobs and PCB hardware.

Hannon Hydraulics is known worldwide as one of the leading hydraulics equipment companies for custom manufacturing, industrial equipment repair, replacement parts and field service. We offer our global customers lifecycle support that includes equipment commissioning, training, technical support, re-certification and repair services.

Essentra Components offers over one billion parts stocked with fast same day shipping. We offer free sampling on most of our standard products, allowing customers to "try before you buy". Browse our online categories or request a free catalog at http://us.essentracomponents.com

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Yates Cylinders Offer:

Visit our website or call 24/7 customer service at 1.800.580.0210. Call 1.800.333.4266 for sales.

Circle 343

• H6 Series - Heavy Duty Hydraulic (3000 PSI) • H4 Series - Medium Hydraulic (up to 1500 PSI) • A4 Series - Heavy Duty Steel Air (250 PSI) • A2 Series - Aluminum Air (250 PSI) • Air/Oil Intensifiers • All Stainless Steel Cylinders • Air/ Hydraulic Welded & Mill Type Cylinders • Special Cylinders per Customer Supplied Prints and Specifications Yates Industries, Inc. Yates Alabama Division 23050 Industrial Dr. E. 55 Refreshment Place St. Clair Shores, MI 48080 Decatur, AL 35601 586.778.7680 ph 256.351.8081 ph 586.778.6565 fax 256.351.8571 fax

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CLOSED-LOOP ELECTRO-HYDRAULIC CONTROL Aids Component Fatigue Testing by Brad Smith, Delta Computer Systems Inc.

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atigue analysis is a technique that is performed in R&D labs to understand the failure properties of a specimen in order to improve the reliability, quality, or cost of a manufactured product. Typically, the analysis starts by evaluating a series of mathematical equations, but then the results can be verified using real-world testing. Such is one of the processes being undergone by the NACCO Materials Handling Group (NMHG) Development Center in Fairview, Ore., one of the three research and development facilities for the Hyster® and Yale® lines of lift trucks. Fig. 1 shows the test apparatus developed by NMHG. The system uses one hydraulic cylinder with a 1.5" bore, capable of exerting up to 2,500 pounds of force in either direction. As the figure shows, the test sample is a lever arm, approximately eight inches long, acted upon directly by the cylinder. Between the cylinder rod end and the sample is a load cell, which is used to monitor the force that is being applied. Embedded in the cylinder is a magnetostrictive linear-displacement transducer (MLDT), which is used to track the amount of deflection of the arm as the weld joint deflects. To control the cylinder, NMHG chose the RMC75E motion controller manufactured by Delta Computer Systems of Battle Ground, Wash. The controller (Fig. 2) connects directly to the load cell via a built-in analog interface and the MLDT via an SSI interface. The control output from the controller goes directly to a proportional hydraulic servo valve, allowing the controller to smoothly increase and decrease the force exerted by the cylinder. The motion controller is coupled via Ethernet to a PLC for supervisory control, and a PC for process monitoring and data logging. To program the motion of the NMHG test platform, the RMC’s built-in sine wave motion function was used, with a frequency of two cycles per second. To ensure that the force applied hits the target value, the controller was set up to perform adaptive control of the hydraulics. The motion program captures the peak amplitudes every cycle, compares them to the force targets, and adjusts the offset and amplitude of the sine wave while ensuring that the system maintains smooth transitions in force levels. In cyclic testing applications such as this, where achieving a particular amplitude and offset are more important than precisely tracking the entire waveform, adaptive amplitude control gives the user the ability to continuously adjust the amplitude of the target signal so that the amplitude of the actual signal is where it needs to be. For example, to achieve a sine wave with an actual amplitude of 1, the adaptive control may adjust the target amplitude to 1.5 and continue to adjust in order to maintain the correct actual amplitude.

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Fig. 1: The NMHG weld test apparatus. The weld test sample is at the bottom of the picture, and the load cell (round blue object) is mounted between the cylinder rod and the sample.

“This adaptive control really shines as our test samples fatigue and the displacement increases,” said Saul Dyal, NMHG test engineer. “Prior to implementing adaptive control, we’d see an offset in our data and the system would struggle to hit the target force in one direction, thus decreasing the actual peak force. Now the motion controller adjusts the offset and amplitude as needed throughout the test to ensure we hit the desired peak forces every cycle, even as conditions change.” One environment variable, for example, is a change in the temperature of the hydraulic fluid, which can affect how the system reacts to a particular control output from the motion controller. Another factor affecting system operation is the fact that, because the fluid volume is different on


the rod side compared to the open side of the piston, the typical cylinder responds differently whether it is extending or retracting. The software needs to compensate for the area difference between the rod and blind end of the cylinder. “With Delta’s adaptive control, the system automatically adjusts to these changing conditions,” continued Dyal. “As a result, we’ve been hitting our force target to within +/-½ pound much of the time.” In tuning the system, the NMHG team used the RMCTools software provided by Delta. One of the most useful of these tools is the Tuning Wizard, which calculates gain values based on plots produced during a move. Fig. 3 shows a plot of approximately three test cycles of the weld test system. In the plot, the black curve is the actual force being applied over time, which precisely overlays a yellow curve representing the target force. The fact that the target force and actual force curves overlap signifies that the system is precisely tuned. Tuning a hydraulic system involves a process of adjusting the gains (multiplier factors) of the proportional (P), integral (I), and derivative (D) factors in the control loop algorithm so that the actual motion of the system matches the desired motion. The NMHG team found system tuning to be difficult initially, largely due to inexperience with tuning hydraulic components. As experience was gained, the team developed a process in which the P and I gain values were set so as to get the actual force to approximately track the target force. Then they followed an iterative process of making a move, creating a plot, and using Delta’s Tuning Wizard to calculate gain values to fine tune the motion. The overall time to force tune the actuator was reduced to a few minutes using this technique. The ability for an attached PC to precisely log parametric data during the course of a test allows the NMHG engineers to gain advance information on the performance of the system, including giving them the capability to see how a weld joint reacts before it fails. The team set up the test process to log data ten times per minute and was able to see that the position curve changes slope before a crack in the joint is visible. The next steps for NMHG will be to gradually increase the complexity of the welded joints and use the test results to develop parameters for mathematical models that will be used to predict the life of various configurations. Ultimately, this should enable a reduction in the time needed for actual physical testing as the company improves its software models and catches potential fatigue issues prior to building physical prototypes. New vehicle testing will always involve running completed units on the test track, but companies such as NMHG can improve their confidence in products’ long-term reliability by testing assemblies down to the level of how individual welds are accomplished.

For more information, visit www.deltamotion.com.

Fig. 2 (left): The Delta RMC75E motion controller can control two motion axes simultaneously and connects directly to an Ethernet network, position and force sensors, and proportional servo valves. Fig: 3 (bottom): A plot of the motion made using Delta’s Plot Manager software. The black curve shows the actual force applied following the yellow target force, the light blue curve shows the target position for the actuator, and the green plot line is the control output. The force applied departs slightly from a smooth sine wave as the cylinder switches from pushing to pulling the sample.

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CIRCLE 330


IFPS Updates

Too Busy to Leave Your Office?

NO PROBLEM.

IFPS Online Training Opportunities Visit www.ifps.org or call 800-308-6005.

ONLINE HYDRAULIC SAFETY AWARENESS TRAINING (SELF-PACED)

IFPS* offers online Hydraulic Safety Awareness Training courses. The courses provide an awareness of hydraulic hazards in the workplace, in-depth reviews of potential exposures to injury from hydraulic systems, and ways to reduce risk and eliminate hazards for workers, equipment, companies, and the environment. Four (4) online hydraulic safety awareness training courses are offered:  ƒƒ Exposure Level ƒƒ High-Risk Maintenance Level ƒƒ Hydraulic Safety in Construction ƒƒ Fluid Injection Awareness *in collaboration with the Hydraulic Safety Authority of Canada

ONLINE TRAINING (SELF-PACED)

Each course delivers a broad-based understanding of the most important fluid power subject matter concepts. Courses begin with the basics: physics laws, systems basics and design, basic analysis, and basic components, and then demonstrate how these systems apply to our industry and how they work and interact with each other. IFPS Members-$99!

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Each training course features approximately 12-16 hours of trade-specific e-training filled with simulations, assessments, quizzes, tests, learning labs, and more. Completion of the online training courses does not constitute IFPS certification; however, after completion of the course, you may be better prepared to take the appropriate IFPS certification test. Online courses are listed below: ƒƒ Mobile Hydraulics * ƒƒ Industrial Hydraulics **  ƒƒ Industrial Mechanical * ƒƒ Mobile Electrical *  ƒƒ Industrial Pneumatics * ƒƒ Industrial Electrical * ƒƒ Electrical Theory * ƒƒ AC/DC Motors and Drives * ƒƒ Diesel Engines * ƒƒ PLC Fundamentals + *available in metric, ** available in metric, Spanish, and Spanish (metric) , + available in Spanish

ONLINE CERTIFICATION REVIEW TRAINING (SELF-PACED)

Online Certification Review Training is offered for the following certifications through CFC Industrial Training, Inc.’s Learning Management System. This is an excellent mecha-

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nism to prepare for IFPS certification at your own pace from your own computer. (IFPS Members receive a discount.) ƒƒ Hydraulic Specialist ƒƒ Pneumatic Specialist ƒƒ Job Performance (for Mechanic & Technician certifications) ƒƒ Mobile Hydraulic Mechanic (written test review) ƒƒ Mobile Hydraulic Mechanic written and Job Performance (as a bundle) ONLINE WEB SEMINARS

IFPS holds free-to-members web seminars every other month (non-members may purchase). Attendance earns Professional Development Points (PDP), which can be applied when re-certifying. Members may view a list of archived web seminars by visiting www. ifps.org. Upcoming Web Seminar “Contamination Study of a Hydraulic System Using a Variable Volume Reservoir” October 15, 2015 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Eastern Presented by: Jose Garcia, CFPHS Purdue University


AVAILABLE IFPS CERTIFICATIONS CFPAI Certified Fluid Power Accredited Instructor CFPAJPP Certified Fluid Power Authorized Job Performance Proctor

CFPIHM Certified Fluid Power Industrial Hydraulic Mechanic CFPMHM Certified Fluid Power Mobile Hydraulic Mechanic

CFPAJPPCC Certified Fluid Power Authorized Job Performance Proctor Connector & Conductor

CFPPM Certified Fluid Power Pneumatic Mechanic CFPMIH Certified Fluid Power Master of Industrial Hydraulics (Must Obtain CFPIHM, CFPIHT, & CFPCC)

CFPE Certified Fluid Power Engineer CFPS Certified Fluid Power Specialist (Must Obtain CFPHS, CFPPS) CFPHS Certified Fluid Power Hydraulic Specialist CFPPS Certified Fluid Power Pneumatic Specialist CFPMT Certified Fluid Power Master Technician (Must Obtain CFPIHT, CFPMHT, & CFPPT) CFPIHT Certified Fluid Power Industrial Hydraulic Technician

CFPMMH Certified Fluid Power Master of Mobile Hydraulics (Must Obtain CFPMHM, CFPMHT, & CFPCC) CFPMIP Certified Fluid Power Master of Industrial Pneumatics (Must Obtain CFPPM, CFPPT, & CFPCC) CFPCC Certified Fluid Power Connector & Conductor CFPSD Fluid Power System Designer

CFPMHT Certified Fluid Power Mobile Hydraulic Technician

CFPMEC (In Development) Mobile Electronic Controls

CFPPT Certified Fluid Power Pneumatic Technician

CFPIEC (In Development) Industrial Electronic Controls

CFPMM Certified Fluid Power Master Mechanic (Must Obtain CFPIHM, CFPMHM, & CFPPM)

CIRCLE 332

NEWLY CERTIFIED PROFESSIONALS Sidonia Anca, PS Stewart & Stevenson Canada, Inc. Garrett Barbari, HS NMC CAT Michael Baynard, MHM Virginia Department of Transportation Luther Bowden, MHM Alabama Power Company Don Carmelo, HS Arthur Carter, MHM Satilla Remc Heath Chesser, MHM Alabma Power Travis Elliott, MHM Virginia Department of Transportation Mark Ellis, MHM Virginia Department of Transportation David Engelhardt, HS Santiago Franco, HS Hydraulic Supply Company

Andy Galvez, MHM Altec Industries, Inc.

Ramnath Ranganathan, HS

John Glascock, IHT Babcock & Wilcox

Bruce Satterwhite, MHM Virginia Department of Transportation

Mike Harvey, MHM Altec Industries, Inc. Jeffrey Hodges, IHT Babcock & Wilcox

Stephen Schaffer, S, PS Materion

Sidney Howell, MHM Altec Industries, Inc.

Daniel Sewell, MHM Alabama Power Company

Stephen Jeffrey, MHM Virginia Department of Transportation

Keith Stinson, MHM Alabama Power Company

Jason Johnson, MHM Virginia Department of Transportation

Christopher Stovall, HS HYDAC Technology Corp.

Jason Kerkman, S, HS Iowa Fluid Power Inc. James Lapp, MHM Virginia Department of Transportation Kevin Perry, PS Camozzi Pneumatics, Inc.

Bruce Thomas, MHM Alabama Power Company Artin Tosounian, HS Zemarc Corporation Dan Wright, S, PS Wabash MPI

Kelvin Ragsdale, IHT BWXT

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IFPS Updates

IFPS Certification Testing Locations Individuals wishing to take any IFPS written certification tests are able to select from convenient locations across the United States and Canada. The IFPS is able to offer these locations through its affiliation with The Consortium of College Testing Centers (CCTC) provided by National College Testing Association (NCTA).  

TO REGISTER FOR A WRITTEN CERTIFICATION TEST:

1. Fill out an IFPS certification test application including your desired location by visiting www.ifps.org. 2. Submit your application with payment to IFPS headquarters. 3. Upon receipt of your application, you will be e-mailed instructions.

TESTING DATES FOR ALL LOCATIONS: NOVEMBER 2015

Tuesday, 11/3 • Thursday, 11/19 DECEMBER 2015

Tuesday, 12/1 • Thursday, 12/17 JANUARY 2016

Tuesday, 1/5 • Thursday, 1/21

Questions? Please call IFPS at 800-308-6005.

ALABAMA Auburn University, AL Birmingham, AL Decatur, AL Huntsville, AL Jacksonville, AL Mobile, AL Montgomery, AL Normal, AL Tuscaloossa, AL ALASKA Anchorage, AK Fairbanks, AK ARIZONA Flagstaff, AZ Glendale, AZ Mesa, AZ Phoenix, AZ Prescott, AZ Scottsdale, AZ Sierra Vista, AZ Tempe, AZ Thatcher, AZ Tucson, AZ Yuma, AZ ARKANSAS Bentonville, AR Hot Springs, AR Little Rock, AR CALIFORNIA Aptos, CA Arcata, CA Bakersfield, CA Commerce, CA Encinitas, CA Fountain Valley, CA Fresno, CA Fullerton, CA Irvine, CA Los Angeles, CA Marysville, CA Riverside, CA Sacramento, CA Salinas, CA San Diego, CA San Jose, CA San Luis Obispo, CA Santa Ana, CA Santa Maria, CA Santa Rosa, CA South San

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Francisco, CA Yucaipa, CA COLORADO Aurora, CO Boulder, CO Centennial, CO Colorado Springs, CO Denver, CO Durango, CO Ft. Collins, CO Greeley, CO Lakewood, CO Littleton, CO Pueblo, CO DELAWARE Dover, DE Georgetown, DE Newark, DE FLORIDA Avon Park, FL Boca Raton, FL Cocoa, FL Davie, FL Daytona Beach, FL Fort Pierce, FL Ft. Myers, FL Gainesville, FL Jacksonville, FL Miami Gardens, FL New Port Richey, FL Orlando, FL Panama City, FL Pembroke Pines, FL Pensacola, FL Plant City, FL Rockledge, FL Sanford, FL St. Petersburg, FL Tampa, FL Winter Haven, FL GEORGIA Albany, GA Athens, GA Atlanta, GA Carrollton, GA Columbus, GA Dahlonega, GA Dublin, GA Dunwoody, GA Lawrenceville, GA Morrow, GA Oakwood, GA

Statesboro, GA Tifton, GA Valdosta, GA HAWAII Laie, HI IDAHO Boise, ID Coeur d ‘Alene, ID Idaho Falls, ID Lewiston, ID Moscow, ID Nampa, ID Rexburg, ID Twin Falls, ID ILLINOIS Carbondale, IL Carterville, IL Champaign, IL Crystal Lake, IL Decatur, IL DeKalb, IL Edwardsville, IL Glen Ellyn, IL Joliet, IL Malta, IL Normal, IL Peoria, IL Springfield, IL Sugar Grove, IL INDIANA Bloomington, IN Columbus, IN Evansville, IN Fort Wayne, IN Gary, IN Indianapolis, IN Kokomo, IN Lafayette, IN Lawrenceburg, IN Madison, IN Muncie, IN New Albany, IN Richmond, IN Sellersburg, IN South Bend, IN Terre Haute, IN IOWA Ames, IA Cedar Rapids, IA Iowa City, IA Ottumwa, IA

Sioux City, IA Waterloo, IA KANSAS Lawrence, KS Manhattan, KS Overland Park, KS Wichita, KS KENTUCKY Bowling Green, KY Covington, KY Highland Heights, KY Louisville, KY Morehead, KY LOUISIANA Bossier City, LA Lafayette, LA Monroe, LA Natchitoches, LA New Orleans, LA Thibodaux, LA MARYLAND Arnold, MD Baltimore, MD Bel Air, MD Columbia, MD Frederick, MD Hagerstown, MD La Plata, MD Westminster, MD Wye Mills, MD MASSACHUSETTS Boston, MA Bridgewater, MA Danvers, MA Haverhill, MA Holyoke, MA MICHIGAN Ann Arbor, MI Big Rapids, MI Dearborn, MI Dowagiac, MI East Lansing, MI Flint, MI Grand Rapids, MI Kalamazoo, MI Lansing, MI Livonia, MI Mount Pleasant, MI Sault Ste. Marie, MI Troy, MI

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University Center, MI Warren, MI

Farmington, NM Portales, NM Santa Fe, NM

MINNESOTA Eden Prairie, MN Mankato, MN Morris, MN

NEW YORK Brooklyn, NY Garden City, NY Middletown, NY New York, NY Syracuse, NY

MISSISSIPPI Goodman, MS Mississippi State, MS Raymond, MS University, MS MISSOURI Cape Girardeau, MO Columbia, MO Cottleville, MO Joplin, MO Kansas City, MO Kirksville, MO Park Hills, MO Poplar Bluff, MO Rolla, MO Sedalia, MO Springfield, MO St. Joseph, MO St. Louis, MO Warrensburg, MO MONTANA Bozeman, MT Missoula, MT NEBRASKA Bellevue, NE Lincoln, NE North Platte, NE Omaha, NE NEVADA Henderson, NV North Las Vegas, NV NEW JERSEY Branchburg, NJ Lincroft, NJ Sewell, NJ Toms River, NJ West Windsor, NJ NEW MEXICO Albuquerque, NM Clovis, NM

NORTH CAROLINA Apex, NC Asheville, NC Boone, NC Durham, NC Fayetteville, NC Greensboro, NC Greenville, NC Jamestown, NC Misenheimer, NC Pembroke, NC Raleigh, NC Wilmington, NC NORTH DAKOTA Bismark, ND Fargo, ND OHIO Akron, OH Cincinnati, OH Columbus, OH Fairfield, OH Findlay, OH Kirtland, OH Lima, OH Newark, OH Orrville, OH Rio Grande, OH Toledo, OH Youngstown, OH OKLAHOMA Altus, OK Bethany, OK Edmond, OK Norman, OK Oklahoma City, OK Stillwater, OK Tonkawa, OK Tulsa, OK OREGON Bend, OR Coos Bay, OR Eugene, OR

Gresham, OR Medford, OR Oregon City, OR Portland, OR White City, OR PENNSYLVANIA Bloomsburg, PA Blue Bell, PA Gettysburg, PA Harrisburg, PA Lancaster, PA Newtown, PA Philadelphia, PA Pittsburgh, PA York, PA SOUTH CAROLINA Beaufort, SC Charleston, SC Columbia, SC Conway, SC Greenville, SC Greenwood, SC Orangeburg, SC Rock Hill, SC Spartanburg, SC TENNESSEE Blountville, TN Clarksville, TN Collegedale, TN Gallatin, TN Johnson City, TN Knoxville, TN Memphis, TN Morristown, TN Murfreesboro, TN Nashville, TN TEXAS Abilene, TX Arlington, TX Austin, TX Beaumont, TX Brownsville, TX Commerce, TX Dallas, TX Denison, TX El Paso, TX Houston, TX Huntsville, TX Laredo, TX Lubbock, TX Mesquite, TX Victoria, TX

Weatherford, TX Wichita Falls, TX UTAH Cedar City, UT Kaysville, UT Logan, UT Ogden, UT Orem, UT Salt Lake City, UT VIRGINIA Lynchburg, VA Norfolk, VA Roanoke, VA Virginia Beach, VA WASHINGTON Bellingham, WA Bremerton, WA Ellensburg, WA Olympia, WA Seattle, WA Shoreline, WA WISCONSIN Fond du Lac, WI La Crosse, WI Milwaukee, WI WYOMING Casper, WY Laramie, WY Torrington, WY AUSTRALIA Rockingham, Western Australia CANADA Lethbridge, AB Lloydminster, AL Olds, AL Castlegar, BC Kamloops, BC Nanaimo, BC Calgary, CL Winnipeg, MB Halifx, NS Toronto, ON Mississauga, ON Windsor, ON Saskatoon, SK Saskatchewan, SK Moose Jaw, SK Prince Albert, SK


WEB SEMINARS

IFPS MEETINGS

Free to members / $40 for non-members “Contamination Study of a Hydraulic System Using a Variable Volume Reservoir” October 15, 2015, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Eastern Visit www.ifps.org to register.

IFPS 2016 Spring Meeting March 20 – 25, 2016, Embassy Suites Downtown San Diego, CA IFPS 2016 Annual Meeting September 27 - October 1, 2016 Location tba

IFPS 2017 Spring Meeting February 8-11, 2017 Location tba IFPS 2017 Annual Meeting September 26-30, 2017 Location tba

CERTIFICATION REVIEW TRAINING Location

Review Date

Eden Prairie, Minnesota Seattle, Washington Virginia Beach, Virginia Fairfield, Ohio Sacramento, California Centennial, Colorado Virginia Beach, Virginia Fairfield, Ohio

November 10-12, 2015 February 9-12, 2016 March 22-25, 2016 April 11-13, 2016 May 10-13, 2016 June 28-July 1, 2016 September 20-23, 2016 October 17-19, 2016

Fairfield, Ohio Seattle, Washington Dallas, Texas Virginia Beach, Virginia Fairfield, Ohio Riverside, California Centennial, Colorado Virginia Beach, Virginia Riverside, California Dallas, Texas

January 25-28, 2016 March 8-11, 2016 April 5-8, 2016 April 12-15, 2016 May 3-6, 2016 May 24-27, 2016 July 19-22, 2016 October 4-7, 2016 October 11-14, 2016 November 15-18, 2016

Fairfield , Ohio Seattle, Washington Dallas, Texas Virginia Beach, Virginia Riverside, California Centennial, Colorado Virginia Beach, Virginia Riverside, California Dallas, Texas

Call for dates March 8-11, 2016 April 5-8, 2016 April 12-15, 2016 May 24-27, 2016 July 19-22, 2016 October 4-7, 2016 October 11-14, 2016 November 15-18, 2016

Houston , Texas Seattle, Washington Dallas, Texas Centennial, Colorado Riverside, California Fairfield, Ohio Virginia Beach, Virginia

November 3-5, 2015 April 19-22, 2016 May 24-27, 2016 June 21-24, 2016 July 19-22, 2016 August 1-4, 2016 September 13-16, 2016

Fairfield , Ohio Houston , Texas Seattle, Washington Dallas, Texas Centennial, Colorado Sacramento, California Riverside, California Virginia Beach, Virginia

Call for dates November 3-5, 2015 April 19-22, 2016 May 24-27, 2016 June 21-24, 2016 June 21-24, 2016 July 19-22, 2016 September 13-16, 2016

Virginia Beach, Virginia Seattle, Washington Fairfield, Ohio Virginia Beach, Virginia Sacramento, California Cincinnati, Ohio Fairfield, Ohio Centennial, Colorado Cincinnati, Ohio

December 15-16, 2015 January 5-7, 2016 February 8-10, 2016 March 1-3, 2016 April 26-28, 2016 June 7-9, 2016 August 24-26, 2016 August 23-25, 2016 December 13-15, 2016

Fairfield, Ohio

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Fairfield , Ohio

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Fairfield, Ohio

July 27-29, 2016

Test Date E-email HYDRAULIC SPECIALIST (HS) November 13, 2015 hydraulicstraining@eaton.com February 12, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com March 25, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com April 13, 2016 register@cfc-solar.com May 13, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com July 1, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com September 23, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com October 19, 2016 register@cfc-solar.com INDUSTRIAL HYDRAULIC MECHANIC (IHM) January 27-28, 2016 register@cfc-solar.com March 11, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com April 8, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com April 15, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com May 5-6, 2016 register@cfc-solar.com May 27, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com July 22, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com October 7, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com October 14, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com November 18, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com INDUSTRIAL HYDRAULIC TECHNICIAN (IHT) Phone: 513-874-3225 March 11, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com April 8, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com April 15, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com May 27, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com July 22, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com October 7, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com October 14, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com November 18, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com MOBILE HYDRAULIC MECHANIC (MHM) November 6, 2015 bwilson@nttinc.com April 22, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com May 27, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com June 24, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com July 22, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com August 3-4, 2016 register@cfc-solar.com September 16, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com MOBILE HYDRAULIC TECHNICIAN (MHT) Phone: 513-874-3225 November 6, 2015 bwilson@nttinc.com April 22, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com May 27, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com June 24, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com June 24, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com July 22, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com September 16, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com CONNECTOR & CONDUCTOR (CC) December 17, 2015 bwilson@nttinc.com January 7, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com February 10, 2016 register@cfc-solar.com March 3, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com April 28, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com June 9, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com August 24, 2016 register@cfc-solar.com August 25, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com December 15, 2016 cwair@nttinc.com PNEUMATIC MECHANIC (PM) Phone: 513-874-3225 PNEUMATIC TECHNICIAN (PT) Phone: 513-874-3225 PNEUMATIC SPECIALIST (PT) July 29, 2016 register@cfc-solar.com

Facility Eaton Hydraulics Training NTT Training NTT Training CFC Industrial Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training CFC Industrial Training CFC Industrial Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training CFC Industrial Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training CFC Industrial Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training CFC Industrial Training NTT Training CFC Industrial Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training CFC Industrial Training NTT Training NTT Training NTT Training CFC Industrial Training NTT Training NTT Training CFC Industrial Training CFC Industrial Training CFC Industrial Training

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In a variable-speed system, the flow control of the hydraulic system is accomplished using an electronic variablefrequency drive along with either a conventional asynchronous or synchronous servo motor, a pressure transducer to measure hydraulic pressure, and either a fixed or variable-displacement hydraulic pump system.

FOCUSING ON THE ENERGY ADVANTAGES OF RETROFITTING

By Bosch Rexroth Corp. Stamping presses that form and bend metal under pressure are themselves under pressure to improve throughput, process cost control, and energy efficiency. Many stamping presses have been in operation for 20 to 25 years and typically operate under punishing conditions – with cycle times between 100 ms and several seconds, and utilization rates ranging from 3,600 to 6,000 hours per year. That much operation consumes a lot of energy, which can significantly impact stamping press productivity and profitability (in the last decade, electricity prices have increased an average of 25% and higher in certain U.S. markets and to 50% in Europe). If the hydraulic systems driving your stamping press operate with less than optimum efficiency, there are multiple benefits that can be realized by considering the value of a hydraulic retrofit.

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The primary reason to consider a retrofit is to improve energy efficiency. Even on standard machines, energy costs can represent 20 to 30% of total life cost—and a much higher share with energy-intensive applications. In a typical hydraulic stamping press operation, a majority of the energy consumed is to generate the force to stroke the ram. Conventional approaches utilize a variable-displacement hydraulic pump driven by an electric motor running at constant RPM. The hydraulic pressure requirements are regulated by a pump control, such as a pressure compensator, or by additional hydraulic flow and pressure control valves downstream of the pump. With a constant RPM design, the motor is always running at rated nominal speed; even if the machine is operating at part load or idle, some motor horsepower is always being wasted. Simultaneously, internal hydrau-


lic pump and valve leakage generate heat in the hydraulic fluid, which must be cooled to maintain optimum operating conditions. The cooling process also results in an additional energy demand on the system. With the latest technology, however, it is possible to obtain significant energy savings with a retrofit that replaces a constant speed electric motor coupled to a variable-displacement or fixed-displacement pump with a “smart” pump system. The “smart” pump system can also eliminate the need for downstream pressure and flow control valves in some machines. So what is a “smart” pump? It is a pump with intelligence to adjust flow and system pressure based on the process demand by varying pump drive speed. This is accomplished by varying drive speed and, in some cases, the swivel angle of a variable-displacement pump. In the variable-speed drive system, the flow requirements of the hydraulic system are controlled using an electronic variable-frequency drive (VFD) coupled to either a conventional asynchronous or synchronous servo motor. A pressure transducer provides a signal to control the hydraulic pressure. The combination of VFDs and variable pumps allows the system to operate at the optimal efficiency point of both the pump and motor. This reduces energy losses directly at the source. A minimal configuration, consisting of a fixed-displacement pump and VFD, delivers a flow rate proportional to the drive speed of the motor. The closed-loop control is located in the VFD and reduces the drive speed to match the load conditions. Additionally, the variable-speed pump drive can be used to perform intelligent axis functions. A properly integrated variable-speed pump drive can cut stamping press energy consumption by 30 to 80%. Using an on-demand control, the system can adjust the pump pressure and flow to the hydraulic actuator without the need for additional control valves. Consequently, the average input power is reduced over the entire machine cycle. Moreover, by not having valve-induced pressure drops generating heat, the temperature rise in the hydraulic oil can often be kept at a small value, reducing or eliminating the additional energy required for the cooling system. Additional improvements may be realized when using variable-speed drives; the machine cycle can be smoother, minimizing maintenance and downtime. This can also extend the operational life of the press. Reducing the pump drive speed can lower noise levels of the hydraulic power unit by 10 to 20 dBA. INVESTING IN RETROFITS: WHEN IS IT RIGHT FOR YOU?

Each stamping press operation is unique, and the potential energy savings for any individual system varies. The important variable

Left: A retrofit using variable-speed drives can lower the cost per stamped part by controlling energy costs and improving ROI. Bottom: A properly integrated variable-speed pump drive, such as the Syntronix system from Bosch Rexroth, which adjusts flow and system pressure as required by the process, can cut stamping press energy consumption by 30 to 80%.

is the competitive pressure your operation faces in controlling costs and improving ROI. Here are five factors to weigh when considering a retrofit for a variable-speed drive hydraulic system for your stamping press:

1

Account for hydraulic system energy consumption. Improper evaluation of pumps, motors, and controls can have a significant negative impact on performance, reliability, and efficiency. It is critical to assess your current stamping operation in terms of cycle times, stroke action, and force to calculate the energy needed to generate the required flow and pressure. It is also valuable to assess the level of control needed to deliver the desired throughput, including the position and force required to fabricate parts precisely to your customer’s specifications.

For many applications, today’s variable-speed hydraulic pump systems are designed to be competitive replacements for constant-speed motors with fixed or variable-displacement pumps. The disadvantage with conventional systems is that motor speed cannot be reduced for partial load. Energy can therefore be wasted through a significant portion of the overall cycle. In many cases, it is more efficient to achieve flow and pressure control by regulating pump speed and stroke than by using control valves. Because the energy is available as high-pressure hydraulic fluid, much of the energy is released in the form of heat as the fluid passes through a control valve from a high-pressure state to a low-pressure state. Control valve operation results in doubling energy waste. Energy is consumed when

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pressurizing the fluid, and then the energy is lost in the pressure drop that occurs through normal valve operation. This generates heat that will require additional energy for cooling. Additionally, dissipating the heat will require large heat exchangers that are operationally complex and expensive. The solution: Take advantage of a variable-speed drive’s intelligent adjustment of motor drive speed to meet the precise demand and avoid inefficient energy waste. A pressure transducer is used to measure the hydraulic pressure and adjusts the pump speed accordingly. No excess flow is generated, and less efficient throttling control utilizing proportional valves can be eliminated. Energy is saved by avoiding the pressure drops and the corresponding heat generated by control valves, which must be dissipated using cooling systems.

Bosch Rexroth’s MLC can offer advanced control software packages tailored to the demands of the hydraulic system’s properties and compensate for factors such as field compressibility and non-linear system dynamics.

2

Consider modernizing and simplifying the hydraulic system. Because older stamping presses use fixed-displacement pumps with relief valves, or variable-displacement pumps with proportional valves, or older load-sensing directional control valve technologies, the value of a retrofit can be determined by asking several age-related questions: ƒƒ What are the ages of these components? Are they still available or re-buildable to like-new condition? ƒƒ What are the maintenance requirements of the system? Is there fluid leakage from these components? ƒƒ Do you need to operate at higher pressure/flow rates to maintain current production requirements, or are you operating frequently at less than full tonnage and wasting energy?

The solution: Retrofitting to a variable-speed system that can simplify the hydraulic system and will head off future component replacements and greatly reduce maintenance costs.

3

Evaluate hydraulic system environmental requirements. It is often assumed that noise and heat are the price to pay for a work environment needed to harness the power delivered by a hydraulic stamping press. Consider heat issues; it is worth assessing system fluid temperatures in regard to the double penalty of generating excessive pressure and/or flow and the energy needed to remove that excess heat. It is also important to factor in the expense of cooling capacity and oversized oil reservoirs. One of the main sources of machine noise in a hydraulic press is the hydraulic pump.

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The sound pressure level depends on the pump’s rotational speed and operating pressure. Higher speeds will produce greater noise. Beyond pump noise, older control system designs and controllers may introduce high levels of hydraulic “shock” during the press motion cycle, which can generate sound levels as high as 80 dBA and can stress piping, valves, and seals.

www.FluidPowerJournal.com • Tech Directory 2015 • www.IFPS.org

The solution: A variablespeed pump can dramatically reduce heat load in

the system. By eliminating throttling losses (pressure drops) using pump speed and stroke control rather than throttling valves, heat transferred into the fluid is reduced, resulting in drastically decreased or eliminated cooling requirements. Finally, variable-speed pump control results not only in lower average pump speeds, but also in smoother accelerations and decelerations with controlled transitions between force and position control. The result is a reduction in average noise emissions from the hydraulic power unit by as much as 20 dBA.


4

Assess and optimize drive and pump sizes. Typical hydraulic drive systems are oversized to deliver peak pressure and flow rather than what is optimum for real-world applications. It’s not uncommon to see motors 50% larger than the actual stamping press process requirements. Over-sizing is intended to compensate for inefficiencies in the hydraulic circuit due to pressure drops, leakage flows, etc. For the electric motor driving the pump, proper sizing requires assessing dwell times and operation at partial and full loads to determine the actual required drive power. To determine optimal sizing of the drive components, simulation tools can be used to investigate dynamic stamping cycle variables, including pressures, flows, forces, and cylinder motion. The solution: Hydraulic and control system engineering experts equipped with advanced simulation tools can provide designs utilizing variable-speed drives to retrofit a stamping press and ideally match demanding cycle requirements.

5

Improve controls for better operation and longer equipment life. Shocks transmitted through a hydraulic system can result in mechanical stress and physical wear on the press frame, fittings, pipes, connections, valves, and manifolds. This can have a negative impact on equipment life, increase downtime, and present the need for more frequent maintenance. If these conditions prevail on your stamping press, the press controls regulating pressure and flow, as well as upper-level control, should be evaluated. These physical “shocks,” even if intermittent, may indicate that the legacy control system may be hampering performance and energy efficiency of your stamping press. The solution: Consider retrofitting the existing controls with a state-of-the-art motion control system specifically engineered to take full advantage of modern electro-hydraulics and variable-speed pump drives. These latest-generation systems provide intelligent, high-performance control of variable-speed pump systems, as well as systems controlled with traditional proportional valves.

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19


COMPANY PROFILE

What makes Hydraquip stand out in the fluid power industry?

One of the unique things we have done is segregate our business into three units: Power Solutions, Hose and Couplings, and Service and Repair. With three distinct sales forces, we can provide a level of support that exceeds industry expectations. We invest a lot of time and financial resources on training to make sure our sales force understands not only the products, but also the technology and the theories behind those products and systems. These investments have allowed us to rapidly develop specialized solutions with a high level of quality. We are also very blessed to have a talented group of employees and an outstanding group of manufacturers. Our commitment to IFPS and to certification only enhances our position within the fluid power industry and our clientele.

A CERTIFICATION SUCCESS STORY Founded in 1951, Hydraquip – a 100% employee-owned company in Houston, Tex. – offers system design, service and repair, and fluid conveyance through many world-class manufacturers. Through partnering with its sister companies, Hydraquip can provide turnkey systems, engineering, and fabrication capabilities. In 2014, it was named one of the Top 10 Places to Work by the Houston Business Journal. Tim Nichols, president, is part of three generations in his family of fluid power specialists. Below he tells us what makes Hydraquip unique in this industry and why IFPS certification has been an integral part of its success.

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What makes Hydraquip an attractive place to work?

Being part of an employee-owned company is an important tenet of our culture and of our values. We all have skin in the game. We have a vested interest to see our customers and company succeed. Imagine, as a customer, speaking to an owner at every level of the process – from our shipping department, to sales, and to our leadership team. This is very compelling and something we attempt to drive every day.

How did it happen that three generations of the Nichols family became certified specialists?

I was fortunate that my father was in the fluid power industry. I learned much from him, and as sales manager for Rineer Hydraulics, he saw the value of certification. My father passed away in 2004, and I remember as I closed out his home office, there were two items that adorned his walls: one was a patent he received in 2001 and the other was his framed IFPS certification (no. 1214, dated April 15, 1989). My mother knew the importance of those two items, and she insisted I display those items as a testament to his life and the things he felt were worthy accomplishments. You can find both of them on my office walls. I became certified in 1993. That was the first year when Hydraquip employees were


encouraged to become certified. I took the test as a new salesman. Not only did I take the test, but so did Tony McGarvey, president of Hydraquip at the time, and his vice president (who is now my boss), Richard Neels. Shortly after, Hydraquip adopted its policies regarding certification that we still use today. When my daughter, Rebekah, began her career at Hydraquip, it was only a matter of time before she would also become certified. Every parent wants his or her children to find a rewarding and stable career that makes them happy. Having my daughter follow in my footsteps, and also in my father’s footsteps, in the fluid power industry and to be able to share that with her is beyond words of pride and joy. And while I am very proud of my daughter’s certification, I am no less proud of the many professionals at Hydraquip who have also obtained that designation.

Why is certification important to Hydraquip?

We consider IFPS certification to be a designation that demonstrates an employee’s ability to perform a specific job or task. We are proud of our record in respect to professional development. The majority of our outside sales force and our leadership have all been promoted from within. Since we highly encourage our employees to be certified, you will not find any of our outside sales force that does not have an IFPS certification. Our Power Solutions employees are encouraged to become Certified Fluid Power Hydraulic Specialists. Our Service and Repair technicians are factory trained and also are Certified Fluid Power Mobile Mechanics. Several of our Hose and Couplings salespeople have the Hydraulic Specialist designation, as well. It certainly increases their ability to assist in plumbing a machine when they can read a schematic. These certifications are so important that we pay for the training, the testing, and we will increase an employee’s wage by 5% once the employee has obtained certification. And while we believe that an individual’s ability to pass the test is first and foremost, it is also that individual’s willingness and desire to begin and finish a task that stands out as part of the accomplishment.

What are the benefits of establishing this certification policy for outside salespeople?

Part of our value proposition is that our salespeople are able to work with our custom-

ers from the beginning of a project through the fruition of that project. That process could include specifying single components to some instances of specifying an entire system. It is important that not only Hydraquip, but also our partners and clients, have a high level of confidence in our sales force to manage that process. Becoming certified is an integral part of building that confidence. Certification makes a statement to both our customers and to our manufacturers. It shows our commitment to our industry, but also allows our employees to provide assistance.

Why is certification important to the fluid power industry?

All companies that deal with hydraulics or pneumatics should encourage their employees to become certified. From an industry perspective, certifications are mobile. Those

certifications move with employees as they move throughout the industry. It allows future employers to validate the knowledge and experience that a potential employee brings. It also provides an unbiased third-party endorsement of that skill and knowledge. Certification demonstrates competency, motivation, and a dedication that is important in a highly technical field. For more information: Hydraquip has offices across Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico.Visit www.hydraquip. com. Mr. Nichols can be reached at tnichols@ hydraquip.com.

www.IFPS.org • Tech Directory 2015 • www.FluidPowerJournal.com

21


NFPA Updates

Consortium Outlines Ways to Improve Fluid Power Product Manufacturing

NFPA is participating in something called the Fluid Power Advanced Manufacturing Consortium. It’s a new collaboration between the NFPA, the CCEFP, the Association of Manufacturing Technology, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to advance fluid power manufacturing in the United States, and it’s the result of acquiring more than $400,000 in grant funding from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The first project of the Consortium will be to define a fluid power manufacturing roadmap. This roadmap, like the Technology Roadmap NFPA completed and published a few years ago, will focus on identifying the areas of pre-competitive research that are needed to advance fluid power technology in the United States. But unlike our existing roadmap, which focuses primarily on improving design and performance characteristics of our components and systems, the fluid power manufacturing roadmap will focus on improving the mechanisms and methods for manufacturing our components and systems. A kick-off session for the Consortium to begin working on this new roadmap was held July 28-29, 2015 on the campus of Georgia Tech, and more than 40 industry professionals and academics attended. The objectives of the session were straightforward: ƒƒ Identify what customers of fluid power products want to accomplish to improve their competitiveness. ƒƒ Describe emerging manufacturing technologies to improve fluid power manufacturing. ƒƒ List fluid power manufacturing capabilities that address customers’ competitiveness. We used a series of breakout sessions to discuss all three objectives, one breakout each for hydraulics used in mobile applications, for hydraulics used in industrial applications, and for pneumatics, and then came back into general session to report out and look for areas of commonality. One of the most interesting outputs was the list of emerging manufacturing technologies the group thought could be better utilized to improve the manufacture of fluid power products. Those recommendations included ƒƒ Coatings that improve performance (durability, enhance load bearing, etc.) ƒƒ Real-time, in-process sensing, feedback and control

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www.FluidPowerJournal.com • Tech Directory 2015 • www.IFPS.org

ƒƒ New, disruptive materials and their processing By Eric Lanke ƒƒ Metrology CEO, NFPA ƒƒ Integrated, batch-free heat treating ƒƒ Direct metal additive manufacturing ƒƒ Robotics for small-batch assembly and manufacturing ƒƒ Manufacturing-inspired design practices that better leverage all of the above Each of those bullet points, and the conversations they represent, just scratched the surface on possible applicability to the manufacture of fluid power products and the resulting competitive advantages that they might bring to the manufacturer and to the manufacturer’s customer. They have been vetted enough, however, to move to the next stage in the roadmapping process, which is to develop a more detailed “innovation scorecard” for each of these emerging technologies, more explicitly stating the potential benefits and barriers associated with applying each to fluid power manufacturing. That’s something we didn’t plan to accomplish at the Georgia Tech meeting. Instead, we put together small project teams to work on those scorecards over the next several weeks, all with the intent of presenting and discussing them at a future roadmapping session—tentatively scheduled for February 2016, again at Georgia Tech. We’re still looking for people with the appropriate expertise, especially in the areas described above, to join these project teams and to become participating members of the Consortium. If you or someone you know might fit that bill, please contact me at the NFPA office. As I’ve stated before, this Consortium and the roadmap it is creating is a VERY BIG DEAL for our industry and our association. The NIST grant that’s funding it is tied to several of the broader manufacturing improvement initiatives of the federal government. That means that, once identified, the roadmap recommendations for how to improve the manufacture of fluid power products have a greater likelihood of attracting significant research dollars from multiple branches of the U.S. government. Incorporating the roadmap results into the overall research strategy of the CCEFP will therefore not only help us grow that network of fluid power researchers and educators, but it will also provide an added industrial and manufacturing focus to those activities.


NFPA UPDATES ITS TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP FOR THE FLUID POWER INDUSTRY The 2015 NFPA Technology Roadmap: Improving the Design and Function of Fluid Power Components and Systems has been published by the National Fluid Power Association. Copies can be downloaded after a brief registration process from the following website: http://www. nfpa.com/aboutnfpa/technology-roadmap_2015.aspx. The NFPA Technology Roadmap is a document that describes a research and technology development agenda to realize industry-elevating advancements in mobile hydraulics, industrial hydraulics, and pneumatics. It focuses on advancements that will help the industry meet the future needs of its customers, expand fluid power into new customer markets, and attract the best and brightest students to the field. The 2015 NFPA Technology Roadmap is a tool that can be used by organizations that wish to pursue projects of importance to the fluid power industry. These organizations include both research institutions and companies across the fluid power supply chain. By aligning their activities with the challenges, objectives, and proposed projects described in the Roadmap, they will all play a role in positively shaping the future of fluid power technology. NFPA will use the Roadmap to shape and direct the research efforts of the NFPA Education & Technology Foundation and the Center for Compact and Efficient Fluid Power.

NFPA published its first Roadmap in August 2009, a second updated version in 2012, and now publishes the third updated version in 2015. All three documents were the result of a collaborative process that engaged a wide cross-section of the fluid power industry to identify areas of consensus regarding the research and development needs of the fluid power industry.

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23


NFPA Updates

NFPA’S 2015 IEOC Breaks Attendance Record

NFPA’s 2015 Industry & Economic Outlook Conference (IEOC), held August 10-12, 2015 at the Westin Chicago North Shore, Wheeling, Ill., exemplified the importance of economics, industry, technology, and networking with an excellent line-up of speakers and another record-breaking attendance of 322 individuals. Members and non-members alike received valuable insights into the future for the fluid power supply chain. Their feedback identified the diverse speaker and topic content, exposure to global market information, and multiple networking opportunities as highlights of this year’s IEOC. NFPA’s 2015 IEOC Invitational Golf Tournament filled Chevy Chase Country Club with 115 golfers, marking the 9th year of this fundraising event. A few raindrops and even a lightning delay did not keep this group from having a great time. A record number of sponsors and 50/50 raffle sales marked a solid return for NFPA’s Education and Technology Foundation. Next year’s 2016 Industry & Economic Outlook Conference and IEOC Invitational Tournament is scheduled for August 15-17, 2016 at the Westin Chicago North Shore and Chevy Chase Country Club in Wheeling, Ill. Questions and comments concerning this event can be directed to Eric Armstrong at earmstrong@nfpa.com or 414-778-3372.

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I am really impressed with the high quality of the speakers and the meeting overall. This event stands head and shoulders above all others serving the industry.” -Tim Reynolds, Tribute, Inc.

www.FluidPowerJournal.com • Tech Directory 2015 • www.IFPS.org

Keep up the good work, NFPA! Well organized, great networking, good use of technology, and the audience keeps on growing every year!” -John Kumler, Linde Hydraulics


Air Teaser

New Problem “I plan to put an eight (8)-ft. elevator in my house using an air-over-oil system in case of power outages. My air compressor has a 75-gallon tank and kicks on at 80 psi. If I were to use a four (4)-in. cylinder for a total load of 350 lbs., theoretically how many cycles would I have with a loss of power, starting at 80 psi?” Use 50 cubic inches of air space on top of the oil tank and back to the regulator. Assume 100% efficiency.

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PREVIOUS PROBLEM Using the chart, how much does it cost to have 1/8" air leak for a year at 90 psi and at 125 psi? Also, how much would 31.54 scfm cost to run at 125 psi for a year? This chart is based on $0.12 / kilowatt. SOLUTION

WINNER Cost of a 1/8" diameter air leak for a year at 90 psi is $4.636.00. Brandon Trahan Cost of a 1/8" diameter air leak for a year at 125 psi is $6,186.00. CFPMM, CFPMHT Cost of 31.54 scfm for a year: Western Hydrostatics, Inc. 31.54 x 60 minutes per hour = 1892.4 cubic feet per hour Riverside, CA 1892.4 x 24 = 45,417.6 cubic feet per day 45,417.6 x 365.25 days per year =16,588,778.4 cubic feet per year Looking on the chart under 1/8" at 125 psi = approximately $6,186.00 per year.

Visit www.fluidpowerjournal.com to view this teaser.

By Ernie Parker, AI, AJPP, AJPPCC, S, MT, MM, MIH, MIP, MMH, Fluid Power Instructor, Hennepin Technical College, EParker@Hennepintech.edu The teaser is posted on the IFPS website (www.ifps. org) and also printed in the Fluid Power Journal. Submit your information via the website, or fax it to 856-424-9248 attn: Donna Pollander. Those who submit the correct answer before the deadline will have their names printed in the Society Page newsletter and in Fluid Power Journal. The winners will also be entered into a drawing for a special gift. Reinforce your industry expertise with a Pneumatic Mechanic, Technician, or Specialist certification. Apply online at www.ifps.org.

Cost of Air Leaks and Open Lines Supply Pressure psig

Orifice Diameter in Inches 1/64

1/32

1/16

1/8

1/4

3/8

1/2

Atmosphere 5/8

3/4

7/8

1

Leakage Rate in CFM at Supply Pressure

14.7 Cost/kWh

70

0.30

1.20

4.80

19.19

76.76

172.71

307.04

479.75

690.83

940.30

1228.15

SCF/Year

157,165

628,659

2,514,637

10,058,549

40,234,194

90,526,937

160,936,776

251,463,713

362,107,746

492,868,877

643,747,104

$0.120

kWh/Year

488

1,953

7,813

31,253

125,011

281,275

500,044

781,319

1,125,099

1,531,385

2,000,176

Cost

$59

$234

$938

$3,750

$15,001

$33,753

$60,005

$93,758

$135,012

$183,766

$240,021

24.0

80

0.34

1.34

5.36

21.46

85.82

193.10

343.29

536.39

772.40

1051.32

1373.15

Days/Week

SCF/Year

175,720

702,881

2,811,525

11,246,099

44,984,394

101,214,887

179,937,576

281,152,463

404,859,546

551,058,827

719,750,304

7

kWh/Year

546

2,184

8,736

34,943

139,770

314,483

559,081

873,564

1,257,932

1,712,186

2,236,324

Weeks/Yr

Cost

$66

$262

$1,048

$4,193

$16,772

$37,738

$67,090

$104,828

$150,952

$205,462

$268,359

52.0

90

0.37

1.48

5.93

23.72

94.88

213.49

379.54

593.03

853.96

1162.33

1518.15

hp / scfm

SCF/Year

194,276

777,103

3,108,412

12,433,649

49,734,594

111,902,837

198,938,376

310,841,213

447,611,346

609,248,777

795,753,504

0.25

kWh/Year

604

2,415

9,658

38,632

154,530

347,691

618,118

965,810

1,390,766

1,892,987

2,472,472

Cost

$72

$290

$1,159

$4,636

$18,544

$41,723

$74,174

$115,897

$166,892

$227,158

$296,697

100

0.41

1.62

6.50

25.99

103.95

233.88

415.79

649.67

935.52

1273.35

1663.15

SCF/Year

212,831

851,325

3,405,300

13,621,199

54,484,794

122,590,787

217,939,176

340,529,963

490,363,146

667,438,727

871,756,704

kWh/Year

661

2,645

10,581

42,322

169,289

380,900

677,155

1,058,055

1,523,599

2,073,788

2,708,621

Cost

$79

$317

$1,270

$5,079

$20,315

$45,708

$81,259

$126,967

$182,832

$248,855

$325,034

125

0.49

1.98

7.91

31.65

126.60

284.86

506.41

791.27

1139.43

1550.89

2025.65

SCF/Year

259,220

1,036,880

4,147,518

16,590,074

66,360,294

149,310,662

265,441,176

414,751,838

597,242,646

812,913,601

1,061,764,704

kWh/Year

805

3,222

12,887

51,547

206,187

463,921

824,748

1,288,669

1,855,683

2,525,790

3,298,991

Cost

$97

$387

$1,546

$6,186

$24,742

$55,670

$98,970

$154,640

$222,682

$303,095

$395,879

Hrs/Day

www.IFPS.org • Tech Directory 2015 • www.FluidPowerJournal.com

25


Industry News

CURTISS-WRIGHT RECEIVES AWARD FROM LOCKHEED MARTIN The Defense Solutions division of Curtiss-Wright Corp. received a production award from Lockheed Martin to provide the Turret Drive Servo System (TDSS) for use in the British Army’s new SCOUT Specialist Vehicle (SV). The TDSS will provide weapon stabilization for the SCOUT Reconnaissance vehicle, which is expected to replace the older Scimitar vehicle. The TDSS was designed, developed, and will be manufactured at Curtiss-Wright’s Drive Technology business in Neuhausen, Switzerland. Products covered by the contract will be delivered to Lockheed Martin, where they will be integrated onto the turrets at the manufacturing facility in Ampthill, UK. www.curtisswright.com

RG Group Breaks Ground on Branch Expansion RG Group announced the groundbreaking for the expansion of its Flour Mill Road manufacturing and distribution center in York, Pa. The new facility plan will provide an additional 22,500 square feet of space. The building will also feature a mezzanine, which will house a 1,250 square feet training and conference center. Completion of the building is expected in the second half of 2015.

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www.rg-group.com

PIRTEK OPENS FOURTH CENTER IN CHICAGO AREA Joining the existing three service and supply centers in the Chicago area, the location at 1701 Quincy Avenue in Naperville, Ill., will provide easy access to nearby companies for custom-built hose assemblies and industrial products. Three mobile on-site hose workshops will provide on-site hose service to the surrounding area. Inventory at the centers includes 3600, 5000, and 6000-psi hydraulic hoses, quick-disconnect couplings, and adapters.

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www.pirtekusa.com

POCLAIN ACQUIRES CASTINGS COMPANY

MTS SENSORS EXPANDS INTEGRATION PARTNER PROGRAM MTS Sensors expanded its Integration Partner Program to offer complete integrated sensor hydraulic control system solutions. The program was introduced initially to bring together the contactless magnetostrictive sensing devices from the company and the hydraulic cylinders available from the industry’s prominent suppliers. The expansion includes the addition of key regional system integrators such as Dakota Fluid Power, Hydraulic & Pneumatic Sales, Kraft Fluid Systems, Livingston & Haven, S.G. Morris Co., PSI of Florida, Power Systems LLC, and Price Engineering. This will result in electronic controls and hydraulic systems expertise being merged with greater application knowledge – a strategic advantage for smaller OEMs serving a variety of sectors such as construction vehicles, agricultural machinery, mining equipment, materials handling, hardware, etc. Cylinder manufacturers already included in the program are Aurelis Manufacturing, Bobalee Hydraulics, Columbus Hydraulics, General Engineering, JARP Industries, and Rosenboom. www.mtssensors.com

ENGIS® AND DELAPENA SIGN AGREEMENT FOR PRECISION BORE HONING

The POCLAIN Group has acquired Grandry Technologies, which specializes in the manufacture of complex molded parts from nodular cast iron and is a supplier to sectors such as the automotive industry, heavy-duty vehicles, buses, military equipment, agricultural machinery, construction machinery, and railway applications. The acquisition will enable Grandry to accelerate its international business development. POCLAIN will benefit from Grandry’s expertise in highly cored castings, which are essential components in the design and performance of hydrostatic transmissions.

Engis Corp. in Illinois and Delapena Group in the UK signed an agreement for the distribution of the Delapena stroke honing machine tools in North America and East Asia by the Engis Group. Engis specializes in the design and manufacture of super-abrasive finishing systems. The single-pass bore finishing approach improves the geometry and bores of precision components in markets such as automotive, hydraulics, firearms, and compressor markets.

www.poclain-hydraulics.com

www.engis.com

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www.FluidPowerJournal.com • Tech Directory 2015 • www.IFPS.org


IFPS Certification Spotlight

Industrial Hydraulic Technician (IHT) The International Fluid Power Society is the only organization that provides comprehensive technical certification offerings for all professionals in the fluid power and motion control industry. IFPS certifications are portable and are recognized industry wide. IFPS certification tests provide an objective, third-party assessment of an individual’s skill level. Individuals who successfully master the level of Industrial Hydraulic Technician’s level of competency are issued a credential CFPIHT signifying an elevated status in the workforce. IFPS defines an Industrial Hydraulic Technician as an individual who applies fluid power theory and related knowledge to test and troubleshoot operational industrial hydraulic systems and applications, reads industrial application schematics, and performs basic cylinder and hydraulic motor calculations. An Industrial Hydraulic Technician is able to supervise system installations and commissioning. All technician certifications require a three (3)-hour written and a three (3)-hour Job Performance (hands-on) Test. If you’re interested in testing for the IHT level certification, registration information can be found by visiting www.ifps.org or by calling 800-308-6005.

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ƒƒ Sets up and tests systems and components under direction of engineering and scientific staff ƒƒ Recommends modifications to circuit and components to improve performance ƒƒ Provides leak-free piping ƒƒ Supervises system installation, flushing, and commissioning ƒƒ Knows how, where, and when to take fluid samples and reads lab reports ƒƒ Can establish ISO cleanliness level for a system ƒƒ Can devise the Target Cleanliness Chart to aid diagnostics ƒƒ Understands sequence and counterbalance circuits and associated valving ƒƒ Sets pump load sensing and compensator controls ƒƒ Understands hydrostatic drives ƒƒ Understands basic electrical controls and their application ƒƒ Understands ladder logic ƒƒ Reads electronic circuits ƒƒ Calculates decompression volume ƒƒ Performs troubleshooting and supervises required replacements, repair, or adjustment.

TEST YOUR SKILLS Visit www.ifps.org and click on “Certification Offered/Technician” to take a free online IHT pre-test and play two fun, interactive IHT Jeopardy-type games. 1. Compared to meter-in and meter-out circuits, bleed-off circuits will have A. The best pump utilization for branch circuits B. Have the highest system efficiency C. More piston seal leakage D. Resistance to overrunning loads E. The best accuracy 2. In a flow control valve, what is the difference between a bi-metallic temperature compensator and a sharp-edged orifice temperature compensator? A. Bi-metallic element is more accurate. B. Sharp-edged orifice has more friction. C. Viscosity changes affect sharp-edged orifices less. D. Bi-metallic element heats the fluid. E. Sharp-edged orifice has less turbulence. 3. A pre-charged empty accumulator receiving 5 gpm fills in 30 seconds. What is the approximate usable volume available from the accumulator? A. 19 cu-in. B. 39 cu-in. C. 347 cu-in. D. 578 cu-in. E. 1155 cu-in.

Answers: 1=B, 2=C, 3=D

SUMMARY:

www.IFPS.org • Tech Directory 2015 • www.FluidPowerJournal.com

27


TECH DIRECTORY 2015

                                    

 

Applied Motion Technologies, Inc. Applied Motion Technologies, Inc. - industrial technology training & engineering

- industrial technology training engineering - - serving the Lehigh Valley & the&world since 1994 - serving the Valley & the world since 1994 visitLehigh us at amthydraulics.com visit us 800-597-6577 at amthydraulics.com 800-597-6577

                                    

Applied Motion Technologies, Inc. Applied Motiontraining Technologies, Inc. - industrial technology & engineering

- industrial technology & engineering - - serving the Lehigh Valleytraining & the world since 1994 - serving theus Lehigh Valley & the world since 1994 visit at amthydraulics.com visit us at amthydraulics.com 800-597-6577 800-597-6577

28

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TECH DIRECTORY 2015

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TECH DIRECTORY 2015

ADACONN®

Custom Reducing Flange Adapter Solutions SAE J518 flange to JIC, ORS, NPTF, and SAE J1926 male ends available in multiple size reductions. © 2015 ADACONN

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®

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Product Review

ULTRASONIC CLEANER Ultrasonic LLC www.ultrasonicllc.com

The Ultra 2400 FA, a fullfeatured ultrasonic cleaner has a 24-gallon tank capacity and horizontal transducers for cleaning without solvents. The 120V or 220V models feature an agitation table, dual filtration, a 6-gallon weir tank, sparge bar, and an insulated tank and lid. With 1920 watts of ultrasonic power and heaters of 1000 + 500 watts, and basket capacity of 22"L x 11"W x 5.5"D, the unit can quickly clean parts such as rubber and plastic parts, bearings, bolts, transmission components, engine parts prior to assembly, plastic injection molds for applications such as industrial/manufacturing environments, as well as automotive, medical, pharmaceutical, aerospace, engineering industries.

z

IMPROVED FIRE SAFETY FOR PNEUMATIC CONTROL SYSTEMS

COUNTERBALANCE VALVES Sun Hydraulics Corp. www.sunhydraulics.com

The LoadAdaptive™ counterbalance valves – an evolution of and direct replacement of the CB series – are multi-pilot-ratio valves that provide improved stability and highly efficient operation. The valve family adapts to operating conditions – providing high pilot ratios for efficiency when possible and low pilot ration and low flow gain for stability when required – for loadholding applications. Three models are currently available with 3:1 pilot ratio (15-gpm standard-capacity, 10-gpm semi-restrictive, and 5-gpm restrictive).

z

Assured Automation www.assuredautomation.com The FM-approved FireChek® thermal shut-offs with resettable memory shape alloy can be used to automatically shut down a pneumatic control system when a nearby fire occurs or when the ambient temperature reaches 135, 150, or 165°F. When excessive heat is sensed from a nearby fire, the air supply line is immediately closed, preventing air from feeding the fire. The system simultaneously vents the spring return actuator to allow the return to fail-safe. The system triggers quickly, securing pneumatically operated process line valves in their fail-safe position for both on/ off and throttling applications. The system responds to heat, not flame, offering improved protection compared with conventional plastic tubing burn-through. The shape memory element senses the ambient temperature and, through a phase induction change, rapidly produces the force and motion to trigger the FireChek. The element is 100% reliable because the shape memory effect is intrinsic to the alloy. The manual reset of the system allows routine performance for safety maintenance programs. Three configurations of the product are available.

z

MEMBRANE DRYER La-Man Corp. www.laman.com

FLEET SNOW AND ICE CONTROL SYSTEM

The AMD-035 SuperStar z membrane dryer provides ultra-clean and ultra-dry compressed air with the automotive industry in mind. The dryer can be used where refrigerated dryers may be too large or where electricity is not available or desirable. The dryer lowers the dew point by continuously removing water vapor and venting into the surrounding atmosphere. A prefiltration system incorporates a high-efficiency coalescing filter into the process. An automotive float drain allows for discharge of moisture from the Extractor/Dryer® while preventing any system air loss.

The Advantage+ snow and ice control system features a Wi-Fi powered, real-time support link to remotely view hydraulic system information. This support link allows engineers to electronically adjust valves and system parameters in real time to keep trucks on the road. Available for Android devices, an app allows supervisors to change system settings and view remote operations for setup, troubleshooting, and data logging. Through data-logging capabilities, they can monitor where the truck has traveled and spreader rates/totals.

Muncie® Power Products Inc. www.munciepower.com

z

www.IFPS.org • Tech Directory 2015 • www.FluidPowerJournal.com

37


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ers 1A Total Safety A & A Manufacturing Company Inc. Aalborg Instruments ABZ, Inc. Ace Wire Spring & Form Co., Inc. Activant Adsens Technology, Inc. Advanced Control Technology Airline Hydraulics Air Logic Airmo, Inc. AirTac International Group ALA Industries, Ltd. All Sensors Corp. Allen Orton LLC Allenair Corporation Alliance Sensors Group Almo Manifold & Tool Company American Aerospace Controls, Inc. American Cylinder Co., Inc. American High Performance Seals American Sensor Technologies, Inc. AMETEK Automation & Process Technologies Anderson Metals Corp., Inc. Anfield Sensors Inc. Applied Industrial Technologies ARGO-HYTOS, Inc. ASCO Numatics Ashcroft Inc. ASI Inc. Assured Automation ASP, Inc. Astrodyne Corporation Atos North America Attica Hydraulic Exchange/Hydraulex Global AutomationDirect Automation Products, Inc. - Dynatrol Div. Automation Services Inc. Automation Systems Interconnect, Inc. Aventics Corporation (formerly Bosch Rexroth Pneumatics) AW-Lake Company Axiomatic Technologies Corporation Balluff, Inc. Behringer Corp. Beswick Engineering Co., Inc. Bimba Manufacuring Company Birmingham Hydraulics Inc. Bondioli & Pavesi, Inc. Bosch Rexroth Corporation Brand Hydraulics Bray Controls, Div of BRAY Int’l Inc. Brennan Industries Inc. Bucher Hydraulics, Inc. Burkert Fluid Control Systems CADSYM Canfield Connector Canimex inc. Central Illinois Mfg. Co. (Cim-Tek) Filtration) Certified Power, Inc. CIM-TEK Filtration Clippard Instrument Laboratory, Inc. CMC Marine, Inc. Coilhose Pneumatics Comatrol Command Controls Corp. Component Sourcing International LLC Concentric Rockford Inc. Continental Hydraulics ControlAir, Inc. Control Enterprises, Inc. Controlled Fluids, Inc. Controlled Motion Solutions, Inc. Cox Instruments CPV Manufacturing, Inc. Cross Mfg. Inc. CRS Service, Inc. CS Unitec, Inc.

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www.IFPS.org • Tech Directory 2015 • www.FluidPowerJournal.com

39

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COMPANY Custom Control Sensors Inc. Custom Sensors & Technologies (CST) Cyber-Tech, Inc. Dakota Fluid Power Danfoss Power Solutions Davies Molding Del Equipment Limited DEL Hydraulics DELTA Computer Systems, Inc. Differential Pressure Plus, Inc. Donaldson Company Inc. Duplomatic Hydraulics Dwyer Instruments, Inc. Dylix Corporation Dynamic Fluid Components, Inc. DynaQuip Controls EAO Corporation Eaton Hydraulics Electro-Sensors Inc. Electroswitch Ellison Sensors, Inc. Elma Electronic Emmegi Heat Exchangers, Inc. Energy Manufacturing Co., Inc. Enfield Technologies Engineered Sales, Inc. Engineering Technology Services, LLC Exair Corporation Fabco-Air, Inc. Falcon Surplus FAMIC Technologies Inc. Faster Inc. FCI Automation FEMA Corporation Feroy Company, Inc. Flint Hydraulics, Inc. Flodraulic Group Flodyne Controls, Inc. Flow Technology Flow-Tek, A Subsidiary of BRAY Int’l Inc. Fluid Line Products, Inc. Fluid Power Associates, Inc. Fluid Power Connections Fluid Power, Inc. Fluid Power Products, Inc. Fluidtechnik USA,Inc. FluiDyne Fluid Power Force America FTI Flow Technology Inc. Futek Advanced Sensor Technology Inc. FW Murphy Galtech Canada Inc. Gefran Gems Sensors & Controls Gemu Valves Global Servo Hydraulics Granzow GS Global Resources, Inc. Hach Flow Meter Products & Services HAWE Hydraulics Haydon Kerk Motion Solutions, Inc. Heavy Motions Inc. HED Inc. (Hydro Electronic Devices) Hedland Flow Meters Helium Leak Testing, Inc. Hengli America Hercules Sealing Products Heypac Inc. High Country Tek, Inc. Himmelstein, S. & Co. HKX, Inc. HL Hydraulic, Inc. HMI Systems Hoffer Flow Controls Huade - USA Humphrey Automation Inc. Humphrey Products Company

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COMPANY HUSCO International Inc. Hydac Inc. Hydradyne, LLC Hydramation, Inc. Hydraulic Management Group, LLC Hydraulic Resources, Inc. Hydraulic Supply Co. Hydraulics International Inc. Hydrauliques Continental HyFlow Controls Inc. IEEE, Inc. IFM Efector Inc. Industrial Hydraulic Services Industrial Nut Corp. Industrial Servo Hydraulics, Inc. Industrial Specialties Mfg., Inc. Innotek Corporation Integrated Hydraulics, Inc. International fpa IQ Valves (Formerly Teknocraft) ITT JH Technology, Inc. J.R. Merritt Controls Inc. Kanamak Hydraulics Inc. Kavlico Keller America, Inc. Kraft Fluid Systems, Inc. Kurz Instruments, Inc. La-Man Corporation LCR Electronics Lovejoy Hydraulics Lynch Fluid Controls, Inc. M & M Rogness Equipment Co. Macro Sensors Madison Company Magnetek Maradyne Corp./Marion Fluid Power Div. Mark Hydraulic Company Inc. Marsh Bellofram Marvel Consultants Inc. Max Machinery Measurement Specialties Micheller and Son Hydraulics, Inc. Mid-West Instrument MKS Instruments, Inc. Mobile Hose & Hydraulic Supply Moog Motion Industries MP Filtri USA, Inc. MROStop LLC MTS Sensors MTS Systems Corporation Murrelektronik, Inc. Nachi America NBB Controls, Inc. NC Servo Technology Net Motion Inc. Norgren Norstat Inc. NOSHOK, Inc. Nott Company Novotechnik U.S. Inc. Nycoil Company OEM Controls, Inc. Oil-Rite Corporation O’Keefe Controls Co. Omega Engineering Optex-FA Panasonic Electric Works Corp. of America Parker Hannifin Corp., Hydraulic Valve Div. PCB Piezotronics Inc. P.E.P. Peter Paul Electronics PHD, Inc. Pico Electronics Pinnacle Systems, Inc. Pneumatic Cylinders & Couplers Inc. (PNEU C&C)

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www.IFPS.org • Tech Directory 2015 • www.FluidPowerJournal.com

43

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COMPANY Poclain Hydraulics Inc. Pressroom Electronics Pressure Components Inc. Pressure Controls Inc. Pressure Systems, Inc. Progressive Hydraulics, Inc. Proportion-Air, Inc. Pulsafeeder, Inc. PWM Controls Inc. PVS Sensors Inc. Rego Cryo-Flow Products Rite pro, Inc., A Subsidiary of BRAY Int’l Inc. Robeck Fluid Power Co. Rota-Cyl Corporation Rupe’s Hydraulics Sang-A Pneumatic Corp. Schmalz Inc. Schroeder Industries Schunk Inc. Scorpion Technologies Ltd. Seal Master Corporation Semiconductor Circuits Inc. Servo-Tek Products Company Inc. Seventy-Three Mfg. Co. Inc. S.G. Morris Co. SICK, Inc. Sierra Instruments, Inc. Simerics Smalley Steel Ring Co. Source Fluid Power Spartan Scientific SPC Sang-A Pneumatic Corp. Spectronics Corporation Spencer Fluid Power Spirax Sarco Stanley M. Proctor Company Suco Technologies, Inc. Sun Hydraulics Corporation SVF Flow Controls, Inc. Swift-Cor Precision, Inc. Switches Unlimited Switching Solutions Inc. SymCom, Inc. The Knotts Company The Oilgear Company Thomas Products LTD Titan Inc. TopWorx UFI Filters UHI, LTD Ultraflo Corporation Unique Automation LLC United Electric Controls Universal Grinding Corp. Universal Hydraulics International, LTD Vaccon Company Inc. Validyne Engineering Corp. VEST, Inc. Vindum Engineering, Inc. Voith Turbo Inc. VOSS Fluid GmbH Wandfluh of America, Inc. Webster Instruments WEBTEC WEH Technologies Inc. Weiss Instruments, Inc. West Coast Fluid Power Western Hydrostatics, Inc. Western Integrated Technologies, Inc. WIKA Instrument Corporation Wilson Company Winters Instruments Wojanis Supply Co. Womack Machine Supply Company WP Associates Young Powertech Inc. Yuken/ALA Industries Limited (N.A. Master Distributor)

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www.IFPS.org • Tech Directory 2015 • www.FluidPowerJournal.com

45

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Classifieds

ADVERTISER INDEX

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EST The Becret. S Kept “I found a system where I can run a family-owned business. We all work closely to make our business a success.” -Carl Jones, Owner PIRTEK North Valley & South Valley, Denver, CO (Formerly worked 35 years in the Fluid Power Industry)

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c/o iPacesetters P.O. Box 413050 Naples, FL 34101-6795 Fax: 888-847-6035

Please circle numbers for additional information from our advertisers. 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128

Reader Service Form

Fax or mail completed form for complimentary information. TYPE OR PRINT ONLY: Name Title Company Company Address City

State

Phone

Fax

Zip Code

Web Address E-Mail Address

129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157

158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215

216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244

245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273

274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302

303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331

332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360

361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389

390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418

419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447

448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476

477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505

1. Do you specify, select, or influence the purchase of components & systems on new or existing machinery? 03  Yes 04  No If yes, in which technologies? (check all that apply) 05  Hydraulic 06  Pneumatic 07  Vacuum 08  Electronic Controls 09  None of these 2. What is your primary job title? (check all that apply)

10  Administration 13  Technical

11  Plant Operations 14  Mechanical

3. Which of the following best describes your market focus? I  Forestry A  Aerospace J  Furnaces B  Agricultural Machinery K  Gas & Oilfield Machinery C  Automotive L  Heavy Construction D  Civil Engineering & Equipment E  Cranes M  Military Vehicles F  Drills & Drilling Equipment N  Construction & Utility Equipment G  Flame Cutting/Welding O  Machine Tools Equipment P  Government Related H  Food Machinery 4. Number of employees at this location?

A  1-19

B  20-49

12  Engineering 15  Purchasing

A  Marine & Offshore Equipment B  Material Handling Equipment C  Mining Machinery D  Packaging Machinery E  Plastic Machinery F  Presses & Foundry G  Railroad Machinery H  Road Construction/ Maintenance Equipment

C  50-99

D  100-249

E  250-499

16  Other

I  Simulators & Test Equipment J  Snow Vehicles, Ski Lifts K  Steel Plants & Rolling Mills L  Truck & Bus Industry M  Textile Machinery N  Woodworking Machines O  Other (specify) P  Fluid Power Industry

F  500-999

G  1000+

66  National

67  International

7. My Company should be advertising in or submit an article to the Fluid Power Journal. Please contact this person: Name: ___________________________________ Title: _________________________________ Phone: _________________________________ 8. I wish to receive a free subscription to Fluid Power Journal:

01  Yes

02  No

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Signature Date 9. I would like more information on the following products: (Please check all that apply) 808  Hose & Tubing 805  Filters 800  Accumulators 809  Hydraulic Fluids 806  Gauges & Sensors 801  Accessories 810  Motors 807  Heat Exchangers, 802  Electronic Controls 811  Pumps Heaters, Aftercoolers, 803  Couplings & Fittings 812  Seals & Packing Dryers 804  Cylinders 10. I plan on purchasing the above products in the next: 68  0-3 months 69  3-6 months 70  6-9 months

813  Vacuum 814  Valves 815  Software

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6. In which region does your company do business? (check all that apply) 61  East 62  Midwest 63  Southeast 64  Southwest 65  West

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5. What is the primary business activity at this location? In the Fluid Power Industry: 56  Manufacturer 57  Distributor 58  Education Outside the Fluid Power Industry: 59  Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) 60  End User of Fluid Power Products

71  12+ months

Please send information about the International Fluid Power Society (please check all that apply) 897  Membership 898  Certification 899  Training/Education

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1. Do you specify, select or influence the purchase of components & systems, on new or existing machinery? 03  Yes 04  No. If yes, which technologies? (check all that apply) 05  Hydraulic 06  Pneumatic 09  None of These 07  Vacuum 08  Electronic Controls 2. What is your primary job title? (check only one) 10  Administration: Chairman, Pres., V.P., Sec., Tres., G.M., Owner, Bus. Mgr., Dir., etc. 11  Plant Operations: VP of Mfg/ Oper/ Prod., Plant Mgr./ Dir. Mgr., Supv./ Supt./ Foreman/ Safety Dir., etc. 12  Engineering: V.P. Eng., Eng., Des. Eng., Dir. of Eng., Staff Spec., Chief Eng., Senior Eng., Maint/Prod. Eng., etc. 13  Technical: Chief Tech., Fluid Power Tech., etc. 14  Mechanical: Chief Master Mech., Master Mech., Fluid Power Mech., etc. 15  Purchasing: VP/Dir. of Purch., Procurement Mgr., Buyer, Purch., etc. 16  Other: (please specify)_____________________________________ 3. Number of employees at this location? A  1-19 B  20-49 C  50-99 D  100-249 E  250-499 F  500-999 G  1000+

(View a sample of our PAPERLESS digital edition at www.fluidpowerjournal.com) 4. What is the primary business activity at this location? In the Fluid Power Industry Outside the Fluid Power Industry 56  Manufacturer 57  Distributor 58  Education 59  Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) 60  End User of Fluid Power Products 61  Other: (please specify)__________________________________________ 5. Which of the following best describes your market focus? A  Aerospace A  Marine & Offshore Equipment B  Agricultural Machinery B  Material Handling Equipment C  Automotive C  Mining Machinery D  Civil Engineering D  Packaging Machinery E  Cranes E  Plastic Machinery F  Drills & Drilling Equip. F  Presses & Foundry G  Flame Cutting/Welding Equip. G  Railroad Machinery H  Food Machinery H  Road Construct/Maint. Equip. I  Forestry I  Simulators & Test Equipment J  Furnaces J  Snow Vehicles, Ski Lifts K  Gas & Oilfield Machinery K  Steel Plants & Rolling Mills L  Heavy Construction & Equip. L  Truck & Bus Industry M  Military Vehicles M  Textile Machinery N  Construction & Utility Equip. N  Woodworking Machines O  Machine Tools O  Other (specify)_____________ P  Government Related P  Fluid Power Industry

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Fluid Power Journal Tech Directory 2015

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