Page 1

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BUSINESS

ViewHouse to open second restaurant and bar in DTC

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LOCAL

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New Leadership for the LDS Church in Denver

In mid-August, local entrepreneur Francois Safieddine will open a second, highly-anticipated ViewHouse restaurant and bar at 7101 S. Clinton St.

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ENTERTAINMENT

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Free outdoor movie series returns to Infinity Park

President Peter J. Krumholz of Denver assumed his role as the new president of the Denver Stake of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

The Seventh Annual Monday Movie Madness series is back this summer with another lineup of free movies shown in the stadium at Infinity Park.

Only

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S i n c e 19 2 6 May 29, 2014

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Vol. 93 No. 24

A Day of Remembrance

Fort Logan celebrates ‘American heroes’

Kyle Goldsberry pays his respects to his grandparents at Fort Logan National Cemetery, May 26. His grandfather, Dilbert L. Lawyer, was a WWII U.S. Navy veteran. Photo by Stefan Krusze

See more photos on page 6 - 7

City Park Jazz announces 2014 lineup City Park Jazz heads into its 28th season with a great lineup of free Sunday concerts in the park. Spanning 10 weeks across June, July and August, the collection of local musicians in this year’s lineup crosses cultures, styles and genres in a way that reflects the musical and cultural diversity of Denver. “Our booking committee hit another homerun this year,” said Chris Zacher, president of the nonprofit City Park Jazz Board of Directors. “We open with perennial favorite Hazel Miller, we have an exciting tribute to

2014 City Park Line up

Date Artist June 1 Hazel Miller June 8 The Lynn Baker Quartet June 15 Ritmo Jazz Latino June 22 Tribute to Freddy Rodriguez June 29 Gumbo Le Funque July 6 SuCh July 13 The Dave Watts Ensemble of Deepness Freddy Rodriguez — who’s a Denver institution himself — and we’re closing out with Chris Daniels and the Kings, who are celebrating their 30th anniversary this year. We’ve got a great, eclectic mix of Latin, Creole

and blues bands sprinkled in between.”

 This season also features a new logo designed by local artist Michael King. “The logo was unanimously approved by the judging committee,” Zacher said. “It reflects so

Date July 20 July 27 Aug. 3

Artist The Dexter Payne Quintet Dan Treanor’s Afrosippi Band Featuring Erica Brown & Merrian Johnson Chris Daniels & The Kings with Freddi Gowdy

many of the things that make CPJ and Colorado great, and most importantly, looks awesome on a T-shirt.” The season runs every Sunday evening starting June 1 from 6-8 p.m. The free concerts are staged on the pavilion in City Park.


PAGE 2 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • May 29, 2014

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Peter Niederman, CEO of Kentwood Real Estate, wears a Google Glass with the company drone hovering behind him. Courtesy photo

Kentwood integrates Google Glass with HD video drone

K

entwood Real Estate has integrated the new Google Glass technology with the company’s high-definition drones to provide a highly advanced, real-world visual display of the company’s listings that is unmatched in the real estate industry. Google Glass, developed by Google, is a wearable computer that looks like an eyeglass. The glass displays information in a smartphone-like, hands-free format with voice-over narrative. “The Google Glass takes video footage of a home’s interior that is very similar to taking a first-hand personal tour of the property complete with voiceover narrative descriptions of the home’s features and highlights,” said Peter Niederman, CEO of Kentwood Real Estate. “It’s like taking a real life walking tour of the residence. This

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highly advanced display of the home’s interior is now combined with our drone’s aerial footage of the home’s exterior and surrounding area, including views and nearby amenities. Our brokers can share the footage and narrative with prospective buyers anywhere in the world for a high tech real estate shopping experience that is unparalleled in the industry.” The Explorer version of the Google Glass was made available to testers by Google in April 2013. The wearable computer device is keyed to voice commands in addition to taking photos and videos. On April 15, 2014, Google held a oneday, international online sale of the Google Glass. All available glasses sold out within one hour, and Kentwood Real Estate was among the buyers. Kentwood Real Estate’s

drones are built primarily of highly durable carbon fiber with a full GPS setup featuring advanced waypoint mission control software, auto pilot, and one switch return to launch capability. The drones house a 1080p full HD video camera shooting at more than 60 frames per second, providing smooth and professional quality footage that can be viewed and monitored in real time during the flight. Each drone can operate at speeds up to 60 mph with excellent stability. Kentwood Real Estate now has a full-time drone operator and videographer who is currently taking aerial footage of the company’s listings throughout metro Denver and Colorado’s high country. For more information, visit Kentwood Real Estate online at www.DenverRealEstate.com.

Guest Column

Investing in space

By Scott McCauliffe Investing in NASA means investing in America and Colorado’s economic prosperity. On July 29, 1958, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration was founded in an effort to have America be the first country to send a man to the moon. As most people remember, America came in second in almost every aspect of the Cold War space race to Russia. Once we successfully landed astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong on the moon, Russia all but bowed out of getting there. We haven’t been back ourselves in more than 40 years. To quote renowned astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, “We stopped dreaming.” NASA’s budget, at its peak, was 4.41 percent of the entire federal budget. That was in 1966. Three years later, we put a man on the moon. In 2012, NASA’s total budget is 0.48 percent of the tax dollar. Now, the only way we

get to space is hitching rides with Russia. There is no doubt that this drop in funding has slowed our innovations as a country. America should be the leading the world, and instead, we’re falling behind everyone else. This is all on the national scale, but Colorado is starting to take the forefront when it comes to space. The Colorado Space Coalition is based right here in Denver. The Colorado Space Coalitions is a group of industry stakeholders working to make Colorado a center of excellence for aerospace. In Colorado, there are nearly 170,000 people employed by space related jobs. If organizations like NASA are moved back into the forefront of thought of Americans, this number grows and improves not just Colorado’s economy, but also our country’s. Colorado ranks second in the nation for private sector aerospace employment. There are five major

universities in Colorado that are leaders in aerospace, space research and education. In 2011, the National Science Foundation selected University of ColoradoBoulder to be the home of the National Solar Observatory. In 2012, $1.1 billion came into these universities and research facilities to further our aerospace programs. As appreciation and more publicity are brought to space sciences, more and more people will recognize Colorado as a leader in the field. Not only would making space exploration a priority to improve America’s standing internationally, but also Colorado would see a direct benefit. Why should we settle for piggybacking our way to space on a Russian spacecraft? Are we willing to give up on being leaders of science and technology? How much would you pay for the universe? We have to continue dreaming of tomorrow.


May 29, 2014 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • PAGE 3

ViewHouse to open second restaurant and bar in Denver Tech Center Submitted by Paulina Szafranski After four years waiting for a new occupant, the lot that once housed the Traildust Steakhouse will soon blaze an exciting new path. In mid-August, local entrepreneur Francois Safieddine will open a second, highly-anticipated ViewHouse restaurant and bar at 7101 S. Clinton St. The first ViewHouse location opened a little more than a year ago at 20th and Market Street in the Ballpark neighborhood and offers, among other things, a 7,000-square foot rooftop for dining with a view of the action at Coors Field and “The Green,” an eyecatching outdoor space where guests play volleyball, bocce, corn hole and other activities. “We named our restaurant ViewHouse in part because we think a great dining experience is made better by a spectacular view. At our Ballpark location there are views of downtown and Coors Field, and at our new DTC location, we’ll have

unrivaled views of the Rocky Mountain Front Range,” Safieddine said. Of course, patrons will have the option of eating outside or, if they’d prefer a cozy and more intimate dining room, inside. ViewHouse’s 16,000-square foot DTC location will offer two large private event spaces downstairs and another upstairs event space with a dedicated kitchen and full bar. There will also be an open green space for outdoor games similar to the “The Green” at ViewHouse’s Ballpark location with additions of water features and a putting green, a perfect setting for a summer of happy hours and weekends in the sun. Both locations will serve chefdriven, yet affordable cuisine from a menu designed by Chef Jose Guerrero. His menus feature locally-sourced meats and produce, and fresh, house-made sauces, condiments, dressings and more. The new DTC location will offer 15 new dishes including several steaks and other selections that will be

The ViewHouse set to open in DTC, located at 7101 S. Clinton St., in mid-August.

crafted specifically for south Denver diners as well as a buffet style brunch every Sunday. To wash it all down, the new

ViewHouse location will offer a full selection of local beers and specialty cocktails and wine. The hours will be 11 a.m. - 2 a.m.,

Courtesy photo

Monday – Saturday, and 10 a.m. – 2 a.m. on Sundays. For more information, visit www.viewhouse.com.

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PAGE 4 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • May 29, 2014 By Joshua Cole

Transfer: A low-cost alternative for a 4-year degree Kevin Iverson

COLLEGE PLANNING: Searching for solutions

By Estelle Meskin

Dear Estelle. Our dream for our children has been to send them to a four-year college in Colorado. We’ve saved money every year and they’ve had jobs so they too could contribute to their college educations. Since the 2008-09 economic downturn, our financials have plummeted and we find that even a four-year college in Colorado might not be affordable. This distresses us because we don’t want our children to graduate with enormous loans. Your thoughts? CWR, Parent, Highlands Ranch College financing has become a critical issue for many parents after the economic downturn several years ago. Many families lost their jobs, along with their college and retirement savings. This situation has been exacerbated by

By Shirley Smith

majorSCHOOL tuition increases by many MATTERS colleges, sometimes as much as 15-20 percent in the past 5-10 years. Fortunately, we now have an affordable alternative here and in other states that makes a fouryear college degree possible for all students at a significantly lower cost. Last year, 38 percent of high school graduates entering college began at two-year institutions. A significant number transferred to By Judith Baenen St. Mary’s four-year collegesAcademy and obtained their baccalaureate degrees. Becoming a transfer student presents opportunities and challenges and it’s important for a prospective student to be aware of these when beginning this journey. Best of all, it will be more affordable than attending any of Colorado’s four-year institutions all four years. Red Rocks Community College has developed transfer agreements with University of Colorado, Colorado State University and the Colorado School of Mines. If a student graduates from high school and receives a two-year degree, they are considered freshman in terms of financial aid and scholarships. They will be recognized as juniors after their transcripts are reevaluated. CSU transfers require a minimum 2.5 GPA, School of Mines, 2.75. Each school provides many

By Chuck Green

services for transfer students, including academic and financial aid advising, mentors, honor societies, and flexible living in upperclass dorms and off campus housing. Before a student considers these innovative partnerships, they should visit the four-year school they want to transfer into and attend a college transfer fair, which are held annually at the communityBy colleges. Jim Miller Many 18 year olds are reluctant to attend the two-year option believing the community colleges will not provide them with the same type of campus life as a four-year school. In recent years, however, many of the community colleges have introduced athletics, student government, and numerous clubs and campus activities. The best part is the cost! This approach could save families a significant amount of money.

Begin your college applications this summer

Dear Estelle. Is it too early to start my college applications this summer? I have a summer job but should have some extra time to work on my applications and maybe the “big” essay. - Dana, Littleton High

F lair!

was outstanding. Students found School. Dana, I’m so glad you asked ideas that were personal, life that question. This is the ad- changing and unique. The essay vice I’m giving my “rising se- itself is still limited to 650 words, niors.” So much can be accom- same as 2013-14. Identify a topic plished during the summer when and start to write. The challenge you don’t have school demands. is finding a topic that resonates Whatever you do now will be one with your head and heart and reless task you have to face when quires you to showcase yourself. senior year starts late August or September. First semester senior year is filled with a significant Other important tasks to do amount of work, and you will be glad you tackled your essay and this summer By Scottie Taylor Iverson your college list and rebegan working on applications. • Finalize search each school that’s on it. Most students use the “common application” so completing a pro- • Visit colleges. Check out my website for a free “College totype of it online this summer will greatly facilitate completForm” to take Evaluation ing the real common application, with you on your upcoming colwhich is available Aug. 1. This lege visits. exercise will give you a chance • Prepare for another SAT/ACT. to gather all the information you Take a test prep course have regarding academic honors, • Read a few good books school activities and community • Take an online course if you’re service. Doing these few task will deficient in credits greatly minimize the stress you • Volunteer might have had if you waited un• Leave time for a vacation, leitil fall. sure and hanging out with The “big” essay is usually the friends one challenge that creates the Estelle Meskin, MA, is an exmost anxiety among college applicants. Check out the Com- perienced Certified Educational mon Application website. The es- Planner and College Coach, and say prompts will not change for a member of the Independent Edthe 2014-15 school year. Select a ucational Consultants Assn. She topic that appeals to you and start practices in Cherry Creek. Call brainstorming possibilities with 303-394-3291, e-mail Emeskin@ your parents and friends. The Mac.com or visit www.EstelleMquality of this last year’s essays eskin.com for more information.

Western Stock Show Association announces new Board of Directors Ron Williams re-elected chairman

Stephen H. Walker, Peter J. Krumholz and W. Jared Scott, the new Denver Stake Presidency

New Leadership for the LDS Church in Denver

Submitted by Emily de Schweinitz Taylor, Denver Stake media relations On Easter Sunday, April 20, President Richard L. Millett was released from his position as stake president of the Denver Stake of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Following President Millett’s nine years of honorable service as a lay leader over the Denver Stake, President Peter J. Krumholz of Denver assumed his role as the new stake president that same day. Typically, a stake president maintains his current professional duties while serving as a lay leader over thousands of congregation members within a given geographic area. As such, Krumholz will continue practicing law in a downtown Denver law firm. To form a stake presiden-

cy, Krumholz has called two counselors, namely Stephen H. Walker of Denver and W. Jared Scott of Greenwood Village. Walker and Scott will assist Krumholz in administering many aspects of his ecclesiastical duties among the nine local congregations of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the Denver Stake. As a long-time resident of downtown Denver and a former Bishop over the highly diverse Capitol Hill Ward congregation, Krumholz looks forward to serving in this new capacity, with a vision of growth and reaching out to the larger Denver community. “We are entering a time where community outreach and cooperative efforts with other faiths will take on a heightened importance. As we continue to strengthen individuals and families within our own faith, we can enlarge our capacity

to serve and engage with the broader community,” Krumholz said. Building upon this idea of community engagement and service, Krumholz said, “The Book of Mormon teaches that we should esteem our neighbors as ourselves, and as Jesus taught so beautifully in the parable of the Good Samaritan, we cannot have a narrow view of who is our ‘neighbor.’ Mormons believe that we are all part of the same divine family, and so our relationships with others in our community are of lasting significance. I look forward to strengthening those relationships.” Certainly, Krumholz, along with the thousands of LDS members in the Denver community, look forward to reaching out to neighbors and bettering the community for all who call Denver home.

The Western Stock Show Association (DBA, National Western Stock Show) announced four new members to the Board of Directors during its annual meeting. “We are excited to welcome Justin Cumming, Doug Jones, Leslie Lange and Terrance Carroll to the board of the Western Stock Show Association,” said Paul Andrews, president and CEO of the National Western Stock Show and Complex. “They are all great leaders in their field and share the passion for the National Western Stock Show and our Vision, Values and Mission.” The new directors join the association with a wealth of experience and accolades. Cumming is a fifth-generation Coloradan, who grew up on the family farm and ranch near Julesburg. He and his family exhibited Hereford and Simmental cattle at Stock Show for more than 50 years. Cumming currently serves as chair of the Executive Livestock Committee and is a member of the Junior Livestock Auction Committee. Cumming is an attorney concentrating on agricultural law as well as real estate, probate and tax litigation. Jones is the president and owner of The JONES Realty Group. Jones is active in the day-to-day operations of the company and supports The JONES Realty Group’s principal activities. Prior to establishing The JONES Realty Group, his professional background included banking and service as a staff member in the U.S. Senate in Washington, D.C. Jones is a Trustee of the Western Stock Show Association and assists in evaluating the National Western’s Long Range Planning needs. He has also served on several other committees for the National

Western. Lange is an accomplished professional horsewoman specializing in quarter horse disciplines ranging from English classes to Western classes, and has trained world champion quarter horses and paint horses. She is a respected horse show judge and serves as a member of many equine organizations, including the American Quarter Horse Association (of which she is an honorary vice president), the National Reining Horse Association, the National Snaffle Bit Association, the Appaloosa Horse Club of America, and USA Equestrian, Inc. She is current president of the Rocky Mountain Quarter Horse Association and current chair of the National Western Executive Horse Committee. Carroll is a lawyer, minister and former Speaker of the Colorado House of Representatives, the first African- American ever to hold that office in Colorado. Carroll was elected in 2002 and represented House District 7, which encompasses parts of Denver until term limited in 2011. Terrance is currently Associate General Council at SCL Health and serves as a trustee of the Western Stock Show Association as well as co-facilitator of the National Western Community Advisory Committee and assists in evaluating the National Western’s Long Range Planning needs. Williams was re-elected as chairman of the Board. The board has now increased to 15 total members, per the new by-laws. Board members for the 2014-15 year are Sue Anschutz-Rodgers, Pete Coors, Pat Grant, Doug Jones, Guy McEndaffer, Thomas Bradbury, Justin Cumming, Mark Gustafson, Gail Klapper, Tracy Ringolsby, Terrance Carroll, Don Elliman, Buck Hutchison, Leslie Lange and Ron Williams.


May 29, 2014 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • PAGE 5

OPINION Racing, hacking, remembering KINDLING

Arapahoe Park is now open for horse racing in our backyard where wagering on the ponies is legal and encouraged. Local horse breeders and trainers have a full racing schedule for the summer months. The “Sport of Kings” is underway.

Chinese hackers By Robert Sweeney

I’m rooting for California Chrome to win the upcoming Belmont Stakes and become the first Triple Crown winner in decades. The pressure on the owners has to be incredible as they await this Super Bowl of racing history.

I’m amazed at our government that we would waste time and money for the U.S. Attorney General to file indictments against four Chinese military officers for alleged computer hacking and omission against the United States. How ridiculous, are we just trying to harass China and ruin our trade relationships with the growing powerhouse? Putin is in China selling them $480 billion

of oil this week while the Obama regime is charging four military officers with computer crimes. The United States is the largest spy country in the world and no doubt we’re doing countless computer antics ourselves. What a waste of taxpayer money and how silly to spend resources in such actions. Of course we spy on each other and the officers were probably educated in the United States at our expense. We can go after these computer folks but we can’t find the people that killed our United States ambassador in Benghazi.

Memorial Day reflections

Visited with Mort Marks prior to Memorial Day and we talked about World War II and he re-

membered how no one wanted to die on the last few days of the war. Those who had fought all the way to Germany and across the Pacific wanted to return home alive. We owe these veterans and present day service members a great deal and it is shameful to see the VA Hospital two years behind schedule and way over budget. American people and veterans deserve better from our leadership.

Primary election

June 24 is the Colorado primary election so make sure you’re registered to vote in your precinct and county. The ballots will be mailed out in early June.

World War II’s home front REMARKS

By Mort Marks

The other evening, I was asked an interesting question – the young lady said to me, “You’ve written about your experiences as an infantry man during World War II, but what was it like for those left at home?” Since I was in college for the entire year of 1942, before being drafted in April of 1943, I still remember life as a civilian on the “home front.” Even though 1942 was – wow 72 years ago – I can still remember that those war years were a long and challenging time in the lives of everyone at home. Waiting wives raised their

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children alone and marked the War Bonds. Hollywood movie little prior experience, and often passing months off their calen- stars were different 70 years ago, not much training, these women dars. Many fathers had never they not only were proud of their donned hard hats, steel-toed seen their child, except for dog- country, they willingly served in shoes, work clothes and gloves, eared and torn photos they carried the military while those at home and even though they were not inside their helmets. When gaso- “stumped” their country selling well received by many men on line, rubber, nylon, cigarettes, bonds, and their efforts raised the job, they did their jobs exsugar, butter and other food items millions of dollars. School chil- ceedingly well. were needed for the war effort, dren willingly saved their nickels Mothers left their children in Americans patriotically tightened and were made to feel part of the the care of families or friends, their belts and carefully managed nationwide endeavor. and it didn’t take them long to their books of rationing stamps. The one event that changed prove themselves in the shipyards To save gasoline, folks at home the direction of many Americans’ as tackers, burners, welders and carpooled, rode buses or walked, lives were the construction of maintenance workers. In aircraft women wore socks and guarded huge shipyards, aircraft and mu- factories, they worked assemtheir precious nylons with their nition factories on both the east bling aircraft parts and as riveters lives; housewives carefully and west coasts that were needed By Glory Weisberg By Kenneth W. James, CFA on airplanes. Soon – in typical planned their meals around what to supply our armed services with American fashion – the “home they had in their nearly empty their vessels, planes and weapfront” was singing a song titled cupboards. Many people even in ons. Since thousands of men and the inner cities grew their own women were needed to “man” “Rosie the Riveter,” which came “victory gardens” and canned the those factories and plants, many to epitomize the wartime spirit products of their labor. families packed up and moved to of America where even women were factory workers. People cued up to donate their both coasts. When news of Germany’s surblood to help supply hospitals on Besides the patriotism they render came, pandemonium broke the front lines, men and women felt, people also knew there was were taught to distinguish the steady work and good money out on the streets. In the factories differences between types of to be made, and they speculated and shipyards, women put down aircrafts, and as members of the that any trade they learned might their tools, took off their badges Civil Air Patrol, volunteered to help them in the future. Since and joined in the celebrations. watch the skies for foreign invad- shipyards, aircraft plants and But women weren’t ready to go ers. their related factories operated back to the lives they lived before Families not only scrimped three shifts a day, the labor mar- war. An important new era of acand saved at home, but also dug ket was now open to women, and tivity had opened up for America deep into their pockets to help for the first time in history, they – society had changed – for womfinance the war by buying W.S. started doing “male jobs.” With en there was no going back.

GLORYUS GOINGS ON

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May 29, 2014 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • PAGE 7

PAGE 6 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • May 29, 2014 Cadet of the Colorado Wing of Civil Air Patrol Samuel Robinson holds the U.S. flag as Aerospace Data FacilityColorado Joint Color Guard, Staff Sgt. Benjamin Cressy salute during the “Pledge of Allegiance.”

A Day of Remembrance Continued from Page 1

CAP Major Gene Munson, who also is known as Dr. Munson at Regis University

Gov. John Hickelooper shakes hands with Hazelle Juarez.

CAP Cadet Hericas escorts Cindy Deitz from Wreath Remembrance Ceremony.

VFW Post 9644 Honor Guard Memorial Rifle Salute

Photos by Stefan Krusze

Securing the Colors are IT3 Christopher Dizon US Navy and AIC Myles Gregory, both from Aerospace Data Facility-Colorado Joint Color Guard.

Bagpiper, MSgt. Ken Giese USMC, retired, plays “Amazing Grace.”

Piccolo players, Boy Scout Troop Leader and VFW Band member Sean Meighan with VFW Band’s most senior member, Milly Hudson

Sgt. Warren Tellgren, USAF, retired, president of Associated Veterans of Colorado, greets Gov. John Hickenlooper and his son Teddy. Hickenlooper brought his son to the Memorial Day Remembrance and stated the importance of teaching children the significant meaning of remembering and honoring those who served and are still serving their country.


PAGE 8 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • May 29, 2014

‘Life with Pets’ campaign features real-life stories to increase adoptions Dumb Friends League to offer summer adoption specials Every year, hundreds of adopters contact the Dumb Friends League with messages of gratitude about how their pet has made life better. Whether they feel happier and healthier, or they smile more and laugh often—the positive impact pets have on their people is undeniable. Inspired by actual letters written by adopters, the Dumb Friends League’s new “Life with Pets” campaign launches this week and aims to increase adop-

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT Free Days in June at Cultural Attractions

Children’s Museum of Denver: June 3, 4 – 8 p.m., 2121 Children’s Museum Drive, Denver, 303-433-7444. Clyfford Still Museum: June 20, 1250 Bannock St., Denver. 720-354-4880 Denver Art Museum: June 7, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Visit www. denverartmuseum.org. Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield: June 3, 8500 Deer Canyon Road, Littleton. Visit www.botanicgardens.org. Denver Museum of Nature and Science: June 2 and 30, 2001 Colorado Boulevard, Denver.303-370-6000. Four Mile Historic Park: June 6, 715 S. Forest St., Denver. 720-865-0800

Lamont Concerts

Sesquicentennial Concert May 29, 7:30 p.m., Gates Auditorium, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver. Lamont Symphony Orchestra, Lamont Chorale, Lamont Women’s and Mens’ choirs. Free concert, ticket required. North Indian Classical Ensemble with Steve Oda May 30, 7:30 p.m., Hamilton Building. Free. The Lamont School of Music is located at the University of Denver, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver. Info/tickets www.du.edu/lamont or 303-871-6412.

‘Seedlings: Top Hogs’

June 3, 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.,Event Hall, Lone Tree Arts Center, 10075 Commons St., Lone Tree. In this fun-filled show for kids, pigs will perform exciting tricks to music and the cues of renowned animal trainer and

tions at its shelters by highlighting the emotional benefits of pet ownership. “We love hearing from our adopters,” said Bob Rohde, president and CEO of the Dumb Friends League. “Their stories motivate us to continue the work we do every day, and we wanted to share that joy with the community through this campaign in hopes of finding homes for even more pets in our shelters.” To coincide with the campaign, which runs through July, the Dumb Friends League will be offering adoption pricing specials throughout the summer— a time of year when the League

performer John Vincent. From simple doglike tricks like Sit-up, Lay-down, Play-dead and Fetch to unbelievably difficult ones. After the show the audience is invited to meet the stars and John answers questions. 720-509-1000.

‘A Handful of Dust’

June 6 – Aug. 31, Byers-Evans House Museum, 1310 Bannock St., Denver. Images by noted photographer and documentary filmmaker Allen Birnbach, will debut with a free reception from 5 to 9 p.m. Info at 303620-4933.

An Evening with Peter Kater

June 7, 7-10 p.m., Cherokee Ranch and Castle, 6113 N. Daniels Park Road, Sedalia. Nine-time Grammy nominee/multiplatinum selling Pianist/Composer Peter Kater has been leading the innovation of contemporary instrumental music for more than three decades. He has performed for presidents and dignitaries; scored the music for over 100 television and film productions including 11 on and off-Broadway dramatic plays. Includes castle tour and cash bar. Tickets at cherokeeranch.org or 303-6884600.

The Music of Led Zeppelin and the Colorado Symphony

June 8, 7:30 p.m., Fiddler’s Green Amphitheater, 6350 Greenwood Plaza Boulevard, Englewood. Presented by St. Anthony Hospital. Bridging the gulf between rock n’ roll and classical music, conductor/arranger Brent Havens takes the podium to present a program he scored to extend the listening experience of Led Zeppelin’s timeless tunes. Visit www. FiddlersGreenAmphithearer-co.com.

sees an increase in the number of pets that come to its shelters. These specials will take place at all adoption locations—the Quebec Street shelter in Denver and the Buddy Center in Castle Rock, as well as select Petco and PetSmart locations where Dumb Friends League cats are available for adoption. In addition to traditional media

to promote the campaign, the League will launch a social media component via Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, asking adopters to share how pet have impacted their life. “By having adopters share the value pets bring to their life, we’re hoping more people will be inspired to adopt,” said Rohde.

All cat and dog adoptions from the Dumb Friends League include a spay/neuter surgery, initial vaccinations, a microchip ID implant, a free visit with a participating veterinarian and a lifetime of love and companionship. To learn more and view adoptable pets online, visit www. DDFL.org or call (303) 7515772.

CLASSES/WORKSHOPS Garden and Plant Photography: It’s The Light

100 W. 14th Avenue, Denver, north lawn. Features over 80,000 items, including children’s books, non-fiction and fiction books, along with CDs, DVDs and audio books, all at bargain prices starting at under $1. New items are added daily. Visit www. denverlibrary.org.

walk that offers participants free food and giveaways; health screenings and fitness assessments; and a kid’s activity area with music and entertainment. To join a team or start your own, visit www.denverheartwalk. org or call 303-801-4656.

June 3 and 10, 6 - 8 p.m., Denver Botanic Gardens, 1007 York St., Denver. Instructor David Winger addresses basic camera operation in the first class in this two-part series, followed by a tutorial on focus, composition, light, exposure and post processing. Participants have the opportunity to photograph the Gardens using their new knowledge. In the second class, the instructor critiques participant photographs. Visit botanicgardens.org.

EVENTS CHUN Capitol Hill People’s Fair

June 7, 10 a.m. – 8 p.m., and June 8, 10 a.m. – 7 p.m., Civic Center Park, Colfax and Broadway, Denver. Art and Music Festival, produced by Capitol Hill United serves as the kick-off to the summer festival season. Food, art, entertainment. Visit www.chundenver.org.

‘Bottoms Up! Colorado’s most Celebrated Saloons’

June 10, 7:30 p.m., Bemis Public Library, 6014 Datura St., Littleton. Wellknown Colorado historian Tom Noel did his Ph.D. dissertation on the saloons of Colorado and has been inspecting these establishments ever since. Copies of Dr. Noel’s recent books will be available for purchase and signing at the program.

The Denver Public Library Gigantic Used Book Sale

June 12 - 15, Denver Public Library,

Regis Day

June 13, noon, Lowell Campus Quad, 3333 Regis Boulevard, Denver. Open to all who live or work in the area. Food, free ice cream, games, live entertainment. Events include a clothing drive for Denver’s homeless and at risk populations. Items needed include: men’s and women’s socks, shoes, underwear, sleeping bags, and backpacks. 303-458-4273.

Waterloo Party

Jodi’s Race for Awareness

June 7, Denver City Park, 17th and Colorado Boulevard, Denver. Fundraiser for ovarian cancer. Register at www.JodisRace. org. Runners and walkers are encouraged to form teams with their families, friends and coworkers, with a fundraising page on the Jodi’s Race for Awareness website.

Colorado Kidney Walk,

June 8, Infinity Park 4400 E Kentucky Ave., Glendale. Onsite registration, 9a.m.; Walk Opening Ceremonies. 10:00am, Kidney Walk and help raise awareness and funds to support the fight against kidney disease in Denver. Those interested in getting involved or supporting a walker can visitwww. kidneywalk.org.  

June 14, 6 – 10:30 p.m., Cherokee Ranch and Castle. 6113 Daniels Park Road Sedalia. Celebrate Tweet Kimball’s 100th birthday at a ‘20s-themed party, the era in which Cherokee Castle was built. The evening begins with a silent auction featuring some of Cherokee’s memorabilia. Entertainment includes Denver’s Metropolitan Jazz Orchestra, along with acrobats, aerialists and a 1920s dance exhibition and lessons. Enjoy drinks, hors d’oeuvres and dancing during this unforgettable night at the Castle. For reservations visit cherokeeranch. org or call 303-688-4600.

TAPS Celebrity Classic

FUNDRAISERS Heart and Stroke Walk

WHAT’S NEW Colorado’s Free Fishing Weekend

June 7, 7:30 a.m. registration, 8:30 a.m. Walk begins, Denver Performing Arts Complex, 14th and Curtis, Denver. 5k walk and 1-mile family fun walk, free. Fundraising is encouraged. A festival before and after the

June 12-14. Concerts include the ‘Saluting Our Fallen Heroes’ Dinner Concert, June 13 and the Songwriters Show, June 12. Golf includes both shows. Concert details, registration and schedule, www.taps.org/Classic/2014/

June 7 – 8, Colorado Parks and Wildlife reminds the public that anglers of all ages can fish without a license anywhere in the state that weekend.

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May 29, 2014 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • PAGE 9

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PAGE 10 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • May 29, 2014

High, Wide and Handsome By Cathleen Norman Montana celebrates two birthdays this year: becoming a territory on May 26, 1864, and achieving statehood on Nov. 8, 1889. Although separated by the fairly flat state of Wyoming, Colorado and Montana share several things in common, starting with their birth through gold discoveries. Colorado was the site of the first Rocky Mountain rush: the William Greene Russell prospecting party found gold flake at the confluence of the South Platte River and Cherry Creek, which triggered an 1859-1860 onslaught of gold seekers, miners and merchants into the region. Substantial discoveries of gold in the mountains to the west soon spawned Central City and Idaho Springs. Colorado became a territory on Feb. 28, 1861, and Montana followed in our footsteps three years later. Both states shared several geographic similarities. While each contains vast eastern plains, Colorado and Montana would both profit mightily from the mineral-rich Rocky Mountains, as well as tourists arriving to marvel at the grandeur of our mountain scenery. By 1862, the most accessible gold deposits had been depleted in Colorado’s first mining districts. Then a gold discovery at Grasshopper Creek in the southwest corner of presentday Montana triggered a major rush into the isolated mountainous region some 700 miles north and west of Denver City. The Grasshopper Creek/ Bannack gold strike of 1862 was followed by Alder Gulch (and Virginia City and Nevada City) in 1863, then Last Chance Gulch in 1864 where the town of Helena soon developed. There was no easy way to get to the Montana goldfields. Prospectors traveled on foot, horseback, wagon or endured the brutal nine-day stagecoach north from Salt Lake City. Freight wagons from Salt Lake City − drawn by teams of 12 to 16 horses, mules or oxen – travelled as long as three months to bring goods, supplies and mining equipment to the goldfields. Alternatively, the MontanaIdaho Transportation steamboat line brought goods up the Missouri River; then wagons labored for two months from the Fort Benton river port southwest over the Northern Overland Wagon Road to finally reach the southwest Montana mining districts. There, placer miners used gold pans, sluice boxes and hydraulic techniques to remove gold from the creeks, streams and rolling hills. By 1870, placer mining had removed the richest ore deposits: the booms at Bannack, Virginia City and Nevada City had flickered out. The high, dry climate and decades of neglect left these “ghost towns” pretty much unchanged. Now preserved and re-

The birth of Montana

Gold panning at Nelson Gulch, near Helena. Like Colorado, Montana was birthed by a gold rush.

Photo courtesy of Denver Public Library – Western History Collection, X-60187.

stored, they are fascinating visitor destinations that depict the earliest days of America’s Mining West. Last Chance Gulch, on the other hand, grew into the Helena, “Queen City” and Montana’s state capital. In the first years of the 1800s, the vast region that is now Montana had been traversed and documented by the Lewis and Clark expedition. In the early 1860s, most of the territory still remained the domain of numerous native tribes. Military forts helped protect the uninvited gold seekers and other settlers; some forts also functioned as trading posts. Withstanding white settlement, military persecution and unfair treaty agreements, the Crow, Cheyenne, Assiniboine, Black Feet, Gros Ventre, Kootenai, Chippewa and Cree each occupies reservation lands in Montana today. By the 1860s, more than 30,000 settlers had arrived in search of gold or mercantile profit, nearly all of European extraction and mostly male. Miners from Colorado, Idaho and California made their way to the

remote southwest Montana mining districts. The most notable arrival from Colorado was William C. Clark, who got his start in mining in 1862 at the Bobtail Mine in Central City. When Clark heard word of the gold strike on Grasshopper Creek, he set out with a couple of companions and a wagon full of goods. “Our motto was Bannack or Bust,” he later recalled. Author-historian Bill Dedman describes how, “Clark and two prospector friends left Colorado with two yokes of cattle, a light Schuttler wagon, picks, shovels, gold pans, fresh vegetables, and the certainty that they’d get rich if anyone could.” Departing Central City on May 4, 1863, they journeyed to Fort Bridger in southwest Wyoming, then northward. The 700-mile trek took 65 days. Clark later described the flood of humanity he encountered on his way to the gold strike, “We found some stampeders on the way, some of them afoot, others on horseback, and all we

had to do was to follow the crowd.” Clark and his comrades reached Bannack on the eve of the Fourth of July. They commenced placer mining, and by the time winter set in they had accumulated several thousand dollars each in gold dust. Clark wintered over in Bannack, which he remembered as “a lively place... The gambling houses were open, where they were running a Spanish game with expert Spanish women.” Mining activity dwindled during the frigid winter, so Clark hauled wood for a hotel owner, earning $2 per day plus meals. Then he prospered by hauling goods from Salt Lake City to the mining towns – flour, butter, tobacco and eggs. Eggs were especially prized, selling for $3 apiece as a coveted ingredient for “Tom and Jerry” rum eggnog. During their transport journey, Clark and his crew shoveled snow for seven days in row, on the way passing wagons with oxen frozen in their tracks. Next, the nimble entrepreneur secured a lucrative government contract in 1867. He delivered the U.S.

mail from the steamboat port of Fort Benton, Mont., to Walla Walla, Wash., a rough and rugged 600-mile route that required a series of “ponies, riders boats and waystations.” “There was no lack of opportunities for those who were alert to making money,” Clark wrote in his journal, a sentiment that he applied to his professional life with huge success. By the 1890s, William A. Clark had become fabulously famously wealthy from commerce, banking, Butte copper mining and railroad building. President Abraham Lincoln signed the act that carved Montana Territory 150 years ago on May 26, out of the eastern half of enormous Idaho Territory. Lincoln appointed Sydney Edgerton of Ohio as territorial governor, and the president selected Virginia City as the territorial capital. By the time Montana achieved statehood in 1889, Bannack, Virginia and Nevada City were withering. Helena won the contested honor of state capital, beating out its rival, the copper mining town of Butte. Butte, however, went on to become Montana’s largest city in the early 1900s and the largest copper mining center in the world. The railroads finally reached Montana in the 1880s to serve the mining industry. Railroad transportation also encouraged homesteading settlement, agriculture and stock raising especially on Montana’s eastern plains. Unlike Colorado, Montana has remained sparsely populated, only last year achieving one million yearround residents. Harsh sub-zero winters discourage residency. As on Colorado’s Eastern Plains, drought and severe blizzards have hampered farming and cattle ranching. Nevertheless, agriculture (especially wheat production) and stock raising, remain the state’s foremost industries. Billings and several eastern Montana counties now enjoy a robust economy thanks to oil and gas drilling, production and refinement. Like Colorado, summer tourism is a strong with visitors to Glacier National Park, Yellowstone Park from the Montana-Wyoming border and the restored “ghost towns” of Bannack, Virginia City and Nevada City.

The Montana State Historical Society assists in preserving and curating Virginia City and Nevada City. Virginia City has a handful of residents today, while Nevada City is a ghost town. Photos by Cathleen Norman


May 29, 2014 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • PAGE 11

— Legal Notices—

NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2014-0228 To Whom It May Concern: On 3/6/2014 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County. Original Grantor: LOUIS R TRUJILLO Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 8/23/2005 Recording Date of DOT: 8/30/2005 Reception No. of DOT: 2005146970 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $91,000.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $91,000.00 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to make payments of principle and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOTS 45 AND 46, BLOCK 3, GREENWOOD ADDITION TO ARGO PARK, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 4684 4686 Pennsylvania Street , Denver, CO 80216 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, July 3, 2014, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 5/8/2014 Last Publication: 6/5/2014 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 3/7/2014 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC JENNIFER M GRIEST Colorado Registration #: 34830 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201 , DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone #: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax #: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney File #: 13-07973 Published in the Denver Herald First published May 8, 2014 Last published June 5, 2014 Legal #: 2014-0228 _________________________________ PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2014-0239 To Whom It May Concern: On 3/13/2014 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County. Original Grantor: JUAN B HERNANDEZ

AND OFELIA A HERNANDEZ Original Beneficiary: U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 1/8/2003 Recording Date of DOT: 1/28/2003 Reception No. of DOT: 2003014656 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $162,000.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $147,184.70 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 7, BLOCK 3, PARKFIELD FILING NO. 9, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO. **LOAN MODIFICATION AGREEMENT RECORDED 5-6-2010 AT RECEPTION #2010049936.** Which has the address of: 15636 East 51st Place , Denver, CO 80239 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, July 10, 2014, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 5/15/2014 Last Publication: 6/12/2014 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 3/18/2014 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: RANDALL S MILLER & ASSOCIATES, P.C. MILNOR H SENIOR Colorado Registration #: 7226 333 WEST COLFAX AVENUE SUITE #450, DENVER, COLORADO 80204 Phone #: (720) 259-8626 Fax #: Attorney File #: 13CO00194-1

said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to make payments of principle and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: ATTACHED HERETO AS EXHIBIT ‘A’ AND INCORPORATED HEREIN AS THOUGH FULLY SET FORTH. **SCRIVENER’S ERROR AFFIDAVIT RECORDED IN THE RECORDS OF DENVER COUNTY COLORADO ON JANUARY 30, 2014 AT RECEPTION NO. 2014009939 TO ADD THE LEGAL DESCRIPTION.** Which has the address of: 2831 Umatilla Street , Denver, CO 80211 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, July 17, 2014, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 5/22/2014 Last Publication: 6/19/2014 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 3/18/2014 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC JENNIFER M GRIEST Colorado Registration #: 34830 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201 , DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone #: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax #: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney File #: 14-00380 Published in the Denver Herald First published May 22, 2014 Last published June 19, 2014 Legal #: 2014-0246 _________________________________

BROKERS CONDUIT Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON, F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS OF THE ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 200555CB, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-55CB Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 7/13/2005 Recording Date of DOT: 7/27/2005 Reception No. of DOT: 2005125351 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $203,000.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $202,690.23 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to make payments of principle and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOTS 9 AND 10, BLOCK B, SUBDIVISION OF PART OF BLOCK “B” IN RICHTOFENS ADDITION TO MONTCLAIR, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 1176 Poplar Street , Denver, CO 80220 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, July 17, 2014, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 5/22/2014 Last Publication: 6/19/2014 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 3/20/2014 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee

Original Grantor: JOY L HARRIS Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: MIDFIRST BANK Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 8/1/2007 Recording Date of DOT: 8/15/2007 Reception No. of DOT: 2007128225 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $233,856.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $213,663.13 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to make payments of principle and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: THE EAST 30 FEET OF THE WEST 62.5 FEET OF LOTS 16, 17, 18, AND 19, BLOCK 2, SAN RAFAEL ADDITION TO DENVER, EXCEPT THE NORTH 4 FEET OF THE EAST 30 FEET OF THE WEST 62.5 FEET OF LOT 19, BLOCK 2, SAN RAFAEL ADDITION TO DENVER, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO. **CORREECTIVE AFFIDAVIT RE: SCRIVENER’S ERROR RECORDED AUGUST 21, 2012 AT RECEPTION NO. 2012112838 TO CORRECT LEGAL DESCRIPTION.** Which has the address of: 929 East 23rd Avenue , Denver, CO 80205-5110

Will sell the following vehicles if not claimed within 30 days of the first publication of this notice: 1) 06 Chyrlser PT Crusier Silver Vin# T357731 2) 09 Dodge Van White Vin # R575337 3) 96 Dodge Intrepid Silver Vin # H2912233 4) 93 Ford Escort White Vin # W382569 5) 88 Ford Winnebago Beige Vin # HB38951 6) 04 Chrysler Town Country White Vin# R597123 Published in the Denver Herald First published May 8, 2014 Last published June 5, 2014 Legal #: DHD 035 ________________________________

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Denver Probate Court Denver County, Colorado Court Address: 1437 Bannock Street, Denver, CO 80202 In the Matter of the Estate of Enes E. Steiner a/k/a/ Enes Steiner Deceased Attorney or Party Without Attorney Karen L. Brady Karen Brady & Associates, P.C. 5400 Ward Road V-170 Arvada, CO 80002 Phone Number: 303-420-2863 E-mail: kbrady@coloradoestateplanning.com FAX Number: 303-424-2599 Atty. Reg. #: 18324 Case Number: 2014PR30484 Division Courtroom NOTICE TO CRDITOR BY PUBLICATION PURSUANT TO 15-12-801, C.R.S. NOTICE TO CREDITORS

NOTICE OF SALE

Estate of Enes E. Steiner a/k/a Enes Steiner, Deceased

The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

Case Number 2014PR30484 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, July 24, 2014, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado On or before September 15, 2014, or the claims may be forever barred. Luke R. Schmieder 14595 W. 58th Place Arvada, CO 80004 Published in the Denver Herald First published May 15, 2014 Last published May 29, 2014 Legal #: DHD 036 _________________________________

Dated: 3/27/2014 Debra Johnson

PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2014-0246

DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is:

To Whom It May Concern: On 3/17/2014 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County.

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The covenants of

To Whom It May Concern: On 3/27/2014 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County.

Broncos Towing 303-722-3555 Owner: Joe Gallegos 1534 W. Bayoud Ave Denver, CO

First Publication: 5/29/2014 Last Publication: 6/26/2014 Publisher: Herald Dispatch

Published in the Denver Herald First published May 15, 2014 Last published June 12, 2014 Legal #:2014-0239 ________________________________

Original Grantor: WILLIAM VAN STRAATEN AND JAN VAN STRAATEN Original Beneficiary: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 5/6/2008 Recording Date of DOT: 5/7/2008 Reception No. of DOT: 2008062721 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $417,000.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $385,655.48

PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-1563

To Whom It May Concern: On 3/19/2014 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County.

The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC CYNTHIA LOWERY-GRABER Colorado Registration #: 34145 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201 , DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone #: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax #: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney File #: 11-02465R

Original Grantor: MARK ALAN ANDERSON Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN

Published in the Denver Herald First published May 22, 2014 Last published June 19, 2014 Legal #: 2014-0256 _________________________________

PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2014-0256

THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC JENNIFER M GRIEST Colorado Registration #: 34830 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201 , DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone #: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax #: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney File #: 13-06759 Published in the Denver Herald First published May 29, 2014 Last published June 26, 2014 Legal #: 2013-1563 _________________________________

NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE OF SALES

— End of legals —


PAGE 12 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • May 29, 2014

Free outdoor movie series returns to Infinity Park 7th annual Monday Movie Madness begins June 9

T

he Seventh Annual Monday Movie Madness series is back this summer with another lineup of free movies shown in the Stadium at Infinity Park that is sure to please everyone in the family. As has become tradition, viewers have voted on and chosen the six movies that will be shown this year, some of which are recent box office hits combined with several classic favorites. Monday Movie Madness has become extremely popular with more than 550 percent growth in attendance over the years since it started. Monday Movie Madness begins on June 9 with everyone’s recent favorite flick, Frozen, followed by The Lego Movie on June 23. The classic hit from 1988, Big, starring Tom Hanks, will be shown on July 7. Fans can see the original Mary Poppins, starring Julie Andrews and Dick Van Dyke

on July 21. Aug. 4 brings Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory starring Gene Wilder to the big screen and to close the series on Aug. 18, the voter’s favorite year after year, will be The Princess Bride. New this year, Infinity Park has partnered up with Brigand Pictures to add an Independent Filmmaker Short Film Contest with the six finalists’ short films showcased immediately prior to each Monday Movie. With film submissions from around the world, a panel of judges has been tasked to review them and vote on their favorites. The winners of the film contest will be shown immediately prior to the feature movie at 7:45 p.m. All of the feature movies begin on the jumbo screen at 8 p.m., with the gates to the stadium at Infinity Park opening at 7 p.m. For more information on Monday Movie Madness or Infinity Park, visit www.infinityparkat glendale.com.

2014 Ford Escape Titanium AWD goes places By H. Throttle Ford’s motto “Go Further” is pretty practical, and so is owning a Ford car or pickup. I’ve driven a Ford car for the past 14 years, so I am maybe a little biased in this report about this great American iconic company, but Ford is one of the great American brands, like Coca-Cola. There is a Ford dealership in almost every town of any size in America; they dot the landscape and it was Henry Ford’s dream to have a car that the working people of America could own, drive and enjoy. His dream came true many years ago with the family dominated car empire. Ford hit a huge home run with their eco-boost engine technology a few years ago whereby they turbocharged an overhead valve 4-cylinder engine and created a power plant that could produce a very hefty drive and also provide fuel economy to match.

The Ford Escape averages 24 mpg, easily operating with a sixspeed transmission. Many Ford products are now pushing out toward 40 mpg that can challenge any of the hybrid products without the batteries. The Escape is nimble, handles well on the freeways, and has a good feel and ride. I would suggest a little more carpeting to ease the road noise that seemed a little loud at times. Stylish, smart-key entry, all the modern bells and whistles, a really good rear camera that gives a sharp image to the back of the vehicle. The Escape is a safety award winner and has almost perfect safety records with top ratings in all categories. The Escape is list priced at $35,030 and no doubt Ford dealers will do there best with special pricing and terms to put Americans in Henry Ford’s mission of having a working family own a good car.

The 2014 Ford Escape Titanium AWD has list priced at $35,030

2014 Tiguan SE is pure Volkswagen By H. Throttle The “People’s Car” was developed in Germany prior to World War II had a similar theme to that of Henry Ford who wanted all American working families to have a Ford car. The Volkswagen “bug” has been around for a long, long time and that distinctive style still are on the roadway, but powered by larger engines mounted in the front rather than the rear of the VW vehicles. Interesting Porsche is now owned by Volkswagen, that is the tail wagging the dog. The German car manufacturer is now the largest car manufacturer in the world with German top quality and engineering. The Tiguan is an all-wheel drive suburban style vehicle that is fully equipped with all-weather equipment and perfect for Colorado weather. Priced at $28,950, the Tiguan is

modestly priced compared to other outdoor AWD vehicles. A 4-cylinder turbo-charged engine produces 200 horsepower and 28 miles per gallon on the highway using a six-speed variable transmission and an S turbomode. Fun to drive – the Tiguan is nimble, has a fine ride, precise steering and comfortable leather covered seats. Heated outdoor mirrors and front seats provide warmth for sudden Colorado weather tantrums. Volkswagen needs to use a smart key rather than the key device for easy vehicle entry and start. Seat belt receptacle is much higher and easier to buckle than most vehicles. The name is hard to remember and spell, but the vehicle performance is top-notch and this vehicle warrants a close consumer look.

The 2014 Volkswagen Tiguan is modestly priced at $28,950.

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