Issuu on Google+

50¢ • Vol. 92 • No. 37

September 5, 2013

What’s Inside w

NEWS

Community Ministry 5k Run/ Walk Sept. 14 PAGE 2

history

Great photographers capture spirit of early Colorado PAGE 5

school

DCIS at Fairmont celebrates ribbon cutting with international flare PAGEs 6-7

INDEX Opinion..................................3 WORSHIP DIRECTORY.............8 CLASSIFIEDS...........................9 HOROSCOPES..........................9 LEGALS...........................10 - 11

Sheridan celebrates Haraldsen as parade’s rand

gmarshal

Submitted by City of Sheridan 2013 is the year that “Sheridan Celebrates Military Heroes,” and there has been just such a veteran participating in the parade for more than 20 years. Ken Haraldsen has driven the little locomotive in the Sheridan Celebrates parade representing the Englewood Lions. But he represents far more than that. He is a true military hero whose service to this country spans more than 40 years. Enlisting in the Army Air Corps in 1942, his dream of being a pilot was dashed when he could not pass the color-blindness test. He became a mechanic instead and later a warden at an overseas prisonerof-war camp along the Rhine River. He joined the reserves after his release from active duty in 1946. When the Air Force was formed in 1947, he became part of that organization. During his tenure in the Air Force, he was cross-trained as a medic and assisted thousands of Vietnam veterans returning to Fitzsimmons in the late 1960s. Later, he moved to the Air Force Academy working in the emergency room and making ambulance trips. His formal theological college instruction at Central Bible College in Springfield, Mo, gave him the compassion and courage that was required for his long-term military service. Haraldsen proudly states, “I’ve saved six lives.” He retired from the Air Force in December 1982. Locally, Haraldsen was employed at the Englewood Post Office for 27 years and is a 25-year member of the Englewood Lions Club. After spending a couple of summers as an engineer for the kiddie train in Belleview Park, Haraldsen thought, “Wouldn’t it be nice if we could have a train in the parade?” So he made it happen. In 1990, he partnered with the Englewood High School shop class and constructed the little locomotive that appears each year in the Sheridan Celebrates parade. Haraldsen’s story will soon be elevated to “star status,” as he was recently interviewed for a History Channel special on World War II veterans. Don’t miss your chance to meet this amazing man at this year’s Sheridan Celebrates parade and festival held on Saturday, Sept. 28. The Sheridan Celebrates Committee welcomes Haraldsen as Grand Marshal and invites all active and veteran military men and women to participate in the 2013 parade.

Air Force veteran Ken Haraldsen will be grand marshal of the 2013 Sheridan Celebrates parade on Sept. 28. Photo courtesy of City of Sheridan

The annual Sheridan Celebrates parade route will run from the intersection of Lowell Boulevard and Nassau Court to Sheridan High School. Graphic courtesy of City of Sheridan

If you would like to participate by walking in the parade, send your name, email address, phone number and dates of military service to jray@joimail.com. If you need some sort of accommodation to take part in the parade, indicate this as well. If you have suggestions or ideas, post them on the Sheridan Celebrates Facebook page or call 303438-3321.

Englewood to fight ruling on sex offenders ACLU says residency law violates state Constitution By Peter Jones Convicted sex offenders may not want to house hunt in Englewood yet. The city has announced it will appeal a federal judge’s ruling that Englewood’s strict limits on where offenders can live pre-empts the state Constitution. “Because the state does not provide any protection for cities, we were basically forced to do that on our own,” Deputy City Manager Michael Flaherty said. “If the state had a law in place as 21 other states do, we would not have had to do this.” The controversial city ordinance makes it a crime for sex offenders to live within 2,000 feet of any school, park, or

playground, and within 1,000 reintegration of sex offenders feet of any licensed daycare during and after their prison senfacility, recreation center or tences. swimming pool. “Few sex Such individuals offenders also cannot live are incaron any property cerated for adjacent to a life,” Jackson bus stop, walksaid. “Most to-school route will at some or recreational point return trail. to the comTwo weeks munity, and ago, U.S. Disthere must trict Judge R. be a place for Brooke Jackson them to live.” ruled that the On Aug. ordinance has 26, the left sex offend- - Englewood Deputy City E n g l e w o o d ers with virtu- Manger Michael Flaherty City Counally no place to cil decided live in the city it would and is in violation of the state’s appeal the decision largely on interest in the uniform treatment, the grounds that there is no spemanagement, rehabilitation and cific state law prohibiting the

If the state had a law in place as 21 other states do, we would not have had to do this.

ordinance. “There is no mention anywhere that says anything about where a sex offender – including the most egregious offender – may or may not live,” Flaherty said. That fact is quickly conceded by Mark Silverstein, legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Colorado, which brought the lawsuit on behalf of a convicted sex offender who was issued a summons from the city after he unknowingly purchased a home in a restricted area of Englewood. According to the ACLU attorney, the issue is the state Constitution’s limits on the powers of home-rule cities when there is a compelling statewide interest. “If an issue is clearly about a Continued on page 2


PAGE 2 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • September 5, 2013

303-936-7778 SUBSCRIBE TODAY! Unique, exquisite engraving using a 100-year-old process Foil Stamping * Foil EmboSSing * blind EmboSSing Call to discuss your printing needs: • Announcements • Invitations • Stationery

• Business Cards • Letterheads • Gold Embossing

303-789-9400 phone • 303-789-9401 fax orders@bakerengraving.com 4980 Monaco St., Unit B • Commerce City, CO 80022

Englewood expected to seek support of other Colorado cities Continued from Page 1 matter of local concern, then the city has total power – like deciding what days there’ll be garbage pickup,” he said. “But if a local ordinance winds up having effects outside the community, then it might be regarded as something where the city doesn’t have full power.” The authority of home-rule cities has been tested before. The City of Denver has successfully used its home-rule status to keep its ordinance prohibiting pit bulls after some argued that law would push the breed’s owners into the suburbs. In the case of sex offenders, Silverstein argues, Englewood’s ordinance, as well as similar ones passed in Greenwood Village, Lone Tree and Castle Rock, among others, could have a rippling impact on the entire state, especially if other surrounding cities pass their own policies for where such offenders can live. “The effect of residency restrictions in Englewood means that sex offenders will go to the next town, so the local ordinance clearly has an effect on areas outside the city,” Silverstein said. “In

In Colorado, local communities don’t have the power to pass an ordinance like this. - Mark Silverstein, ACLU legal director Colorado, local communities don’t have the power to pass an ordinance like this. If residency restrictions for sex offenders are going to be enacted, they would be enacted by the state legislature.” Ironically, that is Englewood’s hope, according to Flaherty. He says the absence of applicable state law is part of what prompted Englewood to pass its 2006 ordinance in the first place. Flaherty concedes there are only a handful of pockets in the city where sex offenders can live, but he does not buy the argument

that the situation could create a crisis across Colorado, noting that only six cities have passed similar ordinances. Further, he says, Englewood’s minimal housing for offenders is connected to the city’s size and character, not an intent to prevent all residencies. “Englewood is a small city,” he said. “We’re not a city of highrise residences. We’re almost all single-family homes and we have a number of schools, playgrounds and parks in the city. Because of the circles that are drawn, it does preclude offenders to limited areas.” The number of Englewood residences legally available to sex offenders has been variously estimated at between 55 and 126, though by all counts such individuals cannot buy or rent in 99 percent of the city, Judge Jackson concluded. Englewood is expected to seek the support of other Colorado cities with similar ordinances in its appeal. Because this is the first legal case addressing municipal residency ordinances for sex offenders in Colorado, the case is expected to have wide-ranging impact across the state.

Community Ministry 5k Run/Walk Sept. 14 Community Ministry will host its annual 5k Run/Walk, Sept. 14, at Bear Creek Trail. This is an annual fundraising event for Community Ministry. Proceeds will go to support the efforts of Community Ministry to meet the basics needs of qualified people in southwest Denver who are experiencing economic hardships and related problems. Community Ministry of southwest Denver meets these needs by providing an emergency food and clothing bank. Utilities assistance is provided with funding from Energy Outreach Colorado. School supplies, Christmas gifts for children and Holiday food baskets are also provided by

Pet of the Week

Community Ministry. Event check in is at Dartmouth Place Shopping Center, 5600 W Dartmouth. Parking is available at St. Andrew Presbyterian Church on the NE corner of Dartmouth and Sheridan. Registration begins at 9:30 a.m., 5k Run at 10 a.m. and 5k walk at 10:05 a.m.

MILITARY BRIEFS ___ neros of. He is also the brother of Stephanie Nunez-Cruz of Denver. He is a 2012 graduate of Jefferson High School, Edgewater.

L

ooking for a cat that’s just terrific in every way? Well, here I am! It’s been reported that in the past I was very good with children, very affectionate, and a loving lap cat that likes to cuddle on the couch. I may be a little shy at first, but I always warm up quickly. I’m a big guy at over 18 pounds, I’m eight years old, already neutered and ready to go home today. Let’s meet and see if we’re a match! I am at the Dumb Friends League, 2080 S. Quebec street, Denver and my ID# is A376398. To see my other feline friends available for adoption, please visit ddfl.org.

Spidey

Come on down and hike with your hound!

Don’t miss the ninth annual Wag ‘n Trail on Saturday, September 21, from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Glendale Farm Open Space in Douglas County. Hike the 1.6 mile trail, shop for pet-friendly merchandise, enjoy dog demonstrations and more. Register now and start collecting pledges to help the homeless animals at the Buddy Center in Castle Rock. www.ddfl.org

Prizes will be given to the fastest runners and walkers in a variety of age levels. The event will conclude with a picnic at 11:30 a.m. at St. Andrew This Presbyterian Church. event is open to people of all ages. Registration fee: Children 5 and younger are free; younger than 18 and older than 60, $15 and ages 19-59 is $25. Registration forms are available at www.comministrydenver.org. They are also available at Runners Roost at 437 S. Wadsworth in Lakewood, the Boulder Running Co. on the southeast corner of Bowles and Wadsworth or Community Ministry, 1755 S. Zuni, Denver.

Jackson, Columbia, S.C.  Bell is the son of Scott and Kathleen Bell of Lakewood. He is a 2010 graduate of Bishop Mackebeuf High School.

Indiana Y. Pastor

Pastor graduates basic military training

Air Force Airman Indiana Y. Pastor graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas. Pastor is the son of Scott Pastor of Denver, and Suk Pastor of Firestone. He is a 2012 graduate of Mead High School, Longmont.

Nunez graduates basic combat training

Army Pvt. Samuel V. Nunez has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. Nunez is the son of Regina Nunez of Lakewood, and Arthur Cis-

Michael D. Medina

Medina graduates basic military training

Air Force Reserve Airman 1st Class Michael D. Medina graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San AntonioLackland, San Antonio, Texas. Medina is the son of Toni Gallegos of Thornton, and Dean Medina of Denver. He is a 2010 graduate of Brighton High School.

Bell graduates basic combat training

Army Pvt. Michael P. Bell has graduated from basic combat training at Fort

Kevin M. Riker

Riker graduates basic military training

Air Force Airman Kevin M. Riker graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas. Riker earned distinction as an honor graduate.  He is the son of Michael Riker Lakewood. The airman is a 2012 graduate of Bear Creek High School.


September 5, 2013 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • PAGE 3

– denver –

opinion

herald dispatch

News roundup military action, but that would be costly, lengthy and very political. Best bet, lot’s of talk, no action.

KINDLING

Broncos season returns

By Robert Sweeney

Fall is busy time for busy people A reminder about the upcoming First American State Bank Fitness Festival this Saturday, Sept. 7, at Crescent Park, DTC Boulevard and E. Belleview Avenue. You don’t have to run, but take the kids, let them run, you browse the many food booths.

Broncos facing Ravens in home opener coming up this week. Game will be over by the time this Villager reaches your mailbox. This game will be a real test and indicator of how good the Broncos team is this season. Expect the passing game to emerge in some great long pass completions. We will score for sure, but can we stop the other team from scoring more points? The pre-season indicates that there is some work to be completed. I do think that the Broncos will be throwing many passes this week and we might just win the game?

KINDLING

Syria?

2200 S. Federal Blvd., Unit 6 Denver CO 80219

up in community newspapers. We can deliver news on paper or glass and that widens the distribution of our news products. The Villager can be read anywhere and anytime. Readers can subscribe to both the online and print versions of the newspaper. It broadens the range of the product and really makes a reliable news platform more valuable. It is our goal to continue to make the paper a pleasure to read and something that is useful in community living. Like the Fitness Festival, residents of the area need to be in-

formed about events, government meetings, and we do all of the work bringing the highlights to readers every week. Average life of a weekly newspaper is around 13 days, so the paper sits around the house for everyone to read sometime during the week or weekend. We like your emails and letters so keep them coming. We’ll be covering schools, elections, sports and many news events, as we do on a weekly basis. We are here to help busy people stay informed.

for solutions ONE YEAR Searching / 52 ISSUES.............$30

REMARKS

By Mort Marks

editorial@villagerpublishing.com

MATTHEW ROWLES, Sales, Classified Ads, Legals 303-936-7778 or 720-434-5891 matt@hdnewspaper.com

TOM McTIGHE Production 303-773-8313 x300 production@villagerpublishing.com

By Glory Weisberg Display Advertising, Press Releases,

By Ke

Letters - 3 p.m. Thursday Classified and Legal Advertising, –Noon Friday

VILLAGER VOICES

Letter to the Editor Submissions

CITY/STATE/ZIP: ____________________________________________________________________________________________ PHONE NUMBER: ___________________________________________________________________________________________

By Jim Miller

_________ Exp. Date _______________________________ Visa Card No.__________________________________ MasterCard No_________________________________ _________ Exp. Date _______________________________ Signature ________________________________________________________________________________________ (required if using credit card)

CO

government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.” -Thomas Jefferson

By Chuck Green

SENIORS / ONE YEAR................$25

By Judith Baenen St. Mary’s Academy

. . .“To decide whether we should

have a government without newsGREENER PASTURES papers, or newspapers without a

ADDRESS: _________________________________________________________________________________________________

Check Enclosed

ELIZABETH DENTON HALE, Editor 303-773-8313 x312

Single Copy $.50

NAME: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________

By Estelle Meskin

gerri@villagerpublishing.com

$30 one year MortGLORYUS GOINGS ON CAP Seniors: $25 per year Marks Call for Out of Town Rates is on Periodicals Published every Thursday. vacation Postage Paid in Denver, Colorado. A Colorado Statutory Publication, this week CRS (1973) 24-70 et al. Postmaster: Send address changes to: and his Denver Herald-Dispatch, 2200 S. Federal Blvd., Unit 6, column Denver CO 80219 U.S.P.S. 241-760 ISSN: 1542-5797 will E-mail your submissions to: return on editorial@villagerpublishing.com Sept. 12. Deadlines

DENVER HERALD DISPATCH MailKevin To: Iverson By Shirley Smith 2200 S. Federal Blvd., Unit 6 Denver, CO 80219 Call: 303-936-7778 orSCHOOL MATTERS Fax: 303-936-0994

COLLEGE PLANNING:

Gerri SWEENEY, Co-Publisher 303-773-8313 x307

octaviangogol@aol.com

SUBSCRIBE TODAY! REAL ESTATE FINANCE TODAY

ROBERT SWEENEY, Publisher 303-773-8313 x350

Stefan Krusze, Photographer

The fate of newspapers

The newspaper business is reWill we bomb Syria, no I don’t covering quickly and savvy investhink so. President Obama as a tors who see great potential in the U.S. Senator opposed such unilat- news industry are purchasing larger eral missions. It would seem that dailies. Warren Buffet is among this is a U.N. matter and other many of the intelligent investors. Community weekly newspapers countries need to be involved. We may step up the rhetoric – have fared well but rise and fall By we Robert on theSweeney success of housing and auto but it is highly unlikely that will act alone. Next step might markets. Both have recovered and be to let Congress debate the newspaper-advertising lineage is

(303) 936-7778 Fax: (303) 936-0994

To be published, letters to the editor sent to the Denver Herald-Dispatch must be signed (name must be legible), address and phone number included. Only the name and city will be printed in the paper. When the writer refuses to be identified, it usually means they are attacking something or someone, and this might be OK, but only if their name is attached. Please email your letters to editorial@villagerpublishing. com.

QUOTE of the WEEK “Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.” – Confucius

By J

F

By Sco


PAGE 4 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • September 5, 2013

Hemi V-8 engine powers new Dodge Durango

The list price of the Dodge Durango RT is $35,995.

By H. Throttle Dodge is a household name in the car industry and is teamed up with Italy’s Fiat where these two iconic brands are producing some exciting cars and trucks. The Jeep line and Ram Tough trucks are especially popular in the United States. The new 2013 Dodge Durango RT features real wheel drive that is extra special to drive. Powered with a 5.7 liter V-8 hemi-engine, this baby will move down the highway. The mufflers are fine-tuned and that hemi engine just purrs its way to high speeds. A smooth six-speed transmission gives this unit fine road appeal and performance. It is built on a chassis similar to a Jeep Waggoner and is comparable in size and shape. Eye catching, with Redline two coat pearl paint and black distinctive tire rims, it turns heads. A youth walking by while parking commented “cool car,” while others have also looked over while I was driving this new Dodge. It is a fun drive with a peppy engine and rather large leather covered steering wheel. Kind of a man’s type of vehicle for sure with the leather trimmed seats and louder mufflers. The list price is $35,995 but the preview model had $9,000 worth of special features in navigation, technology features, along with heated everything.

The seats are exceptionally comfortable and easy to adjust. A plastic key inserts into the dash to start the vehicle rather than the smart key button that has become so prevalent in new cars. The key was hard to insert with the steering wheel in the way but a minor detail for engineering to work out. Fuel consumption for the large engine is pretty good averaging around 20 mpg and having a light throttle foot makes for better fuel economy. Looking at newspaper ads, there are some local Denver car dealers offering specials on this Durango as low as $22,989 and that would no doubt be a stripped down model. But, if that included the hemi V-8 engine and the six-speed transmission, it would be the best buy of the century. This is really a good workhorse vehicle that also includes three-row seating.

303-936-7778

SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

Leadership transition for DSE Rotary Hughes becomes president

The leadership team (and board) supporting Hughes’s presidency is comprised of: Ed Meyer John Hughes recently (DSE Foundation Chair), assumed the presidency Courtney Cowgill (Secof Denver Southeast Roretary), John Wetheringtary Club, succeeding Ed ton (Treasurer), Mick Meyer, who then became Richardson (Community head of the Denver SouthService Chair), Dr. Tom east Rotary Club FoundaLarkin (International Sertion Board. Hughes has vice Chair), Gail Lehbeen a member of the John Hughes rmann (Vocational Serclub since 2005, during vice Chair), Mike Grunke which time he has served as Club trea- (Fundraising Chair), Craig Sargent surer for three years, a board member, (Membership Chair), Paul Schlauch and a member of the club Foundation. (Club Administration), Veronica ReHughes has two key foci for his gan (Fellowship), Dr. Jim Stambaugh presidency: fundraising and club (President-Elect), Bob Forbes (Rotary growth. Foundation Chair), and Karen Loeb “Denver Southeast Rotary contrib- (Public Relations Chair). Club memutes about $130,000 annually to ser- bership includes more than 100 active vice projects, both locally and inter- members. nationally, in addition to considerable Hughes is a Colorado native, who sweat equity from its membership. was born in Colorado Springs and atWe must find creative ways to sustain tended Regis high School. He went this huge ‘Service Above Self orien- to Benedictine College in Atchinson, tation’ of our membership, including Kan.,, for two years, and then returned external fundraising and community to Colorado State University, where involvement in our good work,” said he received his college degree in AcHughes. counting and Business AdministraTo stimulate creative dialog about tion. He started his CPA career with this objective, Hughes recently devot- Clifton, Larson, and Allen, one of the ed a club meeting to tabletop discus- largest accounting firms in the nation. sions about ways to achieve this goal. In 1976, he helped form the Levin, The second major objective for Hughes, and Mithuen firm, which 30 Hughes is to grow DSE membership years later merged into the national through the establishment of a satellite firm of Clifton Gunderson, which later club, a relatively new concept in the merged into CliftonLarsonAllen, one Rotary world. of the largest international CPA firms. “This type of club is really a club- John retired from practice in 2012. within-a-club. Members of the satelHughes is no stranger to leaderlite club are actually members of DSE ship positions, as he serves on the Rotary, yet have a reduced dues struc- board of the Colorado Health Foundature, hold separate evening meetings tion, which is one of the largest founwith lower attendance requirements dations in the United States. He is than the weekly DSE meetings, par- also a member of the Board of Health ticipate in DSE functions, and launch One, which is comprised of seven lotheir own projects as well,” Hughes cal hospitals, helping to guide more said. than $85 million in grants annually in Rotary International has been pi- Colorado. John has also served as past loting this form of Rotary membership chair of the South Metro Chamber of in an effort to attract younger mem- Commerce and a past officer (Treabers who may have more limited time surer, Vice-President) of the Colorado and financial resources at this time in Society of CPAs, as well as a Committheir lives, yet want to be engaged in tee position with the American Insticommunity and global service work. tute of CPAs. Katie Ehlis, herself a young execuHughes’s family includes his wife tive with Red Robin, has spearhead- Patti, and three young adult children. ed the launch of the new satellite He and Patti reside in Greenwood Vilclub, known as DSE Evenings (www. lage and are long-term members of All Souls Catholic Church. dseevenings.wordpress.com).


September 5, 2013 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • PAGE 5

Great photographers capture the spirit of early Colorado By Rosemary Fetter

T

he first man with a camera set foot in Colorado in 1853 as part of the Fremont expedition. Accompanied by several wagonloads of bulky equipment, Solomon Nunes Carvahlo produced Colorado’s earliest photographs, stunning views of the Rocky Mountains, Native Americans and landmarks, including Bent’s Fort in southern Colorado. Although the photos were clear, for reasons unknown, John Frémont chose to include illustrations copied from the photos in his memoirs rather than the photographs themselves. Unfortunately, the original plates were destroyed by fire in 1881.

William Henry Jackson, probably the best known of Colorado’s early photographers, took the first photos of Yellowstone National Park.

William Henry Jackson

The best-known early Colorado photographer, William Henry Jackson, became famous internationally for his breathtaking images of Colorado and the American West. A New Yorker and Civil War veteran, Jackson joined the Hayden Geological Survey of 1871, along with painter Thomas Moran, to visually document the wonders of Yellowstone. Jackson’s fantastic images of the Grand Tetons, Old Faithful and the Mount of the Holy Cross helped to convince Congress to create Yellowstone National Park in March 1872. During the 1880s, Jackson kept

a Denver office at 414 Larimer St., later moving to 1609 Arapahoe St., where he named his firm the W.H. Jackson Photographic and Publishing Co. In 1897, he sold his business to the Detroit Publishing Co. and moved to Michigan to work with the firm. For years, he maintained a Denver studio at 433 Colfax Ave., currently the southern edge of the Auraria Campus. Jackson enjoyed a long and fruitful career, living long enough to serve as an advisor for the filming of Gone With the McClure made sure to mark each of his negatives with his signature, which Wind in 1939. Jackson L.C. McClure, one of died in New York City Jackson’s students, took makes his photos easy to identify. This photo was taken on Curtis Street, in 1942, at the age of crisp, stunning cityscapes Denver’s Great White Way. 99, leaving behind thou- of early Denver. sands of negatives. They were divided between including major triumphs, disasters brought him considerable success as and raised his salary to $15/week. the History Colorado Center, which a commercial photographer, and he Rhoads had a reputation for get- and every president who ever visincludes views west of the Missis- was actively involved with the com- ting the best shots regardless – his sippi, and the Library of Congress munity, particularly Denver Rotary, rule was get there first, get the pic- ited the city. He finally retired on his Prints and Photographs Division, and his church St. John’s Episcopal ture and get back to the office. He birthday (with 69 years of service), which has everything else. Church. He retired in the late 1930s, had that knack any good photogra- continuing to travel and visit the but kept his studio to produce prints pher needs, the ability to capture the Denver Press Club, where he was Louis C. McClure from negatives. After his wife died image at the perfect moment, which a regular. After he died in 1975, his Another long-lived Denver in 1946, he closed his studio and wasn’t easy in the days when cam- brother-in-law, Morey Engle, donatphotographer (1867-1957), Louis donated his entire negative collec- eras were heavy and awkward, and C. McClure, studied under Jack- tion to the Western History Depart- the flash bulb had yet to be invented. ed Harry’s considerable collection to son, opening his own studio on ment of the Denver Public Library. But Rhoads endured, capturing the Denver Public Library Western Glenarm Place after Jackson left He died Feb. 26, 1957, just three Denver’s great moments on film, History Department. town. Although not as famous as months short of his 90th birthday. his mentor, McClure had a keen technical eye and talent for produc- Harry Rhoads ing dramatic, sharp quality prints Denver Post photographer Harry of cityscapes (particularly Denver), Rhoads also was capturing scenes landscapes and railroads. The lat- from early Denver for posterity ter, particularly the Northwestern during the first half of the 20th cenand Pacific along the Moffat Road, tury. Rhoads, whose mother was a made up a good deal of his work close relative of the Mellon bankin the early 20th century. He would ing family, was born in Pennsyloften be given a special car, which vania in 1881. When he was six would park at good photographic months old, his family moved to locations along the way. Some- Denver, where he attended West times he brought along friends or High School, and he played footfamily, taking advantage of the op- ball. When he was a senior in high portunity for a mini-vacation when school, he got a job in the circulathe work was done. tion department of the Denver ReMcClure is probably best known publican. On a chilly November for his fabulous cityscape pictures of morning in 1900, the publisher, Denver from the 1890s through the who was in a pinch, asked him to 1920s. His works have been called run out and take a picture of a fire. the most accurate and artistic de- The publisher subsequently added pictions of any American city dur- photography to his workload for ing the City Beautiful era. He had the princely salary of $7/week, a good life, married to the daughter seven days a week, 17-hour days. For more than 60 years, newspaper photographer Harry Mellon of a prominent building contractor, In 1913, the Rocky Mountain News Rhoads captured the evolution of 20th century Denver. John Schrock. McClure’s artistry bought out the Denver Republican

Jackson, took this fabulous photo of Estes Park in the 1870s.

Harry Rhoads clowns around with Mary Coyle Chase, author of Harvey. Photos courtesy of Denver Public Library, Western History Collection


PAGE 6 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • September 5, 2013

September 5, 2013 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • PAGE 7

DCIS at Fairmont celebrates ribbon cutting with international flare

By Elizabeth Denton Hale A dream that has become a reality to many involved, DCIS at Fairmont officially celebrated its grand opening with a ribbon cutting ceremony and performances, Aug. 30. Principal Anne Jacobs was elated that all the hard work put into opening the new school for 2013-14 came to fruition.

Denver Mayor Michael B. Hancock and DPS Superintendent Tom Boasberg congratulated the staff, students and parents, and are both looking forward to seeing the school grow into a success. Dan Lutz founded Denver Center for International Studies in 1985 as a magnet program at Denver’s West High School. The middle and high school moved into its current

location on 6th Avenue in 2006. DPS School Board expanded to two new DCIS campuses in 2011 in far northeast Denver. DCIS Ford Elementary School offers ECE – fifth grades. DCIS Montbello serves sixth and ninth grade students, phasing in full middle and high schools grades over the next three years.

DCIS at Fairmont’s students will automatically feed into the magnet middle and high school on 6th Avenue once completing fifth grade. DCIS at Fairmont serves grades ECE through fifth grade and is located in the historic Baker District in Denver. For more information, visit www.dcisfairmont. dpsk12.org.

DCIS at Fairmont faculty, students, staff and parents gather for the new school’s celebration.

Mariachi Amadeus performs for the DCIS at Fairmont’s ribbon cutting ceremony.

DPS School Board member Landri Taylor, DPS Board At Large – President Mary Seawell, Denver Mayor Michael B. Hancock, DCIS at Fairmont Principal Anne Jacobs, DCIS at Fairmont Principal Anne Jacobs, DPS Chief of Innovation & Reform Alyssa Whitehead-Bust, DPS Superintendent Tom Boasberg, Founding Principal of DCIS Dan Lutz and (front) Tavien Woods, Paola Chavez, Isaiah Powers, Arturo Burciaga Emma Chevallard and Caylen Holleman cut the ribbon to officially celebrate Denver Center for International Studies at Fairmont’s opening, Aug. 30. Caleb Chavez and Aaliyah Casias lead the Pledge of Allegiance.

ECE students Ethan Rains-Thomas, Lucielle Lebowitz, Bailey Fastner and Zion Youde wave flags representing different countries around the world prior to the ribbon cutting. Colorado Speaker of the House and Baker resident, Mark Ferrandino, expresses his excitement and welcomes DCIS at Fairmont to the neighborhood. Owen McMann, Jahovie Hunter, Alexis Rascon Camacho, Brooke Salazar, Assistant Principal Mayorvy Cifuentes, Yareli Chable, a nd Ayleen Rascon Camacho (front). The students were picked by their teachers to greet dignitaries and parents toaDCIS at Fairmont’s ribbon cutting celebration, Aug. 30. DCIS at Fairmont Principal Anne Jacobs welcomes everyone to the new international school in Denver. The elementary school students will feed into the DCIS middle and high school.

Denver Indian Singers and Drum Group perform at the ribbon cutting. Denver Mayor Michael B. Hancock commends DCIS at Fairmont and welcomes the new school to the Baker community.

Grupo Folklorico Sabor Latino, Yanis Parra, Arturo Curiel, Monica Nichol and Lorenzo J. Ramirez, director of the dance company, get ready to perform.  Photos by Elizabeth Denton Hale


PAGE 8 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • September 5, 2013

Free InnovAge prescription, transportation programs offer help to low-income seniors Low-income seniors in Colorado have easier and more affordable access to vital medications and transportation services thanks to InnovAge, a Colorado nonprofit organization that serves as the comprehensive resource for Colorado’s aging population. InnovAge offers free and fee-based programs to help older adults. InnovAge provides a full spectrum of affordable fee-based ser-

vices including healthcare and day programs, care management, memory loss programs and home care services to enable older adults to live independently in their homes and communities. InnovAge also provides a variety of resources at no charge through InnovAge Home Care. The InnovAge Prescription Assistance Program helps seniors navigate the complex, expensive

and often frustrating prescription drug system. As a part of the Prescription Assistance Program, InnovAge Home Care works one-on-one with seniors to help them identify the best solutions to their unique prescription medication needs. The InnovAge Team helps low income seniors apply for low or no cost prescription drugs through foundations and pharmaceutical companies.

Eligibility is based upon monthly income, medical diagnosis and prescription drug requirements. The InnovAge team works with eligible senior to identify and apply for options or programs and is there to help them through the entire process until they have the medication in their hands. The InnovAge Transportation Program provides free transportation to low-income seniors

living in Denver and Aurora. While the program is free to qualifying seniors, donations are accepted and appreciated. The program helps get seniors to and from medical appointments and the grocery store. For more information about the free programs provided by InnovAge Home Care, call 855-487-6768 or visit www.MyInnovAge.org.

Calendar of Events

Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to editorial@villagerpublishing.com.

Arts/Entertainment Swallow Hill Music concerts through Sept. 15

Concerts begin at 8 p.m., unless otherwise noted, 71 Yale St., Denver. Sept. 6, Ben Sollee and A.J. Croce Sept. 7, Trout Steak Revival w/ Birds of a Feather Sept. 12, Shawn Mullins w/ David Berkeley @ L2 Arts & Culture Center, 97.3 KBCO and Twist & Shout present Sept 13, Karla Bonoff with David Berkeley Sept 13, Folk Ragout, World Music Night, KGNU 88.5FM/1390AM presents Sept. 14, The Clay Kirkland Band with The Rhythm Mystics and Trunko, Kirkland and Briggs Sept 14, Darden Smith

Friendship Powwow and American Indian Cultural Celebration

Sept. 7, Acoma Plaza between Denver Art Museum 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway and Denver Public Library. 10 a.m. Gourd dance; noon, Powow Grand Entry. Colorful dance competitions, hands-on activities with local artists, community sewing circle with artist-in-residence Marie Watt in a community sewing circle. Visitors can stop in to see Red, White and Bold: Masterworks of Navajo Design, 1840–1870, on view through Sept. 22. Powwow activities and general museum admission are free. Visit www.denverart museum.org.

‘Death of a Salesman’

Sept. 20 – Oct. 20, The Space Theatre, Tuesday – Thursday, 6:30 p.m., Friday – Sunday, 7:30 p.m., Saturday – Sunday, 1:30 p.m., Stage Theater, Denver Center, 14th Death and Curtis streets, Denver. Arthur Miller’s of a Salesman Pulitzerand Tony-winning drama is the story of Willy Loman, a failing salesman who cannot accept that his dreams for his family are no match for realities of their ordinary lives. This heartbreaking portrayal of the American Dream

explores families, promises and how slowly both can break. Visit www.denvercenter.org.

Mixed Media Show

Through September, Core Annex 900 Santa Fe Drive, Denver, Juried by Patricia Calhoun, Editor-in-Chief, Westword. Sponsored by the Women’s Caucus for Art; 35 artists representing 14 states were chosen by Patricia Calhoun to show their work on the theme of Mixed Media: combining various distinct visual art media like found object, traditional painting, graphite, altered books, assemblage, collage, decollage; these artists show a wide range of interpretations and integration. Visit www.corenewartspace. com, or call 303-297-8428.

Events

Denver Food and Wine

Through Sept. 9, various times and locations. The popular event attracts more than 5000 food and wine lovers who can sample foodie fare from 40 local restaurants and taste more than 600 samples of wine and spirits on the campus of Metropolitan State University of Denver. The entire culinary, wine and spirits classic is presented by US Foods and US Foods Food Fanatic Magazine. Top sponsors are Southern Wine and Spirits of Colorado and the Colorado Restaurant Association and The Lincoln Motor Company. www.denverfoodandwine.com.

Long’s Peak Scottish-Irish Festival

Sept. 5 – 8, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. daily with musical acts nightly Stanley Park Fairgrounds, 1209 Manford Ave., Estes Park. Festival Parade Sept. 8, 9:30 a.m., beginning with the new Highlander 5K race. Registration open online. Tickets and info: 1-80090-ESTES, www.scotfest.com, through Ticketwest at any King Soopers location. Children ages 4 and under admitted free.

Vail Automatic Car Auction Preview

Sept. 6, 4 p.m., Car Viewing & Cocktail

Reception, 6:30 - 8 p.m., Auction, Eagle. Free admission, cash bar, food, live music. Great line up of both reserve & non-reserve cars Proceeds from the sale of the nonreserve, 1985 XJ6 Jaguar Vanden Plas will sell at any price and proceeds from the sale of will directly benefit Jack’s Place at Shaw Regional Cancer Center. The auction will also includes other items such as a $500 Gift Certificate to Vail Discount Tire, automobilia, and a necklace from The Golden Bear, Proceeds from the sale of the necklace will directly benefit Eagle Valley Senior Life. www.vailautoshow.com

Jim Gill at DPL

Sept. 7, 2 p.m., Central Library B2 Conference Room, 100 W. 14th Ave., Denver. The award-winning musician and author is bringing his Family Room Tour to Denver Public Library. He will strum energetic rhythms on his banjo while everyone claps, sings, dances and even sneezes along to the silly and inspiring musical games that he creates. This interactive concert is free to the public and suitable for kid’s birth to three years old. www.denverlibrary.org.

Boulder Tec Job Fair

Sept. 11, 3 – 7 p.m., Boulder Chamber of Commerce, 2440 Pearl St., Boulder. Thirteen companies are looking to fill an array of technical positions covering a wide variety of programming languages and ranging from entry-level positions to senior embedded engineers.

Celebrate Fashion at Cherry Creek

Sept. 12, 5-p.m., Fillmore Plaza, 200 Fillmore St., Denver. In-store events, night of fashion with district-wide, in-store celebrations, a children’s fashion show followed by a runway fashion  show, 9:30 p.m., official After Party,  (231 Milwaukee St.) Purchase event tickets at www.CherryCreekNorth. com.

Antique Appraisal Fair

Sept. 13, noon – 7 p.m., Bemis Public Library, 6014 S. Datura St., Littleton. Bring dishes, jewelry, coins, toys, books, lamps, glassware and other antiques and collect-

ibles to be evaluated by local appraisers. A maximum of two items will be appraised; photos of large pieces of furniture are preferred. Appraisers will explain the history, significance and approximate value of each item. To register for a time slot with appraisers, call the library at 303-795-3961.

ACC Astronomy Program ‘Star Parties’

Sept. 20, Oct. 11 and Nov. 8, 8 – 10 p.m., Littleton Campus, 5900 S. Santa Fe Drive, outside on the West Lawn; between the main building and lot G. Open house format, attendees are welcome to arrive at their convenience. ACC will provide a telescope, free and open to the public (no RSVP necessary). Free hot cocoa and cookies will be served. Contact jennifer.jones@ arapahoe.edu or 303-797-5839.

Hop, Skip and Jump Start

Sept. 22, 5K 9 a.m., other events, 10:15 p.m., 2121 Children’s Museum Drive, Denver. Family fitness event dedicated to promoting healthy habits and lifestyles in a kid-friendly way, offering multiple races and events for every member of the family. Includes stroller-friendly 5K along the South Platte River Trail, mini meets, post race expo. Registration includes bib for the designated event, chip timing (5K only), T-Shirt or onesies (guaranteed for those who register by Sept. 10), post-race snacks, museum admission and event activities. Visit www. childrensmuseum.org.

Fundraisers

Colorado Fall Home Show

Sept 6 – 8, Colorado Convention Center, 700 14th St., Denver. Will showcase more than 300 exhibitors, well versed in home renovation, remodeling and sustainable living. The event is a fundraiser for grants and scholarships for education in the green and agricultural industry. For more information, visit www.GardeningColorado.com.

Hope Center Walk-A-Thon

Sept. 7, 7:30 - 10:30 am, Central Park,

9651 E. Martin Luther King Boulevard, Denver. Register at www.blacktie-colorado. com/rsvp, Event Code: HOPE97.

Aged to Perfection

Sept. 7, 4 p.m., Historic Inn at Hudson Gardens, 6115 S. Santa Fe Drive, Littleton. Features Hazel Miller Band, KMGH news anchor Ann Trujillo. The event will include a silent auction and all proceeds will directly benefit Seniors’ Resource Center. Tickets can be purchased online via www.agedperfectly.eventbrite.com or call Bob Timm at 303-235-6918.

Englewood ‘Operation Christmas Child’ Countdown Event

Sept. 19, 7 – 8:30 p.m., Grace Chapel: 8505 S. Valley Highway Englewood. Local volunteers host a celebration event to kick off the 2013 Operation Christmas Child season. This event is for those who love Operation Christmas Child or for anybody wanting to learn more about the organization. Information at www.samaritanspurse.org or call 303-745-9179.

Golf Tournament for Cancer League of Colorado

Sept. 23, 10 a.m. Shotgun Start, Glenmoor Country Club, 110 Glenmoor Drive, Cherry Hills Village. To reserve a foursome, contact John Snow, js@hackstafflaw.com, 303-534-4317. To volunteer contact Karen White, Karen@kfwhitepmp.com. Must arrive at 8 a.m.

What’s New

Calling Youth Entrepreneurs through age 24

Sept. 21-22, Denver Art Fest, Skyline Park, 16th St. Mall. Bring, hang and sell your art at the Arts Street ClothesLine Art booth. No submission fee; keep all your sales proceeds, or commission an Arts Street youth event manager to sell your art work. Call 303-825-1334, or write info@arts-street. org to reserve a spot and enjoy pancake breakfast.

Advertise your church services for only $12.50 Per week! 303-936-7778 Bethany United Methodist

Brentwood United Methodist

Harvey Park Baptist

Notre Dame Catholic

Trinity Lutheran

3501 W. 1st Ave.

1899 S. Irving • 303-936-3447

WE ARE THE HANDS AND FEET OF CHRIST

2112 S. Patton Ct. at West Evans www.harveyparkbaptistchurch.org

2190 S. Sheridan Blvd. 303-935-3900

4225 W. Yale Ave.

303-936-1001

Sunday Anticipated Mass: 4:00 p.m. Saturday

303-934-7163

E-Mail BethUMC@juno.com

Rev. Bich Thy (Betty) Nguyen, Pastor

www.brentwoodchurchdenver.com

SUNDAY SERVICES

8:45 a.m. - English Language Sunday School Sunday School . . . . . . . .9:30 am 9:45 a.m.- English Language Worship Children’s Sunday School Sunday Fellowship . . . .10:15 am 10:45 a.m.- Fellowship Time for All Sunday Worship . . . . . .10:30 am 11:15 a.m.- Vietnamese Language Worship Nursery Provided on Sunday 11:45 a.m.- Children’s Church Thursday Brown Bag Lunch & 5 p.m.- Spanish Language Worship

Bible Study . . . . . . . . . .11:30 am

Sunday Schedule

Nursery Available

Sunday Schedule: 7:30 a.m. • 9:00 a.m. 10:30 a.m. • 12:00 p.m.

COME JOIN US IN WORSHIP

ALL ARE WELCOME

Religious Education………………..9:30 a.m. Worship Service…………...10:45 a.m.

Missouri Synod

(Between Sheridan and Federal)

303-934-2103 Worship 9 a.m. with Deaf Interpretation 10:30 a.m. Sunday School - all ages 10:30 a.m. Nursery Available Early Childhood Center Child Care and Preschool call

303-934-6160


September 5, 2013 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • PAGE 9

v

Classified Line Ads • Classified Display Ads • Service Directory Ads

CALL 303-936-7778

HELP WANTED Drivers: OTR Hopperbottom for HCT. Great Equipment, Great Pay. No Loading Docks or Lumpers. The best OTR trucking job out there! CDL-A, 2yrs exp. 877-714-2513.

Drivers: Home Nightly! Great Paying Denver Box truck or CDL-A Flatbed Runs. 1yr Exp. Req. Estenson Logistics. Apply: www.goelc.com 1-888-399-5856

Drivers:    
$2,500.00 Orientation Completion Bonus!  
$2,500.00 Driver Referral Bonus!  
Great Pay, Benefits! Excellent Home-time!  
CDL-A OTR Exp. Req. 
Call Now: 1-855-314-1138

SERVICES

VOLUNTEER

Drivers: Super-Regional Dry Van Solo. Home Every 14 days or less. Great Late Model Equipment, all trucks equipped with APU. TX, Midwest and Western 11 Mileage or Percentage Pay, Your Choice! Reliable Company in business since 1985. Call 866-586-5092 for details, M-F 8a-5p. www.highcountrytrans.com

JIM DA PLUMBER. Licensed plumber with 30 years experience. Your neighborhood plumber. Water Heaters, Remodels, Repairs. Reasonable – Free estimates. 303922-2832. THE LEAK FINDER ROOFING REPAIR “I take good care of my customers and your roofing needs.” - George New-Repairs- All types of roofs Licensed Insured - Free estimates. Owner operated and run! Ph: 303-366-7368

VOLUNTEER TUTORS NEEDED for Avid program - JFK High 3-6 hours pr/wk/a.m.  Call Dave 720-423-4452, david_weber@dpsk12.org

WANTED UNWANTED APPLIANCES

 

Drivers: Home Nightly! Great Paying Denver Flatbed! CDL-A or B, 1yr Exp. Req. Estenson Logistics. Apply: www. goelc.com Call 6a-6p: 1-888-399-5856

Painting, Drywall texturing & repair. 25 years exp. Local. Call Bob 303887-3538.

Working or not. Picked up at no charge. Call Kyle at 303-922-6009 Or 720-427-6972.

Immediate Need for Local & Shuttle Drivers-Commerce City! Great Benefits! 401K w/Match, Vacation/Holidays. CDL-A, 1yr exp, good driving record. WW Transport, Inc: 800-936-6770 x144, x111

NORM’S CHEAP FENCE & REPAIR

REAL ESTATE

Drivers: Great Paying Out & Back Openings! Quarterly Bonus! No Forced Dispatch! CDL-A, 2yrs. Exp. Req. Miller Brothers Express, x123, x103:  1-888-984-6809

Wood – Chain Link- Ornamental Experienced – Welding Available Free Estimates Call Norm 303-936-5638 Leave Message

Drivers: Home Nightly! Great Paying Denver Box truck or CDL-A Flatbed Runs. 1yr Exp. Req. Estenson Logistics. Apply: www.goelc.com 1-888-399-5856 Drivers: Local, Shuttle, OTR. Great Benefits! 401k w/Match. Vacation/Holiday Pay. Haul Food Grade Products. CDL-A, 1yr experience, Good Driving Record.  www.wwtransportinc. com or 800-936-6770 x144 or x112

M-F M-F Noon, Noon, 7, 7, 10:30 10:30 pm pm Sat Sat Noon, Noon, 4, 4, 7, 7, 10:30 10:30 pm pm Sun Sun Noon, Noon, 7, 7, 10:15 10:15 pm pm

NEWSPAPER PRODUCTION ARTIST

Southeast Denver newspaper/publishing company seeks experienced and motivated print publication designer for a part-time position. (1420 hours/wk.) Full days on Monday and Tuesday to produce and lay out visually appealing pages for two weekly community newspapers. Position requires knowledge of Macintosh computers and software creating various page layout styles with InDesign CS6 and creating ad designs with Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator. Position works closely with production lead position to meet deadlines. Occasional ad design/update work and other minor desktop publishing duties are required. Only applicants with previous print production/design experience will be considered. Additional newspaper publication, journalism, word press   experience is a plus, and could lead to expanded hours and responsibilities.    This is a “print production” position and NOT for a creative artist. Only applicants who can demonstrate a solid understanding of news design principles and have experience creating informational graphics and/or ads will be considered.  Experienced applicants should send resumes and work samples to:  gerri@villagerpublishing.com.

Colorado Statewide Classified Advertising Network

COSCAN

ToTo place a 25-word COSCAN COSCAN network ad innetwork 100 place a 25-word ad in 83newspapers Coloradofornewspapers Colorado only $250, call for youronly local $250, contact your local newspaper or newspaper today. Contact Matt at 303-773-8313 call SYNC2 Media at 303-571-5117.

EVENTS

HELP WANTED

SALIDA FIBER FESTIVAL September 7-8, 2013. Riverside Park, Salida, CO. The Heart of the Rockies! Dozens of vendors, fiber, fleece, yarns, rovings. Demonstrations and childrens activities! www.salidafiberfestival.org

PAID CDL TRAINING! No Experience Needed! Stevens Transport will sponsor the cost of your CDL training! Earn up to $40 first year - $70K third year! Excellent benefits! EOE 888-993-8043 www.becomeadriver.com

HELP WANTED

REAL REAL ESTATE ESTATE

HIRING Local, OTR & O/O DRIVERS local Driver’s live within 50 miles of Pierce. Class-A-CDL Plus 2 yrs Exp. Pay $53-65k/yr. Benefits, No Touch, Paid/Home weekly, 877-273-3582

BUSINESS FOR SALE Hi Tech Running & Tennis Store located on Main Ave in the Resort Town of Durango, CO. In business for 10(+) years with solid reputation. Turn-key, cash flow operation, $120,000. Owner retiring. Call 970-247-1551

HELP WANTED 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED! Learn to drive for Swift Transportation at US Truck. Earn $750 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks! 1-800-809-2141

SYNC2 MEDIA Buy a statewide 25-word COSCAN classified line ad in newspapers across Colorado for just $250 per week. Maximize results with our Frequency Deals! Contact this newspaper or call SYNC2 Media at 303571-5117


PAGE 10 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • September 5, 2013 LEGAL NOTICES

Legal Notices What are legal/public notices?

“(1) ‘Legal notice’ or ‘advertisement’ means any notice or other written matter required to be published in a newspaper by any laws of this state, or by the ordinances of any city or town, or by the order of any court of record of this state. “(2) ‘Privately supported legal notice or advertisement’ means any legal notice or advertisement which is required by federal, state, or local law or court order which is paid for by a person or entity other than a governmental entity either directly or by direct, specific reimbursement to the governmental entity. “(3) ‘Publicly supported legal notice or advertisement’ means any legal notice or advertisement which is required by federal, state, or local law or court order which is paid for by a governmental entity.” -Legal Publication Laws of Colorado, Colorado Press Association

PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-0783 To Whom It May Concern: On 6/11/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County. Original Grantor: HOLDINGS II LLC Original Beneficiary: JUNGLELAND INVESTMENTS LLC Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: JUNGLELAND INVESTMENTS LLC Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 4/6/2012 Recording Date of DOT: 4/9/2012 Reception No. of DOT: 2012046714 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $55,000.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $55,000.00 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: the covenants of said deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to make payments on said indebtedness when the same was due and owing. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOTS 28, 29, 30, BLOCK 2, DOWNINGS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 3155 Lafayette Street , Denver, CO 80205 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, October 10, 2013, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 8/15/2013 Last Publication: 9/12/2013 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 6/12/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: GADDIS, KIN, HERD & CRAW P.C. JAMES W KIN Colorado Registration #: 1873 118 SOUTH WAHSATCH SUITE #100, COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO 80903 Phone #: (719) 471-3848 Fax #: (719) 471-0317 Attorney File #: HOLDINGSII Published in the Denver Herald First Published August 15, 2013 Last Published September 12, 2013 Legal #: 2013-0783 ________________________________________ DISTRICT COURT, COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO 1437 Bannock Street Denver, CO 80202 Plaintiff: DEVEN PROPERTIES, LLC, a Colorado limited liability company v. Defendants: PASQUALE J. LOSASSO, an individual, JOANN V. SALAZAR, an individual, RICARDO CORTEZ, an individual, AMERICAN UNITED MORTGAGE CORPORATION d/b/a AMERICAN UNITED MORTGAGE OF COLORADO, a Georgia corporation, PUBLIC SERVICEEMPLOYEES CREDIT UNION, d/b/a PUBLIC SERVICE CREDIT UNION, a Colorado nonprofit corporation, THE ESTATE OF NORMA I. ELLIOTT, EUGENE D. ELLIOTT a/k/a EUGENE V. ELLIOTT, an individual, GREENWOOD INVESTMENT GROUP, LLC a Colorado limited liability company, and all unknown persons who claim any interest in the subject matter of this action Attorneys for Plaintiff Robert W. Hatch II Joseph J. Novak Hatch Ray Olsen Sandberg LLC

730 Seventeenth St., Ste. 200 Denver, Colorado 80202 Phone Number: (303) 298-1800 Fax Number: (303) 298-1804 Email Address: rhatch@hatchlawyers.com; jnovak@hatchlawyers.com Attorney Registration Nos.: 16888, 41904 Case Number: 2013CV32766 Division: SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: JOANN V. SALAZAR, an individual, RICARDO CORTEZ, an individual, and all unknown persons who claim any interest in the subject matter of this action. You are hereby summoned and required to appear and defend against the claims of the complain filed with the court in this action, by filing with the clerk of this court an answer or other response. You are required to file your answer or other response within 351 days after the service of this Summons upon you Service of this summons shall be complete on the day of the last publication. A copy of the complaint maybe obtained from the clerk of the court. If you fail to file your answer or other response to the complaint in writing within 35 days after the date of the last publication, judgment by default may be rendered against you by the court for the relief demanded in the complaint without further notice. This is an action to quiet the title of the Plaintiff in and to the real property situate in Denver County, Colorado, more particularly a described below, attached hereto and by this reference made a part hereof. The real property at issue in the lawsuit is generally described as a 4x25 foot strip of land and is legally described as follows: Also a strip of ground 4 feet wide and 25 feet long in the Southwest corner of Lot 20, Block 4, McLeod’s Addition to the Town of Highlands more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Southwest corner of said Lot 20,thence North 4 feet, thence East 25 feet, thence South 4 feet, thence West 25 feet to the point of beginning Dated this ____ day of 2013. HATCH RAY OLSEN SANDBERG LLC By: Robert W. Hatch, II Joseph J. Novak Attorneys for Plaintiff Deven Properties LLC Published in the Westwood. First Publication: August 6, 2013 Last Publication: September 10, 2013 This summons is issued pursuant to Rule 4(g), C.R.C.P., as amended. This form should not be used where personal service is desired. 1 Rule 12(a), C.R.C.P., allows 35 days for answer or response where service of process is by publication. However, under various statutes, a different response time is set forth; e.g., §38-6-104, C.R.S. (eminent domain), §38-36-121, C.R.S. (Torrens registration). Published in the Denver Herald First Published August 29, 2013 Last Published Sepetember 26, 2013 ________________________________________ PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-0803 To Whom It May Concern: On 6/14/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County. Original Grantor: ANGELA RAMOS Original Beneficiary: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 1/3/2011 Recording Date of DOT: 1/14/2011 Reception No. of DOT: 2011006113 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $170,563.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $165,599.51 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to make payments of principle and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 11, BLOCK 2, HARVEY PARK ADDITION FILING NO. 20, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 3070 South Yates Street , Denver, CO 80236 NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, October 17, 2013, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 8/22/2013 Last Publication: 9/19/2013 Publisher: Herald Dispatch

Published in the Denver Herald First Published August 29, 2013 Last Published Sepetember 26, 2013 Legal #: 2013-0838 ________________________________________

Dated: 6/19/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC CYNTHIA LOWERY-GRABER Colorado Registration #: 34145 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201 , DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone #: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax #: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney File #: 13-04086 Published in the Denver Herald First Published August 22, 2013 Last Published Sepetember 19, 2013 Legal #: 2013-803 ________________________________________ PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-0838 To Whom It May Concern: On 6/24/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County. Original Grantor: JOSE M CLARK Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR CHERRY CREEK MORTGAGE CO., INC. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOICATION Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 3/28/2008 Recording Date of DOT: 4/1/2008 Reception No. of DOT: 2008043959 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $122,970.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $126,498.32 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to make payments of principle and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOTS 1, 2 AND 3, BLOCK 8, OAKLAND, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 3690 Locust Street , Denver, CO 80207 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, October 24, 2013, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 8/29/2013 Last Publication: 9/26/2013 Publisher: Herald Dispatch

Dated: 6/24/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC CYNTHIA LOWERY-GRABER Colorado Registration #: 34145 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201 , DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone #: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax #: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney File #: 13-03992

PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-0852 To Whom It May Concern: On 6/26/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County. Original Grantor: THOMAS M WORLEY Original Beneficiary: BCS COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: BCS COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 6/27/2008 Recording Date of DOT: 7/18/2008 Reception No. of DOT: 2008099181 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $132,698.37 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $125,867.22 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: the covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Default has been made in installment due monthly and subsequent installments; principal balance due plus interest.Said Deed of Trust was rerecorded on 5/10/2013, under Reception No. 2013067800. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 16, BLOCK 7, MONTBELLO NO. 33, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 4640 Blackhawk Way , Denver, CO 80202-5698 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, October 24, 2013, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 8/29/2013 Last Publication: 9/26/2013 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 6/28/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: BERENBAUM, WEINSHIENK & EASON, P.C. JAMES R NOTTINGHAM Colorado Registration #: 33230 370 17TH STREET REPUBLIC PLAZA, SUITE 4800, DENVER, COLORADO 80202-5698 Phone #: 1 (303) 825-0800 Fax #: Attorney File #: WORLEY Published in the Denver Herald First Published August 29, 2013 Last Published Sepetember 26, 2013 Legal #: 2013-0852

________________________________________ PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-0865 To Whom It May Concern: On 7/2/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County. Original Grantor: VIVIAN D CHAVEZ Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR UNITED CAPITAL MORTGAGE CORPORATION, AN ARKANSAS CORPORATION Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: MIDFIRST BANK Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 9/24/2001 Recording Date of DOT: 10/1/2001 Reception No. of DOT: 2001165139 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $73,972.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $58,579.62 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to make payments of principle and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: ATTACHED HERETO AS EXHIBIT ‘A’ AND INCORPORATED HEREIN AS THOUGH FULLY SET FORTH. Which has the address of: 1437 Yosemite Street , Denver, CO 80220 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, October 31, 2013, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/5/2013 Last Publication: 10/3/2013 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 7/5/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC REAGAN LARKIN Colorado Registration #: 42309 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201 , DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone #: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax #: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney File #: 13-03986 Exhibit A CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO. 2 YOSEMITE STREET CONDOMINIUMS, ACCORDING TO THE CONDOMINIUM MAP THEREOF RECORDED JANUARY 25, 1995 AT RECEPTION NO. 95000120232 IN THE RECORDS OF THE CLERK AND RECORDER OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, AND AS DEFINIED AND DESCRIBED IN CONDOMINIUM DELARATION FOR YOSEMITE STREET CONDOMINIUMS RECORDED JANUARY 25, 1995. AS RECEOTION NO. 9500010229 AND AS AMENDED BY INSTRUMENT RECORDED FEBRUARY 7, 1995 AS RECEPTION NO. 9500015052 AND AS AMENDED BY INSTRUMENT RECORDS MAY 24, 1995 AS RECEPTION NO. 9500059820, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO Published in the Denver Herald First Published September 5, 2013 Last Published October 3, 2013 Legal #: 2013-0865 ________________________________________

— End of Legals—

303-936-7778

SUBSCRIBE TODAY!


September 5, 2013 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • PAGE 11

R

Family Features

eturning to a school or work routine is bittersweet. Schedules and agendas don’t have to be boring, though, when your lunch routine is anything but. Run-of-the-mill PB&J and turkey and cheese standbys are making way for a new hero: gourmet sandwich creations that inspire envy. Craveable ingredients, like savory green olives, peppery salami and smoky roasted tomatoes can be lunch staples with these delicious recipes. Skip those weekday blues and mix up your lunch with a layer of excitement.

BLT Boats Serves 6 1/2 cup Hidden Valley® Smoked Bacon Ranch Sandwich Spread & Dip, divided 2 cups chopped lettuce, 1/2-inch pieces 1 cup seeded and chopped tomato 1 cup chopped, sliced turkey (about 6 ounces) 6 hot dog buns Crumbled crisp-cooked bacon, optional In medium mixing bowl, gently stir together sandwich spread, chopped lettuce, tomato and turkey. Fill hot dog buns with mixture. If desired, garnish with bacon.

Makes Great Meal Any Way You Stack It

Weekday lunch breakers rejoice — the sandwich is making a comeback. Kick-start your lunch routine with these easy tips and craveable recipes that are sure to inspire lunch envy: Prep the Week: Create a shopping list based on your week’s menu, and prep your ingredients in advance so creating a delicious sandwich is easy. Have a little fun and experiment. Bet you didn’t know that if you put two pieces of bread in the same slot of the toaster, the outside of the bread gets crispy and the inside stays soft and pillowy. Spread the Love: Spice things up with a Smoked Bacon Ranch or Spicy Chipotle Pepper Hidden Valley Sandwich Spread & Dip — it’s a simple addition and guar­anteed to be tasty. For more recipes, visit www.hiddenvalley. com/sandwiches. Nibble Ready: Stock your fridge with quick, grab-and-go snacks and sides. Fresh vegetables are a tasty treat when dipped in Country Herb Ranch or Oven Roasted Garlic Parmesan Hidden Valley Sandwich Spread & Dip. Made with white beans and cream cheese, each tablespoon has one-third the calories of mayonnaise. Cherry tomatoes, broccoli, cauliflower or bell pepper strips also make great dippers. Leftover Magic: Repurpose boring left­ overs into delicious sandwiches to take on-the-go for school and office lunches. Simply add spread and bread. Yesterday’s roast chicken is today’s tasty Chicken Bacon Club. BLT Boats

Veggie Lovers Sandwich with Roasted Garlic

Veggie Lovers Sandwich with Roasted Garlic

Serves 2 1 sourdough sandwich roll, toasted 2 tablespoons Hidden Valley Oven Roasted Garlic Parmesan Sandwich Spread & Dip 8 slices of mixed grilled vegetables, such as eggplant, zucchini, yellow squash, red bell pepper, red onions and mushrooms Freshly grated Parmesan cheese, for garnish, optional Spread both sides of sandwich roll with garlic sandwich spread. Top with layers of grilled vegetables and a sprinkle of cheese, if desired.

Fusion Reuben Sandwich

Fusion Reuben Sandwich

Chicken Bacon Club Sandwiches

Serves 2 2 slices rye bread 2 tablespoons Hidden Valley Spicy Chipotle Pepper Sandwich Spread & Dip 2 slices (2 ounces) corned beef or pastrami 1/4 cup drained sauerkraut 2 slices Swiss cheese Spread one side of each slice of bread with sandwich spread. Top with meat, sauerkraut and cheese. Close sandwich and grill until cheese is melted.

Louisiana-style Muffaletta Sandwiches

Chicken Bacon Club Sandwiches Serves 5 2 cups shredded, cooked chicken 1/2 cup Hidden Valley Smoked Bacon Ranch Sandwich Spread & Dip 10 slices buttermilk sandwich bread, toasted 5 leaves lettuce 1 large tomato, sliced 1 large avocado, sliced Stir chicken and sandwich spread together. Spread 1/2 cup chicken salad on 5 slices of toast. Top with lettuce, tomato, avocado and remain­ing toast to create sandwiches.

Louisiana-style Muffaletta Sandwiches Serves 10 1 16-ounce loaf sweet Italian or French bread, cut in half lengthwise 1/2 cup Hidden Valley OvenRoasted Garlic Parmesan Sandwich Spread & Dip 3/4 pound assorted Italian deli meats, such as ham, salami and mortadella 1/4 pound sliced provolone cheese 1/2 cup sliced green olives Lettuce, if desired Open loaf of bread and spread sand­wich spread on both sides of cut surfaces. Top one side with layers of meat, cheese, olives and lettuce and then close with other side. Slice into 2-inch wide seg­ ments for serving.


PAGE 12 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • September 5, 2013

My new smart personal assistant By Dorothy Rosby f you had told me even five years ago that someday, I would replace my cell phone because it stopped texting, I would have said, “It stopped what?”  But that’s what I did. And I’d do the same if it stopped receiving my email, or keeping my calendar, or letting me play Doodle Jump. I’m joking. I’ve never downloaded Doodle Jump. But I do think I’ve reached a point where I use my phone for non-phone tasks more than I use it for its original purpose. You remember; making and receiving phone calls. That’s because my new phone can do everything except the laundry—and I might find out she does that too once I get to know her better.    You’re probably asking, how I know my new phone is a she. I’ll tell you how: Because she talks. And I

I

don’t just mean, “Please hang up and dial again.” I mean, “Here’s the weather,” and “Should I look that up for you?”  The other day she said, “I think therefore I am, but let’s not put Descartes before the horse.” I’m not making that up. She’s a show off.  Maybe it’s time to do away with the word “telephone” altogether and call our phones, “Smart Personal Assistants Who, Among Their Many Talents, Can Also Make and Receive Phone Calls,” except that’s not very catchy and it takes up a lot of space in an advertisement.  It’s not even 6

a.m. as I write this, and I’ve already used my Smart Personal Assistant six times, and not once to make a call—lucky for you, if you’re on my contact list.  I checked the time, sent a tweet, read my email, and asked her to check the weather for me. When I thanked her, she said, “You’re satisfaction is all the thanks I need.” I think she’s still trying to impress me. She reminded me about a relative’s birthday, so I asked her for the address so I could send a card. I’m still wait-

ing for her to fill it out and mail it for me. If I wanted, I could spend the day with my Smart Personal Assistant, listening to music, hanging out on Facebook, or even watching movies on her, though I’m not sure why I would do that, since I have a television screen the size of Seattle in my basement.  Nor do I necessarily I want to read an entire novel on a device no bigger than a deck of cards, but I could. Or maybe she’d read to me. She does math problems if I ask her to. I wish I’d had her when I was in school.    If I get lost, which I often do, I can ask my Smart Personal Assistant for directions. And if the electricity goes out, I can use her as a flashlight. She’s easier to keep track of than my other flashlights because she rings sometimes.  She’s not perfect though. She tries to correct my spelling, and she’s not as smart as she thinks she

is. When I texted my son that we were going “canoeing,” she guessed I meant “canning.” Clearly she doesn’t know me very well. And she occasionally gets her directions wrong, which is the only thing we have in common. Plus there are a lot of things she can’t do.  She can’t balance my checkbook. She can’t warn me not to back out of the garage while I’m texting. She can’t paint my house. But, she does a lot. And all she asks of me is that I keep her battery charged. That and pay our cell phone bill on time. One wonders what will become of the manufacturers of cameras, alarm clocks, calculators, and all sorts of other devices as more and more people get Smart Personal Assistants Who, Among Their Many Talents, Can Also Make and Receive Phone Calls. And what will become of me if I ever lose mine? (Contact drosby@rushmore.com or see www.dorothyrosby.com.)

Win a 2014 Ford ExplorEr or up to $25,000 in cash! ®

It’s up to you...take the wheels or the cash deal! october 5 at 8:00pm 1,000 cash drawings: 6:00pm, 7:00pm, 9:00pm & 10:00pm

$

25X entries every tuesday 100X entries september 2 receive one free swipe per day and earn additional entries for every 20 unadjusted points september 2 through october 5, 2013.

1-800-THE-ISLE • www.theisleblackhawk.com © 2013 Isle of capri casinos, Inc. Must be 21 years of age or older. Ford Motor company and their respective logos, emblems, slogans and vehicle model names and body designs are trademarks and/or service marks of Ford, its subsidiaries, affiliates or licensors. phil long Ford of denver gave the Isle casino hotel Black hawk permission to use the phil long Ford of denver logo and name as well as permission to use an image of the Ford explorer. actual color and features of car may vary from images shown. Free swipes are not eligible for 25X and 100X entries. activate entries beginning at 4:00pm on the day of the drawing. promotions subject to change or cancellation without notice. please visit player’s club or cashier services for details. Gambling problem? call 1-800-522-4700.


9 5 13 herald combo