Page 1

FIRST BELL

Littleton Public Schools may hit the snooze button

LOPEZ TONIGHT

LOCAL | PG 6

FLEURISH | PG 13

Lebanese foreign minister makes local visit

SCHOOLS | PG 3

S O U T H

BEIRUT LANDING

Comedian to emcee famed Carousel Ball

M E T R O

VOLUME 35 • NUMBER 45 • SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

Since 1982

www.villagerpublishing.com

TheVillagerNewspaper

@VillagerDenver

To win for losing weight In an era in which sedentary electronic “devicing” may be among the greatest obstacles to fitness among young people, leave it to Eesha Sheikh to toss a common assumption into calorieburning headstands. “Why fight the tide? Just move with the tide,” the 26-year-old entrepreneur said. Sheikh means “move” quite literally, by winning one for personal health in the same gaming world that birthed a new generation of cellphone-dependent teenagers. A study published in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity says electronic devices have had a significant and negative influence on cardio-respiratory fitness among college students, concluding “highfrequency users were more likely … to report forgoing opportunities for physical activity in order to use their cellphones.” Sheikh, a Centennialbased millennial, is running circles around such studies, hoping to prove that the answer to such problems as childhood obesity and poor fitness might be found in the same device that houses such apps as time-consuming Facebook, Tinder and Minecraft. But first, Sheikh is playing another game, crowd-

Childhood obesity prompts young entrepreneur to create fitness gaming app

Entrepreneur Eesha Sheikh is preparing to launch a Kickstarter campaign for Keeko, a fitness game she is developing at Innovation Pavilion, a high-tech co-working center in Centennial. She was inspired to create the app by her own difficult battle with childhood obesity. Photo by Peter Jones

funding Keeko, her in-development game app designed to help players reach new levels of health and fitness through their own behavior

and that of a personally designed onscreen character. “It’s all about making exercise fun,” she said. “You’re doing it in a way where your

focus is the game. The right balance of psychology, game design and game theory— that is what is going to set this apart from all the other

apps out there.” And it isn’t just exercise at play. Eating habits and Continued on page 7

LPS takes on bullying and bigotry Superintendent’s letter comes after two suicides and several racially-charged incidents

After a rough start to the 2017/18 schoolyear, Littleton Public Schools

Superintendent Brian Ewert is striving to make clear that the district’s schools should be safe and welcoming places for everyone. “In LPS, we are committed to the ideal that all means all,” he wrote in a Sept. 15 letter to the community. “All students—regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, disability … stu-

make a formal dents who are giftproclamation ed, immigrants, on the matter English-language soon, accordlearners, LGBTQ, ing to board homeless, poor, President Jack affluent and those Reutzel. who may have so“We’re trycial, emotional, ing to emphabehavioral or acasize the point demic challengto our stues—matter.” - LPS Superintendent dents, to our Ewert’s letter Brian Ewert c o m m u n i t y, went out to parents the day after the LPS Board to our teachers that this kind of beof Education informally affirmed havior is abhorrent to us,” he said. its commitment to inclusion, in the “We strive to give everybody a great wake of two back-to-back student education experience and we’re not suicides and several reports of ra- going to tolerate this type of conduct cially motivated harassment in just from anyone.” the first month of the new schoolyear. The board was expected to Continued on page 14

We are committed to providing learning environments that are physically, socially and emotionally safe places for all.


PAGE 2 | THE VILLAGER • September 28, 2017

County clerk presents election updates at GOP forum Arapahoe County Clerk and Recorder Matt Crane was the guest speaker at the Aurora Republican Forum held at the Aurora Association of Realtors in Aurora on Sept. 23. He unveiled updated information on all political party and independent voter registrations, reporting that Colorado ranks first in the nation for the highest percentage of voting-eligible population that is registered to vote [87 percent]. Across the state, Crane’s statistics show 1,221,870 unaffiliated voters at 36.07 percent of all registrations. In second place with 1,055,000 registrations are Democratic voters at 31.14 percent. In third place are Republicans with 1,047,876 at 30.93 percent. An amount of 63,162 registrations make up the difference in other factions, described as “others,” amounting to 1.86 percent of all Colorado voters. Close to home in Arapahoe County, his statistics show unaffiliated voters leading county registrations at 136,462 at 36.16 percent. Second place follows the Colorado trend of Democratic voters at 126,756 reg-

istrations at 33.59 percent. Republicans again in third place at 107,569 at 28.51 percent. “Other” registrations in the county at 6,573. For the purpose of this report, Crane pinpointed Aurora as the largest voting population in Arapahoe County with 62,620 unaffiliated voters at 36.32 percent. Democrats are at 65,435, 37.95 percent, and Republicans are at 41,295, 23.95 percent. “Others” are at 3,085, 1.79 percent. Crane said county ballots would be mailed, by law, 22 days prior to the general election, Tuesday Nov. 7. He is already mailing ballots to armed-services members. Most ballots will be mailed to registered voters beginning Oct. 16. He reported that the county will have four voterservice and polling centers that will open beginning Monday, Oct. 30, operating Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The four locations are the Arapahoe CentrePoint Plaza in Aurora, Byers at Kelver Library, Centennial at the branch office, and the Littleton courthouse. Crane reported that there are no statewide ballot questions on the ballot this year,

which means the county will have to pay for all election expenses with no state contribution. Crane outlined how the vote centers will be open eight days prior to the election. Affiliated voters will only receive a ballot in the mail for their party affiliation. For unaffiliated voters, unless a preference is declared, they will receive ballots for both major parties. They will only be able to participate in voting for one ballot or the other, not both. The county will track which ballot is used. He also advised that there could be more voting changes coming. Political parties are meeting currently to discuss whether to have an open primary, in which unaffiliated voters could choose in which primary to vote. Lastly, Crane reported that Arapahoe County is the first government to deploy kiosks for motor-vehicle registrations and to date has issued 14,500 new registrations since February. The new kiosks are located in Aurora, Centennial and Littleton. Full voting information is available at arapahoevotes. com

A/D Works! celebrates new Workforce Resource Center in Aurora

Arapahoe/Douglas Works! is re-open for business in Aurora. On Sept. 20, the Arapahoe County Board of Commissioners, representatives from the office of U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman and Aurora Chamber of Commerce President Kevin Hougen celebrated an updated and upgraded Workforce Resource Center in Aurora. The new center, located in Arapahoe County’s Altura Plaza, has increased space and added computer terminals. Additional computers enable customers with limited access to technology to compose resumes and cover letters and apply for employment online. The center has also moved to the first floor to provide easier access to all customers. A/D Works! staff

is available to provide strategic directional career guidance to job seekers of all skill levels. Job seekers and businesses can access a broad array of free services year-round, such as career and personality assessments, networking opportunities and industryspecific job training. The experienced staff offers individual assistance with career exploration and planning and has experts for young adults, seniors and veterans seeking employment. The Center is located at 15400 E. 14th Place and is open to the general public, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Workforce centers also are located in Littleton, Centennial and Castle Rock. For more information, call 303-636-1260 or visit adworks. org.

OWL Learning Gala set for Oct. 10 OpenWorld Learning or OWL provides afterschool educational programs for Title I, third-through-eighth-graders who would otherwise not have opportunities for handson technology learning at home. The lessons learned go far beyond just a computer screen—students walk away with leadership skills, confidence and life-long friendships. The gala will be held Oct. 10 at Wings Over the Rockies, 7711 E. Academy Blvd.

in Denver, 5:30 and 8:30 p.m., with Anne Trujillo of 7 Denver as emcee and DU Chancellor Rebecca Chopp as keynote speaker. Standard tickets are $200 per person. Patron tickets are $350 and junior tickets for those 35 and younger are $85 or two for $150. Purchase tickets and sponsorships at OpenWorldLearning.org/gala-auction. For more information contact Lea Ann Reitzig at 720-982-4527 or lreitzig@ openworldlearning.org.

YOUR DREAMS. OUR FOCUS. 11671 EAST BERRY AVENUE

NEW LISTING LISTED AT $1,349,000 • ENGLEWOOD

IN LAKE POINTE ESTATES BACKS TO CHERRY CREEK STATE PARK All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed and should be independently verified. All properties are subject to prior sale, change or withdrawal. Neither listing broker(s) nor Kentwood Real Estate shall be responsible for any typographical errors, misinformation, misprints and shall be held totally harmless.

303.817.0192 Jennifer@MarkusDreamHomes.com MarkusDreamHomes.com


September 28, 2017 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 3

Schools

Littleton Public Schools considers later start times Science suggests teenagers need more sleep

While Cherry Creek Schools adjusts to a later bell for high school students, its neighbor to the west, Littleton Public Schools, is mulling its own options as the scientific consensus increasingly agrees that the teenage brain needs more time to sleep in. Officials continue to seek feedback from students, parents and district staff as the LPS Long-Range Planning Committee considers the merits of delaying high school start times by as much as 70 minutes, creating a ripple effect across LPS’s elementary and middle schools. “People are asking questions about what does this mean for childcare, transportation or activities,” district spokeswoman Diane Leiker said. “The committee is going to be taking all the information and they’re going to be reporting back to the school board in November.” If LPS decides to set back the alarm clock, it would be joining a growing number of school districts across the country that have adjusted their schedules in deference to scientific research. Both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control recommend start times of 8:30 a.m. or later for middle and high school students, though fewer than 20 percent meet that standard with many starting as much as an hour earlier. Multiple studies show when teens get more sleep, it is their grades and standardized test scores that get up earlier—and the lowestscoring students were the ones who showed the biggest jump on their report cards, according to at least one analysis. Lisa Meltzer, a pediatrics professor at Denver’s National Jewish Health, recently presented such evidence to the LPS Board of Education, suggesting that later start times positively affect teenagers’ alertness, mental health and behavior. Since transportation, afterschool activities and the logistics of family life are also considerations, the Long-Range Planning Committee has developed two scenarios, one that would jump the high school start time from its current 7:20 to 8:30 a.m. A second more modest option would ring the first bell at 8:05 a.m. The less ambitious selection strives to balance the science of teenage sleep with the realities of family and school operations, especially within LPS’s finely tuned school-bus systems. An 8:05 a.m. start time would get high school students out of class shortly after 3 p.m., a good half-hour to 45 minutes before their

younger elementary-school siblings would leave their desks. “Having elementary children dismissed earlier than the middle and high school kids was problematic for some families,” Leiker said. “They really need their elementary kids to get out after [for childcare]. Parents have these kinds of concerns every time there’s change. We are committed to making sure we can do all we can to accommodate the needs of our parents.” In contrast, the more ambitious first option would get high-schoolers out of school at about 3:30 p.m., more than 45 minutes after many of their elementary counterparts. The district continues to solicit opinion. So far, more than 30 parent-community meetings have been held, with the next open house scheduled for Friday, Sept. 29, 5-7 p.m., at Powell Middle School. Nearly 6,000 parents, staff and middle and high school students took part in a recent survey about the potential changes, generally showing support in principle for the later school starts, but raising questions at the same time, Leiker said. The district’s efforts come as Cherry Creek Schools implements its own much-discussed later start times this semester. So far, so good, says Abbe Smith, that neighboring district’s spokeswoman. “We’re hearing anecdotally that students are appreciating the extra sleep and we are absolutely going to be looking at data over the course of this year and the coming years to see if there is improvement in academic performance and other indicators like attendance and discipline referrals,” she said. Smith says the district has also been encouraged by a recent study by Rand

Corporation that found later start times not only help academically, but may even make teens safer drivers. The LPS Board of Education is expected to next discuss the issue in November, though it is unclear when a final decision would be made or when any potential changes in the school schedule would be instituted. “It’s very important to the board to make a change early enough to give parents lots of time to adjust,” Leiker said.

Start and End Times - Scenarios

Courtesy of Littleton Public Schools


PAGE 4 | THE VILLAGER • September 28, 2017

The Villager

St. Mary’s Academy welcomes new president

It was a bright and sunny morning Sept. 19 as the new St. Mary’s Academy President Bill Barrett addressed the student body, faculty, trustees, parents and guests in the Academy quad. It was his first public address and was well received. Senior Mariah Horvath was the emcee and Pearl McGivney, Loretto community president, offered the opening prayer. St. Mary’s Academy’s honor choir sang “Let the River Run.” Senior Idali Rodriguez gave the student reflection saying, “No matter what time, what event, St. Mary’s Academy will always have love and hopeful arms for each and every one of their past, present or future students.” President Barratt shared his reflections on his first two months at the academy: “I have seen you be kind to each other, care for each other, serve others, take risks and push yourselves, both in and out of the classroom. You model our Loretta school values of faith, community, justice and respect, and you all have the capacity to be— and some of you already are—leaders and agents of change in a world where we desperately need to work together to show compassion, express empathy, model common decency and find peace.” The world needed to hear president Barrett’s brief remarks as we teeter on the brink of another war, terrible hurricanes and earthquakes. What a treasure that the sisters of Loretto gave to Colorado with the establishment of St. Mary’s Academy 153 years ago. This academy is a blue-ribbon school to be honored, respected and loved, right in the middle of our communities. President Barrett, in his address, told of the warm welcome

Barbwire Bob

This past week started with the courtyard address by new St. Mary’s Academy President Bill Bennett to students, faculty and parents. He will be a welcome addition to the community and to Colorado education leadership. Following the address, there was a reception on the new patio adjacent to the food-service court. There are some very nice additions to the main building and I enjoyed the building tour by Director of Development Charlie Arbogast. St. Mary’s is a Cherry Hills treasure founded by the Sisters of Loreto more than a century ago. It specializes in educating young ladies to achieve great success. The school follows the mission of faith, community, justice and respect. New programs are offering special scholarships to inner-city girls. Students still sit on the floor by their lockers as a school tradition. I did see some stools, but girls were doing homework on the hall floor. Among the guests was one of my favorite Loretto sisters, Sister Lydia Pena, who spent

he received with a huge glass container full of Reese’s peanut-butter cups on his desk and the wildcat paw prints leading to his new office and a photograph of himself posted on the office TV screen. A touch of class from a very classy and smart school, Blue Ribbon all the way. Barrett also showed Bill Barrett the audience a full platter of hundreds of welcome cards he received and said he would treasure them for many years to come. President Barrett shared a Douglas Pagels quote on friendship: “A friend is one of the nicest things you can have and one of the best things you can be.” In his closing remarks, Barrett recited a poem by one of his favorite authors, Mattie Stepanek, who began writing at the age of 3. He had muscular dystrophy, but despite how hard life was for him, he prevailed and continued to write until his passing at 13. The poem was entitled “Resolution Blessing.” The first few lines are very special and go like this … Let our breath be gentle wind, Let our ears be of those who listen, Let our hearts be not ones that rage so quickly, And thus, blow dramatically and uselessly … We welcome President Barrett to St. Mary’s Academy.

Ramblin’ around the corral with Bob Sweeney

many years teaching and working at Regis University and is still going strong helping St. Mary’s and the Havern school. A special thanks to Kathleen Hogan, communication director, who keeps us well informed on school news and activities. *** The Denver Lions Club will be celebrating its 100th anniversary at the Wellshire Events Center Oct. 14 with a banquet observing countless service projects and weekly meetings. Lions serve the blind and hearing impaired, along with many other worthy projects. At one time, they provided milk for Denver school children. They join Rotary who celebrated its 100th anniversary several years ago. At the downtown Maggiano’s luncheon, the program last week was presented by Douglas Jackson, president and CEO of Project CURE located in Centennial. He has more than 25,000 volunteers and sends millions of dollars of new and used medical equipment and

supplies to underserved countries. Many local people volunteer to sort and pack container shipments to those in need, now more than ever with these devastating hurricanes. Jackson is without a doubt one of the best speakers that I have ever heard, and believe me I have heard a lot of speakers in my lifetime. Doug is a real treasure and deserves many honors and accolades for his dynamic work for the underserved. *** My wife Gerri and I enjoyed an excellent sampling of new cuisine at Del Frisco’s last week. The new menu will be out Sept. 28. It includes a 45-day dry aged steak that we found delicious, along with regular prime cuts of steak, chops and fish. There are 53 Del Frisco’s around the nation and the company is listed on the NASDAQ. The restaurant just donated $805,000 to the Houston Food Bank for aid to victims of Hurricane Harvey. The new drinks are a hoot, especially at a noon lunch. ***

I attended an Eagle Bend Golf Club meeting where plans and designs were revealed to club members on a potential remodel of the clubhouse. The $3 million makeover would enlarge many areas that are booked for months already. A great venue for weddings, golf tournaments and meetings that may even be greater if members approve the changes Nov. 8. *** On Sept. 2, I heard Arapahoe County Clerk and Recorder Matt Crane speak to the Aurora Republican Forum outlining the latest registrations in Colorado and the county. There are more unaffiliated voters, with 136,462 just in Arapahoe, followed by 126,756 Democrats and 107,569 Republicans. See the story on page (add number). Ballots for the Nov. 7 election will be mailed Oct. 16—by law 22 days prior to the general election. There are no statewide issues Continued on page 5

Past presidents were pilloried by the press too

“There ought to be a jubilee in the United States on the day Jackson was stung—and stung hard—by Charles Hammond, after the president retires from office.” a Cincinnati editor who wrote, “Ought a convicted adulteress No, no, no, that wasn’t written about President Trump. It was and her paramour husband be placed in the highest office of actually referring to the father of our country, George Washing- this free and Christian land?” ton. He was referring to the circumstances of Jackson’s marriage It was written by Benjamin Franklin Bache, his namesake’s to Rachel Robards. grandson, who was the editor of an anti-federalist newspaper It seems that Mrs. Robards’s divorce from her first husband and went on to accuse Washington of “ostentatious professions was technically incomplete at the time of her second marriage of piety, stately journeying through the American continent in to Jackson, who was convinced that her death before he was search of personal incense”. sworn in as president was hastened by depression over the slanPeople today mistakenly believe that the scandals swirling der. around our president is a new phenomenon inauguJackson “always doubted that any other presidenBY MORT rated by today’s newspapers, TV reporters and talkREMARKS MARKS tial contest was ever, or could ever, be pitched on so show hosts. low a plane.” But as Bernald Weisberger in American Heritage Nasty criticisms were not confined only to the points out, “No chief executive ever made it out of the press. In 1836, during Martin Van Buren’s run for the White House without being scalded.” White House, Davy Crockett, then a U.S. senator, had In fact, newspapers began leveling charges against this to say on the senate floor in regard to Van Buren: our country’s officeholders as soon as our Constitu“Laced up in corsets, such as women in town wear, tion took effect. and if possible tighter than the best of them, it would During the period between Washington’s election be difficult to say from his personal appearance, and his inauguration, the president-elect complained whether he was man or woman, but for his large red that the “editors of the different gazettes in the union and gray whiskers.” might be better employed at something useful, rather Next was Lincoln. “A third-rate country lawyer,” “raconteur than stuffing their papers with scurrility and nonsensical decla- of coarse and clumsy jokes” and “an African gorilla” were just mation.” a few of the press’s descriptions of the president. Although sex scandals allegedly took place in the past presiAnd even “press leaks” are nothing new when it comes to dent’s White House, sex, itself, was an everyday “news” topic as tarnishing someone’s reputation. Ugly rumors, were launched far back as Thomas Jefferson’s days. that Mary Todd let Lincoln’s military secrets slip to the ConWhen Jefferson ran for president, one of the most critical federacy through correspondence with some of her Southern reports came from James Callender, a Richmond, Va. political relatives. writer who denounced Jefferson for fathering illegitimate “muSex, again, came to the forefront of the presidency when latto” children by one of his own slaves. Andrew Jackson was the next target. In 1882, the newspapers Grover Cleveland, a bachelor, was accused during the 1884 campaign of fathering a “bastard child.” of that day went after Jackson, who at first was not accused of Cleveland told the truth. He immediately admitted to that anything pertaining to sex, but rather of being a murderer. fact, went on with business and won the election. A murderer, because while a general in the Army, Jackson Today’s candidates, nominees and officeholders need to stop had summarily executed six militiamen under his command whining about the press and remember these words of Thomas and two Britishers who trained with the Indians in Florida. Jefferson: “A newspaper is an evil for which there is no remedy. These facts were never in dispute, but the first charge of Our liberty depends on the freedom of the press, and that canmurder had a lesser effect on Jackson than did a later one innot be limited without being lost.” volving him with sex.

Office: 8933 East Union Ave. • Suite 230 Greenwood Village, CO 80111-1357 Phone: (303) 773-8313 Fax: (303) 773-8456 A legal newspaper of general circulation in Arapahoe County, Colorado. (USPS 431-010) Published weekly by the Villager Publishing Co., Inc. Available for home or office delivery by U.S. Mail for $45 per year. Single copies available for 75¢ per issue. PERODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT ENGLEWOOD, CO. A Colorado Statutory Publication CRS (19732470 et al). Postmaster: Send address changes to The Villager, 8933 East Union Ave., Suite #230, Greenwood Village, Colorado 80111-1357 Deadlines: Display Advertising, Legal Notices, press releases, letters to the editor, 4:00 p.m. Friday. Classified Advertising, noon Monday. PUBLISHER & EDITOR Gerri Sweeney — x307 gerri@villagerpublishing.com PUBLISHER Robert Sweeney — x350 bsween1@aol.com VICE PRESIDENT/MARKETING Sharon Sweeney — x305 cogambler@mac.com MANAGING EDITOR Becky Osterwald — x303 editorial@villagerpublishing.com NEWS EDITOR Peter Jones — x318 peter@villagermediagroup.com REPORTERS Peter Jones — x318 peter@villagermediagroup.com Robert Sweeney bsween1@aol.com PHOTOGRAPHER Stefan Krusze — 303-717-8282 octaviangogoI@aol.com FLAIR Scottie Iverson swandenver@qwestoffice.net ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS Sharon Sweeney — x305 303-503-1388 cogambler@mac.com Linda Kehr — x314 linda@villagerpublishing.com Valerie LeVier — x317 valerie@villagerpublishing.com Susan Lanam — 720-270-2018 Gerri Sweeney — x307 gerri@villagerpublishing.com DESIGN/PRODUCTION MANAGER Tom McTighe — x300 production@villagerpublishing.com IT MANAGER Patrick Sweeney — x304 idpro.it@icloud.com SUBSCRIPTIONS B.T. Galloway — x301 subscribe@villagerpublishing.com LEGALS Becky Osterwald — x303 legal@villagerpublishing.com EDITORIAL COLUMNISTS Robert Sweeney — x350 bsween1@aol.com Mort Marks gopmort@aol.com

The Villager is an award-winning, locally owned, independent newspaper. All letters to the editor must be signed. The contributor’s name, hometown and phone number must also accompany all letters to the editor for verification, and we reserve the right to edit contributions for space. We attempt to verify all matters of fact but hold contributors liable for the content, accuracy and fairness of their contributions. All submissions become the property of The Villager and may be reused in any medium.

Reverend Martin Niemoller “In Germany, the Nazis first came for the communists, and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a communist. Then they came for the Jews, and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a Jew. Then they came for the trade unionists, and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a trade unionist. Then they came for the Catholics, and I didn’t speak up because I was a Protestant. Then they came for me, and by that time there was no one left to speak for me!”

QUOTE of the WEEK I was raised in a

QUOTE the WEEK Baptistof household,

went to a Catholic church, lived in a Jewish neighborhood, and had the biggest crush on the Muslim girls from one neighborhood over. – Will Smith


Opinion

September 28, 2017 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 5

Vietnam: The whole story revealed The recent PBS release of the 18-hour television documentary series, The Vietnam War, produced by award-winning documentarians Ken Burns and Lynn Novick, is creating a cathartic moment for both those of us who served in combat and those who protested the war. The in-depth analysis covers the long history of Vietnam’s occupation by the Chinese, Japanese, French and finally the Americans’ early influence and the ultimate military involvement in one of our nation’s longest wars. One of the most stunning analyses is the segment on the similarly failed strategies of France’s loss of its Indochina colonial empire and America’s failure to save South Vietnam’s corrupt regime. Both countries failed to understand that the Vietnamese people only wanted the reunification of the two Vietnams. Their struggles began as a plea for nationalism. I arrived in South Vietnam as a young and naïve Army private in March 1967. Before being assigned to a unit, I was sent to Cholan, a Chinese district in Saigon, to pull guard duty for two weeks. The barracks were in an old rice factory that had not been used for several decades. On the walls of the latrine, I discovered military graffiti in Chinese, French, Vietnamese and English dating back to World War II. It was clear that this factory had been used by many armies whose missions failed to win the hearts and minds of the Vietnamese people. The lesson for me was that our current involvement in Vietnam would not be a fruitful endeavor.

In addition to those who gave their lives and those who bear the wound of that conflict, many of the nearly 2.7 million who honorably served in Vietnam suffer from a lifetime of invisible scars of posttraumatic stress and the long-term effects of exposure to a chemical herbicide, agent orange, that attacks the nerve system and causes heart and lung problems. The mental stress caused by the trauma of combat has resulted in the suicides of many Vietnam veterans who were in need of adequate medical and mental healthcare from the Department of Veterans Affairs. By the end of the war, more than 58,148 American men and woman had died and 75,000 were disabled. Sen. John McCain, who spent five and a half years in captivity in a North Vietnamese prison called the Hanoi Hilton, recently stated he hopes that the Burns and Novick film will become the vehicle that will bring all factions together to finally soothe the bitterness that so divided our nation for so many years. The American people have begun to understand that blaming the warrior is not appropriate. Those who sent young men and women to war are the ones to blame. Vietnam veterans served this nation with honor. Their unselfish deeds of heroism are legendary and those who lost their lives deserve to be honored by all Americans. Hopefully, The Vietnam War documentary will be the catalyst that will bring this nation back together to truly understand this war and its tragic impact.

Barbwire Bob Continued from Page 4 on this year’s ballot, but many city council elections. We will be featuring candidates in our upcoming election issue Oct. 19. *** It was a sad Sunday with the Broncos losing to Buffalo in Buffalo. The call for unsportsmanship conduct on Vaughn Miller was laughable after he failed to help the quarterback up after first offering a helping hand to the quarterback that he sacked with a fair hit. The flag came in after the referee saw Vaughn decline to help. Old news by now, but the calls were one-sided and the Broncos have to

overcome bad breaks. The bottom line: We made too many mistakes to win the game. The Rockies came through Sept. 24, and we’re now ahead two games for the wildcard playoff series. It looks like the Rockies will make the playoffs that will electrify Colorado baseball fans. *** B.T. Galloway, who manages our Villager front office and subscription sales, is a savvy baseball fan who knows how the ball bounces. When I have baseball questions, I just ask B.T. He knows the score! He can handle your subscription questions if you call him at 303-773-8313, ext 301.

First-responders from South Metro Fire Rescue successfully put out the May 31 fuel fire on I-25, but not before traffic was stalled for hours. File photo

Final repairs on I-25 at Orchard Road Closure of multiple lanes after fuel tanker fire in May On Sept. 25 and 26, the Colorado Department of Transportation and contractor partner, SEMA Construction Inc., closed multiple lanes of Interstate 25 at Orchard Road to remove and replace a median barrier and mill and pave the roadway. Four lanes on southbound I-25 at Orchard Road were closed at 11 p.m., and three

lanes northbound were closed at 12 a.m. All lanes were open by 5:30 a.m. This work was in response to a fuel tanker fire and response in May that closed the interstate from Dry Creek to Belleview for nearly 17 hours. The roadway reached at least 450 degrees during the fire and ultimately damaged the asphalt. At the time, CDOT crews made temporary repairs to ensure I-25 was open before the morning rush hour.


PAGE 6 | THE VILLAGER • September 28, 2017

BEAUVALLON PENTHOUSE

925 LINCOLN

Colorado’s most dramatic, sophisticated penthouse over 8700 square feet, Brazilian ebony floors, 11 ft ceilings and 360 degree panoramic views. Exclusive use of roof. $4,350,000. PARKER

9610 SARA GULCH Extraordinary home and finishes on 1.6 acre site surrounded by open space on 2 sides. $1,295,000.

GREENWOOD VILLAGE

ONE CHERRY LANE

Extraordinary low maintenance home, private location, incredible appointments, exercise pool, theatre, the best of everything. $2,250,000. CASTLE PINES NORTH

1325 FOREST TRAILS

Fabulous walk-out ranch on the golf course, dramatic and ready for move-in. $1,325,000. CHERRY HILLS VILLAGE

Former Ambassador Sam Zakhem, right, presented Gebran Bassil, Lebanese foreign minister of affairs and emigrant relations, with a proclamation from Gov. John Hickenlooper.

Lebanon foreign minister makes historic visit Gebran Bassil, foreign minister of affairs and emigrant relations of Lebanon, flew into Centennial Airport on Sept. 22 for a luncheon with more than 100 local Lebanese U.S. citizens and other invited guests. He was there to muster support for his nation as it hosts more than two million Syrian immigrants. Lakewood resident and former U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Sam Zakhem, appointed by President Reagan, served as master of ceremonies. He told the audience that this was the first ever Colorado visit by a Lebanese foreign minister. Bassil is also son-in-law to the ruler of Lebanon, Michek Aoun, as he is married to Aoun’s daughter Chantale. Ambassador Zakhem’s oldest son John, a prominent attorney with the national law firm of Jackson Kelly with offices in Denver and Washington D.C., introduced Bassil to the receptive audience. In his introduction, Zakhem said, “Gebran Bassil is the face of Lebanon to the entire world and has throughout his career endeavored to enhance the lives of the Lebanese wherever they may be.” He continued, “An engineer by training, he received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in civil engineering from American University

of Beirut. From 1998 to 2005, Bassil was a key leader in the Free Patriotic Movement in Lebanon, which guided the republic out of decades of civil war and through a historic regeneration. In 2005, he became the leader of the Free Patriotic Movement and was an influential leader in many aspects of Lebanon’s efforts to reclaim its role as the center of economic and cultural development as the gateway to the Middle East. “In Nov. 2009, he became the minister of energy and water of Lebanon and put his engineering knowhow to work, overseeing scores of successful, vital public-utility projects throughout his country.” In 2014, “Gebran became minister of foreign affairs and emigrants,” Zakehm said. “In this role, he guided Lebanon’s foreign policy in a time of great challenges that included keeping factions in his country out of the Syrian civil war, dealing with the resulting flow of refugees and displaced Syrians, the constant threat of terrorism, and the high price the Lebanese soldiers paid to defeat Da’esh.” Bassil briefly addressed the audience, mentioning his visit to three U.S. cities while attending the U.N. General Assembly in New York. In addition to Denver, he went to San Francisco and Houston, seeking to connect Lebanese

immigrants in the United States to pride in their Lebanese heritage. Bassil also urged them to be great Americans. “We are not seeking any help wherever we may go. Rather we, the Lebanese, are successful enough to bring help to the societies where we go. Better living comes with us,” he said. A traditional Lebanese meal was prepared by Saj Grill, owned by Lebanese couple Ali and Shaden Awada. Aurora Mayor Steve Hogan proclaimed a city day in Bassil’s honor. He was also honored by Lakewood Mayor Adam Paul. A gift of a black pearl necklace was presented by Dr. George Zoorob for Bassil’s wife Chantale, who was back home with the family. John Zakhem also read a proclamation by Gov. John Hickenlooper. Other honored guests included Ambassador Johnny Ibrahim, consul general of Lebanon in Los Angeles. Other hosts included Hani Sawaged, Dr. George Zoorob, Ali and Shaden Awada, Hani Sawaged and Josh Hanfling, honorary consul for Morocco. World history recognizes the Lebanese as the “Phoenicians,” early world ambassadors and explorers—and they are still living up to this historic reputation. The minister, following a short address, mingled with the enthusiastic audience.

14 VILLAGE ROAD

Phenomenal European Estate on Cherry Hillls’ best street.16,000 sq ft, 2.4 acre site. Only $5,300,000.

Lakewood Mayor Adam Paul, Centennial City Councilmember Stephanie Piko and Aurora Mayor Steve Hogan were among the guests at last week’s visit by a Lebanese foreign minister.

Photos by Bob Sweeney


September 28, 2017 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 7 Covering business

in the DTC & Denver south SM

the

An app that gets you moving - Sheikh: ‘It’s all about making exercise fun... Your focus is on the game’ Continued from Page 1 other lifestyle choices are part of Keeko’s game design. Some are already incorporated into a prototype that Playpal, Sheikh’s parent company, has tested in focus groups. Plans are to incorporate a wearable fitness band that would track a player’s progress and synch it with the onscreen character. “Everything is being tracked—your oxygen levels, your heart rate, your activity, how much you’re walking,” Sheikh said. “Your game play and how it evolves and how your character transforms throughout the gameplay is a direct consequence of your life. You are the game.” One’s food choices would be entered manually, at least for the time being. Players would also be able to compete with or track the progress of friends and strangers as they strive to improve the lives of their character—err themselves. The entire apparatus—including the wearable band or ring and an app-trackable water bottle— would likely sell for something in the neighborhood of $100 to $150, Sheikh said.

There’s an app for that

A game like Keeko is something this tech entrepreneur wishes she had 20 years ago when she was struggling with her own childhood weight problem. Born in Pakistan, her family emigrated to Texas when Sheikh was in elementary school, where the young transplant was bullied—not for her family’s Muslim faith or social customs, but for her weight, which had reached 170 pounds by the time she was 8. “It was very bad. I was called the human jelly doughnut,” she said. “The popular kids used to come and just throw my food away. I became a very aggressive child. I would cry and scream at my parents and they didn’t know what to do with it.” The family’s Pakistani cultural norms did not help matters when Sheikh’s traditional father and mother failed to take the problem seriously at first. It was only when a doctor finally diagnosed the grade-schooler with clinical obesity, running afoul

A primitive prototype for Keeko, which is expected to eventually incorporate a wearable fitness band that would track a player’s progress and synch it with the onscreen character Photo by Peter Jones of the family’s health insurance, that her parents realized how serious the situation really was. Sheikh’s father soon incentivized his daughter’s weight loss with the promise of new toys, and in less than two years she lost 65 pounds—though not in the best way possible. “I did it in a very unhealthy manner,” she said. “I went on fad diets. I went on banana and milk for a month. The doctor didn’t refer me to a nutritionist, which I thought was the weirdest thing ever. I love to eat. It’s hard to suppress it even now.” As a young woman, Sheikh’s struggle continued. It was not until she was in high school that she says she fully understood what her battles with fitness were all about. “I started to realize that my self-worth was more in my intellect and my service to the world,” she said. “You’ve got Victoria’s Secret, America’s

Next Top Model. We forget the service we can give to the world as women, as opposed to just looking like Barbie dolls.” Sheikh would eventually receive her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in medicinal chemistry, with an eye on somehow helping others. Her research was published and she was working to create cancer drugs by the time she was 18. “I’ve always been an overachiever. I don’t think I would have been this courageous or ambitious if I hadn’t [gone through the weight-loss ordeal] at such a young age. I believed in myself like a crazy person,” she said. After returning to Pakistan to work in her repatriated father’s business, Sheikh says she had a revelation about her future in helping the world through technology. “I felt like if I combined both passions together, it could create something really magnificent,” she said. “I thought about the running-game genre. What about myself when I was a big kid running as a character collecting good foods and avoiding the bad foods—and what if it got synched with my body?” In 2015, Sheikh relocated to Colorado and Centennial’s Innovation Pavilion to find her niche. With a few thousand dollars to her name, the young entrepreneur began supporting her dream project by developing other games, including one for Pepsi’s Sting energy drink. Sheikh also hopes to raise between $500,000 and $1 million on a soon-to-launch Kickstarter campaign. If Keeko turns out to be worth its weight in financial investment, who knows where her socially conscious gaming may lead her? “I come from a culture where women don’t get to do this,” Sheikh said. “They don’t get to leave their husbands for two and half months after getting married. Women don’t work. Women are expected to conform to certain roles—this is the biggest revolution of all of these.” Could a game that sees a young Middle Eastern woman get points for striking out independently and starting her own international business be in the offing? “That would be amazing. That’s a really good idea,” she said.

Learn how to prepare yourself for an end-of-year review and get that raise Tanya Kelly Bowry has successfully lobbied under both Republican and Democratic gubernatorial administrations in Colorado, as well as successfully led advocacy efforts in Washington, D.C. for 10 years. As one of the few women in top leadership at the University of Colorado, she is respected at state and federal levels by legislators, cabinet members and lobbyists. You will leave with the keys to successfully negotiating and advocating for those you represent.

The Art of Negotiation

EduTalks Tuesday, Oct. 10 | 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. $55 all-inclusive networking, lunch and program at 10035 S. Peoria St., Lone Tree. Tickets: 303-315-94444 or cusouthdenver@ucdenver.edu. The EduTalks Series serves up interactive and mind-expanding professional education from leading CU subject-matter experts. Discover new insights to help you lead, build business and inspire teams, all over a chef-prepared world-class lunch.

Kelly-Bowry serves as vice president of government relations. She has more than 20 years of advocacy experience, having lobbied on behalf of higher education, human services and healthcare issues. She earned bachelor’s degrees in international affairs and political science at CU Boulder and a master’s degree in nonprofit management from Regis University as a Colorado Trust fellow. Kelly-Bowry also studied at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government as a member of the senior executives in state and local government. She is a 2013 alum of the HERS Institute.


Politics

PAGE 8 | THE VILLAGER • September 28, 2017

POLITICS

Finance pro makes run for Centennial Council

Volunteer and finance professional Charlette Fleming has announced her candidacy for City Council in Centennial’s eastern District 4. “Centennial is a great city and has come a long way for being such a young city,” she said. “Earning such rankings as the second healthiest housing market in Colorado, one of the best places to move/open a business, and one of best cities to start a family is impressive.” Fleming says she wants to

maintain Centennial’s strong economy, business community and the high quality of life that the 16-year-old city has grown to enjoy by encouraging businesses to open and expand in Centennial. “I will focus on improving infrastructure, easing traffic congestion, encourage innovation and ensure smart growth,” the candidate said. “Centennial is fiscally sound, and I want to continue to ensure that the city’s resources are used wisely

Charlette Fleming and effectively.” Fleming says she would

bring both her volunteer and corporate experience to the council. She says she has an extensive corporate accounting background and is a certified project manager. She has worked for several Fortune 500 companies, including EDS, US West and Xcel Energy. Fleming is also a volunteer chaplain at Sky Ridge

Medical Center and a board member at Vega Collegiate Academy. She recently led a drive in Piney Creek to gather supplies for victims of Hurricane Harvey. She graduated from Louisiana State University with a bachelor’s degree in business, with an emphasis in finance and accounting. She and her husband Walker have lived in Centennial since 2000. Their two daughters graduated from Cherry Creek Schools.

Accountant Nickless seeks seat Former councilmember Holen seeks return to on Centennial City Council

Nancy Nickless is a newly announced candidate for Centennial City Council in central District 2. She and her husband have lived in the city’s Palos Verdes neighborhood since 1998. The candidate says she “feels blessed to be in such an incredible city and gets energized by her daily views of our majestic mountains.” Nickless, who says she strives to stay educated, informed and proactive, became interested in running for council while studying for her master’s in public administration, where coursework included investigating city structure and function. That is how she says she became familiar with Centennial’s home-rule charter and the city’s ordinance and referenda procedures. Nickless says she cares about the “people’s voice” and the continued strate-

gic progress of Centennial’s growth and development. Currently, the candidate works as an accountant at the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus, where she says she is reminded every day that “science curesa disease and good public administration makes a city thrive.” The candidate similarly promises to make well informed, fact-based decisions. “I have always been a registered Democrat, but do not identify with the far left,” she said, calling herself fiscally conservative and a believer that law protects liberty. “… Federalism is the way of the future, spontaneous free markets should prevail, and everyone has individual rights.” Nickless looks forward to playing a role in the city’s future. “Centennial is an excep-

Aurora Council

Nancy Nickless tional city to be a part of and [I take] nothing for granted,” she said. “Growth is inevitable and can be a positive addition to our landscape, while it is also important to monitor for scale and infrastructure.”

I See Color (subtle)

Amy Adams is a well-known designer specializing in paint color, art, and furniture placement

ONE DAY ROOM OR HOME MAKEOVERS

Amy will select from her design store and wholesale resources with lamps, draperies, pillows, accessories, furniture and well-priced art. Amy will bring unique selected merchandise and rework your own furnishings with her inventory

PLEASE CALL AMY AT 303-437-7219

(Formerly Adams & Jane)

BOOK YOUR TRIP TODAY!

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10-2:30, or by appointment 1800 W. Oxford Ave., Unit D. 15% Off expires Oct. 15, 2017

Debi Hunter Holen, who served as an at-large councilmember 2011 to 2015 and as mayor pro tem in 2015, is seeking a return to Aurora City Council this year. The native Coloradan has called the city home for nearly 40 years. She says she is focused on bringing her “vision of attainable housing, accessible public infrastructure and accountable city government” back to City Council. While serving previously, Holen helped establish Aurora Sister Cities International, the Office of International Affairs, Stanley’s Marketplace and Aurora Welcome Center. Since leaving office two years ago, Holen has remained active, helping to secure funding and space for Rocky Mountain Multicultural Radio. She also served on the boards for Aurora Warms the Night, the Aurora Public Schools Foundation, Aurora Sister Cities International, Aurora NAACP, Aurora At Home, Aurora Mental Health, Aurora Gang Reduction Intervention Prevention and the Citizens Advisory Budget Committee Before being elected to council, Holen was assistant to the chief of equity and engagement for Aurora Public Schools. Throughout her career, Holen says she has “fought for a more fair and higherquality public education system for all children and for the welfare of all of Aurora citizens, especially those affected by homelessness and

Debi Hunter Holen mental illness.” She served on Aurora Citizens for Excellent Schools, helping to pass the school district’s bond and mill levy measures. Holen served as president of the Nuñez Foundation for four years and was on its scholarship committee for six years, helping establish a summer-school program for middle school students in both Aurora and neighboring school districts. She has also been Aurora PTA Council president and a member of the Colorado PTA board. Holen has served on the Board of the Asian Pacific Partners in Leadership for Education, the military academy selection board for U.S. Rep. Ed Perlmutter, and on the Refugee Services Quarterly Community Consultation Committee.

VACATION CONDO FOR RENT Nightly, Weekly, Monthly

Prime Location in Vail Village! Just steps away from dining, bowling, theater, shopping and Gondola One.

303-503-1388

Private Parking Space Included


September 28, 2017 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 9

DTC Del Frisco’s previews succulent new menu items There are pleasurable moments in the newspaper world and one of them is doing reviews of new and existing popular restaurants, such as Greenwood Village’s Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steak House at 8100 East Orchard Road. This very successful chain started in 1981 with headquarters in Southlake, Texas and has expanded to 18 steakhouses across the United States with three different brands, Del Frisco’s, Del Frisco’s Grille and Sullivan’s. They went public in 2012 and are listed on NASDAQ with a symbol DFRG. A Del Frisco’s Grille is located in Cherry Creek. The Greenwood restaurant is one of the oldest and most successful operations in the organization with good reasons. They have excellent steaks, chops, seafood and

service, along with community involvement with charities, and they host such groups such as the Denver Rustlers on their State Fair trip. The annual trip begins with wonderful entrees at the Greenwood Village “Double Eagle” steakhouse before boarding buses to Pueblo. New menu items are being launched this week and media representatives have been invited to sample these new delicacies. Last week, my wife Gerri and I were invited to enjoy six new cocktail creations, along with 45-day dry aged prime steak, octopus, seared rare Wagyu beef carpaccio, marinated shrimp with special sauces and a succulent new maque choux side dish of shaved fresh corn on the cob with “Shito” green pepper complimented by a cream sauce. Just outstanding and winning “best of show.” We didn’t just sample this dish, but enjoyed it all, spoon after spoonful. Probably the

New specialty drinks are served in beautiful glassware with garnishment.

Centennial ranks third on Military Times’s Best Places to Live

Military Times has named Centennial as the third Best Place to Live, formerly known as Best for Vets: Places to Live. The methodology included the evaluation of 577 places as designated by the U.S. Census Bureau, dividing them into 254 small cities with populations of fewer than 75,000, 244 medium-sized cities with populations between 75,000 and 199,000, and 79 large cities with populations of more than 200,000. With a population of slightly more than 109,000, Centennial ranks as a medium-sized city. Cities are compared in three broad categories: veteran and military culture and services, economic indicators and livability factors, such as crime, health and school quality. “In Colorado, and especially in the metropolitan area that we’re in, embracing the military is the norm,” Mayor Cathy Noon said. “I think that energy, that value of the military culture is just part of who we are.” Other Colorado cities to make the list include Highlands Ranch (No. 7 as a small city), Lakewood (No. 15 as a medium-sized city) and for large cities Colorado Springs (No. 3) and Aurora (No. 21).

A new addition to the Del Frisco’s menu is octopus served with spinach, tomatoes and butter beans Photos by Bob Sweeney cheapest item on the menu to prepare, but just delicious. We were given two steak samples to compare, the standard prime steak and the newly featured aged steak. Both excellent, I liked one, Gerri liked the other, both delicious. When we arrived at 1 p.m., the restaurant was packed with patrons enjoying many luncheon specials, ranging from a prime cheeseburger at $14 to prime steak salad at $21, with a full complement of business lunch entrees. Entering the restaurant, we were greeted by manager Donna and Maria, who handles public relations for the restaurant from the Feed media.com office. We received a welcome from general manager Amanda Springmeier and were then escorted to our seats and greeted by our waiter, Greg. Within a few minutes, the newly cre-

Apply to showcase your talent in Centennial People’s Art Gallery The 2018 exhibit of the Centennial People’s Art Gallery is now accepting submissions. Members of the Centennial community may submit an application until Nov. 3. Selected artists will display a short bio along with their twodimensional artworks in the Centennial Civic Center for one year starting Dec. 4, until Dec. 3, 2018. Artists may offer their artwork for sale while on display. However, all sales

must be conducted by the artist or representing gallery. The City of Centennial does not receive commission on or compensation from the sale of artwork displayed. Centennial Civic Center is located at 13133 E. Arapahoe Road. Artists must live or work in Centennial to be considered. an application to have their work considered for display. For more information, visit centennialco.gov.

ated cocktails started to arrive in creative glasses with berries, fruit, frothy bubbles and rich colors of red pomegranate, smoky Paloma and black raspberry. ®

I chose a tequila Mescal and Gerri sampled the VIP drink, marinating pineapple for two weeks with clementine vodka. We had to go back to work after lunch so we didn’t consume all of the drinks, but they know how to make creative drinks at that bar. After the assortment of new menu food items for dessert, we were served chocolate mouse and lemon cake. Part of the generous slice of cake went home in a box to be enjoyed that evening, still moist and fresh with thick lemon frosting. Del Frisco’s will be featuring its food items at the upcoming Taste of Greenwood Village Oct.18 at the DTC Marriott. There will be more than 55 food stations represented. Tickets are on sale at DTCChamber.com

Investment Opportunity

Located at 4825 Oakland St., this 16,500 SF industrial building is being offered to the investment market. The facility sits on a one acre lot, offers 30 parking spaces, 16’ clear height, and has 2 drive in doors. Current tenant is a professional MMJ grow facility, offers NOI of $231,000 and a cap rate of 9.0%. $2,567,000. Call Tanner Fanello or Brian Baker. Fuller Real Estate, 5300 DTC Pkwy., #100 Greenwood Village, Colorado 80111

www.FullerRE.com (303) 534-4822

WHAT INSPIRES US?

Engineering feats. The Baseline Collection with patented CX™ technology. ®

e n g i n e e r e d f o r r e a l i t y . g u a r a n t e e d f o r l i f e .™

Free chipping and mulch event on Sept. 30 The City of Centennial is partnering with CH2M, Terracare Associates and South Suburban Parks and Recreation to host a free citywide tree-recycling on Saturday, Sept. 30, 8 a.m. to noon. (Chippers will be shut off at noon sharp). There will be two locations where residents may drop off tree limbs and woody plant materials. • South Suburban’s Willow Spring Service Center, 7100 S. Holly St.

• Centennial Public Works Facility, 7272 S. Eagle St. Free mulch will be available at the Willow Spring Service Center throughout the event and the Public Works Facility will have mulch available starting at noon. Please note: Lumber, salvage materials, or rounds larger than 10 inches in diameter will not be accepted. For more information, call 303-325-8000.

WE ARE ALL ABOUT TRAVEL! 4442 S. Broadway Englewood, CO 80113 (303) 320-4646


PAGE 10 | THE VILLAGER • September 28, 2017

School readiness redefined — beyond the ABCs How can I get my child ready for kindergarten? That’s a question all parents of young children can relate to, and you might be surprised by the answer. Lisa Regalla, a nationally-recognized expert in early learning, will show you how to go beyond the ABCs and 123s on Wednesday, Oct. 4, at Smoky Hill Library, 5430 S. Biscay Circle in Centennial, and again on Thursday, Oct. 5 at Koelbel Library, 5955 S. Holly St. in Centennial. On both evenings, light refreshments and dessert will be served at 6:30 p.m. and the program will begin at 7 p.m. Regalla, deputy director of the Center for Childhood Creativity at the Bay Area Discovery Museum,  will share ideas for developing language, math and social skills, all key ingredients for kindergarten readiness. Parents, teachers,

Lisa Regalla grandparents and caregivers are invited to attend to gain insights on how to support creativity and imagination in children and to get a running start on school and lifetime success. To learn more or to save space for either program, visit arapahoelibraries. org/school-readiness or call 303-LIBRARY (303-5427279).

v

AT THE TOP OF HER PROFESSION SINCE 1977

Edie Marks Office: 303-773-3399

CRS, GRI

Cell: 303-905-0744

EXPERIENCE COUNTS! 14 Village Road

Amazing Harrison custom,on 2.4 acres, pool,pond, party barn,elevator,exquisite finishes.

$5,300,000

NEW LISTINGS

o 360 DEGREE VIEWS - Denver’s most exciting penthouse at the Beauvallon. Over 8700 square ft, Brazilian ebony floors, 360 degree views, exclusive roof top use. Two master suites. The best of everything at a price well below replacement cost. $4,350,000. o ONE CHERRY LANE GREENWOOD VILLAGE - Extraordinary low maintenance home, private location, incredible appointments, exercise pool, theatre, the best of everything. Unbelievable quality throughout, indoor/outdoor living - $2,250,000. o 23 BELLEVIEW LANE - $1,250,000 SOLD. o AUTHENTIC SOUTHWESTERN IN CASTLE PINES VILLAGE - $1,250,000 SOLD. o CASTLE PINES NORTH IN THE EXCLUSIVE PINNACLE AREA - Phenomenal, dramatic walk out ranch. Master and second bedroom on main floor, fabulous walkout basement for entertaining. Private site on the golf course. - NOW OFFERED AT $1,289,900. o THE HILLS AT CHERRY CREEK 5255 S. JAMAICA WAY – BUY AND SELL SIDES $680,000 - SOLD. o SPIRIT RIDGE, PARKER - 9610 SARA GULCH - Exceptional finishes on 1.5 acre site surrounded by open space on 2 sides. True Colorado living with extraordinary appointments. $1,295,000. o BEAR TOOTH RANCH ARCHITECTURAL MASTERPIECE ON 35 ACRES - 15,000 Sq.Ft. Finish includes guest house, indoor/outdoor pool, panoramic mountain views with open space on all sides. $5,750,000. o THE PRESERVE 5402 PRESERVE PKWY N. - Incredible home, top to bottom updates, fabulous outdoor kitchen and fireplace. $1,795,000. o 14 VILLAGE RD. CHERRY HILLS: EXQUISITE EUROPEAN VILLA WITH HORSE FACILITY - Once in a lifetime opportunity. 16,000 sq ft of perfection. Site of many charitable fundraisers. Pool, waterfall,outdoor kitchen, elevator, extraordinary quality. UNBELIEVABLE VALUE AT $5,300,000. o 3737 E. FLORIDA - Development site in Cory Merrill 12000 ft. site 2 houses. $573,000. o PREMIER 1.2 ACRE SITE - in Whispering Pines. Back to Buffalo reserve. $570,000.

CHERRY HILLS VILLAGE

o 3800 E MANSFIELD - $2,550,000 SOLD. o 16 VISTA RD - $2,375,000 SOLD. o 3701 S. COLORADO BLVD - $1,000,000 SOLD. o 36 CHERRY HILLS FARM DRIVE - $2,750,000 SOLD. o CHERRY HILLS FARM WEST. $2,175,000 SOLD. o 27 MARTIN LANE - $1,695,000. SOLD. o 4850 S. GAYLORD - $2,050,000 LIST AND SOLD. o 85 GLENMOOR - $2,400,000 - SOLD. o CHERRY HILLS PARK LAND $1,750,000. SOLD. o BUELL MANSION - Architectural Digest perfection. $1,850,000 SOLD. o CHARLOU IN CHERRY HILLS - $1,195,000 SOLD.

GREENWOOD VILLAGE & SUBURBS

o 7180 E. BERRY ST. - LIST AND SOLD - $2,895,000. o THE PRESERVE - $1,735,000 SOLD. o THE PRESERVE - - $1,520,000 SOLD. o ONE CHERRY LANE - $1,705,000. SOLD. o HILLS AT CHERRY CREEK Opportunity at $579,900 SOLD. o THE PRESERVE - $1,650,000. SOLD. o GREENWOOD HILLS - $1,500,000 SOLD. o THE HILLS AT CHERRY CREEK - $680,000 LIST AND SOLD.

Ann Anderson and Annabella and Kristin Rodewald

A gift of knowledge is shared from mother to daughter This September during Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

A Denver grandmother shares the importance of genetic testing in saving the lives of her own children and grandchildren. Ann Anderson is grateful for her life. Diagnosed with ovarian cancer when she was 68, she admits, “I was very lucky that I was in really good physical shape when all this happened.” The Denver mother of three didn’t know the symptoms and risk factors of ovarian cancer, but she did realize she was experiencing a need to urinate frequently. Her sister, a nurse, also noticed and mentioned it while they were together on a trip. Already overdue for a checkup, Anderson went to her gynecologist after feeling a lump on one side of her abdomen. The results of Anderson’s CA 125 blood test, used to determine levels of a tumor marker that may be elevated in cases of ovarian cancer, confirmed that Anderson was one of the 20,000 Americans diagnosed annually with the deadliest gynecologic cancer and the fifth most common cancer in females in the United States. Her surgery the following day included a hysterectomy and removal of the growth. After 10 days in the hospital and a month of recovery,

fewer than 20 percent have undergone the procedure, or even discussed it with their doctor. During her treatment at the Rocky Mountain Cancer Center, Anderson learned about the Colorado Ovarian Cancer Alliance. The mission of the Denver-based nonprofit, colo-ovariancancer.org, is to promote awareness and early detection of ovarian cancer through advocacy and education, while providing support to people affected by ovarian cancer. Since then, Anderson has volunteered at health fairs and never leaves home without some of the “symptom cards,” which look like business cards but are used to educate women about the symptoms of ovarian cancer. These small but important aids highlight the disease’s risk factors and symptoms, which include pelvic or abdominal pain, suddenly-occurring or persistent bloating, difficulty eating or feeling full quickly, and urinary urgency or frequency. After surviving for nearly two and a half years, Anderson is optimistic that knowledge about ovarian cancer is coming to the forefront. For those who are diagnosed with and treated for ovarian cancer, Anderson advises, “Don’t be hard on yourself and don’t dwell on the past. Reconcile yourself to the fact that you are lucky. Be grateful and happy with what you can do today.”

Downsizing? Settling                             an Estate                              in Colorado? ^

CASTLE PINES & DOUGLAS COUNTY

o KEENE RANCH - CASTLE ROCK - $915,000 SOLD. o HIGH PRAIRIE FARM - $974,900 SOLD. o MCARTHUR RANCH - $2,200,000 SOLD.

DENVER

o 418 DETROIT - $1,800,000 SOLD. o POLO CLUB NORTH - $900,000. SOLD. o WASHINGTON PARK - $1,150,000, SOLD. o CHERRY CREEK 420 ADAMS ST. - $775,000 SOLD. CHECK OUT MY INDIVIDUAL HOMESITES at www.DenverRealEstate.com E-mail me at emarks@DenverRealEstate.com

#1 DENVER BOARD OF REALTORS 12 YEARS STRAIGHT #44 OF 1,350,000 AGENTS IN THE USA (THE WALL STREET JOURNAL)

Anderson began a year-long chemotherapy regimen. Through genetic testing, Anderson learned that she carries the BRCA2 gene, which increases the risk of female breast and ovarian cancers greatly. Her sister does not carry the gene. Similarly, one of her daughters inherited the BRCA2 gene and the other didn’t. Referring to her daughter who tested BRCA2 positive, Anderson said, “She has been given a gift of knowledge. “She believes this will enable her child to take action to reduce the likelihood of someday being diagnosed with ovarian, breast or other cancers. Her daughter will also be more likely to consider genetic testing sometime in the future for Anderson’s young granddaughter. “Preventative measures or early diagnosis are powerful weapons against cancer.” Anderson said. A new study from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health reports that among the nearly 4 million American women who have had ovarian or breast cancer, at least 1.5 million have a high risk of carrying genetic mutations that could increase their probability for additional cancers in the future. However, even though simple tests can identify these mutations and enable women to be better informed when making decisions about surgery, cancer therapy and steps to reduce the risk of future cancers,

Sell Everything in Just 2 Weeks! call

720-506-2279 .com/Villager *Licenced from Cartoonstock.com by MaxSold

Local expert help in Colorado to sell everything!


SeniorChoices

September 28, 2017 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 11

SeniorChoices A comprehensive guide to products and services for active & vibrant senior adults

Exercises that help ease arthritis pain and stiffness

Dear Savvy Senior, What exercises are best suited for seniors with arthritis? I have osteoarthritis in my neck, back, hip and knee and have read that exercises can help ease the pain and stiffness, but I don’t know where to start, and I certainly don’t want to aggravate it. Stiff and Achy

SAVVYSENIOR

best to work with your doctor or a physical therapist to help you develop a personalized exercise program. The different types of exercises that are most often recommended to seniors with arthritis include: Range-ofmotion exercises: These are gentle stretching exercises that can relieve stiffness as well as Dear Stiff, improve your abilMany people ity to move your who have arthritis BY JIM MILLER joints through their believe that exercise normal range of motion. will worsen their condition, but that’s not true. Exercise is These exercises should be done daily. actually one of the best treatStrengthening exercise: ments for osteoarthritis. Calisthenics, weight training Proper and careful exercises can help reduce joint and working with resistance pain and stiffness, strengthen bands are recommended (two muscles around the joints or more days a week) to mainand increase flexibility. It also tain and improve your muscle helps manage other chronic strength, which helps support conditions that are common and protect your joints. among seniors with arthritis, Aerobic exercises: Lowsuch as diabetes, heart disimpact activities like walking, ease and obesity. cycling, swimming or water Here are some tips to help aerobics are all recommended you get started. three to five times per week to help improve cardiovascular health, control weight and imRecommended exercises Determining exactly which prove your overall function. It’s also important to keep types of exercises are best for in mind that when you first you depends on the form and start exercising, you need to severity of your arthritis and go slow to give your body time which joints are involved. It’s

Heritage Fine Arts Guild presents art show

October 10 marks the opening of the “This is Colorado” art show. Sponsored by the Heritage Fine Arts Guild of Arapahoe County, the exhibit features two-dimensional works of many of Colorado’s finest artists. The show is held annually at the Arapahoe Community College Gallery of the Arts, 5000 South Santa Fe Drive in Littleton. The gallery is in the main building called the An-

As you

nex on the northeast side of the campus. Lance Green, well known Colorado expressionist, will serve as this year’s juror. Awards will be presented at the artists’ reception from 5 to 7 p.m. on Thursday, October 12. The exhibit runs through November 2. Admission to the show is free and viewing hours are Monday thru Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.

ather

this season,

open the conversation to Senior Livin

Is it time for healthful change? We help families navigate Successful Aging.

MorningStarSeniorLiving.com

303.321.3277 |

14301 E. Arapahoe Road

to adjust. If you push yourself too hard you can aggravate your joint pain. However, some muscle soreness or joint achiness in the beginning is normal. To help you manage your pain, start by warming up with some simple stretches or range of motion exercises for five to 10 minutes before you move on to strengthening or aerobic exercises. Another tip is to apply heat to the joints you’ll be working before you exercise, and use cold packs after exercising to reduce inflammation. If you’re experiencing a lot of pain while you exercise, you may need to modify the frequency, duration or intensity of your exercises until the pain improves. Or you may need to try a different activity, for example, switching from walking to water aerobics. But it you’re having severe, sharp or constant pain, or large increases in swelling, or your joints feel hot or red, you need to stop and see your doctor.

gov (or call 800-222-2225), a National Institute on Aging resource that offers a free exercise guide that provides illustrated examples of different exercises. If you need some motivation or don’t like exercising alone, ask your doctor about exercise programs in your area for people with arthritis. Hospitals and clinics sometimes offer special programs, as do local health clubs and senior centers. The Arthritis Foundation

also conducts exercise and aquatic programs for people with arthritis in many communities throughout the United States. Contact your local branch (see Arthritis. org/local-offices, or call 800283-7800 to find out what may be available near you. Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC “Today” show and author of “The Savvy Senior.”

Exercising aids

To help you exercise at home, the Arthritis Foundation offers a variety of free online videos (see Arthritis. org/living-with-arthritis/ exercise/videos) to guide you through a variety of exercises. There are arthritis exercise DVDs you can purchase for a few dollars through Collage Video (CollageVideo.com, 800-819-7111) or the Arthritis Foundation Store (AFstore. org). Also see Go4life.nia.nih.

We’ll give you a reason to smile

• Specializing in dental implants “Teeth in a day” • New state-of-the-art facility • Laser therapy available

• Participating provider for Delta Dental,

Metlife, Cigna and most other insurance companies

PROVIDING EXCEPTIONAL PATIENT CARE

www.yourdentalimplants.com

303-695-0990

3690 S. Yosemite St., Denver CO 80237


PAGE 12 | THE VILLAGER • September 28, 2017

FLEURISH

Broadway-bound ‘Frozen’ didn’t freeze out fashion and fun The Denver Center for the Performing Arts outdid itself. Fashionably dressed in costume and cocktail attire, those who attended the Frozen gala were treated

to a magical showcase, both onstage and in the Seawell

Grand Ballroom. The blue and white wonderland was decorated for dinner and later transformed yet again for after party desserts. The performance, set design

and choreography were exquisite. According to a Disney representative, Denver was chosen for the Broadwaybound production because

of its exceptional venue and support base. DCPA reaches 84,000 students statewide who might not otherwise have an opportunity to enjoy the arts.

Photo by Tommy Collier Fur and YSL vintage jewelry from Dan Sharp

FAR LEFT: A sample of the dramatic decor in the Seawall Grand Ballroom LEFT: Epicurean’s Stephanie even garnished the salads with “snow.” RIGHT, ABOVE: DCPA’s newest trustee June Travis is surrounded by Mary Gearhart and Amy Fitch. RIGHT, BELOW: Dan and Pam Piro, right, welcomed Pam’s sister Peaches and her granddaughters Chloe and Scarlett Cederholm from Utah. LEFT: Blue signature drinks suited Becky LaBrant, Drs. John and Olinga Hargreaves, and Patricia Villegas, all members of the Denver Center Alliance 100% Club.

Photos by Scottie Taylor Iverson

Civic Center Gala honors Elaine Asarch ‘Opening Doors to the City’ theme reflects new art installation Civic Center Gala Chairs Liane and Robert Clasen and Cindy and Jack Parsons welcomed a sell-out crowd

to the fifth annual gala at the McNichols Civic Center building with multi-tiered entertainment and catering by Occasions starting in the entry plaza and graduating to the third floor. The gala supports the nonprofit Civic Center

Conservancy’s free public programming aimed at elevating and sustaining Civic Center Park as a vibrant and iconic cultural and community hub. Elaine Asarch, who founded the Civic Center Conservancy 13 years ago and formerly served as

chair, was presented with a commissioned art piece by local artist/architect Adam Ambro to commemorate the annual award in her name. The gala’s “Opening Doors to the City” theme was chosen because of the new public art installation by

Miko Iwasaki at the entrance of the McNichols building. Denver Mayor Michael Hancock was on hand and Gov. John Hickenlooper sent a video message. Chris Frampton is Civic Center Conservancy’s board chair.

Comedian George Lopez added to Carousel Ball star lineup

ABOVE: Robyn Loup, Elaine Asarch and Vicki Pepper LEFT, ABOVE: Sunny Brownstein and Gail Berliner LEFT: Peter Wurzberger and Maureen Brooks with honoree Elaine Asarch and husband Richard Asarch, M.D. Photos by Stevie and Debbie Crecilius for Civic Center Conservancy

Carousel Ball Gala Chair Dana Davis and Honorary Chair Barbara Davis announced that comedian/ actor George Lopez will be emcee for this year’s biennial gala on Oct. 7 to benefit Children’s Diabetes Foundation. The popular TV star received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2006 and Time magazine named him one of the 25 most influential Hispanics in America. Harris Poll named him one of the top 10 favorite TV personalities. Rock legend Lenny Kravitz, one of the preeminent musicians of our time, will be the featured entertainer. Sharon Magness Blake

George Lopez will emcee Carousel Ball gala.

Photo by Justin Stephens

and Ernie Blake are being honored. They, along with Team Thunder, are celebrating 25 years of providing and managing Thunder as the Denver Broncos mascot. Thunder and the team have been to four Super Bowls. For more information, ChildrensDiabetes Foundation.org.


September 28, 2017 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 13

FLEURISH

Frank named 2018 Citizen of the West

Participants in the 2016 Roadless Ride at Greenwood Athletic Club. Photo courtesy Clifford Lawson Photography

Local nonprofit spins its wheels with 11th annual event The Roadless Ride supports Brent’s Place – providing hope and healing for kids with cancer and their families. Greenwood Athletic and Tennis Club members and staff will be pedaling hard for a great cause to raise money for Brent’s Place; a local charity that provides safe-clean housing for children with cancer and other life-threatening illnesses and their families. The 11th Annual Roadless Ride is an all-day spinathon in which participants can choose to ride in an hour time slot or all day. All proceeds benefit programming for kids with cancer and their families staying at Brent’s Place. At Greenwood Athletic and Tennis Club, on Friday, Oct. 13, those expecting just another visit to the gym will be pleasantly surprised; an estimated 300 people will participate in one of the 11 spinning classes and 25 Century Riders who will ride all 11 hours for the annual Brent’s Place Roadless Ride. According to Barbara Lubbers, Greenwood Athletic and Tennis Club’s assistant general manager, “Every year we look forward to partnering with Brent’s Place to help the children and their families who stay there, while in cancer treatment. For every $93 we raise, the needs of one family can be met for one day. It is an amazing event to assist an amazing organization.” According to Sean Meyerhoffer, executive director of Brent’s Place, “Each and every rider can make a difference for the families that call Brent’s Place home.” Last year, the Roadless Ride gave eight children and their families the resources needed to temporarily locate to Denver so their children could receive lifesaving medical treatments.” Corey Kish, previous Greenwood Member and Brent’s Place supporter, chose to Ride for Brent’s

Place after he heard how his love for riding could benefit a local charity that saves children’s lives. After his third year as a Century Rider, he found out that his niece, Katie, was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Corey’s 12-hour rides seemed like nothing in comparison to Katie’s 600+ day fight with cancer and now living cancer free. According to Corey, “Come ride with me, sign up for a Century Ride and raise money to help save kids like Katie.” For more information on how to raise funds as part of the Roadless Ride, or to sign up to take your place in the saddle, visit brentsplace.org or contact Brittany Loan at Brent’s Place at 720.343.2803 or visit GreenwoodATC.com.

The Roadless Ride

Friday, October 13, 6 a.m.-6 p.m. Greenwood Athletic and Tennis Club 5801 South Quebec Street Greenwood Village

The National Western Stock Show has named Tony Frank the 2018 Citizen of the West, an award that recognizes those who embody the spirit and determination of the Western pioneer and perpetuate the West’s agriculture heritage and ideals. A committee of community leaders selects the recipients. Frank is the president of Colorado State University and chancellor of the Colorado State University System. He will receive the prestigious award at a dinner on January 8, 2018, at the National Western Events Center. Proceeds from the event support 100 scholarships awarded annually to colleges and universities in Colorado and Wyoming by the National Western Scholarship Trust. Growing up in Illinois, Frank was heavily involved in 4-H and has since been inducted into both the Illinois and Colorado 4-H Halls of Fame. After graduating from Wartburg College, he earned his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from the University of Illinois, and a PhD in comparative pathology from Purdue. Prior to his appointment as president of Colorado State University in 2008, he served as the university’s provost and executive vice president, vice president for research, chairman of the pathology department, and associate dean for research in the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Frank is lauded for his academic vision and leadership enhancing the land-grant mission of Colorado State University. “Tony has served Colorado State University and the CSU system with impressive leadership for many years. He is an extraordinary visionary who is committed to a broader engagement of CSU region-

Tony Frank ally, nationally, and internationally, through an expanding role at the future National Western Center.” Pat Grant, chairman of the board, the Western Stock Show Association Frank’s dedication to the larger community shines through nationally in his role on the University Research Alliance; the NCAA Division I Board of Directors; the National Renewal Energy Laboratory External Advisory Council; board of managers, College Football Playoff; and as past chair of the Association of Public and Land Grant Universities Commission on International Initiatives. Locally, he serves on the boards of the National Western Stock Show Association, the Boettcher Foundation, the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, and the Food Bank for Larimer County. He has served on panels including the U.S. Department of Commerce Deemed Export Advisory Council, the editorial board of toxicologic pathology, and as a member of the Colorado Climate Action Panel. Frank and his wife, Dr. Patti Helper, live in Loveland and have three daughters. To purchase tickets to attend the 2018 Citizen of the West event honoring Tony Frank, please contact Morgan Unks at 303-299-5560 or MUnks@NationalWestern. com

Radford hired as executive director of Adam’s Camp Adam’s Camp announced last week that Lindsay Radford is their new executive director. After a thorough, months-long search that attracted many strong applicants, the search committee unanimously selected Radford as the next leader of Adam’s Camp. Radford is a top-performing media executive with more than 20 years of experience building and leading teams to success, but she is also the mother of a son with Down syndrome who has personally experienced the remarkable heart and dedication of Adam’s Camp. Radford comes to Adam’s Camp having most recently served as news director for KMGH-TV. Previously, Radford spent six years as news director for KSTP-TV in MinneapolisSaint Paul. She is also a dedicated volunteer and non-profit leader and serves on several local and national boards, focusing her efforts on marketing, fundraising and making connections with families. It was the family’s move to Colorado that gave Radford her first introduction to Adam’s Camp. “When we moved to Colorado, we didn’t know where to go for therapy, doctors or community support. Luckily a neighbor recommended Adam’s Camp. Our time in the Early Start Program changed our lives. We saw first-hand how a week of camp allowed our son, Noah, to make tremendous strides with his speech. I am thrilled to join Adam’s Camp and to have the opportunity to contribute to its future success,” said Radford. Kellie Newland, president of Adam’s Camp’s board of directors shared, “Lindsay’s energy is contagious and as a parent of a child with special needs, she understands from her heart the mission and benefits of our programs. To learn more visit adamscampcolorado.org, contact Sarah at 303-563-8290 or sarah@ adamscamp.org.


PAGE 14 | THE VILLAGER • September 28, 2017

Littleton Public Schools confronts bullying Continued from Page 1

Famed Honda makes luxury Acura MDX BY H. THROTTLE AUTO COLUMNIST Cars and trucks just keep getting better and better. Whether made in the U.S.A., Japan or Germany, vehicles have reached the highest level in automotive history in quality, performance—and more than anything else, safety. My first test drive has just occurred in driving an Acura. This is a Honda product, a massive leap upwards from my snow blower and lawnmower. If you go to Asia, Honda bikes fill the roadways with various styles and sizes. They are world famous for their quality products. What about the Acura MDX all-wheel-drive “Advanced”? Well, it is very advanced in all respects. Appearance is outstanding with “white diamond” paint exterior and “ebony” interior. I’m

proud to have it sitting in my driveway with such a stately design and style. The drive is of equal quality as the appearance. A larger SUV, this Acura has a fuel-injected V-6 engine producing 290 horsepower. The transmission has nine speeds and the combination produces a respectable 22 mpg for a seven-passenger vehicle. The final assembly of this Acura is in Lincoln, Ala. with a U.S. engine and transmission. More jobs for the fastmoving state of Alabama. Differing from recent reviews, this Acura comes complete with no additional options with a sticker price of $57,340, which includes a sixyear, 70,000-mile powertrain warranty. This 2017 MDX falls in the luxury class of SUV products, not because of price, but be-

Your car is tuned up, NOW it is your turn! Personal Tune Up -- Relationships --Anxiety, Depression, Addictions

Call for an appointment, 303-523-0621

3 sessions,

$350

www.a-womans-way-to-recovery.com

Your Vision. Our Expertise. ur creative O designers are experts at remaking ordinary rooms into gourmet kitchens and extraordinary baths. Call or visit our beautiful showroom today to get your project started! 5501 S. Broadway, Littleton 303-797-8663

www.greenwoodcabinetry.net GRANITE COUNTERTOPS • CABINETRY TILE • DESIGN • INSTALLATION

cause of the overall quality and included options from paint to safety features. In safety, Acura has every new feature, including an advanced frontal warning light that flashes if a car ahead becomes too close, well in advance of a possible collision. The SUV has every possible airbag, positioning from frontal, knee, side curtain, in dual capacity for front-seat driver and passenger positions. An overall safety rating of a perfect five score exhibits Acura’s goal of safety and features of collision mitigation braking, forward-collision warning, lane-departure warning, lane-keeping assist system and road-departure mitigation. One very different feature is a one-button drive system. The MDX does the shifting and the driver just has to push a single button to move forward. Reverse and parking are two separate controls, but once the driver becomes familiar with the system, it is a superior feature that make driving easier. A long list of premium upgrades is added to the package, including first and second-row captain-chair seating, heated front and rear seating, and duel-front power seats for driver and passenger. Honda has made a very competitive vehicle in a competitive price range with larger SUV models, which in some cases cost far more. This is really a comfortable, safety-first family SUV.

The first suicide by an Arapahoe High School junior occurred Aug. 29. The next day, a Powell Middle School eighth-grader shot himself at Mark Twain Elementary. Both had just posted disturbing messages on social media. Among the recent discriminatory incidents included a white student injecting a racial slur into a black student’s PowerPoint presentation, an elementary student telling an Indian classmate to “go wash their skin,” a middle school student shouting racial slurs, and symbols like swastikas bring drawn in yearbooks and elsewhere. “In some cases, the students did not intend to be hurtful. They were simply unaware of the true meaning behind the symbols and language,” Ewert wrote in his letter. “They did not fully understand how painful these symbols and words can be. In other instances, the students had full understanding and chose to behave in this way.” The superintendent said LPS has a number of social, emotional and behavioral programs in place to teach students appropriate ways to interact. He said each instance of bullying or harassment is taken seriously and handled, sometimes with discipline, other times through education or “restorative justice.” Parental involvement is an important part of this process, he wrote. “We expect our students to learn and demonstrate suitable ways to discuss age-appropriate [and sometimes controversial] topics in the classroom as part of their studies,” Ewert continued. “As educators, it is our duty to model respect and inclusiveness for all.

Every day in our schools, we honor the expectation that differing views and opinions should be discussed, but always within the framework of respect and seeking to understand.” Ewert said it was the district’s moral responsibility to stand against hate and create a “culture of acceptance” in the schools and the larger community. “We are committed to providing learning environments that are physically, socially and emotionally safe places for all,” he wrote. The results of a districtwide survey last year show, students, parents and employees reported feeling safe and positive about the climate in their schools, Ewert stressed. A similar survey is slated to be conducted again later this schoolyear to see if things have changed. Reutzel thinks there is likely a connection between incidents in LPS and such recent events as the violent racial protests in Charlottesville, Va. that prompted a controversial response from President Trump. “The coincidence is hard to ignore,” the school board president said. “Clearly, there’s a national narrative out there that can’t help but filter down to states and communities, and what happens in communities sometimes ends up at schoolhouse doors.” LPS is expected to host a panel discussion and mental-health resources fair on Tuesday, Oct. 10, 5:308:30 p.m., at Mission Hills Church, 620 Southpark Drive in Littleton. “We all want to partner together to help our families in crisis,” said Diane Leiker, LPS’s spokeswoman.

LGA CONSTRUCTION Specializing in Carpentry – Licensed –

• Free Estimates • Plumbing • Concrete • Roofing • Ceramic • Kitchens • Bathrooms • Patios • Painting • and much more – 720-278-5915 – libanosg@gmail.com

5663 S. Prince St., Littleton, CO. 80120 303-795-5006 reinkebrothers@msn.com


Arts & Entertainment

September 28, 2017 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 15

EVENTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Tesoro Cultural Center’s 20 Summer Weekends Sept. 29-Oct. 1, Living history, featured artists: Teresa Duran and Lynn Fresquez. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. The Fort, 19192 Highway 8, Morrison. Sat. Movie Matinee: ‘The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks’ Sept. 30, 2-4 p.m. Watch the film adaptation of this bestselling nonfiction book at Bemis Public Library. Starring Oprah Winfrey as Henrietta Lacks, the unwitting pioneer of countless medical breakthroughs. Free popcorn and lemonade. Denver Brass free concerts Oct. 1, 4:30 p.m. Galleria at Denver Performing Arts Complex. Bring a lawn chair. No tickets required. Info: denverbrass.org. Free Queen City Jazz Band opening concert Oct. 6, 25th Season of the Fine Arts Series at Littleton United Methodist Church, 5894 S. Datura St., Littleton. Info: 303-794-6379 ext. 247. Greenwood Village Monster Bash Fall Fest Oct. 7, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. William McKinley Carson Park, 6060 S. Quebec St. Tickets required for Greenwood Village residents only. Tickets available Aug. 28-Oct. 4 at the Parks, Trails and Recreation counter at City Hall, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. ID required. Cherry Creek North Art Feast Oct. 7, 3-7 p.m. A free walking tour of 10 art galleries plus select bites from Cherry Creek North’s restaurants. Partnering with Denver Young Artists Orchestra for musical entertainment. the guided art gallery tour begins at Fillmore Plaza (2nd Ave. and Fillmore St.) Visit CherryCreekNorth.com After-Dark Corn Maze at Chatfield Farms Oct. 6-28, The lights are out in Corn Maze and brave visitors can find their way through with only the light of a glow stick. This maze is not haunted. For hours and times, call 720865-3552. ‘This is Colorado’ statewide juried exhibition Oct. 10-Nov. 2, Arapahoe Community College, in conjunction with the Heritage Fine Arts Guild exhibition at the Colorado Gallery of the Arts at ACC. The juror will be Colorado expressionist Lance Green. Opening reception with light refreshments on Oct. 12, 5-7 p.m. Admission is free and open to the public. Mon.Fri., 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tues. until 7 p.m.; closed on weekends. Info: leewasilikO@gmail.com. Earthen Vessel Dinner Oct. 12, Photographer John Fielder will be presenting photos from his latest book, A Colo-

rado Winter, as well as sharing his own family dementia journey. Will also honor volunteers. Info: 720-974-3642. Littleton Symphony Orchestra concert season Oct. 13, opening with “From the Ballet” at 7:30 p.m. at Littleton United Methodist Church, 5894 S. Datura St., Littleton. Tickets: littleton symphony.org or 303-933-6824. Ballet Ariel’s season opens Oct. 13, 7 p.m. Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, based on the beloved classic Jungle Book at Lone Tree Art Center. Tickets: 720-509-1000. Tesoro Historic Lecture Series Oct. 15, 6 p.m. at The Fort, 19192 Highway 8, Morrison. Ghosts of The Fort by Dr. Tom Noel. Gates Garden Court Gallery exhibition Through Nov. 5, Works by Pattie Lee Becker at York St. Botanic Gardens. Fine-line drawings and curious soft sculptures. Chatfield Botanic Gardens Corn Maze Through Oct. 29. Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Fees. Free for children 2 and younger. Erinbird@botanicgardens.org or call 720-865-3552. Floral and Fowl: The Artwork of Michael Warren and Darryl Trott Through Sept. 30. Old South Frame and Gallery, 1588 S. Pearl St., Denver. Original paintings from private collection. Info: 303715-3828. Bowl-A-Rama And New Bowling Bingo Nov. 4, 12:30-1:10 p.m., check-in and pizza and 1:30-3:30 p.m., bowling and awards. Four bowling locations to raise money for Bessie’s Hope. Minimum $40 to participate. Call 303-623-1176.

CHAMBERS

Englewood Pub Crawl Sept. 29, 5:30 p.m., The Whiskey Biscuit, 3299 S. Broadway, dinner and drinks; 7-8 p.m. The BOB at 3445 S. Broadway, have your favorite brew; 8-9:30 p.m., Englewood Grand, 3435 S. Broadway to finish off the evening. RSVP: admin@myenglewoodchamber.com or call 303-789-4473. Oct. 6, Chamber picnic, 5-7 p.m., Community Banks parking area and grass, 3501 S. Broadway. South Metro Denver Chamber: Business Leaders for Responsible Gov’t Oct. 18, 7:30- 9 a.m., coffee and breakfast. “Our State Budget: Solutions for Change.” Panel discussion with state Sen. Jack Tate, Sen. Cheri Jahn, Rep. Leslie Herod and Rep. Cole Wist. Moderator: Joey Bunch. South Metro Denver Chamber, 2154 E. Commons Ave., Ste. 342, Centennial.

Cancer League of Colorado Fall Membership Luncheon Sept. 28, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Cherry Hills Country Club. Guest speaker Dr. Scott Cramer, chair of CLC’s Scientific Advisory Board. Members are to bring prospective new members. Bring the most guests and receive a $150 gift certificate from Shanahan’s. Business meeting and election of treasurer-elect and acting treasurer-elect. Tickets $35. Info: Phillip at 303519-9237. Crohn’s and Colitis Distinction Awards Dinner Oct. 4, 50th anniversary event at Cable Center for “A Night of Inspiration.” Info: distinctionawards.com. Marijuana’s True Impact on Colorado Oct. 6, 8:30 a.m.-4:20 p.m. Join Centennial Institute at Colorado Christian University to hear from law enforcement, education-action, medical, public policy and family health experts who have experienced the effects of marijuana legalization firsthand. Lively debate between Jeff Hunt and Robert Corry, top lawyer for cannabis industry. $15, includes lunch at Colo. Christian Univ. Event Center, 8787 W. Alameda Ave., Lakewood. Purchase tickets by Oct. 2 to reserve a seat. Call 303-963-3424. Life Is Why We Ride Oct. 7, 4-6 p.m. ride and 6-7:30 p.m. block party. American Heart Assn. and American Stroke Assn. will host Cycle National, a relaystyle stationary cycling event with 200 bikes at Tivoli Quad downtown. Info: mallory.guymore@heart.org Survivors of heart disease and stroke will participate. 303-801-4674. Open World Learning’s 12th Annual Gala and Auction Oct. 10, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Honoring Jeffrey Tara with the Dean Abrams Leadership Award. Wings Over the Rockies Air and Space Museum, 7711 E. Academy Blvd., Denver. Keynote Speaker: University of Denver Chancellor Rebecca Chopp. Tickets: visit OpenWorldLearning.org/ gala-auction. Taste of Greenwood Village Oct. 18. Doors open at 4:30 p.m. for VIPs, 5:30 p.m. for general admission. Sponsored by DTC/Greenwood Village Chamber of Commerce with major sponsor Stevenson Imports. Denver Marriott Tech Center, 4900 S. Syracuse St. More than 40 vendors signed up so far. Musical entertainment. VIP $109; general admission, $79. Benefiting Cherry Creek Schools Foundation. Visit dtcchamber.com. Women of Distinction Thin Mint Dinner Oct. 19, Girl Scouts of Colorado honors top women leaders at Denver Marriott Tech Center, celebrating 20 years. Event chairs are Maria Garcia Berry, Jean Galloway and Arlene Hirschfeld. Will honor all 426 Women of Distinction recognized since the program began in 1997. Tickets: 303-607-4833. Wine in The Pines Jazz Night Oct. 20 and 21. Oct. 20, winemaker’s

dinner at Keystone Ranch, 6 p.m. Five courses expertly prepared by Keystone Ranch’s Chef, Vincent D’Amato, to complement select William Hill Estate Wine pairings. Theme: Denim and Diamonds; Dressy denim only, please. Oct. 21, International Wine and Gourmet Food Tasting, 6 p.m. Keystone Conference Center. Enjoy smooth jazz featuring live musical entertainment by MoDaZz, silent and live auctions, nearly 500 wines, sumptuous cuisine and irresistible desserts. Dress at the Jazz Festival is Black Tie/Formal or Cocktail attire. Tickets: WineInThePines.org or call 303-691-9339.

at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House. Sneak peek of Dracula rehearsal. $65 per person. Tickets: susan.stiff@coloradoballet.lorg or 303-5980104.

Colorado Uplift Guild Fashion Show and Membership Luncheon Oct. 26, check-in, 10:30; program 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Advanced Leadership students will model the latest fashions from Evey K Fashionliner then shop in the Mobile Boutique. Glenmoor Country Club, 110 Glenmoor Dr. $48. Reservations: 720-244-2232 or jennifer@ myers.bz or 720-341-7986 or carleenhaselden @haselden.com

Pumpkin Festival and Glow at the Gardens Oct. 13-15, Chatfield Farms, 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. A day at the 10-acre pumpkin patch, including live music, face painting, pillow and horsedrawn hayrides. Oct. 18, 19, 25, and 26, Glow at the Gardens at Denver Botanic Gardens York St. location. Tickets: 720-865-3500.

Staenberg-Loup Jewish Community Annual Dinner Nov. 1, 5:30 p.m. Grand Hyatt Denver. Honoring Norman Brownstein with Brownstein Hyatt Färber Schreck. $500 tickets at jccdenver. org/annualdinner. Denver South Economic Development Partnership Annual Luncheon Nov. 17, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. at Denver Marriott South at Park Meadows. Global update with Katty Kay, World News America’s lead anchor. Register: denversouthedp.org/events. Info: Alex@denversouthedp.org. Denver Go Red for Women Luncheon Nov. 17, 11:15 a.m. - 3 p.m. Heart Healthy Expo,1:30-3:00 p.m. Event chair: Jena Hausmann, president and CEO, Children’s Hospital Colorado. Tickets: sanya.andersen-vie@heart. org.

FUNDRAISER

Audubon Society Summer Fundraiser Connecting people with nature through education and conservation. Research funds needed. Donate on Support Our Siding GoFundMe page. Info: 303-973-9530. Lenny Kravitz at Carousel Ball Oct. 7, Hyatt Regency Denver at Colorado Convention Center. Gala Chair Dana Davis and Honorary Chairwoman Barbara Davis. High Hopes Tribute Award will be presented to Sharon Magness Blake and Ernie Blake. Proceeds benefit Children’s Diabetes Foundation and Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes. Visit childrensdiabetesfoundation. org or 303-863-1200. Denver Dumb Friends League and Homeless Animals Fundraiser Oct. 11, 4 p.m., Smashburger, Arapahoe and University. Portion of proceeds donated.

HOLIDAY EVENTS

A Ghoulish Dracula Ballet Preview Luncheon. Oct. 4, 11 a.m. at Chambers Grant Salon

Denver Zoo Guys and Ghouls Special Events Oct. 5-7, 12-14, 19-21 and 26-28. Adults-only evenings: Oct. 5, 12, 19, and 26. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Live music, animal encounters and more. Different themes each evening. Boo at the Zoo: Oct. 21-22 and 28-29 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tickets: denverzoo.org/dinos

Assistance League of Denver Holiday Season Grand Opening Oct. 15, 12-4 p.m. “A Very Beary Holiday.” Handcrafted holiday decorations, gently used home decor, glittery holiday wear, wreaths, greens and decor, collection of stuffed bears. Fundraiser for philanthropic programs. The Thrift Mart is located at 1331 E. Colfax, Denver. Info: 303-861-2122. 8 Week Holiday Gift Guide in The Villager Nov. 1-Feb. 28. Advertise your business for the holidays in The Villager, your locally owned community newspaper. Call 303-7738313 and ask for your favorite advertising representative: Sharon, Linda, Valerie, Susan or Gerri.

MEETINGS

Oct. 24, 5-7 p.m. Public meeting for the I-25 PEL: Colorado Springs Denver South Connection. Douglas County Fairgrounds, 500 Fairgrounds Rd., Castle Rock.

POLITICAL

Great Education Colorado Luncheon Oct. 5, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Honoring Sam and Nancy Gary, education advocates, philanthropists and founders of Gary Community Investments, which includes Piton Foundation. Cable Center at DU. RSVP: 303-722-5901. Lincoln Club of Colorado celebrates 100th birthday with Picnic in the Park Oct. 7, 12-3 p.m. at Washington Park. $5 per person plus, guests asked to donate desserts for purchase to benefit GOP candidates. E. Mississippi Ave. and S. Franklin St. Bring blanket or chairs. RSVP: 303-242-7570. Lori.horn@ comcast.net.

SANCTUARY

Older People Up to Something: OPUS First and third Sundays of each month. 9 a.m. Studying the Bible and other Christianrelated books. Highline Community Church, 6160 S. Wabash Way, Greenwood Village. Info: 303-671-2927 or 303-755-8944.

Wine in the Pine fundraiser set for October Founders Mike and Margaret Smith announced Sept. 6 that William Hill Estate Winery will host the acclaimed Winemaker’s Dinner at the 34th Annual Wine in the Pines. Held annually at the renowned Ranch in Keystone Colorado, a AAA Four-Diamond restaurant, Wine Spectator DiRoNa winner, and recognized Best Restaurant in Colorado by the prestigious Zagat Survey. Genius Head Chef Vincent D’Amato will demonstrate an exquisite balance of flavors and textures paired with exquisite William Hill Estate wines. This 2017 spectacular five-course dining experience will characterize the evening phenomenon, in recognition of 34 remarkable years. William Hill Estate Winery was founded in 1976 by visionary vineyard developer William Hill, and is located on an exceptionally unique 200-acre parcel at the foot of Atlas Peak on the Silverado Bench. This benefit for Ability Connection Colorado’s Kelly Smith Employment Center has justifiably earned the reputation of a premier wine and culinary event. As with fine wine, age and dedication has become the evolutionary

ingredients that has turned Wine in the Pines into one of the most elegant, enchanting and exciting events anywhere. Inspired by Kelly Smith, the daughter of founders Mike and Margaret Smith, owners of Dillon Ridge Liquors, Wine in the Pines is a fundraiser held each of the last 34 years to help support the Kelly Smith Employment Center at Ability Connection Colorado. Ability Connection Colorado is a non-profit organization which serves over 40,000 Colorado children, adults and families through early childhood education, employment and statewide support services. Participants can indulge in some of Colorado’s most savory cuisine prepared flawlessly by Keystone’s foremost chefs, paired with exquisite wines from around the world. This extraordinary gathering of culinary talents, discriminating wines and unmatched entertainment and atmosphere are all assembled to celebrate this premiere epicurean event. Wine in the Pines is Oct. 20 and 21 at the Keystone Resort. Tickets are available online at wineinthepines.org or locally starting October 1, at Dillon Ridge Liquors.

A monkey suit for a dog

Must be ruff: Jean Ray, left, organizer of Sheridan Celebrates, and Sheridan Mayor pro tem Tara Beiter-Fluhr present a tuxedo fit for a dog to grand marshal Jack and human companion Tina Mason at Carson Nature Center in Littleton. The theme for this year’s festival is “Sheridan Celebrates Furry & Feathered Friends.” The parade on Saturday, Sept. 30, will be followed by an afternoon festival on the grounds at city hall. As part of the goings-on, a group of south metro mayors, including Centennial’s Cathy Noon, Greenwood Village’s Ron Rakowsky, Cherry Hills Village’s Laura Christman, Littleton’s Bruce Beckman and Englewood’s Joe Jefferson were expected to help Sheridan’s Dallas Hall do the public cleanup duties associated with any event involving furry friends. Photo by Peter Jones


PAGE 16 | THE VILLAGER • September 28, 2017

FORECLOSURES COMBINED NOTICE – PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 0343-2017 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 5, 2017, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s) Phillip Ortiz Jr Original Beneficiary(ies) Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Heartland Home Finance, Inc., an Illinois Corporation Current Holder of Evidence of Debt Bank of New York Mellon, FKA The Bank of New York, as Trustee (CWALT 2007-23CB) Date of Deed of Trust May 30, 2007 County of Recording Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust June 08, 2007 Recording Information (Reception No. and/or Book/Page No.) B7073129 Original Principal Amount $152,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance $153,231.21 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. Lot 2, Block 1, a resubdivision of Lots 41 and 42, Block 93, Sheridan Heights, located in the Northwest 1/4 of Section 28, Township 4 South, Range 68 West of the 6th P.M., County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado. Also known by street and number as: 2057 W Adriatic Pl, Englewood, CO 80110. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 10/25/2017, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado, 80120, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication 8/31/2017 Last Publication 9/28/2017 Name of Publication The Villager IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT A LENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOLATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A SINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SECTION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBITION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SECTION 38-38103.2, THE BORROWER MAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THE COLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB), OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COMPLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. Colorado Attorney General 1300 Broadway, 10th Floor Denver, Colorado 80203 (800) 222-4444 www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov Federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau P.O. Box 4503 Iowa City, Iowa 52244

(855) 411-2372 www.consumerfinance.gov DATE: 07/05/2017 , Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Karen J. Radakovich, Esq. #11649 Frascona Joiner Goodman and Greenstein PC 4750 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, CO 80305-5500 (303) 494-3000 Attorney File # 7192.10220 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees’ Association of Colorado Revised 1/2015 Published in The Villager First Publication: August 31, 2017 Last Publication: September 28, 2017 Legal # 0343-2017 ____________________________ COMBINED NOTICE – PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 0354-2017 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 14, 2017, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s) Bridget F Bartelds and Robert B Allen Original Beneficiary(ies) Washington Mutual Bank FA Current Holder of Evidence of Debt JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Date of Deed of Trust December 02, 2005 County of Recording Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust December 07, 2005 Recording Information (Reception No. and/or Book/Page No.) B5184059 Original Principal Amount $278,200.00 Outstanding Principal Balance $179,446.06 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. LOT 17, THE BUELL MANSION SUBDIVISION, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO Also known by street and number as: Englewood, CO 80111. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. If applicable, a description of any changes to the deed of trust described in the notice of election and demand pursuant to affidavit as allowed by statutes: C.R.S.§ 38-35-109(5) PURSUANT TO AFFIDAVIT OF SCRIVENER’S ERROR RECORDED ON 4/27/2017 AT RECEPTION NO. D7047176 TO CORRECT LEGAL DESCRIPTION NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 11/01/2017, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado, 80120, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication 9/7/2017 Last Publication 10/5/2017 Name of Publication The Villager IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT A LENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOLATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A SINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SECTION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBITION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SECTION 38-38103.2, THE BORROWER MAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THE COLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB), OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COMPLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. Colorado Attorney General 1300 Broadway, 10th Floor Denver, Colorado 80203

LEGALS

(800) 222-4444 www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov Federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau P.O. Box 4503 Iowa City, Iowa 52244 (855) 411-2372 www.consumerfinance.gov DATE: 07/14/2017 Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Eve Grina #43658 Jennifer Cruseturner #44452 Holly Shilliday #24423 Courtney Wright #45482 Erin Robson #46557 Jennifer Rogers #34682 McCarthy & Holthus LLP 7700 E Arapahoe Road, Suite 230, Centennial, CO 80112 (877) 369-6122 Attorney File # CO-17-765546-LL The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees› Association of Colorado Revised 1/2015 Published in The Villager First Publication: September 7, 2017 Last Publication: October 5, 2017 Legal # 0354-2017 ____________________________ COMBINED NOTICE – PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 0380-2017 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 25, 2017, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s) Mills H Ford and Elise Mallon Ford Original Beneficiary(ies) Imperial Lending, LLC Current Holder of Evidence of Debt The Bank of New York Mellon fka The Bank of New York as trustee for the Certificateholders of CWABS Inc., Asset Backed Certificates, series 2005-SD1 Date of Deed of Trust September 20, 2004 County of Recording Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust September 27, 2004 Recording Information (Reception No. and/or Book/Page No.) B4169981 Original Principal Amount $195,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance $192,393.57 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. LOT 25 AND THE SOUTH 20.5 FEET OF LOT 26, BLOCK 2, BANK ADDITION, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO Also known by street and number as: 555 E Eastman Ave, Englewood, CO 80113. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 11/15/2017, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado, 80120, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication 9/21/2017 Last Publication 10/19/2017 Name of Publication The Villager IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT A LENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOLATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A SINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SECTION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBITION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SECTION 38-38103.2, THE BORROWER MAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THE COLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB),

OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COMPLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. Colorado Attorney General 1300 Broadway, 10th Floor Denver, Colorado 80203 (800) 222-4444 www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov Federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau P.O. Box 4503 Iowa City, Iowa 52244 (855) 411-2372 www.consumerfinance.gov DATE: 07/25/2017 Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Eve Grina #43658 Jennifer Cruseturner #44452 Holly Shilliday #24423 Courtney Wright #45482 Erin Robson #46557 Jennifer Rogers #34682 McCarthy & Holthus LLP 7700 E Arapahoe Road, Suite 230, Centennial, CO 80112 (877) 369-6122 Attorney File # CO-17-771873-LL The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees’ Association of Colorado Revised 1/2015 Published in The Villager First Publication: September 21, 2017 Last Publication: October 19, 2017 Legal # 0380-2017 ____________________________ COMBINED NOTICE – PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 0384-2017 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 25, 2017, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s) CARA HOUK AND KURT HOUK Original Beneficiary(ies) MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGE SOLUTIONS OF COLORADO, LLC, ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS Current Holder of Evidence of Debt PINGORA LOAN SERVICING, LLC Date of Deed of Trust May 26, 2015 County of Recording Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust May 28, 2015 Recording Information (Reception No. and/or Book/Page No.) D5054466 Original Principal Amount $255,290.00 Outstanding Principal Balance $249,138.78 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. LOTS 5 AND 6, AND THE SOUTH 18 INCHES OF LOT 4, BLOCK 76, HARLEM, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. Also known by street and number as: 4822 S GRANT ST, ENGLEWOOD, CO 80113. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 11/15/2017, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado, 80120, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication 9/21/2017 Last Publication 10/19/2017 Name of Publication The Villager IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT A LENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOLATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A SINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SECTION 38-38-103.1

OR THE PROHIBITION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SECTION 38-38103.2, THE BORROWER MAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THE COLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB), OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COMPLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. Colorado Attorney General 1300 Broadway, 10th Floor Denver, Colorado 80203 (800) 222-4444 www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov Federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau P.O. Box 4503 Iowa City, Iowa 52244 (855) 411-2372 www.consumerfinance.gov DATE: 07/25/2017 Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Lynn M. Janeway #15592 Elizabeth S. Marcus #16092 Kelly Murdock #46915 David R. Doughty #40042 Alison L Berry #34531 Sheila J Finn #36637 Eve M. Grina #43658 Nicholas H. Santarelli #46592 Janeway Law Firm, P.C. 9800 S. Meridian Blvd., Suite 400, Englewood, CO 80112 (303) 706-9990 Attorney File # 16-013356 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees’ Association of Colorado Revised 1/2015 Published in The Villager First Publication: September 21, 2017 Last Publication: October 19, 2017 Legal # 0384-2017 ____________________________

Abarca Maravilla Petitioner: Rosible Elizabeth Abarca Morales and Respondent: Maricela Elizabeth Peraza Case Number: 17JV139 Division 35 Courtroom 35 Veronica Reyes, Esq. #41963 P.O. Box 404 Aurora, CO 80040 (720) 808-9417 veronicareyeslaw@gmail.com PETITIONER’S VERIFIED MOTION FOR PUBLICATION BY CONSOLIDATED NOTICE The Petitioner moves for an Order to serve the Respondent by the method checked above for the following reasons: 1. Petitioner has filed: Motion for Maternity. 2. Petitioner has been unable to locate an address for service and/ or complete personal service of the Respondent despite diligent efforts, as follows: Internet search: The name was invented. That person does not exist. Other: The name was invented. That person does not exist. I invented the name out of fear. 3. Respondent’s last known mailing address is as follows: Respondent does not exist. 4. Petitioner never met Respondent. Respondent does not exist. I made up the name when I gave birth out of fear.

ARAPAHOE COUNTY

5. This action DOES NOT involve property located in the State of Colorado, in which the Respondent has an interest.

ARAPAHOE COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS CHRISTENSEN LANE ESTATES NO. 03 – REPLAT (P17-009) AND VACATION OF EASEMENTS (V17-002)

6. This involves issues relating to allocation of parental responsibilities (decision-making and parenting time) of minor children, in which the Respondent has an interest.

PROPOSAL: Point Consulting, LLC, applicant, on behalf John Overmeyer, and Christensen Lane Estates Homeowners Association, Inc.,owners, has made application to Arapahoe County for a Replat and Vacation of Easements to the herein referenced parcels.

Published in The Villager First Publication: September 21, 2017 Last Publication: October 19, 2017 Legal # 7629 ____________________________ District Court Arapahoe County, Colorado 7325 Potomac Street Centennial, Colorado 80112

PROPERTY LOCATIONS: The subject properties involve Parcel Nos. 2077-19-4-17-004, 2077-194-15-005. and 2077-19-4-15-004.

In the Interest of: Carlos Daniel Abarca Maravilla

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on October 17, 2017 at 9:30 a.m., or as soon thereafter as the calendar of the Arapahoe County Board of County Commissioners permits, public hearings will be held, at which, all interested persons will be given an opportunity to be heard concerning the above-described Replat and Vacation of Easements applications for Christensen Lane Estates No. 03 (Case Nos. P17-009 and V17-002). The hearings will be held at the Arapahoe County Administration Building, East Hearing Room, 5334 S. Prince St., Littleton, CO 80120 at the above-stated date and time.

Veronica Reyes, Esq. Attorney for Petitioner P.O. Box 404 Aurora, CO 80040 (720) 808-9417 veronicareyeslaw@gmail.com Atty. Reg. # 41963

The applicant has applied for a Replat and Vacation of Easements approval for the parcels described above, known as Christensen Lane Estates No. 3 (Case Nos. P17-009 and V17-002), which seeks County approval for the replatting of a parcel and two tracts and vacation of easements. More information about this proposal is available at the Arapahoe County Public Works and Development Department, Planning Division, 6924 S. Lima St., Centennial, CO 80112, or by calling 720-8746650 during business hours (8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday). Matt Crane, Clerk to the Board Published in The Villager Published: September 28, 2017 Legal # 7681 ____________________________

COURTS District Court Arapahoe County, Colorado 7325 S. Potomac Street Centennial, CO 80112 In the Interest of: Carlos Daniel

Petitioner: Rosibel Elizabeth Abarca Morales v. Respondent: Carlos Mauricio Abarca Maravilla

Case Number: Division Courtroom PETITION FOR MATERNITY I, Rosibel Elizabeth Abarca Morales, Petitioner, ask this Court to find Petitioner to be the mother of the child named in this Petition, and state that: 1. Information about the Petitioner: Mother Date of Birth: January 6, 1997 Length of Residence in Colorado: 3 years Current Mailing Address: 82 Lansing City & Zip: Aurora, CO 80010 Home Phone #: 720.202.8908 2. Information about the Respondent: Father Date of Birth: Unknown Length of Residence in Colorado: Unknown Current Mailing Address: Unknown City & Zip: Unknown Home Phone #: Unknown 3. Petitioner, is the biological parent of the following children: Maria Michelle Abarca Rivera 82 Lansing Street Aurora, Colorado 80010 SEX: F Date of Birth: 12/25/2012 Carlos Daniel Maravilla Abarca 82 Lansing Street

— Continued to page 17 —


September 28, 2017 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 17

LEGALS — Continued from page 16 — Aurora, Colorado 80010 SEX: M Date of Birth: 01/06/2013 4. The Court has jurisdiction over the Petitioner. 5. The minor children live in this County. 6. Each party has a continuing duty to inform the Court of any proceeding in this or any other state that could affect the current proceeding. 7. I have NOT participated in ANY proceedings regarding the child as a party or a witness, or in any other capacity concerning the allocation of parental responsibilities including decision-making and parenting time with the child. 8. I DO NOT have knowledge of the ANY proceedings that could affect the current proceeding including, but not limited to proceedings relating to domestic violence or domestic abuse, enforcement of Court orders, protection/restraining orders, termination of parental rights, and adoptions. 9. The following people are not parties in this matter, but have physical custody of the child(ren) or claim rights of parental responsibilities, legal custody or physical custody, or visitation/parenting time with the child(ren) Identify name and address of those persons, if any. N/A 10. Identify below the name and address of each person that the child(ren) has/have lived with over the past five years. Identify the relationship to the child(ren). N/A 11. I seek the following: • Determination that Petitioner is the MOTHER. • Order that the Birth Certificate be changed to show Petitioner as the MOTHER. • Allocation of parental responsibilities (decision-making and parenting time) be addressed. 12. Required Notice of Prior Protection/Restraining Orders. Have any Temporary or Permanent Protection/Restraining Orders to prevent domestic abuse or any Criminal Mandatory Protection/ Restraining Orders (MRO) or Emergency Protection Orders been issued against either party within two years prior to the filing of this Petition? No. Notice: Colorado Revised Statutes §19-4-105.5, provides that upon personal service of the Petition and Summons on the Respondent, or upon waiver and acceptance of service by the Respondent, an automatic temporary injunction shall be in effect against both parties for 120 days after its effective date, unless all parties consent to a modification of the temporary injunction. Either party may apply to the Court to modify the length of time the temporary injunction is in effect. 1. Both parties are enjoined from molesting or disturbing the peace of the other party; and 2. Both parties are restrained from removing the minor child(ren) from the state without the consent of all parties or an Order of the Court modifying the injunction; and 3. Both parties are restrained, without at least 14 days advance notification and the written consent of all other parties or an Order of the Court, from cancelling, modifying, terminating, or allowing to lapse for nonpayment of premiums, any policy of health insurance or life insurance that provides coverage to the minor child(ren) as a beneficiary of a policy. Petitioner acknowledges that he or she has read, and understands the terms of the automatic temporary injunction set forth in this Petition. Published in The Villager First Publication: September 21, 2017 Last Publication: October 19, 2017 Legal # 7630 ____________________________

DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE STATE OF COLORADO 7325 S. Potomac Street Centennial, Colorado 80112 (303) 649-6355 PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO, Petitioner, IN THE INTEREST OF: ANGEL AVALOS, ERICK CHOCOY-AVALOS, ASHLEIGH AVALOS and ANA BARAHONA Children, and concerning ANNA AVALOS, SANTOS BARAHONA, ERICK CHOCOY-IXTOS, JOSE GALEAS, ANTONIO LAST NAME UNKNOWN and JOHN DOE Respondents. Pax Moultrie, Atty. Reg. #: 37945 Assistant County Attorney 14980 East Alameda Drive Aurora, CO 80012 Phone Number: (303) 636-1895 pmoultrie@arapahoegov.com NOTICE OF ADJUDICATORY HEARING AND DEFAULT JUDGMENT Case No: 17JV236 Division: 14 To The Respondents: PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that an Adjudicatory Hearing regarding ERICK CHOCOY-IXTOS, JOSE GALEAS, ANTONIO LAST NAME UNKNOWN and JOHN DOE on October 26, 2017 at 9:00 a.m. in Division 14, at the Arapahoe County District Court, 7305 South Potomac Street, Centennial, Colorado 80112. You have the right to be represented by an attorney during these proceedings; if you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed to represent you. In the event you fail to appear for said hearing at the date and time indicated, the Petitioner will request that the Court enter a default judgment against you and adjudicate the child(ren), dependent and neglected in accordance with the Colorado Children’s Code. Pax Moultrie, Reg. #:37945 Assistant County Attorney 14980 East Alameda Drive Aurora, CO 80012 Phone Number: (303) 636-1895 Published in The Villager Published: September 28, 2017 Legal # 7679 ____________________________ DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE STATE OF COLORADO 7325 S. Potomac Street Centennial, Colorado 80112 (303) 649-6355 PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO, Petitioner , IN THE INTEREST OF: GIOVANNI MENDOZA Child, and concerning LESLY ARIAS and EDWIN SANCHEZ -MENDOZA Respondents. Pax Moultrie, Atty. Reg. #: 37945 Assistant County Attorney 14980 East Alameda Drive Aurora, CO 80012 Phone Number: (303) 636-1895 pmoultrie@arapahoegov.com NOTICE OF ADJUDICATORY HEARING AND DEFAULT JUDGMENT Case No: 17JV538 Division: 14 To The Respondents: PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that an Adjudicatory Hearing regarding EDWIN SANCHEZ­MENDOZA is set for October 18, 2017 at the hour of 2:00 p.m., in Division 14, at the Arapahoe County District Court, 7305 South Potomac Street, Centennial, Colorado 80112. You have the right to be represented by an attorney during these proceedings; if you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed to represent you . In the event you fail to appear for said hearing at the

date and time indicated, the Petitioner will request that the Court enter a default judgment against you and adjudicate the child(ren), dependent and neglected in accordance with the Colorado Children’s Code. Pax Moultrie, Reg. #: 37945 Assistant County Attorney 14980 East Alameda Drive Aurora, CO 80012 Published in The Villager Published: September 28, 2017 Legal # 7680 ____________________________

SPECIAL DISTRICTS NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON THE PROPOSED 2018 BUDGET AND NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON THE AMENDED 2017 BUDGET NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a proposed 2018 budget has been submitted to the Board of Directors (the “Board”) of the WILLOW TRACE METROPOLITAN DISTRICT (the “District”). A copy of the proposed budget is on file in the office of Simmons and Wheeler, 304 Inverness Way South, Suite 490, Englewood, Colorado, where the same is open for public inspection.

Classified Advertising FOR RENT

SERVICES

CHERRY HILLS VILLAGE. Ranch style on 1 acre site, 4 bedrooms, 3 full bathrooms, 2 car garage. Contact Dionne at 720-270-1213 or email Actionphd@gmail.com. s21,o12

HELP WANTED Drivers: $3,000.00 Orientation Completion Bonus! Dedicated Fleet! Excellent Home-Time!! Full Comprehensive Benefits. (New hires guaranteed minimum $$$ week)! 1yr CDL-A: 1-866-319-1157. s7-28

Handyman who can do it right the first time. Local repairman. Call Doug at 303-756-5655. tfn Gardener can do it all. Flowers. Trim and prune, weed, loving care of roses. Good local references. 720-404-8032. tfn

NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that an amendment to the 2017 budget has been submitted to the District. A copy of the proposed amended budget is on file in the office of Simmons and Wheeler, 304 Inverness Way South, Suite 490, Englewood, Colorado, where the same is open for public inspection. Such proposed budget and amended budget will be considered at a public hearing during a meeting of the District to be held at Simmons and Wheeler, 304 Inverness Way South, Suite 490, Englewood, Colorado, on October 3, 2017, at 4:15 P.M. Any interested elector of the District may file any objections to the proposed budget or amended budget at any time prior to final adoption of the budget and amended budget by the governing body of the District.

S14-O5

Colorado Statewide Classified Advertising Network

BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS: WILLOW TRACE METROPOLITAN DISTRICT /s/ WHITE BEAR ANKELE TANAKA & WALDRON Attorneys at Law Published in The Villager Published: September 28, 2017 Legal # 7677 ____________________________ NOTICE AS TO PRELIMINARY BUDGET AND PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that a preliminary budget has been submitted to the Arapahoe Library District Board of Trustees for the ensuing year of 2018. That a copy of such preliminary budget has been filed in the office of the District at 12855 E. Adam Aircraft Circle, Englewood, Colorado, where same is open for public inspection.

To place a 25-word COSCAN Network ad in 91 Colorado newspapers for only $300, contact B.T. at The Villager, 303-773-8313 ext 301. HELP WANTED

Seeking Senior Construction Specialist in Lead, SD to oversee complex construction with minimal supervision. B.S. in Construction Management or related, 10+ years’ experience required. http://bit.ly/2fbkC6m

WANTED Cash for Mineral Rights Free, no-risk, cash offer. Contact us with the details: Call: 720-988-5617 Write: Minerals, PO BOX 3668, Littleton, CO 80161 Email: opportunity@ecmresourcesinc.com

WANTED

SYNC2 MEDIA

FREON R12 WANTED: CERTIFIED BUYER will PICK UP and PAY CA$H for R12 cylinders or cases of cans. (312) 291-9169; www.refrigerantfinders.com

Buy a 25-word statewide classified line ad in newspapers across the state of Colorado for just $300 per week. Ask about our frequency discounts! Contact B.T. at 303-773-8313 ext 301.

A public hearing on such preliminary budget will be held Tuesday, October 17, 2017, at 5:30 p.m. preceding the regular meeting of the Arapahoe Library District Board of Trustees at the Smoky Hill Library, 5430 S. Biscay Circle, Centennial, Colorado. Any interested elector within such Arapahoe Library District will be given the opportunity at the hearing to be heard concerning the preliminary budget and may inspect the preliminary budget and file or register any objections thereto at any time prior to the final adoption of the budget, scheduled for Tuesday, November 14, 2017, 5:30 p.m., at the Koelbel Library, 5955 S. Holly Street, Centennial, Colorado. Published in The Villager Published: September 28, 2017 Legal # 7678 ____________________________

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE

— End of Legals —

GMMEEEEETT U H SWAP S

SEE THE NEW 2018 SLEDS FROM Artic Cat, Ski-Doo, and Polaris

P ub

lic N o t i

s ce

OCTOBER 7-8 National Western Complex - Denver For show details and discount tickets, visit

www.COSnowmobileExpo.com


PAGE 18 | THE VILLAGER • September 28, 2017

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Junior League to release cookbook in 2019: Centennial Celebrations

The wait is almost over. Junior League of Denver (JLD) announced that Centennial Celebrations, JLD’s sixth cookbook, is slated for release in 2019. The new cookbook will join the League’s collection of five other awardwinning cookbooks. The League needs your help! Celebrating JLD’s 100 years of serving Colorado and the many flavors of the Centennial State, Centennial Celebrations will feature recipes for the meals and occasions that connect us. We are looking for your favorite recipes for celebrations of all sizes. From date nights to large holiday gatherings and everything in between, how do you celebrate with food? All submissions will be considered. Submit your favorite recipes by November 20! 1. Online at www.frprecipe collection.com, enter Book

Code 8020-VS 2. Email to recipes@jld.org 3. Mail to: Junior League of Denver c/o Recipe Collection 1140 Delaware Street Denver, CO 80204 JLD’s five award-winning cookbooks have been a Denver institution since Colorado Cache was released in 1978. The League has sold more than 2.1 million books to date, with net proceeds totaling $6.9 million. JLD is well known for creating incredible cookbooks that feature unique triple-tested recipes, as well as

mouth-watering recipe photos and Colorado landscape photography. Proceeds support the League’s efforts to train women and improve our community. A great example is JLD’s newest community initiative, Leaders United in Volunteer Service (L.U.V.S.), a League-wide day of service. For the inaugural year, JLD members will complete nine projects in the Globeville and Elyria-Swansea (GES) neighborhoods on Saturday, September 23, 2017. The League has been hosting Read2Kids literacy events at Swansea Elementary for many years, and is proud to continue supporting these wonderful neighborhoods with partners like Habitat for Humanity, Denver Public Library Friends Foundation, Swansea Elementary, and others.

Shantell Martin paints the streets of the Denver Theatre District Beginning Oct. 16, over the course of four to six days, internationally renowned artist Shantell Martin will create one of her signature black-and-white drawings on the streets of the Denver Theatre District, covering an area on 14th Street from Stout to Champa, wrapping around Champa, and including the entire outdoor plaza of the Colorado Convention Center. DTD presents Martin’s installation as part of its Terra Firma series to enliven a 16-block area of downtown

Denver through interactive, immersive and experimental art and culture events and experiences. The series, including Martin’s installation, is curated by NINE dot ARTS. “We are working closely with NINE dot ARTS to select artists for Terra Firma who embody the efforts of the Denver Theatre District. We’re focused on providing our community and visitors with experimental arts and culture experiences that captivate and engage,” said David Ehrlich, executive director, DTD. “Sh-

Colorado Metalsmithing Association at Outnumbered Gallery

Friday, October 6th, from 5 - 8 PM sculptu and jewelry from Featuring sculpture members of the Colorado Metalsmithing Association or CoMA, as well as the basketry of Mayumi Tsukuda.

antell’s fluid approach to her work is a perfect fit. Her largescale signature drawing will engage the community and become an integral part of how people experience the Denver Theatre District.” “My work is a meditation of drawn lines – a language of characters, creatures and messages that invites the community to share in the creative process,” said Martin. “I’m excited to bring this work to downtown Denver where I will create not only my largest and most publicfacing installation to date, but also the first on the ground.” In addition to the ground drawing, Martin has designed a sculptural bench that will read “DON’T HIDE + YOU ME” to be installed near the Colorado Convention Center entrance on 14th Street. The installation will remain for two to three years, maintained through a protective coat and upkeep by the Denver Theatre District. For a shorter period of time, DTD will feature Shantell’s art on the triple billboard on the corner of 13th Street and Champa Street.

Dreaming of your European vacation? Remind yourself with a beautiful European scene all year round Visit our showroom to see other wonderful European oil paintings to enhance your home. The holiday season is approaching fast. 1111 W. Evans Ave., Suite C Denver, CO 80223 303-936-4212 artsource-design.com Trade Discounts Available Hours: Monday - Friday 9:30 to 4:30 or by appointment

New 7,000-square-foot Opera Colorado Opera Center space at 4121 S. Navajo St. in Englewood.

Opera Colorado announces new center in Englewood

Opera Colorado announces that it will relocate its administrative offices to Englewood, combining the company’s office space with rehearsal space as part of the new, 7,000-square-foot Opera Colorado Opera Center. For the past 30 years, Opera Colorado has conducted business out of a 4,800-square-foot administrative office located on South Colorado Boulevard in Denver’s Belcaro neighborhood, with rehearsals taking place downtown in The Studio Loft at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House and in other venues in and around the Denver Performance Arts Complex. Now, by bringing together under one roof the administrative and artistic functions of the company, Opera Colorado will experience unprecedented synergy between the organization’s administration and its artistic product. Staff and artists will have direct, immediate access to each other’s work, allowing for greater collaboration and innovation across the entire Opera Colorado team. “The idea of moving Opera Colorado’s office has been years in the making, and we are thrilled to finally see all the pieces align this past year, and our vision of creating an Opera Center come to fruition,” stated Opera Colorado General Director Greg Carpenter. The new 7,000-square-foot Opera Center will be located at 4121 S. Navajo St., Suite 100, in Englewood, in a 1930s industrial warehouse with a bow-shaped truss ceiling, exposed brick and ample natural light. With square footage divided nearly equally, half the building will serve as office space featuring an open floor plan with glass architectural elements to promote an open and airy feel. The adjacent rehearsal venue will boast acoustic cloud ceilings and dimmable lighting, making it suitable for hosting events in addition to rehearsals. The property is currently owed by LCP Development, which has worked closely with Opera Colorado in developing this project. Opera Colorado signed a 10-year lease for the property in July and construction for tenant improvements is now underway, with a target move-in date set for late November.

Opera Colorado Managing Director Paul Deckard, who joined the organization in the spring, has been intimately involved with the details of the relocation. “This exciting move for Opera Colorado was possible because of Greg Carpenter’s visionary leadership,” said Deckard. “We worked closely with the board of directors in methodically finding the best possible option for Opera Colorado without increasing our existing facilities budget and while improving our expense control. These efforts will provide great momentum and stability for the company.” Discussions for Opera Colorado’s office and rehearsal space relocation began in February of this year, when SVN Commercial Real Estate Advisors were engaged to help the company identify a well-suited location. During the search process, Opera Colorado’s leadership remained open to all possibilities throughout the Denver Metro Area including downtown Denver, Littleton, Englewood and Glendale. The property in Englewood, however, stood out for having the best intersection of location, space and cost, as well as for the building’s existing architecture, its surrounding community and its close proximity to public transportation for artists and staff to commute directly to downtown and the Ellie Caulkins Opera House via RTD rail lines. Additionally, the new building is located in a Colorado Enterprise Zone, which gives Opera Colorado the opportunity to apply for additional tax credit incentives. “Opera Colorado had many options for their new location and we are very pleased that they chose Englewood,” stated Englewood Community Development Director Brad Power. “Our Economic Development staff worked closely with them to identify suitable office space. As an employer that is bringing new jobs to Englewood, they received a rebate of some of the taxes associated with the completion of their office space under our Primary Employer Incentive Program. Opera Colorado is a great addition to the vibrant and diverse Englewood business community.”


Entertainment

September 28, 2017 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 19

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Music of the spheres—songs that have looked to the stars for inspiration BY LUCIE M. WINBORNE REMIND MAGAZINE Since the beginning of time, humans have looked to the stars with fascination and dreamed of what lies beyond them. In that time, many musicians have created their own unique interpretations of the eternal question of how humans might fare in that seemingly endless expanse, as evidenced in these five “celestial” compositions.

ritated and I went downstairs and it turned into a sort of cosmic song rather than ‘Why are you always mouthing off at me?’”

Rocket Man

Space Oddity

David Bowie admitted that he was on a bit of an unearthly journey of his own when inspiration for his 1969 tune struck, thanks to the fact that he was “very stoned” when he went to see 2001: A Space Odyssey. The tale of Major Tom floating ‘round his tin can became a hit for the singer, and in 2013 astronaut Chris Hadfield performed it on the International Space Station. On Facebook, an impressed Bowie called the

Debuting in October The Halcyon

Ovation’s series The Halcyon will debut on Monday, Oct. 2 at 8 p.m. MST. From the producers of Downton Abbey and The Crown, The Halcyon is a criticallyacclaimed drama that takes you inside a bustling and glamorous five-star hotel at the center of London during World War II. A captivating look at the private lives of London socialites and visiting hotel guests through the dark prism of war—revealing the extraordinary impact war has on families, politics and personal relationships. A hit in the United Kingdom that critics put on par with first-rate period dramas like Downton Abbey and featuring original music from multi-award-winning singersongwriter Jamie Cullum, The Halcyon stars Steven Mackintosh (Luther), Olivia

rns with SCAnDAL retu

historic video “possibly the most poignant version of the song ever created.”

Across the Universe

While John Lennon’s lyrics reflected the Beatles’ interest in transcendental

Williams (Manhattan), Matt Ryan (Constantine) and Hermione Corfield (Knights of the Roundtable: King Arthur). In the premiere episode, Lord Hamilton (Alex Jennings) returns to the hotel just as a scandal threatens to engulf it. A mysterious American guest arrives and Garland (Mackintosh) must reckon with unwanted visitors. Freddie (Jamie Blackley) returns to the hotel with a surprise for Emma (Corfield).

meditation, its roots were decidedly earthbound: The line “Words are flowing out like endless rain into a paper cup” was sparked by first wife Cynthia’s nagging. As Lennon later explained, “I was a bit irbe at their worst, he finds himself tasked with an unbelievable mission … saving the world. This is a unique one-hour drama filled with hope, heart and a good dose of irreverent humor. On a dangerous path of despair, Kevin returns to his childhood home in Texas to crash with his widowed twin sister, Amy (JoAnna Garcia Swisher), and teenaged niece Reese (Chloe East). A series of fantastic events, in-

A short story by Ray Bradbury gets the ultimate credit for this Elton John classic about a lonely man sent to live on Mars as a scientific experiment, torn between dedication to his “job five days a week” and family back on Earth, with lyricist Bernie Taupin noting, “It’s common knowledge that songwriters are great thieves, and this is a perfect example.” The song rose to No. 2 in the United Kingdom and No. 6 in the United States, and has been covered by luminaries ranging from Kate Bush to Alvin and the Chipmunks.

Walking on the Moon

In a video filmed at the Kennedy Space Center, this reggae-flavored ode

cluding a meteorite landing near the house, leads Kevin to meet an unlikely celestial guide, Yvette (Kimberly Hébert Gregory).

Valor

The CW will premiere its new drama Valor on Monday, Oct. 9 at 7 p.m. An elite unit of Army helicopter pilots called the Shadow Raiders is sent on a top-secret mission to Somalia, a mission that goes terribly awry. Only two

hell! House bombs another White My life on television— and what’s next

BY DAMIAN HOLBROOK Cheers to Mr. Mercedes for the smooth ride to the dark side. From a high-octane cast led by Brendan Gleeson and Harry Treadaway to the bone-deep dread that soaks each scene, Audience Network’s layered, haunting take on Stephen King’s tale of an ex-cop’s hunt for a madman continues to drive us wild.

you save 84% off Tv GuIDe MaGaZINe

EXCLUSIVE!

Sneak peek at e isod the 400th ep

the ultimAte Guide to WhAt’s Worth WAtchinG

R: LAW & ORDE

PLUS

figURE g SkAtinW PREViE at

Who’ll shine tional the U.S. Na hips Champions

for less than 40¢/wk!

ents favorite mom

BEACHESie!

Grab a hankhot Inside the remake

one year special

start your subscription online, By Mail or Call

20

$

JAN. 16–29, 2017

• double issu

Magazin tv guide

members of the team return safely: Warrant Officer Nora Madani (Christina Ochoa), one of the unit’s first female helicopter pilots, and her commanding officer, Capt. Leland Gallo (Matt Barr), while the whereabouts of their comrade Jimmy Kam (W. Tré Davis) are unknown. Now back in the United States, Madani and Gallo are the only ones who know the truth about what really went wrong in Somalia.

Jeers to the Bachelor in Paradise dudes for being dawgs. During the season finale’s reunion, it was revealed that Robby, Daniel and Dean all did wrong by the ladies they left Paradise with, making us wonder if the free vacation is worth all the ugliness we saw from these hotties. Jeers to Amazon for canceling The Last Tycoon. Listen, we get it. The period drama about Hollywood in the ‘30s was pricey and maybe not the hugest hit for the streaming site. But it is never OK to take Matt Bomer away from our screens. We’re still mad at USA for ending White Collar ... and they didn’t even charge us for a Prime membership!

With A GreAt offer from tV Guide mAGAzine

for Villager Media group readers only

m reveal their Mariska and tea

Based on a keyboard riff from the early ‘80s, with lyrics inspired by “Space Oddity,” a tune not even originally intended for release as a single hit No. 1 in 25 countries for Swedish rockers Europe and remains a crowd-rallying favorite at sporting events. And though they didn’t make it to Venus, writer Joey Tempest said that here on terra firma, “It does communicate so well with the audience and we really love playing it.”

sTop searChing. sTarT WaTChing.

LILY TOMLIN

SVU

The Final Countdown

Cheers to To Tell the Truth for keeping it in the family. As much as we love host Anthony Anderson, we cannot lie. The best thing about ABC’s reboot is his mama Doris’s hilariously honest asides as the show’s scorekeeper.

Kevin (Probably) Saves the World

ABC will premiere its new series Kevin (Probably) Saves the World on Tuesday, Oct. 3 at 8 p.m. Kevin Finn (Jason Ritter) is not a good person. He’s not terrible, but he’s selfish, and clueless, and values material wealth and status over all else. And he’s beginning to realize that those things aren’t making him happy— in fact, he’s fairly miserable. Just when things seem to

to space exploration even featured Stewart Copeland drumming on a Saturn V moon rocket, but the original title and riff owed their existence to Sting’s late-night inebriation in a Munich hotel suite and attempt to clear his head by “walking ‘round the room.” Sobered up the next day, he changed what he called “a stupid title” to “something even more stupid.”

e $4.99

e

online: tvguidemagazine.com/newsoffer2 mail: complete order form below call: 1-800-365-1940 WHeN CaLLING use PRoMo: l7nWspadC

greaT reasons To sTarT your suBsCripTion Every issue delivers inside scoop on your favorite shows Breaking news keeps you in the know Highlights help guide you to what’s worth watching Your favorite stars take you behind the scenes 28 Pages of easy-to-use primetime listings


PAGE 20 | THE VILLAGER • September 28, 2017

Profile for Patrick Sweeney

9-28-17 Villager E edition  

9-28-17 Villager E edition  

Advertisement