Issuu on Google+

50¢ • Vol. 92 • No. 36

August 29, 2013

What’s Inside w

NEWS

Denver Bar Association distributes hundreds of backpacks

Citizens group steamed over long-awaited Depot sale SEE PAGE 4

LOCAL

Littleton fire chief announces retirement SEE PAGE 8

CHARITY

Reporter’s cancer fundraiser continues SEE PAGE 12

DPS students Khaled Ali, Abdi Salah and Yasir Salah pose with their new backpacks.

T

hree hundred Denver Public Schools students experiencing homelessness had the opportunity to enjoy a spectacular back-to-school carnival at Whittier K-8 with their families on Aug. 10. Each student received a backpack full of school supplies helping him or her to be prepared to go back to school. The event was filled with many fun activities such as face painting, balloon animals, music, carnival games, bouncy castles and great food.

“It was so wonderful to see the kids enjoying themselves and just getting to be kids!” said Anna Theisen, Homeless Liaison, DPS. “This was a great way to help our students kick off the new school year and the volunteers did such an amazing job creating a fun day that made each student and parent feel special and valued.”  The 2013 drive, organized by the Denver Bar Association’s Community Action Network Committee, was a great success. Thanks to the generosity of the

INDEX

more than 40 local law firms who donated schools supplies, the CAN Committee was able to fill almost 300 backpacks. Committee members, DPS and employees from the participating firms also volunteered their time and energy to put on the carnival.  Students were invited to the event through the Educational Outreach Program of DPS (EOP Homeless Services). This program helps eliminate the educational barriers that these students may face, allowing them to have a successful start to the school year. EOP provided support to

2,036 students experiencing homelessness during 2012-2013 and anticipate that number to rise during the 2013-14 school year. “We are seeing a very large increase in the number of requests for basic need items such as school supplies, clothing and food from families, we know that if these needs are not met it is difficult for students to concentrate on academics. We could not do what we do without the incredible generosity and support from the community and organizations like the Denver Bar Association. Thank you,” Theisen said.

DPS goes back to school

Opinion..................................3 WORSHIP DIRECTORY.............8 CLASSIFIEDS...........................9 HOROSCOPES..........................9 LEGALS...........................10 - 11

Volunteer Trisha Leakey helps Esttel Romero and Joshua Badillo catch a fish.

There were long lines at the snow cone stand. Photos courtesy of DBA

Abigail, 5, along with thousands of other Denver Public Schools’ students, started the 2013-2014 school year, Aug. 26. Photo by Elizabeth Denton Hale


PAGE 2 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • August 29, 2013

303-936-7778 SUBSCRIBE TODAY! Unique, exquisite engraving using a 100-year-old process Foil Stamping * Foil EmboSSing * blind EmboSSing Call to discuss your printing needs: • Announcements • Invitations • Stationery

• Business Cards • Letterheads • Gold Embossing

303-789-9400 phone • 303-789-9401 fax orders@bakerengraving.com 4980 Monaco St., Unit B • Commerce City, CO 80022

Veterans Passport To Hope Launches free resource portal

V

eterans now have unprecedented access to services, organizations, and resources throughout Colorado. In addition to raising awareness about the issues veterans are facing upon returning from the battlefields in Iraq and Afghanistan, Veterans Passport To Hope recently unveiled the Colorado Resource Portal For Veterans – www.VeteransResource Portal.com – that brings veteran friendly organizations to the fingertips of veterans and their families. Veterans Passport To Hope believes that it is the responsibility of all Americans to participate in assisting the men and women who have returned home from multiple war zones over the past twelve years and are doing more than their part. Thousands of hours networking with organizations have led to the most comprehensive and detailed list of resources ever assembled; something that has never existed before in Colorado. From activities and community to mental and physical health, the Colorado Resource Portal For Veterans addresses eleven key categories of available resources. Veterans Passport To Hope has

also published a brochure of these resources, which has been distributed throughout the Colorado community. The brochure has helped both veterans and veteran service officers identify appropriate organizations for transition and reintegration to the civilian world. Most importantly, the brochures and Resource Portal assist friends and family members who are looking to turn somewhere for help regarding the veteran in their life.

The most common signs of veterans who are struggling

1. Trouble sleeping 2. Relationship problems 3. Social withdrawal/isolation 4. Alcohol and/or drug problems The Colorado Resource Portal For Veterans brochure can be downloaded as a PDF file from: www.VeteransPassport2Hope. org/Veterans-Resources.

Key features

5. 100 percent free for veterans and their families 6. Largest and most complete list of veteran resources in Colorado 7. Direct points of contact within each organization listed

8. Living, breathing, and growing list of resources 9. All organizations are vetted and can be rated by the veterans who have used their services. “I believe that we have a three to five year window to help our young veterans. In order to ensure successful transition and healthy lives, it will take more than the V.A. It is going to take entire communities throughout the United States, coming together, creating resources, volunteering, and placing veteran needs as a priority. Colorado has been very successful in this regard. That’s why we’ve created the Veteran’s Resource Portal; to bring these resources to veterans and their families,” said Shane Schmutz, executive director Veterans Passport To Hope. These are tough times for our veteran community. Together we can make a difference by ensuring our veteran community not only has every opportunity (which they have earned through years of service to their country) afforded to them, but also access to the necessary resources to continue their mission towards a successful transition into civilian life.

Coloradans unaware of new health insurance requirements Colorado HealthOP helps prepare to purchase health insurance

Pet of the Week A

t over 14 pounds, they might want to change my name to Garfield. I do like my food and will even meow to remind when it is time to feed me. I’m a 3-year-old, buff tabby who is super friendly and loves to snuggle with you for naps. I would especially enjoy being the only cat in the house so I can have all the food and all the love. I am at the Dumb Friends League, 2080 S. Quebec street, Denver and my ID# is A650855. To see my other feline friends available for adoption, please visit ddfl.org.

Gonzo

Hundreds of cats need homes!

From now through Sept. 8 the Dumb Friends League is waiving adoption fees on cats one year or older. At the Dumb Friends League, all cat adoptions include spay/neuter, a microchip ID and initial vaccinations. Visit ddfl.org to find your next furry friend.

  According to a June Gallup poll, nearly half (43 percent) of uninsured Americans are unaware they are required by law to carry health insurance by Jan.1, 2014. In Colorado, that translates to more than 350,000 Coloradans who may not know that they have less than five months to find health insurance coverage. The new health insurance requirements come with penalties for those who do not comply. Consumers who do not secure health insurance coverage in 2014 may have to pay fines of $95 per adult or 1 percent of adjusted family income – whichever is greater. Fines will escalate in future years. With October’s open enrollment period just around the corner, now is the time to get educated.  To help prepare Coloradans for new health insurance requirements, Colorado HealthOP, Colorado’s first statewide nonprofit health insurance cooperative, offers advice to help individuals make the best choices for their personal and financial health.  “Recent changes in health care make it possible for more people than ever to have access to affordable, quality health insurance,” said Julia Hutchins, chief executive officer of Colorado HealthOP. “The biggest challenge the health care community faces is educating Coloradans – whether they are uninsured, underinsured or unhappy with their current health insurance – about the options that are now available and how to ac-

cess them.”  In preparation for these new health insurance requirements, Colorado HealthOP recommends Coloradans follow six steps to get health insurance coverage:

1. Learn more about how health reform affects you and your family

Changes in health care affect every Coloradan. Colorado HealthOP offers details about how the changes may impact you and your family on its website www.COHealthOP.org. 

2. Ask your employer about coverage

If you are employed, find out if your employer will offer health insurance in 2014. Recent changes in health care make it more affordable for many small employers to cover their employees.

3. Familiarize yourself with Connect for Health Colorado

If you do not receive health care coverage through your employer, you have the option of purchasing an individual plan through Connect for Health Colorado, the state’s online health insurance marketplace. Enrollment begins Oct. 1, and you will start receiving coverage Jan. 1.

4. Find out if you qualify for tax credits

Many individuals and families are now eligible for tax credits to help cover the cost of health insurance. Colorado HealthOP can help you determine whether you qualify. Visit Colorado HealthOP’s website or call 720-

627-8900 to speak with an insurance expert.

5. Do your homework

Individuals and families will have access to a variety of health insurance plans from multiple carriers. While many will look at cost as a major factor in their decision-making, there are other important considerations, such as: • Do you prefer working with a nonprofit or a for-profit health insurance company? • Does the company offer wellness benefits or incentives to help your family stay healthy and save money? • Does the company have a reputation for good customer service? Visit www.COHealthOP.org for more information about Colorado HealthOP’s plans.

6. Sign up

Be informed before open enrollment starts. Sign up to receive information so that you’re ready to enroll for health insurance coverage in October. “Unfortunately, the people who are most affected by the new health insurance requirements are those who are least aware of what they need to do,” Hutchins continued. “As a health insurance cooperative, we are committed to providing affordable, quality and hassle-free coverage. We are also dedicated to helping Coloradans take charge of their own health care decision-making.”  For more information about Colorado HealthOP or to learn more about how changes in health care affect you or your family, visit www.COHealthOP.org.


August 29, 2013 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • PAGE 3

– denver –

herald dispatch

opinion

Pre-season blues KINDLING

By Robert Sweeney

Broncos keeping passing game under wraps Labor Day is approaching – where has the summer gone? It seems to always fleet so swiftly into fall and winter.

Skiers and boarders are counting the days but for many of us scraping that ice off the windshield with cold winds blowing is not enjoyable. What does make this time of year enjoyable is football, then Thanksgiving and the holiday season. But for many of us, the return of high school, college and professional football is our calling. High school sports are special for families with athletes; there’s nothing like watching a son, daughter, grandson or granddaughter play sports. As far as college teams go, we root for those teams where we have connections. Some of us love University of Colorado, Colorado State University and the University of Denver. Our beloved Broncos have now

played three pre-season games with a 2-1 record. Like most Broncos’ fans, I’m scratching my head with all the Super Bowl hype when we lose one game 40-10 and the following week we trail the Rams 20-10 at halftime with Manning playing the entire first half. Hmmmmmm, what does all this mean? Well take heart fans; I think we’re keeping our playbook close to Coach Fox’s vest. If you noticed, QB Manning delivered very few long pass plays. I think we’re keeping our long-range pass plays off the pre-season menu, and that will be an awesome attack. I noticed in the Rams game, wide receiver Eric Decker was wanting more passes but instead we were running Hillman and Ball into the line. Broncos still seeking a star running back, it seems like we

2200 S. Federal Blvd., Unit 6 Denver CO 80219

have about four pretty good backs, including Knowshon Moreno, who I think is still the best. Now did you notice how our second team was much better than St. Louis’s second team? Our second team won the game and, outside of a last minute fumble, played very well. I think that means that we have some really good team depth and that the Broncos go really deep in talent. It looks like we will need the depth to make up for the growing list of injuries. We have plenty of running backs, a great passing attack, and the defense is going to be the question for the upcoming season. I think the Broncos have been playing possum on offense. Only time will tell.

More scientists rip global warming REMARKS

By Mort Marks

Recently, there have been numerous scientific studies questioning the values projected by the UN’s past report of their “Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change” and on their forthcoming report next month. Despite the fact that nearly a thousand scientists from around the world have spoken out against

VILLAGER VOICES

the hysteria created by “global because they have criticized and hundreds of their colleagues beGLORYUS GOINGS ON pointed out the errors in the mis- cause they basically agree with warming,” candidates for public office must still have to consider led theory of global warming? Vaughan. what if anything should be done How could such a comparison Vaughan said, “The cause of about this question, because Vice be applied to Nobel Prize win- global change is fundamentally President Al Gore still insists that ning physicist Ivar Giaver, a sup- due to the sun and its effect on anyone who calls his theory into porter of Obama in the last elec- the Earth as it moves about in its question is a bigot. tion, because he publicly resigned orbit, not from manmade activiA report in the prestigious Last from the American Physical Soci- ties.” Resistance on Aug. 12 pointed ety because he could not live with The question is why is there so out that in an interview with the their statement, “The evidence is much passion about global warmWashington Post’s Ezra Klein, Al incontrovertible: global warming ing even though the facts show Gore actually compared “Warm- is occurring.” there has been a lack of such By Glory Weisberg By Kenneth W. James, CFA ing, ‘deniers’ to racists, ‘homoHow could Gore’s compariphobes’ and drunks.” son be applied to such scientists warming for well over the past 10 How could all these hun- as Dr. Diane Douglas, a climatol- years? The answer must lie in the dreds of eminent scientists, many ogist who worked for the Departfact that many global warming whomGREENER are affiliatedPASTURES with such ment of Energy; to Dr. George T. alarmists, such as academic represtigious institutions as NASA, Wolff, a former member of the searchers, certain businesses, and the U.S. Naval and Air Force, the EPA’s Science Advisory Board; charitable foundations that work Defense Department, Princeton to Dr. Mark L. Campbell, a proUniversity, Tulane University, fessor of Chemistry at the U.S. the tax system by promising to the U.S. Naval Academy and the Naval Academy and retired save our planet from warming deEPA be compared to “racists, ho- NASA atmospheric scientist struction have all done financially mophobes and drunks” by Gore Dr. William Vaughan and the well.

CAPITAL GAINS

COLE’S CORNER

SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

By Shirley Smith

By Chuck Green

SCHOOL MATTERS

ONE YEAR / 52 ISSUES.............$30 SENIORS / ONE YEAR................$25

By Joshua Cole

F lair!

Mail To: DENVER HERALD DISPATCH 2200 S. Federal Blvd., Unit 6 Denver, CO 80219 Call: 303-936-7778 or Fax: 303-936-0994

NAME: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ By Jim Miller By Judith Baenen ADDRESS: _________________________________________________________________________________________________ By Scottie Taylor Iverson St. Mary’s Academy

CITY/STATE/ZIP: ____________________________________________________________________________________________ PHONE NUMBER: ___________________________________________________________________________________________

Check Enclosed _________ Exp. Date _______________________________ Visa Card No.__________________________________ MasterCard No_________________________________ _________ Exp. Date _______________________________ Signature ________________________________________________________________________________________ (required if using credit card)

(303) 936-7778 Fax: (303) 936-0994

ROBERT SWEENEY, Publisher 303-773-8313 x350 Gerri SWEENEY, Co-Publisher 303-773-8313 x307 gerri@villagerpublishing.com

ELIZABETH DENTON HALE, Editor 303-773-8313 x312 editorial@villagerpublishing.com

MATTHEW ROWLES, Sales, Classified Ads, Legals 303-936-7778 or 720-434-5891 matt@hdnewspaper.com

TOM McTIGHE Production 303-773-8313 x300

production@villagerpublishing.com

Stefan Krusze, Photographer octaviangogol@aol.com

Single Copy $.50 $30 one year Seniors: $25 per year Call for Out of Town Rates

Periodicals

Published every Thursday. Postage Paid in Denver, Colorado. A Colorado Statutory Publication, CRS (1973) 24-70 et al. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Denver Herald-Dispatch, 2200 S. Federal Blvd., Unit 6, Denver CO 80219 U.S.P.S. 241-760 ISSN: 1542-5797

E-mail your submissions to: editorial@villagerpublishing.com

Deadlines

Display Advertising, Press Releases, Letters - 3 p.m. Thursday Classified and Legal Advertising, –Noon Friday . . .“To decide whether we should have a government without newspapers, or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.” -Thomas Jefferson

Letter to the Editor Submissions

To be published, letters to the editor sent to the Denver Herald-Dispatch must be signed (name must be legible), address and phone number included. Only the name and city will be printed in the paper. When the writer refuses to be identified, it usually means they are attacking something or someone, and this might be OK, but only if their name is attached. Please email your letters to editorial@villagerpublishing. com.

QUOTE of the WEEK “Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.” – John F. Kennedy


Sold! PAGE 4 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • August 29, 2013

A citizens group wants to derail the recent sale of the historic Englewood Depot. The City Council voted 5-2 this month to sell the building to a Denver couple, but some think the Englewood Historic Preservation Society, which offered to buy the building for $1, has been railroaded. File photo

Citizens group steamed over long-awaited Depot sale

By Peter Jones The City of Englewood has formally accepted an offer to sell the Englewood Depot to a Denver couple for $30,000, but an opposing citizens group is still firing its engines. On Aug. 19, the City Council gave final approval to sell the historic train station to Tom and Patty Parson, who plan to turn the dormant building on Dartmouth Avenue into a letterpress museum. The vote was 5-2 with Councilmembers Joe Jefferson and Rick Gillit opposing the controversial transfer. Mayor Pro Tem Jim Woodward, who strongly supported the sale, says the Parsons’ offer was the most viable of any that has been brought to the council, particularly in comparison to a bid from the Englewood Historic Preservation Society, which had wanted to buy the depot for $1 and turn the 1,700-squre-foot building into a public museum dedicated to Englewood history. “What the Preservation Society offered was zero,” Woodward said after the council’s preliminary vote last month. “They wanted the city to provide sewer and water hookups and to pay no tap fees and for the city to waive all sales and use tax. The Parson bid appeared more sustainable.” Despite protests from citizen activists, most loudly from the Englewood Citizens for Open Government, which has challenged the legality of the sale, the property is expected to formally change hands by this week. That does not mean opponents have given up the fight to derail the sale. ECOG members say the property, frequently called Depot Park, should not have been sold in the first place. They cite the city charter requirement that mandates voter approval before Englewood can sell city-owned parkland. Although the 2006 Parks and Recreation Master Plan listed the depot land as a park and Englewood Parks and Recreation maintains the property, city officials stress that the term “park” had been used informally and that there never was an official designation.

“There are all kinds of things called parks that aren’t parks.” - Englewood Mayor Pro Tem Jim Woodward all kinds of things called parks Whatever the case, the “They’re not allowing us that aren’t parks.” sale’s opponents insist they Barrantine’s group has still were improperly denied the le- to do [a petition] process, not ruled out a legal challenge gal recourse to contest the sale probably because they to Englewood’s decision to through the citizens’ initiative process, which generally al- are well aware we could handle the sale administrativelows petitions for ballot initialy and may seek to recall the get the signatures.” tives to be circulated in direct councilmembers who voted to - Former Englewood City challenge to recently approved approve what she considers an Councilwoman Laurett Barrentine illegal sale. council ordinances. The $30,000 purchase The problem: The city has Even so, ECOG supporters are considered the depot sale an admin- expected to place at least one issue came despite appraisals of as much istrative matter, not an ordinance – a on November’s ballot. If passed, as $425,000. An estimated $370,000 difference that disallows a citizens’ that ballot question would officially in restoration work and a lack of ballot question. designate a series of unofficial city plumbing and heating systems have Former Councilwoman Laurett “parks” in hopes of avoiding avoid been the reason for lower offers. An earlier proposal to buy the Barrentine, an ECOG activist, finds future sales without voter approval. that distinction disingenuous. “We have no dedication process. depot for $50,000 was nearly ac“We should have the right to go We have no regulations to dedicate cepted last year before the potential ahead and do the referendum pro- a park,” Barrentine said, insisting buyer balked at the city’s purchase cess,” she said. “They’re not allow- her movement has been caught in stipulations, which were designed to ing us to do that process, probably a catch 22. “There’s no process, no preserve the exterior of the historic because they are well aware we procedure, no explanation.” structure. The Parsons’ subsequent offer Whatever the reasons for the could get the signatures.” That claim has been strongly re- confusion, Woodward and other – including an agreement that the jected by Woodward, who empha- councilmembers insist the depot buyers pay for restoration costs – sizes the city attorney’s view that be- land in question was never an offi- was the preferred option of a City Council-appointed committee concause the sale was a onetime action cial city park. and not an ongoing policy decision, “Parks and Recreation takes care sisting of two Englewood residents it was proper to handle the issue ad- of the lights on South Broadway and and three “historic-preservation exministratively. that’s not a park,” he said. “There are perts.”

A contract stipulation requires the Parsons to maintain the building’s exterior, but not its well-worn interior. The city would also have first right of refusal should the Parsons wish to sell the depot at a later date. The long-dormant depot opened in 1915, but was abandoned 40 years later. The building is one of the nation’s two remaining vintage railroad depots with a similar pueblostyle design. The other is in Glorietta, N.M. In 1994, the depot – by then, risking demolition – was purchased by an earlier version of the Preservation Society and the building was moved from its original location on South Windermere Street to the north Englewood residential neighborhood where it now sits. The depot was eventually placed on the Colorado Register of Historic Places and underwent an incomplete restoration funded in part by the Colorado Historical Fund. In 2002, after unsuccessful efforts to find a suitable use for the building, the Society deeded the building back to the City of Englewood.

Arapahoe/Douglas Works! offers wage reimbursement for new hires

Inaugural Doo Wop Sock Hop Car Show set for Aug. 31

Companies can receive funding to offset training costs

Namaste Hospice and TWiZTD MiNDZ Entertainment will be sponsoring the Doo Wop Sock Hop Car Show at Cherry Creek Nursing Center, on Saturday, Aug. 31, 10 am. – 2 p.m. Local Denver metro car owners will be showcasing their vintage cars and visiting with the residents, and local community. Cherry Creek Nursing Center specializes in both short-term rehabilitation and long term care. The Rapid Recovery Unit provides beautiful, spacious private rooms for recovery and therapy services. For memory impaired seniors, the Renaissance Unit provides care with dignity, tailored to each residents needs. A variety of funding sources are accepted, including Medicare, Medicaid and most private insurances. Namaste Hospice is a Medi-

  Submitted by Arapahoe County Colorado businesses looking to grow their workforce can now receive a wage subsidy to offset the costs of hiring and training new employees. The Arapahoe/Douglas Works! Workforce Center is excited to announce MATCH (Maximizing Area Talent for Competitive Hires). MATCH is an on-the-job training program funded by the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment that reimburses businesses 50 to 90 percent of a new employee’s wages, up to $6,000 per hire. The reimbursement is intended to assist with the extraordinary cost of training new hires.

The percentage is determined by the company size. “This is a tremendous opportunity for Colorado companies to conserve resources when hiring new employees and also save valuable time in recruiting new employees,” said Arapahoe County Commissioner Bill Holen. “Arapahoe/Douglas Works! will prescreen suitable candidates from our pool of talent that matches your business‚ hiring needs, and then offer a wage subsidy while you get your new employee up to speed with onthe-job training.” Current full-time and part-time on-the-job training opportunities include administrative assistants, general laborers, cash tellers, security officers, production assistants, humanresources assistants, and many other positions.  To qualify, a business must have been operating in Colorado for at

least 120 days, pay into workers compensation and unemploymentinsurance programs, and must not have laid off employees within the past six months. Businesses must sign an agreement with Arapahoe/Douglas Works! before hiring an individual. The business will agree to hire the trainee as an employee of their company, with the commitment to retain the employee after training has been successfully completed and all expectations have been met.  If your business would benefit from a wage subsidy for new hires, contact Cassandra Snow at 303-6361461 or email csnow@arapahoegov. com. To learn more about the workforce center’s free services for job seekers and business, visit www. adworks.org or call 303-636-1160.

care and Medicaid certified fullservice Hospice provider. We are licensed in the State of Colorado, but since our founding fifteen years ago, our focus has been and remains to be that of serving the Denver Metropolitan Community. All of our nurses and certified nursing assistants have extensive training and have expertise in hospice and end-of-life care. The word Namaste is a Sanskrit spiritual salutation that reflects and expresses mutual respect. When one greets someone using the word Namaste, they are essentially saying, “The divine in me bows to the divine in you”. Public is invited for a day of fun and awareness of the joys vintage cars at Cherry Creek Nursing Center, 14699 E. Hampden Ave., Aurora. Staff will be manning the grills for lunch and refreshments.


August 29, 2013 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • PAGE 5

Magnificent Mole Chicken Torta

Magnificent Mole Chicken Torta

Family Features

E

ncouraging kids to get creative in the kitchen is a fun way to make great memories, meals and moments together. And for more than 10 years, Jif® has inspired parents to creatively collabo­ rate with their kids in the Jif Most Creative Sandwich Contest™ for the chance to win a $25,000 college fund. Last year’s top entries ranged from a sweet and spicy sandwich to satisfying snacks and dreamy desserts. Inspire your family with these delicious recipes or check out www.jif.com for even more creative options.

Peanut Butter Pear-ot

Peanut Butter Pear-ot

Makes: 2 Sandwiches 2 tablespoons Jif Natural Creamy Peanut Butter 1 pear, shredded 1 medium carrot, shredded 1 celery stalk, sliced thin 1/4 cup dried cranberries 2 whole wheat flatbread wraps 2 tablespoons Jif Chocolate Flavored Hazelnut Spread 1 teaspoon chopped dry roasted peanuts 1. MIX peanut butter, pear, carrot, celery and dried cranberries in medium bowl. 2. DIVIDE mixture between two flatbread wraps. Wrap snugly. Cut each wrap in half. 3. SPREAD hazelnut spread on cut halves of wraps, and sprinkle on chopped peanuts. 4. PREPARE to delight your taste buds. Don’t forget to share with a friend.

Bananas Foster PB & B

Makes: 1 Sandwich 4 tablespoons butter 2/3 cup brown sugar 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract Bananas 2 thick slices of bread 2 tablespoons Jif Creamy Peanut Butter Crispy cooked bacon 1. MELT butter in pan over medium heat. Stir in brown sugar, cinnamon and vanilla. Peel and slice bananas in half, then slice again lengthwise. Once it begins to bubble, put in slices of banana and cook until bananas are warm, about 2 to 3 minutes. 2. TOAST bread. Spread 1 table­spoon peanut butter (or more, if desired) on each piece of toast. 3. PLACE bacon slices on one side of toast. 4. GENTLY place warm banana slices on top of other piece of toast. 5. CLOSE sandwich and slice in half.

Bananas Foster PB & B

Jacob C., Morgantown, N.C. 2013 Grand Prize Winner Makes: 1 Sandwich Sauce: Crisco ® Original No-Stick Cooking spray 2 tablespoons minced onion 1/4 teaspoon minced garlic 2 tablespoons Jif ® Chocolate Flavored Hazelnut Spread 1/3 cup condensed tomato soup Juice of half a lime (about 2 tablespoons) 1/8 teaspoon ground cumin 1/4 teaspoon dried cilantro 1/4 cup chopped green chili peppers Sandwich: 3/4 cup pulled rotisserie chicken, heated 1 bolillo roll, sliced lengthwise 1 slice Monterey Jack cheese, halved 3 avocado slices 1/2 cup thinly sliced lettuce 1/8 cup chopped tomato Dollop of sour cream (optional) 1. SPRAY small sauce pot generously with no-stick cooking spray; sauté minced onion and garlic over medium-high heat until tender. 2. STIR in spread, tomato soup, lime juice, cumin, cilantro and green chili peppers. Bring to a boil and simmer on low heat for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. 3. REMOVE sauce from heat. Toss half the sauce with pulled chicken; place mixture on bottom half of roll. 4. TOP with cheese slices and place sandwich openfaced under toaster oven or broiler for 2 to 3 minutes until cheese melts. Remove sandwich from oven, and place sliced avocado on top of melted cheese. 5. ADD lettuce, tomatoes, dollop of sour cream (optional) and top half of roll. Use remaining sauce as extra or to make another sandwich.

Our most recent champ, 9-year-old Jacob C. from North Carolina, impressed the judges with his savory Mexican-inspired sandwich using Jif Chocolate Flavored Hazelnut Spread. Get Cooking! This year, your family can be a part of the excite­ ment as Jif launched the 12th Annual Jif Most Creative Sandwich Contest on August 20, 2013. Parents can submit their kid’s creative sandwich recipes using at least two tablespoons of any Jif product (except Jif To Go®). Visit jif.com for Official Rules and more infor­ ma­tion. The Jif Most Creative Sandwich Contest is open to legal residents of the 50 United States and D.C. between six and 12 years of age by November 8, 2013. Void where prohibited.

Banutter Cream Sandwiches

Apple Fries Peanut Butter Surprise

Makes: 1 Sandwich 1 8-inch flour tortilla 3 tablespoons Jif Creamy Peanut Butter, divided 1 tablespoon granola (small chunks) 1 tablespoon mini chocolate chips 1 large apple 1. LAY tortilla flat on plate. Spread 2 table­ spoons peanut butter in 4-inch circle in top center of tortilla (start about 2 inches down from top). 2. SPRINKLE 1 tablespoon of granola and 1 tablespoon of mini chocolate chips on top of peanut butter. Lightly press in. 3. CUT one apple to look like French fries. Lay apple fries vertically on top of the peanut butter circle. Place all apple fries on top of peanut butter; stack if necessary. 4. SPREAD remaining 1 tablespoon peanut butter to line edges of entire bottom half of tortilla. 5. FOLD up bottom half of tortilla to cover half of apple fries. Take right side of tortilla and fold in. Take left side and fold in as well, overlapping the right side. Dab some peanut butter to “glue” sides together. 6. TO EAT: Pull out apple fries one by one, and/ or eat like a sandwich.

Banutter Cream Sandwiches

Makes: 4 Sandwiches 2 ripe bananas 4 tablespoons Jif Creamy Peanut Butter 1 teaspoon honey 8 chocolate graham crackers 1. PEEL 2 ripe bananas and cut into 1-inch slices. Freeze bananas for at least 1 hour, then remove from freezer and put into blender. 2. ADD 4 rounded table­spoons of peanut butter, 1 teaspoon of honey, and blend well. 3. SPOON mixture onto graham cracker and place another graham cracker on top (should make 4 sandwiches). 4. PUT sandwiches in freezer until mixture is frozen solid.

Apple Fries Peanut Butter Surprise


PAGE 6 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • August 29, 2013

August 29, 2013 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • PAGE 7

Tejay van Garderen wins 2013 USA Pro Challenge  The 2013 USA Pro Challenge came to an exciting conclusion Aug. 24, as 2013 Tour de France Sprint Champion Peter Sagan (SVK) of Cannondale Pro Cycling took the stage to the roaring cheers of fans lining the route in Downtown Denver (his fourth stage win of the race). And with an overall time of 22 hours 38 minutes and 48 seconds, Tejay van Garderen (USA) of BMC Racing Team took home the overall win. “I felt like this was a long time coming. I’ve been so close to winning before,” said van Garderen. “Races are difficult to be motivated for after July, but with this race on the calendar, it wasn’t a question on if I was going to stay motivated at all. This is my hometown race, so I wanted it bad. It feels amazing to finally get this win.”  After a tough week of racing over mountains at high altitudes, the riders tackled their first flat stage of the race in Denver. Borrowing from the 2011 route for the ever-popular Denver circuit finish, Stage 7 included eight laps that would showcase LoDo, City Park, Civic Center Park and all the other highlights of downtown. Giving fans a chance to see the riders nine times and the riders plenty of opportunities to familiarize themselves with the course, the stage brought another exciting finish to seven days of fiercely competitive racing. The final jerseys of the 2013 race were awarded and included The Smashburger Leader Jersey going to van Garderen. Sagan kept his hold on the Clif Bar Sprint Jersey. Matt Cooke (USA) of Jamis-Hagens Berman p/b Sutter Homes hung on to the Nissan King of the Mountains Jersey (no points were awarded today). Lachlan David Morton (AUS) of Team GarminSharp kept the Colorado State University Best Young Rider Jersey. And King was awarded the FirstBank Most Courageous Rider Jersey for his overall effort throughout the week. “The 2013 USA Pro Challenge was our best edition ever and we’ve learned more and more each year,” said Shawn Hunter, CEO of the USA Pro Challenge. “These athletes gave us a great show over the course of the last seven days. Fans from the start in Aspen to the finish in Denver witnessed the world’s best cyclists compete in the biggest race in America. The USA Pro Challenge is definitely coming back next year.  For full results, archived footage, GPS data, course information, race play-by-play and more, please visit the official race website www.prochallenge.com.

Race Fans Shara Teitg, Julia Richman and Kendall Kruase Stage 7 winner, Peter Sagan of Slovakia, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock

Matt Cook, USA, of the Tamis-Hagen Berman p/b Sutter Home team; Peter Sagan, Slovakia, of the Cannondale Pro Cycling team; Winner Tejay van Garderen, USA, of the BMC team; Best Young Rider Lachland David Morton, Australia of the Leopard Trek team; and Most Courageous Rider Ben King, USA, of RadioShack Leopard Trek team.

Racers make their way down Larimer Street.

2013 Pro Challenge overall winner Tejay van Garderen and Gov. John Hickenlooper Photos by Stefan Krusze

Mathias Frank of Switzerland and Tejay van Garderen of the USA celebrate their first and second place overall finishes as BMC teammates.

USA Pro Challenge Co-Chairman and CEO Shawn Hunter with NBA legend and bicycling enthusiast Bill Walton

Tejay van Garderen, wearing the Yellow Race Leader’s jersey and BMC team rider, was the USA Pro Challenge overall winner.

Riding with Carmichael Training Systems (CTS Team), Boston Scientific sponsored “100% Battery Operated,” for the heart pacemaker, Heidi Dohse. Yes, Heidi Dohse does have a heart pacemaker and has overcome many challenges, and has fun making the “100% Battery Operated” comment.

The start of the seventh and final stage of the 2013 Pro Challenge in Denver, racers make their way in turn one at Broadway onto Colfax. Stage 7 winner Peter Sagan crosses the finish line.


PAGE 8 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • August 29, 2013

Littleton fire chief announces retirement

Littleton Fire Rescue Chief John Mullin announced his retirement last week, capping a distinguished 40-year career in fire service. Mullin will remain chief of the 160-person department until Dec. 31. His retirement will become effective April 1, 2014, the anniversary of his four-decade commitment to the profession. “I want to thank everyone for their friendship and support during this great adventure as a member of Littleton Fire Rescue,” Mullin said. “I’m really looking forward to spending more time with Colleen and our terrific grandchildren.” Mullin’s career with LFR began in 1974 when he was hired as a firefighter/paramedic. He rose through

the ranks to become a battalion chief. In 1998, he left LFR after he was selected to become the chief of the Woodlands, Texas Fire Department, a master-planned community with a population of 80,000 residents. After six years at the helm in Texas, Mullin was selected as chief of LFR, a department that serves 230,000 residents in the city of Littleton, the Littleton Fire Protection District and the Highlands Ranch Metro District. During his nine-year tenure as chief, Mullin was responsible for LFR becoming a full-transport department, improving the continuity of care for EMS patients. He secured automatic-aid agreements with South Metro and West Metro

Littleton Fire Rescue Chief John Mullin

Fire Rescue, resulting in improved response times for the TrailMark neighborhood and the eastern portion of the district.  Mullin began the accreditation

process with the Commission for Fire Accreditation International, acquired larger office space for the Life Safety Bureau, reached an agreement with West Metro for LFR personnel to train at its state-of-the-art facility, put a fifth medic unit in service, and created the incident-safety officer position, improving safety for firefighters on the scene of incidents. “Chief Mullin has dedicated 40 years of his life to the betterment of this community and to the success of the organization,” City Manager Michael Penny said. “It was important to him to reach that milestone, which is very admirable and something to be incredibly proud of. John has some short-term goals he wants to complete by the end of the year. Other items are longer term, and he and I are in agreement that the timing is good for a new leader to work through those.”

Mullin is a proud Oklahoma State University Cowboy who earned his master’s of science degree in fire and emergency management. He has a second master’s degree in business administration from the University of Phoenix. He earned many awards in his career and his peers recognized his leadership skills when they elected him president of the Missouri Valley Division of the International Association of Fire Chiefs, an organization of 1,125 fire service chief executives encompassing eight states.  He is a graduate of the University of Denver Public Safety Leadership Program and achieved Chief Fire Officer designation from the Center for Public Safety Excellence. Penny will develop a recruitment process with the LFR staff and partners.

Calendar of Events

Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to editorial@villagerpublishing.com.

Arts & Entertainment

Free Days at Denver Cultural attractions

Children’s Museum of Denver: Sept. 3, 2, 2121 Children’s Museum Drive, Denver. www.mychildsmuseum.org. Denver Art Museum: Sept. 7, 100 W. 14th Ave., Denver. Visit 
www.denverartmuseum.org. Denver Museum of Nature and Science: Sept. 8, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver. Visit www.dmns.org.

Swallow Hill Music September Discovery Series At The Café

Concerts begin at 7:30pm, unless otherwise noted, 71 Yale St., Denver. Matt Haslett: Sept. 5. A blend of blues, bluegrass, jazz, rock ‘n’ roll, and traditional folk. The Delta Sonics: Sept. 12, One of the finest blues acts in Colorado. Lee Johnson: Sept. 19. Award-winning singer/songwriter/guitarist and winner of the Durango Songwriters “Write with a Hit Maker” song contest 2010. Open Stage: Sept. 26. Open to all.

‘Priscilla Queen of the Desert The Musical’

Sept. 3 – 15, Buell Theater, Denver Performing Arts Center, 14th and Curtis streets, Denver. With More than over 500 dazzling 2011 Tony® Award-winning costumes, Priscilla Queen of the Desert The Musical features a hit parade of over 20 dance-floor favorites including “It’s Raining Men,” “Finally” and “I Will Survive.” Tickets: 303-893-9582 or www. denvercenter.org.

Denver Plein Air Arts Festival: Fisher/Ruthven/Smallwood

Sept. 6 - 28, Sept. 6 reception,

5 – 9 p.m., The Byers-Evans House Gallery, 1310 Bannock St., Denver. Features works by Karen Fisher, Scott Ruthven, and Paul Smallwood, winners in the Emerging Artists category of the 2012 Denver Plein Air Arts Festival. Call 303-620-4933 or visit www. coloradohistory.org/be.

Friendship Powwow and American Indian Cultural Celebration

Sept. 7, Acoma Plaza between Denver Art Museum 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway and Denver Public Library. 10 a.m. Gourd dance; noon, Powow Grand Entry. Colorful dance competitions, hands-on activities with local artists, community sewing circle with artist-in-residence Marie Watt in a community sewing circle. Visitors can stop in to see Red, White and Bold: Masterworks of Navajo Design, 1840–1870, on view through Sept. 22. Powwow activities and general museum admission are free. Visit www.denverart museum.org.

Classes

Heart Health Nutrition

Sept. 18, 11a.m. – noon, South Denver Heart Center, 1000 Southpark Drive, Littleton. “Something’s Fishy” class and cooking demonstration. For information or to register call 303744-1065, www.southdenver.com.

C

lubs/Organizations

Columbine Genealogy & Historical Society

Sept. 10, 9:30 a.m. board meeting, 1 p.m. business meeting and program, Finding the “R” at the Library, with James Jeffrey, research librarian. Visit www.columbinegenealogy.com.

Greater Englewood Chamber Business After Hours

Sept. 19, 6 - 8 p.m., “Cuttn’ it Loose, 901 Englewood Parkway #100. Breasts of Colorado breast casts displayed. 303-789-4473.

Events

A Taste of Colorado

Aug. 30 – Sept. 2, Civic Center Park, West Colfax Avenue and Broadway, Denver. More than 50 area restaurants and food trucks, live music from big-name acts, including MC Hammer and America, KidzStage, featuring magic, clowns and puppets and some classic carnival rides. Call 303-295-6330 or visit www.a tasteofcolorado.org.

Biennial of the Americas

Through Sept. 2, various locations in Denver. International festival of ideas, art and culture that provides a non-partisan platform for leaders in business, government, civil society, and the arts to examine the significant issues impacting life in the Americas. Check www.biennialoftheamericas.org for events taking place over Labor Day Weekend.

Denver Food and Wine

Sept. 3 – 9, various times and locations. The popular event attracts more than 5000 food and wine lovers who can sample foodie fare from 40 local restaurants and taste more than 600 samples of wine and spirits on the campus of Metropolitan State University of Denver. The entire culinary, wine and spirits classic is presented by US Foods and US Foods Food Fanatic Magazine. Top sponsors are Southern Wine and Spirits of Colorado and the Colorado Restaurant Association and The Lincoln Motor Company. Visit www.denverfoodandwine.com.

Jim Gill at DPL

Sept. 7, 2 p.m., Central Library B2

Conference Room, 100 W. 14th Ave., Denver. The award-winning musician and author is bringing his Family Room Tour to Denver Public Library. He will strum energetic rhythms on his banjo while everyone claps, sings, dances and even sneezes along to the silly and inspiring musical games that he creates. This interactive concert is free to the public and suitable for kid’s birth to three years old. www.denverlibrary.org.

Antique Appraisal Fair

Sept. 13, noon – 7 p.m., Bemis Public Library, 6014 S. Datura St., Littleton. Bring dishes, jewelry, coins, toys, books, lamps, glassware and other antiques and collectibles to be evaluated by local appraisers. A maximum of two items will be appraised; photos of large pieces of furniture are preferred. Appraisers will explain the history, significance and approximate value of each item. To register for a time slot with appraisers, call the library at 303-795-3961.

Day Out With Thomas

Sept. 14-15, 21-22, 28-29, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Colorado Railroad Museum, 17155 West 44th Ave., Golden. Ride behind a 15-ton replica of Thomas the Tank Engine, star of the popular Thomas & Friends, around the Colorado Railroad Museum’s grounds. Meet Sir Topham Hatt, controller of the railway, participate in activities for the whole family including arts and crafts, storytelling, video viewing, petting zoo, live music and magic shows. For more information, visit www.ColoradoRailroadMuseum.org. Ticket Information: 866-468-7630, 800-3656263 or visit www.TicketWeb.com/dowt or ww.ColoradoRailroadMuseum.org.

Fundraisers

Colorado Fall Home Show

Sept 6 – 8, Colorado Convention Center,

700 14th St., Denver. Will showcase more than 300 exhibitors, well versed in home renovation, remodeling and sustainable living. The event is a fundraiser for grants and scholarships for education in the green and agricultural industry. For more information, visit www.GardeningColorado.com

Hope Center Walk-A-Thon

Sept. 7, 7:30 - 10:30 am, Central Park, 9651 E. Martin Luther King Boulevard, Denver. Register at www.blacktie-colorado.com/rsvp, Event Code: HOPE97.

Aged to Perfection

Sept. 7, 4 p.m., Historic Inn at Hudson Gardens, 6115 S. Santa Fe Drive, Littleton. Features Hazel Miller Band, KMGH news anchor Ann Trujillo. The event will include a silent auction and all proceeds will directly benefit Seniors’ Resource Center. Tickets can be purchased online via www.agedperfectly.eventbrite.com or call Bob Timm, SRC’s Vice President of Development, at 303-235-6918.

Golf Tournament for Cancer League of Colorado

Sept. 23, 10 a.m. Shotgun Start, Glenmoor Country Club, 110 Glenmoor Drive, Cherry Hills Village. To reserve a foursome, contact John Snow, js@hackstafflaw.com, 303-534-4317. To volunteer contact Karen White, Karen@kfwhitepmp.com. Must arrive at 8 a.m.

Health

Alferd Packer Bacon Party

Sept. 14, 3 – 10 p.m., 5663 S. Prince St., Littleton, rain or shine. Live entertainment, food concessions, kids activities, artisan. Fundraiser for the Littleton Rotary Foundation. Visit www.alferdpackerbaconparty. com.

Advertise your church services for only $12.50 Per week! 303-936-7778 Bethany United Methodist

Brentwood United Methodist

Harvey Park Baptist

Notre Dame Catholic

Trinity Lutheran

3501 W. 1st Ave.

1899 S. Irving • 303-936-3447

WE ARE THE HANDS AND FEET OF CHRIST

2112 S. Patton Ct. at West Evans www.harveyparkbaptistchurch.org

2190 S. Sheridan Blvd. 303-935-3900

4225 W. Yale Ave.

303-936-1001

Sunday Anticipated Mass: 4:00 p.m. Saturday

303-934-7163

E-Mail BethUMC@juno.com

Rev. Bich Thy (Betty) Nguyen, Pastor

www.brentwoodchurchdenver.com

SUNDAY SERVICES

8:45 a.m. - English Language Sunday School Sunday School . . . . . . . .9:30 am 9:45 a.m.- English Language Worship Children’s Sunday School Sunday Fellowship . . . .10:15 am 10:45 a.m.- Fellowship Time for All Sunday Worship . . . . . .10:30 am 11:15 a.m.- Vietnamese Language Worship Nursery Provided on Sunday 11:45 a.m.- Children’s Church Thursday Brown Bag Lunch & 5 p.m.- Spanish Language Worship

Bible Study . . . . . . . . . .11:30 am

Sunday Schedule

Nursery Available

Sunday Schedule: 7:30 a.m. • 9:00 a.m. 10:30 a.m. • 12:00 p.m.

COME JOIN US IN WORSHIP

ALL ARE WELCOME

Religious Education………………..9:30 a.m. Worship Service…………...10:45 a.m.

Missouri Synod

(Between Sheridan and Federal)

303-934-2103 Worship 9 a.m. with Deaf Interpretation 10:30 a.m. Sunday School - all ages 10:30 a.m. Nursery Available Early Childhood Center Child Care and Preschool call

303-934-6160


August 29, 2013 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • PAGE 9

v

Classified Line Ads • Classified Display Ads • Service Directory Ads

CALL 303-936-7778

HELP WANTED Drivers: OTR Hopperbottom for HCT. Great Equipment, Great Pay. No Loading Docks or Lumpers. The best OTR trucking job out there! CDL-A, 2yrs exp. 877-714-2513.

SERVICES JIM DA PLUMBER. Licensed plumber with 30 years experience. Your neighborhood plumber. Water Heaters, Remodels, Repairs. Reasonable – Free estimates. 303-922-2832. THE LEAK FINDER ROOFING REPAIR “I take good care of my customers and your roofing needs.” - George New-Repairs- All types of roofs Licensed Insured - Free estimates. Owner operated and run! Ph: 303-366-7368

Drivers: Home Nightly! Great Paying Denver Box truck or CDL-A Flatbed Runs. 1yr Exp. Req. Estenson Logistics. Apply: www.goelc.com 1-888-399-5856

VOLUNTEER VOLUNTEER TUTORS NEEDED for Avid program - JFK High 3-6 hours pr/wk/a.m.  Call Dave 720-423-4452, david_weber@dpsk12.org

WANTED UNWANTED APPLIANCES

Painting, Drywall texturing & repair. 25 years exp. Local. Call Bob 303-887-3538.

Working or not. Picked up at no charge. Call Kyle at 303-922-6009 Or 720-427-6972.

NORM’S CHEAP FENCE & REPAIR

REAL ESTATE

Wood – Chain Link- Ornamental Experienced – Welding Available Free Estimates Call Norm 303-936-5638 Leave Message

Drivers: Super-Regional Dry Van Solo. Home Every 14 days or less. Great Late Model Equipment, all trucks equipped with APU. TX, Midwest and Western 11 Mileage or Percentage Pay, Your Choice! Reliable Company in business since 1985. Call 866-5865092 for details, M-F 8a-5p. www. highcountrytrans.com Drivers: Home Nightly! Great Paying Denver Flatbed! CDL-A or B, 1yr Exp. Req. Estenson Logistics. Apply: www.goelc.com Call 6a-6p: 1-888-399-5856 Immediate Need for Local & Shuttle Drivers-Commerce City! Great Benefits! 401K w/Match, Vacation/Holidays.CDL-A, 1yr exp, good driving record. WW Transport, Inc: 800-9366770 x144, x111 Drivers: Great Paying Out & Back Openings! Quarterly Bonus! No Forced Dispatch! CDL-A, 2yrs. Exp. Req. Miller Brothers Express, x123, x103:  1-888-984-6809

NEWSPAPER PRODUCTION ARTIST

Southeast Denver newspaper/publishing company seeks experienced and motivated print publication designer for a part-time position. (1420 hours/wk.) Full days on Monday and Tuesday to produce and lay out visually appealing pages for two weekly community newspapers. Position requires knowledge of Macintosh computers and software creating various page layout styles with InDesign CS6 and creating ad designs with Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator. Position works closely with production lead position to meet deadlines. Occasional ad design/update work and other minor desktop publishing duties are required. Only applicants with previous print production/design experience will be considered. Additional newspaper publication, journalism, word press   experience is a plus, and could lead to expanded hours and responsibilities.    This is a “print production” position and NOT for a creative artist. Only applicants who can demonstrate a solid understanding of news design principles and have experience creating informational graphics and/or ads will be considered.  Experienced applicants should send resumes and work samples to:  gerri@villagerpublishing.com.

Drivers: Home Nightly! Great Paying Denver Box truck or CDL-A Flatbed Runs. 1yr Exp. Req. Estenson Logistics. Apply: www.goelc. com 1-888-399-5856 Drivers: Local, Shuttle, OTR. Great Benefits! 401k w/Match. Vacation/Holiday Pay. Haul Food Grade Products. CDL-A, 1yr experience, Good Driving Record.  www.wwtransportinc. com or 800-936-6770 x144 or x112

To place a 25-word COSCAN network ad in 100 Colorado newspapers for only $250, call your local newspaper today. Contact Matt at 303-773-8313

M-F Noon, 7, 10:30 pm Sat 10:30pm pm M-FNoon, Noon,4,7,7,10:30 Sun Noon, 7, 10:15 pm Sat Noon, 4, 7, 10:30 pm Sun Noon, 7, 10:15 pm

Your Weekly Horoscope – By Gren Chatworth VIRGO (Aug. 23 – Sept. 22) The aspects for your sign are basically good now but there is a slight chance that you might let some romantic interlude cause a “clash” with a loved one.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 – Jan. 19) This week will be a little brighter than last, but don’t start celebrating quite yet. There are still some heavy forces working against you, but they’re not as over-whelming as they’ve been.

LIBRA (Sept. 23 – Oct. 22) Good forces will be noticed during this week, and whatever you do will turn out well for you. Your career and your social life will have a boost as well.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 – Feb. 18) Travel plans might be just as well to put on hold at the present time. In a few days, you will have the green light to go but have your vehicle checked over carefully.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23 – Nov. 21) Emphasis is on your health this week. Scorpio persons love to eat and you also love to hang around just being comfortable. It may be time for you to embark on a new exercise program. You will feel better in the long run.

PISCES (Feb. 19 – March 20) You are a very determined person, but this week you may run up against more than your fair share of obstacles. Keep a tight grip on your temper, and don’t get uptight just because things don’t immediately work out.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 – Dec. 21) You will be suddenly filled with energy the next few days. New ideas to take to your boss who will be most impressed with your enthusiasm. Your financial matters that you have been worrying about will suddenly take care of themselves.

ARIES (March 21 – April 19) The romance department is knocking this week. You have become infatuated with a new acquaintance. Be careful, as all may not be as rosy as you think. There will be a few disappointments along the way. The word is caution!

TAURUS (April 20 – May 20) Your diplomatic air is paying off for you. People respect you for this and consequently will open up more doors than you can imagine. A call from someone from your past will brighten your week. You will be pleasantly surprised. GEMINI (May 21 – June 20) A little friction is mounting between you and your life partner pertaining to money matters. Get things out in the open and iron out the differences – otherwise there will be no solution. CANCER (June 21 – July 22) You should be feeling on top of the world with a real glowing attitude toward life. Grasp available opportunities with both hands. You are really going to accomplish something great! LEO (July 23 – Aug. 22) You can make a major step in business areas right now. You are responsible to explain all details in this regard to avoid any misunderstands that might occur. The ball is your hands and also your success.


PAGE 10 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • August 29, 2013 LEGAL NOTICES

Legal Notices What are legal/public notices?

“(1) ‘Legal notice’ or ‘advertisement’ means any notice or other written matter required to be published in a newspaper by any laws of this state, or by the ordinances of any city or town, or by the order of any court of record of this state. “(2) ‘Privately supported legal notice or advertisement’ means any legal notice or advertisement which is required by federal, state, or local law or court order which is paid for by a person or entity other than a governmental entity either directly or by direct, specific reimbursement to the governmental entity. “(3) ‘Publicly supported legal notice or advertisement’ means any legal notice or advertisement which is required by federal, state, or local law or court order which is paid for by a governmental entity.” -Legal Publication Laws of Colorado, Colorado Press Association

PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-0783 To Whom It May Concern: On 6/11/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County. Original Grantor: HOLDINGS II LLC Original Beneficiary: JUNGLELAND INVESTMENTS LLC Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: JUNGLELAND INVESTMENTS LLC Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 4/6/2012 Recording Date of DOT: 4/9/2012 Reception No. of DOT: 2012046714 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $55,000.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $55,000.00 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: the covenants of said deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to make payments on said indebtedness when the same was due and owing. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOTS 28, 29, 30, BLOCK 2, DOWNINGS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 3155 Lafayette Street , Denver, CO 80205 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, October 10, 2013, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 8/15/2013 Last Publication: 9/12/2013 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 6/12/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: GADDIS, KIN, HERD & CRAW P.C. JAMES W KIN Colorado Registration #: 1873 118 SOUTH WAHSATCH SUITE #100, COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO 80903 Phone #: (719) 471-3848 Fax #: (719) 471-0317 Attorney File #: HOLDINGSII Published in the Denver Herald First Published August 15, 2013 Last Published September 12, 2013 Legal #: 2013-0783 ________________________________________ DISTRICT COURT, COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO 1437 Bannock Street Denver, CO 80202 Plaintiff: DEVEN PROPERTIES, LLC, a Colorado limited

liability company v. Defendants: PASQUALE J. LOSASSO, an individual, JOANN V. SALAZAR, an individual, RICARDO CORTEZ, an individual, AMERICAN UNITED MORTGAGE CORPORATION d/b/a AMERICAN UNITED MORTGAGE OF COLORADO, a Georgia corporation, PUBLIC SERVICEEMPLOYEES CREDIT UNION, d/b/a PUBLIC SERVICE CREDIT UNION, a Colorado nonprofit corporation, THE ESTATE OF NORMA I. ELLIOTT, EUGENE D. ELLIOTT a/k/a EUGENE V. ELLIOTT, an individual, GREENWOOD INVESTMENT GROUP, LLC a Colorado limited liability company, and all unknown persons who claim any interest in the subject matter of this action Attorneys for Plaintiff Robert W. Hatch II Joseph J. Novak Hatch Ray Olsen Sandberg LLC 730 Seventeenth St., Ste. 200 Denver, Colorado 80202 Phone Number: (303) 298-1800 Fax Number: (303) 298-1804 Email Address: rhatch@hatchlawyers.com; jnovak@hatchlawyers.com Attorney Registration Nos.: 16888, 41904 Case Number: 2013CV32766 Division: SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: JOANN V. SALAZAR, an individual, RICARDO CORTEZ, an individual, and all unknown persons who claim any interest in the subject matter of this action. You are hereby summoned and required to appear and defend against the claims of the complain filed with the court in this action, by filing with the clerk of this court an answer or other response. You are required to file your answer or other response within 351 days after the service of this Summons upon you Service of this summons shall be complete on the day of the last publication. A copy of the complaint maybe obtained from the clerk of the court. If you fail to file your answer or other response to the complaint in writing within 35 days after the date of the last publication, judgment by default may be rendered against you by the court for the relief demanded in the complaint without further notice. This is an action to quiet the title of the Plaintiff in and to the real property situate in Denver County, Colorado, more particularly a described below, attached hereto and by this reference made a part hereof. The real property at issue in the lawsuit is generally described as a 4x25 foot strip of land and is legally described as follows: Also a strip of ground 4 feet wide and 25 feet long in the Southwest corner of Lot 20, Block 4, McLeod’s Addition to the Town of Highlands more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Southwest corner of said Lot 20,thence North 4 feet, thence East 25 feet, thence South 4 feet, thence West 25 feet to the point of beginning Dated this ____ day of 2013. HATCH RAY OLSEN SANDBERG LLC By: Robert W. Hatch, II Joseph J. Novak Attorneys for Plaintiff Deven Properties LLC Published in the Westwood. First Publication: August 6, 2013 Last Publication: September 10, 2013 This summons is issued pursuant to Rule 4(g), C.R.C.P., as amended. This form should not be used where personal service is desired. 1 Rule 12(a), C.R.C.P., allows 35 days for answer or response where service of process is by publication. However, under various statutes, a different response time is set forth; e.g., §38-6-104, C.R.S. (eminent domain), §38-36-121, C.R.S. (Torrens registration). Published in the Denver Herald First Published August 29, 2013 Last Published Sepetember 26, 2013 ________________________________________ PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-0803

To Whom It May Concern: On 6/14/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County.

Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County.

undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County.

Original Grantor: ANGELA RAMOS Original Beneficiary: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 1/3/2011 Recording Date of DOT: 1/14/2011 Reception No. of DOT: 2011006113 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $170,563.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $165,599.51

Original Grantor: JOSE M CLARK Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR CHERRY CREEK MORTGAGE CO., INC. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOICATION Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 3/28/2008 Recording Date of DOT: 4/1/2008 Reception No. of DOT: 2008043959 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $122,970.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $126,498.32

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to make payments of principle and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof.

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to make payments of principle and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof.

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: the covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Default has been made in installment due monthly and subsequent installments; principal balance due plus interest.Said Deed of Trust was rerecorded on 5/10/2013, under Reception No. 2013067800.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 11, BLOCK 2, HARVEY PARK ADDITION FILING NO. 20, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO.

The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOTS 1, 2 AND 3, BLOCK 8, OAKLAND, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO.

The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 16, BLOCK 7, MONTBELLO NO. 33, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO.

Which has the address of: 3070 South Yates Street , Denver, CO 80236 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, October 17, 2013, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 8/22/2013 Last Publication: 9/19/2013 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 6/19/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC CYNTHIA LOWERY-GRABER Colorado Registration #: 34145 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201 , DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone #: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax #: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney File #: 13-04086 Published in the Denver Herald First Published August 22, 2013 Last Published Sepetember 19, 2013 Legal #: 2013-803 ________________________________________ PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-0838 To Whom It May Concern: On 6/24/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of

Which has the address of: 3690 Locust Street , Denver, CO 80207 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

Original Grantor: THOMAS M WORLEY Original Beneficiary: BCS COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: BCS COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 6/27/2008 Recording Date of DOT: 7/18/2008 Reception No. of DOT: 2008099181 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $132,698.37 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $125,867.22

Which has the address of: 4640 Blackhawk Way , Denver, CO 80202-5698 NOTICE OF SALE

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, October 24, 2013, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, October 24, 2013, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 8/29/2013 Last Publication: 9/26/2013 Publisher: Herald Dispatch

First Publication: 8/29/2013 Last Publication: 9/26/2013 Publisher: Herald Dispatch

Dated: 6/24/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC CYNTHIA LOWERY-GRABER Colorado Registration #: 34145 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201 , DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone #: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax #: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney File #: 13-03992

Dated: 6/28/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: BERENBAUM, WEINSHIENK & EASON, P.C. JAMES R NOTTINGHAM Colorado Registration #: 33230 370 17TH STREET REPUBLIC PLAZA, SUITE 4800, DENVER, COLORADO 80202-5698 Phone #: 1 (303) 825-0800 Fax #: Attorney File #: WORLEY

Published in the Denver Herald First Published August 29, 2013 Last Published Sepetember 26, 2013 Legal #: 2013-0838 ________________________________________ PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-0852

Published in the Denver Herald First Published August 29, 2013 Last Published Sepetember 26, 2013 Legal #: 2013-0852 ________________________________________

To Whom It May Concern: On 6/26/2013 the

— End of Legals—

SUBSCRIBE TODAY! ONE YEAR / 52 ISSUES.............$30 SENIORS / ONE YEAR................$25 Mail To: DENVER HERALD DISPATCH 2200 S. Federal Blvd., Unit 6 Denver, CO 80219 Call: 303-936-7778 or Fax: 303-936-0994

NAME: ____ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ _ ____ __ _ ___ __ _ ____ __ ___ __ ___ _______ _ __ __ _ __ _ __ _ __ _ __ _ _____ _ ___ __ _ ____ __ _ __ __ _ ____ _ __ __ _ ____ _ __ __ _ _____ _ __ __ _ _____ _ ___ __ _ __ __ _ ___ _ ___ __ _ __ __ _ ____ _ __ __ _ ____ _ __ __ ___ ______ _ __ ADDRESS: _________________________________________________________________________________________________ CITY/STATE/ZIP: ____________________________________________________________________________________________ PHONE NUMBER: ___________________________________________________________________________________________

Check Enclosed _________ Exp. Date _______________________________ Visa Card No.__________________________________ MasterCard No_________________________________ _________ Exp. Date _______________________________ Signature ________________________________________________________________________________________ (required if using credit card)


August 29, 2013 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • PAGE 11


PAGE 12 • Denver Herald-Dispatch • August 29, 2013

Making a clean breast of it By Peter Jones Superman’s iconic emblem meets cultural symbols of endurance. “I wanted to incorporate strength,” Englewood artist Christine Blackburn said. “It takes an order of strength to survive breast cancer.” And not just for women. Men constitute about 2,000 cases a year in the United States, or about 1 percent of U.S. breast cancer diagnoses overall. That’s part of the reason this reporter donated his breasts – such as they are – for this year’s Breasts of Colorado, the second annual breastcancer fundraiser organized by the Greater Englewood Chamber of Commerce. This year, I was one of two men, and more than 20 women, who humbly submitted ourselves to breast castings. These are sort of papier-mache replicas of our bosoms, which were then turned over to local artists to get creative. In my case, the casting on chest hair was a rather painful process that I detailed with some post-traumatic duress in a previous story. It was a learning experience in more ways than one – about a more liberal application of inexpensive baby oil, for example. And, during those moments when I pictured a medical team being called in to remove my hopelessly hair-glued cast, I did catch an ever-so-brief glimpse of the pain, strength and fear faced by breast cancer survivors. Sort of. But not really. The whole experience kind of put the whole thing into perspective. Fortunately, the money raised from my “endurance” will benefit Sense of Security, a Colorado-based nonprofit that assists breast-cancer patients with their living expenses while they endure the ongoing treatment and survival process. Models such as myself have ventured to raise money for the cause by way of friends, family, social networking and in my case, yet another newspaper article. When Blackburn stepped up to my breasts, she says she immediately focused on the concept of strength

Reporter’s cancer fundraiser continues “I wanted to incorporate strength. It takes an order of strength to survive breast cancer.” – Christine Blackburn, artist

RIGHT: It’s a bird! It’s a plane! Englewood artist Christine Blackburn has turned a replica of reporter Peter Jones’s chest into strength-themed art with an emphasis on Superman. The breast cast is part of Breasts of Colorado, a benefit for the nonprofit Sense of Security, which assists breast-cancer patients with their living expenses.

Breasts of Colorado

Photos by Peter Jones

tapping into Superman, in part, because his alter ego was Clark Kent, an intrepid newspaper reporter. What’s more, Superman’s virile chest could move buildings and locomotives and would have no doubt survived the rigors of breast cancer, if bird-like Clark had ever fallen into that unfortunate 1 percent of male survivors. On either side of Superman’s signature “S,” Blackburn painted

“I have to be really conscious of my audience,” she said. “This is to collaborate and help raise money. You want art to make you feel, but you don’t need art to give you this feeling of desperation.” Models have until early to September to raise money. A reception and art show, along with a silent auction and other surprises, will be Sept. 19, 5 - 9 p.m., at ABOVE: Strength and Cuttn’ it Loose salon in Englewood pain: On the back of Civic Center, whose fountain will be the cast is a quote from colored pink for the occasion. The social activist Thomas event is open to the public. Merton, underneath Readers who would like to show some carefully support for my fundraising effort preserved chest hair. should send a check made out to Sense of Security in care of The VilI think.” lager as soon as possible. See ad“That one was inspired dress above. by you,” Blackburn told me. “You have to endure – and breast cancer survivors have to endure, and perhaps we are all a bit stronger than we think. To sponsor the breast cast of Peter You said it was really Jones, please send a check soon painful, and I thought I made out to Sense of Security to had to incorporate that someway.” the following address: Blackburn is doing Breasts of Colorado double duty as both an c/o Denver Herald-Dispatch artist and a model, having donated her own breasts 8933 E. Union Ave. Suite 230 to the cause. For that artwork, she Greenwood Village, CO 80111 plans to incorporate her longtime Please write “Breasts of Colorado” personal relationship – in part because of her last name – with the on the check memo. Beatles’ song “Blackbird.” Her only For more information about Sense concern is to make sure that she balof Security, visit www.senseof ances her “darker” inclinations with her desire to present a positive messecurity.org. sage.

lesser-known icons of strength – symbols of Nordic, Asian, Celtic and pagan varieties, among others. On the back of the cast, she created an appropriately blood-red frame around remnants of my chest hair and included a quote from Catholic priest and social activist Thomas Merton: “Perhaps I am stronger than

ULA donates backpacks, school supplies to DPS students United Launch Alliance has once again provided backpacks and school supplies for low-income and homeless children in DPS. Employees leveraged resources and time to collect and assemble backpacks filled with supplies for DPS students as they begin the 2013-14 school year. ULA employees delivered backpacks by motorcycle and convertible to the Mitchell Administration Building, Aug. 16. “United Launch Alliance is proud to support Denver Public Schools in a number of meaningful ways,” said Chris Chavez, who leads ULA’s corporate citizenship efforts. “ULA provides funding for science and math education programs, as well as volunteer support and employee donations like this backpack drive. Both are key ingredients to multi-faceted and longterm engagement that help kids succeed.” ULA has invested in Science Tracks since 2007, a DPS elementary school curriculum that has

increased fifth grade science proficiency scores 11 percentage points since its implementation.   Minority Enterprise & Educational Development facilitated the ULA school supply drive. For the last decade, MEED has collected backpacks and school supplies for DPS students in need. The backpacks are distributed through the Educational Outreach Program office, which supports the 2,000 DPS students and families experiencing homelessness. Support from the community through the Educational Outreach Program office allows DPS to provide school supplies and other basic needs for students facing the challenge and uncertainty of homelessness. Support for these students has been shown to impact their attendance and performance in the classroom.  “It’s quite simple – when a student does not have the tools they need to succeed in the classroom, they are starting the new school year already at a disadvantage to their

ULA donated hundreds of backpacks to low-income and homeless children attending Denver Public Schools.

Courtesy photos

peers,” said DPS Educational Outreach Program’s Jackie Bell. “This is about more than just school supplies. It’s about giving kids resourc-

es that enable them to focus their energy and attention on the lessons that lie ahead of them this school year. Without generous donors like

United Launch Alliance, these children would already be a step behind in the classroom. We’re so grateful for partnerships like this one.”


8 29 13 herald combo