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NEWS

CDOT launches ‘Drive High, Get a DUI’

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“Drive High, Get a DUI,” a new campaign by CDOT, will educate and warn the public on the dangers of operating a motor vehicle while under the influence.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

‘The New West’ on display at McNichols

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“The New West: Contemporary Perspectives of the Rocky Mountain Region” is open through May 25 at the McNichols Building.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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Locally shot ‘Bee People’ minds its beeswax

Denver’s “Bee Guru” gets down to beeswax in Bee People, which plays the Women+Film Voices Film Festival on March 22.

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S i n c e 19 2 6 March 13, 2014 By Don Bain If you have kids from age 2 to 12, you are probably aware of all the available Lego toys, as well as the huge LEGOLAND theme park in Carlsbad, California. On March 8, representatives from the park, expressly designed to empower the imaginations and creativity of children, were in Denver on a promotional visit. This effort had its most public exposure at a competition between two members of the LEGOLAND modeling team at The Children’s Museum on Saturday. Each of the modelers, who normally work together (rarely getting a chance to compete), was given and equal number of Lego bricks and a three-hour period to produce models along the theme of a Lion Chi castle. The lion theme derives from the new expansion of the LEGOLAND Water Park, named for the Legends of Chima, the toymaker’s latest and currently most popular toy set. As visitors enter the water park they walk through a giant arch made entirely from Lego bricks, as is almost everything in LEGOLAND. “At LEGOLAND California Resort, kids are in the driver’s seat and parents take a back seat to watch their children’s imagination run wild,” said Jake Gonzales, media relations for the park. The 128-acre park has more than 27,000 models comprised of more than 65 million Lego bricks. The modelers, who were at The Children’s Museum, participated in building many of those creations. The expansion of the existing Water Park at LEGOLAND was in response to visitor demand. “People told us they love everything about the Water Park, but to give them more, so that’s exactly what we did,” said

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LEGOLAND

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Vol. 93 No. 13

modelers make brief Denver appearance

Tim Sams and Rob McCarthy pose before their competition at The Children’s Museum. Photo by Don Bain

Bridge demolition over I-25 pushed back Work set for March 16-21

Demolition work on the US 6 bridge over I-25 has pushed back a week to give more crews time to do the preparatory work necessary before bringing down this bridge. The demolition is now scheduled for the nights of Sunday, March 16, through Friday, March 21. Motorists driving on I-25 near the 6th Avenue interchange these nights should expect heavy traffic and travel delays.  Beginning at 10 p.m. each of these nights, crews will be doing demolition work on the east portion of the US 6 bridge deck that crosses over I-25. To

ensure the traveling public’s safety, southbound I-25 will be diverted off the highway at 6th Avenue and northbound I-25 traffic will shift over into the southbound lanes to travel beneath the bridge. Southbound I-25 motorists will be detoured west on US 6 to Federal Boulevard then south on Federal to 5th Avenue to take eastbound US 6 and reconnect with southbound I-25. With I-25 traffic making this loop detour, people traveling south on Federal Boulevard and east on US 6 can also expect heavier than normal traffic, particularly between the hours of 10 p.m. and midnight each night. To facilitate traffic movement on Federal

Boulevard, the eastbound US 6 off-ramp to Federal will be closed. Traffic in both directions of I-25 will be narrowed down to a single lane prior to reaching 6th Avenue and this process of funneling traffic into one lane will begin prior to 10 p.m. so drivers should plan for heavy traffic beginning about 9:30 p.m.  Regional northbound through traffic should avoid the area by taking C-470 or I-225 to I-70 and northbound local traffic can take Santa Fe Drive north to 8th Avenue. Regional southbound through traffic should avoid the area by taking I-70 west to C-470 or east to I-225 and southbound local traffic can use Colfax or

8th avenues. The $98 million US 6 Bridges Design-Build Project will replace six obsolete bridges on US 6 between Knox Court and I-25, improve traffic movements in the I-25 and US 6 interchange and enhance driver safety by eliminating several traffic weave movements along US 6 between Federal Boulevard and I-25. Substantial project completion is planned for August 2015. All construction activities are weather-dependent and subject to change. For updated project information, visit http:// www.coloradodot.info/projects/ US6Bridges, call 720-881-5540 or email US6Bridgesinfo@ cig-pr.com


PAGE 2 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • March 13, 2014

CDOT launches ‘Drive High, Get a DUI’ SS ii nn cc ee 1199 22 66

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Arapahoe sheriff expects need for drug-recognition training By Peter Jones Although legalized marijuana has been among the most highly charged issues to hit Colorado in recent years, public safety has been one rare area of agreement among advocacy groups, law enforcement and other interested parties. The Arapahoe County Sheriff’s Office has joined the Marijuana Industry Group and other police and community organizations in supporting “Drive High, Get a DUI,” a new campaign by the Colorado Department of Transportation. The program is designed to educate and warn the public on the dangers – both medical and legal – of operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of marijuana. “We all cooperate and work very effectively with CDOT,” Sheriff Dave Walcher said. “They take the lead and all local agencies participate to a degree.” Michael Elliott, executive director of the Marijuana Industry Group, said his organization has been providing CDOT with a voice from the marijuana community as an active participant on the Interagency Task Force on Drunk Driving. “We want this new industry to thrive, and the best way to do that is to ensure marijuana users and the industry understand the laws and regulations and consume marijuana responsibly,” Elliott said. Drivers intoxicated by marijuana have been a growing concern in the face of the gradual legalization of both medical and recreational marijuana use. In 2012, about 12 percent of Colorado drivers that were involved in roadway fatalities and tested for drugs were found to have marijuana in their systems. In Arapahoe County, the problem has been somewhat less significant, though Walcher does not think his jurisdiction will be spared for long. “Right now, it’s a fairly low percentage, probably 5 to 10 percent of the people we stop,” he

said. “But I know that our business related to marijuana enforcement and driving under the influence is going to increase. There’s no doubt in my mind.” Before launching “Drive High, Get a DUI” this week, CDOT conducted extensive research that found medical and recreational marijuana users held erroneous beliefs on the effects marijuana. Twenty-one percent of respondents who said they had used marijuana in the past year had driven a motor vehicle after consuming it within the previous month. Those who drove within two hours of using marijuana did so more than 15 times a month. “We heard repeatedly that people thought marijuana didn’t impact their driving ability, and some believed it actually made them a better driver,” CDOT spokeswoman Amy Ford said. CDOT hopes to change that, starting this week with television spots aimed squarely at men age 21-34, the group with the highest number of DUIs. CDOT also plans outreach to rental-car companies and marijuana businesses to inform tourists and local users about the driving laws in Colorado. Here are some facts the campaign plans to emphasize: • Driving under the influence of marijuana can result in costs of more than $10,000. • It is illegal to drive with five nanograms of active THC in one’s blood. In any case, officers can base arrests on observed impairment. • If a driver is under the influence of both alcohol and marijuana, his risk increases to 24 times that of a sober driver, according to the American Journal of

Epidemiology. • If children are present in the vehicle, an impaired driver can be charged with child abuse. • It is illegal to have marijuana in the passenger area of a vehicle if it is in an open container, a container with a broken seal, or if there is evidence marijuana has been consumed. It is also illegal to consume marijuana on any public roadway. The new normal of legalized marijuana in Colorado has presented its share of challenges to the state’s law enforcement community. Part of the problem is that the standard roadside sobriety test used for alcohol will not work for marijuana, which requires a more time-consuming off-site blood test. For that reason, Arapahoe County and other agencies will eventually need to increase drugrecognition training, according to Walcher. According to the Arapahoe sheriff, the greatest adjustment for his deputies has been getting used to a world where using and transporting small amounts of marijuana is not necessarily grounds for arrest. “When I started in law enforcement years and years and years ago, everything was illegal – paraphernalia, any amount of marijuana, seeds. Life was easy then,” Walcher said. “You’d see Zig-Zag rolling papers sitting on the dashboard, and if you were a good cop you’d start asking questions. Now we have all these new challenges. We’ll adjust to this.”

Hill honored by Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce Leadership Foundation Invest in Kids Executive Director Lisa Hill was honored March 6, as the 9News Community Leader of the Year at the Celebrating Civic Leadership event in downtown Denver. The Denver Metro Chamber Leadership Foundation sponsors the event annually. Hill “has a natural ability to build and nurture relationships with staff, volunteers, donors, providers and community leaders,” wrote Dorothy Horrell, former president of the Bonfils-Stanton Foundation, former president of the Community Colleges of Colorado and current chair of the Board of Governors for the Colorado State University System, in her nomination letter. “Lisa is a leader with passion that is undeniable, commitment that is unsurpassed, and effectiveness that is unparalleled.” Since taking over as executive director, Invest in Kids has increased the number of children and families served by 57 percent.

Lisa Hill

One of the top 100 nonprofits nationally as selected by The Social Impact Exchange, Invest in Kids helps struggling families across Colorado become more stable. Invest in Kids delivers two prevention programs that have been proven to work. The Incredible Years helps young, vulnerable children get ready for school, while NurseFamily Partnership helps first-time,

low-income mothers become selfsufficient. Over the last 15 years, Invest in Kids has reached more than 52,000 people. “Thank you to 9News and the Denver Metro Chamber Leadership Foundation for this wonderful honor,” said Hill. “For as long as I can remember, I have loved helping others. I wanted to make a difference in people’s lives – particularly those less fortunate than myself. Invest in Kids has given me an opportunity to do just that. I have been blessed to live my dream and pursue my career with this tremendous organization.” Hill also thanked the large network of community organizations, foundations, businesses and other non-profit organizations that have supported Invest in Kids. The 9NEWS Leader of the Year Award recognizes an emerging leader who has made a significant contribution to the Colorado community.


March 13, 2014 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • PAGE 3

Jeffrey Allan Lane

Man arrested for luring child on Internet

By Peter Jones A 58-year-old man who has reportedly admitted to Internet luring of a person he believed to be a 14-year-old boy has been released from the Arapahoe County jail after posting a $50,000 bond. Jeffrey Allan Lane was arrested Feb. 28 after allegedly sending nude photos of himself to an undercover officer with the sheriff’s Internet Crimes Against Children Unit. “During ongoing communication, [Lane] described explicit sexual conduct and detailed how he wanted to engage in sexual intercourse with the 14-year-old,” a release from the sheriff’s office said. Lane had also asked for nude photos of the boy, according to the release. Investigators obtained a search warrant for Lane’s address and collected “several items of evidence,” the release said. Lane, who agreed to speak with investigators, was booked on two Class 4 felonies.

Gordon McConnell, They’re Coming, 2008 acrylic on hardboard panel

Courtesy of Gordon McConnell

‘The New West’ on display at McNichols In conjunction with the release of IMAGINE 2020: Denver’s Cultural Plan, Denver Arts & Venues and Visions West Galleries are proud to present “The New West,” an exhibition celebrating Colorado’s Western heritage as interpreted by artists today. “The New West: Contemporary Perspectives of the Rocky Mountain Region” is open through May 25 at the McNichols Building, 144 W. Colfax Ave. The show is open during all public and private events and the McNichols Building is open to the general public on Saturdays and Sundays from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. and by appointment.

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The exhibition celebrates Colorado’s heritage, featuring works by contemporary artists with personal connections to the Rocky Mountain West. “The show tells a visual story that honors our proud heritage and contemporary spirit,” said Tariana Navas-Nieves, manager of Cultural Programs for Denver Arts & Venues. “Furthermore, it embodies the ideals of IMAGINE 2020 as we shape the future of art, culture and creativity in our city, a path that is inspired by innovation yet very much rooted in the past.” From abstracted landscapes to depictions of the modern cow-

boy to symbolic images of the West, the show creates an interesting and thought-provoking visual juxtaposition. Artists include Maura Allen, Duke Beardsley, Mark England, Rocky Hawkins, Adam Jahiel, Charles Lindsay, Robert McCauley, Gordon McConnell, Tracy Stuckey, Barbara Van Cleve, Arin Waddell, and Theodore Waddell. The exhibition is supported by the McNichols Cultural Partner Program. For more information, please contact Tariana NavasNieves at 720-865-4312 or tariana.navas@denvergov.org. Denver Arts & Venues seeks to enhance Denver’s quality of

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PAGE 4 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • March 13, 2014

Englewood city manager stepping down Sears to retire at end of summer

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By Peter Jones nglewood City Manager Gary Sears carried around a version of his retirement letter for a few months before finally deciding the time was right. “I’ve had the letter for a couple City Council meetings, but issues came up,” he said. Budgetary matters, a strategic planning process and talks about merging Englewood’s fire department with a neighboring jurisdiction kept Sears’s resignation in his briefcase, but he finally pulled it out on March 3. “I felt maybe it was time to look at the world from a different lens and move ahead,” said Sears, 66. “The city’s in good shape. I’m working well with the City Council. I’ve got great department directors. But at some point in time with the number of hours required in this job, you want to do a little bit of traveling and maybe do something of a volunteer nature.” Sears will step down Sept. 1, ending his long tenure as Englewood’s municipal CEO. The long-serving city manager has seen significant change, hav-

Englewood City Manager Gary Sears

ing served under six mayors and overseeing some of the most significant change in Englewood’s history. “I came here when Cinderella City was on its last legs and going through the whole transit-oriented development. That’s been a highlight,” Sears said. “The big thing

was going through the downturn economy, the layoffs and freezes. It’s been a challenge, but we survived that without raising taxes – and the level of services continues to be outstanding.” Perhaps the most outstanding survival has been that of Sears himself. In a governmental industry where a city manager’s average term of service is little more than five to six years, Sears nearly tripled that average, serving in his often politically delicate role for 17 years. As Englewood’s top appointed leader, Sears has been the intermediary between the elected City Council and Sears’s staff of full-time municipal professionals. The role can be challenging because as a city’s elected leaders change, a new guard often seeks new blood in the city manager position. Although Sears has fared comparatively well with the changing councils, he says the newer members may nonetheless take his retirement as an opportunity for change. “I think there are probably several who will like to see me go,” Sears said with a slight laugh. “I know council will perhaps be pleased with a different style of manager. I think it’s a healthy process.”

It is a process that will happen largely without Sears’s involvement. As he indicated in his retirement letter, his decision to sit out the search is in keeping with the guidelines of the International City Managers Association. “The council are the ones we work for and the council is an elected body that needs to make their determination as to what they feel are the qualifications for a new candidate,” the outgoing manager said. Sears began his 43-year municipal career in 1971 as Loveland’s assistant city manager before taking a job as Greeley’s human-resources manager several years later. He would serve as city manager in Silverthorne and Glendale before coming to Englewood in 1997. In addition to his managerial roles, Sears has served as an adjunct professor, teaching classes on the politics of public budgeting and strategic management at the University of Colorado. The Englewood City Council plans to begin an immediate nationwide search for its next city manager. Mayor Randy Penn told Sears at the March 3 meeting, “We have been lucky to have you here to lead the City of Englewood all these years.”

LEAP raises benefit levels to help Coloradans keep warm

Colorado’s Low-income Energy Assistance Program, which provides financial assistance with home heating bills, announced an increase to the minimum and  maximum  benefit levels for residents who qualify. Program beneficiaries will now receive at least $300 to help defray home heating costs and the maximum benefit  has been raised to $1,300.  LEAP is a federally funded program that provides cash assistance to help hard-working families and individuals pay winter home heating costs. This year the average benefit for people who qualify is  expected to be $447 per household.  “LEAP’s increased benefit levels will allow  peace of mind for Coloradans who need

help staying warm this winter,” LEAP Manager Aggie Berens said. “With the recent increases in home heating costs, especially propane, we want to make sure that no Coloradans go cold because they can’t afford their heating bill.” The program has several eligibility requirements. Applicants must be Colorado residents and U.S. citizens or legal aliens. They also need to provide a copy of a valid identification and a  completed  affidavit to comply with Colorado Revised Statutes regarding documentation of lawful presence. Valid forms of I.D. include a Colorado driver’s license or I.D. card; a U.S. Military I.D. card or Military Dependent’s I.D. card; a U.S. Coast Guard Merchant Mariner card; or a Na-

tive American Tribal document. Other forms of I.D. may be accepted as well.  Applicants also must be responsible for paying heating costs, either directly to a utility company or to a landlord as part of rent. Applicants’ income cannot exceed 150 percent of the federal poverty index. People interested in applying can call 1-866-HEAT-HELP (1866-432-8435) to order a mailed application. Alternatively, applications are available at every county department of social or human services, most utility companies, and many community agencies, like Catholic Charities. Applications also can be downloaded from www.colorado.gov/ cdhs/leap. Applicants may fax the com-

pleted application to their appropriate county office or mail it to the county at the address available on the website. People eligible for LEAP may also qualify for  other benefits, like the Crisis Intervention Program, which helps repair or replace the home’s primary heating system; or the Weatherization Program, which improves energy efficiency in homes. Colorado also offers a rebate of property tax, rent and heat expenses to low-income seniors and disabled persons. Known as the Property Tax/Rent/Heat Credit (PTC) rebate, the maximum property tax rebate is $660 and the maximum heat expenses rebate is $192. The Colorado Department of Revenue administers the rebate. 

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Continued from Page 1 Gonzales. The Legends of Chima is a 3-acre addition to the Water Park and will open this summer. Three areas of the new park have already been announced. One sure favorite is bound to be the Lion Temple Wave Pool, which appears to be floating, as water cascades down a 30-foot mountain between Lego statues of the eight animal tribes of Chima. Another popular feature involves Eglor’s Build a Boat, where young minds can apply themselves to creating a floating Lego watercraft. Tim Sams, one of the two model builders in the competition, stated aquatic engineers might learn something from the things the kids come up with. The most popular rides in the park are probably the Coastersaurus, a thrill for 2to 5-year-olds, a roller coaster reaching nearly 20-mph climbing, curving and dipping into and around a prehistoric jungle of animated, life-sized Lego dinosaurs. The other best-loved part of the park is Fun Town, a kid-sized village where youngsters can attend the Volvo Driving School and get an official LEGOLAND Driver’s License. So if you have kids from younger than 12, LegoLand should be in your travel plans this summer. What parent wouldn’t want to see the radiant smile of wonder and imagination on their child’s face as the creative and fun possibilities of their world multiply exponentially in their minds. The park is located in Carlsbad, a seaside community 30 miles north of downtown San Diego and one hour south of Anaheim. A three-story, 250-room hotel opened at the entrance to the park last year, providing guests exclusive early morning access to the park. “2014 is a big investment year for us. A great corner stone to the resort’s success is listening to our guests and striving to increase the value of their experience,” said General Manager Peter Ronchetti. “We are excited to build an entirely new LEGOLAND Water Park based on the Lego Chima product line immersing children and their families into an interactive world of play!” For more information, visit www.LegoLand.com.

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March 13, 2014 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • PAGE 5

OPINION

– DENVER –

Russia will not return Crimea KINDLING

By Robert Sweeney

Dry land wheat farms stretch from Denver across the Eastern Plains into Kansas and beyond until rains support Iowa corn crops. The Ukraine has been the jewel of the old Soviet Union producing vast amounts of wheat to bake bread across the continent. The Ukraine, along with Brazil, Australia, Canada and the United States, produce most of the grains used around the world for food,

livestock feed and corn for ethanol. Putin’s Russia has been basking in the sunlight of what appeared to be a very successful Olympiad. No terrorism, some hotel problems, but overall it appeared to be a fabulous event, and the television coverage of opening and closing ceremonies was outstanding. Russia wanted to make a $50 billion statement to the West that they have arrived, that the ex-communists are now successful capitalists. But lurking deep in the old Soviet souls is the lust to return to the power of the U.S.S.R. that was a superpower to match the United States. There is much sentiment in Russia that breaking up the Union was a disaster and that included losing the breadbasket Ukrainian farmland. The Russians are paranoid about their borders and the old Empire has been invaded 13 times,

but never successfully. They don’t just want Crimea; they would love to have the Ukraine back in their fold. The country is divided but is predominantly former Russians in language and culture. The rich breadbasket is now broke, funds misspent or stolen by their leaders. Bankruptcy looms on this wealthy region and the United States is offering $1 billion to give them assistance. Russian soldiers have already taken the Crimean area and don’t expect them to leave or to give this seashore port back to the Ukraine. While the United States might bluster and make threats, it is really none of our business. It would be like the Russians coming into Texas. Europe has a deeper stake than the U.S., but they will do nothing in fear of the Russians who supply most of their natural gas. The Crimea parliament has al-

ready voted to rejoin Russia. As usual, the United States is sticking our nose in where it doesn’t belong and furthermore, our tax dollars don’t belong in the Ukraine. The Russians must be jubilant over this turn of events and don’t expect them to retreat easily because they never have. It was only when President Reagan bankrupted them on a military spending contest that they tore down the Berlin Wall and broke up their U.S.S.R. regime. The Communists took all of the property, money and are now the wealthy Russian establishment basking in successful capitalism. The Russian bear growled and isn’t going to hibernate again without Crimea and maybe even the Ukraine. Bears need a lot to eat and this is a feast.

Have you heard - the one about? REMARKS

By Mort Marks

The Californian, the Coloradan and the Texan. The three gentlemen were attending a convention in a little town just outside Las Vegas and were standing in a seedy bar enjoying a few drinks. The Californian grabbed his wine spritzer – knocked it back in one gulp – then he threw the glass against the back wall, smashing it to pieces. He told the other startled drinkers that – “The standard of living was so high in California that they never had to drink with the same ones twice.” Next – the Texan finished his margarita and threw his glass By Shirley against the backSmith wall. He loudly proclaimed, “In Texas not only were they all rich from oil, but they had so much sand that glass was cheap and he

too never drank out of the same out, “Ordinarily a person who sets murder her, the killing of Ronald glass twice.” out to commit suicide ultimately Opus had to be an accident since Next, the Coloradan drank his succeeds – even though the mech- the gun had been accidently loadCoors, drew a revolver and shot anism that kills him might not be ed. the Californian and the Texan. what he had intended.” As the investigation continAs he was returning the gun to That Ronald Opus was shot – ued, a witness turned up who achis holster, he told the wide-eyed on the way to certain death nine bartender, “In Colorado, they stories below – normally would tually saw this couple’s son load have so many Texans and Califor- not have changed the medical their shotgun approximately six nians that they never had to drink examiner’s cause of death from weeks prior to the fatal accident. with the same ones twice.” suicide to homicide. The investigators also learned Have You Heard – The One But, in this case – Ronald that this elderly lady had previAbout – 1994’s most bizarre sui- Opus’ suicidal intent would not ously cut off her son’s financial cide? have been successful since there At the 1994 annual awards was a net below, and under these support. The son – knowing the prodinner in San Diego given by the circumstances the Medical Exampensity ofW. hisJames, father toCFA use the American Association for Foreniner felt that they had a homicide By Glory Weisberg By Kenneth sic Science, the organization’s on their hands. shotgun threateningly – loaded President Don Harper Mills asFurther investigation revealed the gun with the expectation that tounded his audience with the fol- that an elderly man and his wife his father would shoot his mother. lowing story concerning the legal occupied the room on the ninth The case now becomes one of complications of a bizarre death. floor from where the shotgun murder on the part of the elderIt seems that on March 23, blast emanated. 1994, the medical examiner The couple had been arguing ly couple’s son for the death of viewed the body of Ronald Opus and the man threatened his wife Richard Opus. and concluded that he had died with the shotgun, but he was so But now comes the twist. from a shotgun wound of the upset that when he pulled the Continued investigation rehead. trigger, he completely missed his vealed that the son was Richard But – the decedent, Ronald wife and the pellets went through Opus who had become increasOpus, had left a note indicating the window – striking Mr. Opus. despondency and had actually The law holds that even though ingly despondent over the failjumped from the top of a 10-story a person intends to kill subject A, ure of his attempt to engineer his building intending to commit sui- but accidently kills subject B, he mother’s murder. cide. is still guilty of murder. This failure to kill his mother However, as Opus fell past When confronted with the is what led him to jump off the the ninth floor, he was hit by a charge the man and his wife were 10th story building on March 23 shotgun blast that came through a both adamant that neither knew By Joshua – only toCole be killed by a shotgun Bykilled Chuck Green window and was instantly. the shotgun was loaded, the elderblast through a ninth story winBecause of this net – Ronald ly man pointed out that it was his dow. Opus would not have been able to long-standing habit to threaten The medical examiner closed complete his suicide. his wife with the unloaded shotMills continued by pointing gun. Since he had no intention to the case – “suicide.”

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QUOTE QUOTE of of the the WEEK WEEK Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it. – Mark Twain


PAGE 6 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • March 13, 2014

Wings gets a ’Han’ from Hollywood Actor lauds aviation, future museum site in Centennial By Deborah Grigsby Smith, Centennial Airport Nothing like having Han Solo on your side if you’re looking to expand an air and space museum — Wings Over the Rockies Air and Space Museum President Greg Anderson knows just how good that feels. Actor Harrison Ford, who pioneered the early Star Wars role, joined a handful of select business leaders March 4 at Centennial Airport to walk the future site of the museum’s new Exploration of Flight facility. The tour was part of the museum’s Wingspan Capital Campaign, led by Ford and Gov. John Hickenlooper. Wingspan is a fundraising effort to secure $21 million to build the 15-acre site on the southeast side of the airport that will showcase a rotating collection of aircraft and historical artifacts. Ford, a pilot and avid aviation advocate, lauded the museum’s efforts to engage not only students, but parents and teachers as well. “We often forget that when we reach out to children, we also reach out to their parents who vote for— or sometimes against—aviation benefits,” Ford said. “Some don’t understand the economic value

an airport brings to a community, or the great benefits aviation has brought to this country.” The new facility, expected to open in mid-2015, will feature experience- and flight-based learning activities geared at renewing the state’s leadership in science, technology, engineering and math. Plans for the site also include a charter school. “America is still an aerospace nation,” said retired Air Force general and former Aurora Public Schools Superintendent John Barry. “The last time this country saw a real explosion in science and math was back in the ‘60s and ‘70s—about the same time we saw an increase in the manufacturing of aircraft.” But as Ford noted, aviation has become somewhat of a “political football,” and supporters “need to step up and advocate for the value it brings to all.” A 2013 economic impact study conducted by the Colorado Division of Aeronautics linked more than 6,700 jobs, $404 million in payroll and $1.3 billion in total economic impact to the operation of Centennial Airport. “We can’t expect airplanes hanging from the ceiling to tell the (aviation) story we want told,” said Ford. “We also need to take the opportunity to engage it… this project, these people, all of us, have an opportunity to tell the story of the benefits of aviation.”

Rod and Melanie Buscher, left, join actor Harrison Ford on the southeast side of Centennial Airport for a VIP tour of what will become Exploration of Flight, a new Wings Over the Rockies facility. Ford, along with Gov. John Hickenlooper, is one of the driving forces behind the Wingspan Capital Campaign, a $21 million charity effort to fund the facility slated to open in mid-2015.

Photo courtesy of Centennial Airport

Ford earned his pilot’s certificate in 1996 and is the former chairman of the Experimental Aircraft Association’s Young

Eagles, a program launched to give interested young people the change to fly in a general aviation aircraft. Ford has flown more than

280 Young Eagles since 2001. For more information on the project, visit www. explorationofflight.org.

Jewish Family Service acquires Lunchbox Express Program

Jim DeLutes, Downtown Denver Arts Festival director

Downtown Denver Arts Festival ranked among nation’s top Art Fair Source Book’ ranked 33 out of 600 The Downtown Denver Arts Festival announced it has been ranked as one of the nation’s most outstanding arts festivals, according to the Art Fair Source Book, a leading industry guide to juried art and craft shows nationwide (www. artfaisourcebook.com). The DDAF achieved a ranking of 33rd out of 600 events, making it one of the most popular and sought-after arts festivals in the country. The ranking was determined by a vote of participating artists, who base a great deal of their business on successful festivals. “When the Downtown Denver Arts Festival first began 16 years ago, it was a fledgling festival

that had tremendous support, but after eight years it was no longer meeting the expectations of the artist community,” said Jim DeLutes, who took over as the festival’s director in 2007. “Since that time, we’ve made some tremendously successful changes, including establishing our new location at the Denver Performing Arts Complex, and making sure that the artwork being presented at the DDAF is from the very best and highest caliber artists in the nation. We have grown to become one of the country’s premier art festivals.” This year’s Downtown Denver Arts Festival will take place over Memorial Day Weekend, May 23-25, at the Denver Performing Arts Complex. This year’s festival has received a record

number of applicants (a number that has doubled since 2007), and the judging process has just been completed to determine the 140 artists who will be invited to this year’s event. “It’s never easy to say ‘no’ to people you work with, admire and respect, but unfortunately, this year we’re going to have to say ‘no’ to more artists than ever before,” said DeLutes. “We want to produce the very best event possible, and continue to achieve great things.” More information regarding this year’s Downtown Denver Art’s Festival will be announced in the weeks ahead. The Downtown Denver Arts Festival is free. For more information, visit www.Downtown DenverArtsFestival.com.

Jewish Family Service announced that Lunchbox Express will be incorporated as a program of JFS. LBX is a simple mobile food delivery system that targets discrete areas of underserved children and brings free lunch to them during the summer. Allen and Hannah Levy started LBX in 2011 as a community volunteerdriven organization dedicated to feeding hungry Colorado kids when school is out and children don’t have access to free or reduced-fee lunches in their schools. Beginning in the summer of 2014, JFS will operate the program under its Family Safety Net division while the Levys remain closely involved. Due to the generosity of Dresner Foundation of Michigan and other anonymous donors, JFS was able to acquire this program. “It is the biggest mitzvah to feed the hungry,” said JFS president & CEO Yana Vishnitsky. “We are so pleased that we will be able help feed hundreds of children in the Denver metro area who are food-insecure.” The program operates as a sponsor of the USDA’s Summer Food Service Program, a federal program that makes nutritious lunches available during the summer at approved sites with high concentrations of low-

income children. The nutritionally balanced packaged meals and milk are purchased from federally approved vendors. There is no proof of income required. All children 18 and under qualify for a free lunch, no matter where they live or go to school. LBX began from the idea t h a t closed, static sites were not having a significant impact on children’s access to food during the summer session when school was out. Utilizing a donated, repurposed mini school bus as the delivery vehicle, an enthusiastic band of volunteers and a bus driver served 6,000 meals at four sites in Englewood during the 11 weeks when school was out in 2011. By 2013, the program had grown significantly, operating three buses and distributing more than 47,000 meals to low-income children in Denver, Aurora, and Englewood. In summer 2014, LBX will operate five buses. “JFS and the Levys are excited about the future of the program, which will continue to grow and feed more kids and families who need resources in the summer,” says Vishnitsky. For more information, call 720-248-4654, email shines@ jewishfamilyservice.org or visit www.lunchboxexpress.org.


March 13, 2014 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • PAGE 7

Denver for Peace in Ukraine Demonstrators protest Russian President Putin First generation Ukrainian American, Landscape Architect/Artist Nestor Fedak, holds a protest sign he painted and used on the very same steps of the Colorado State Capitol in the 1970’s when protesting Soviet occupation of Ukraine and other captive Eastern European Nations. Helen Pcholka holds the flag of the former USSR

Marko Babiak and his father John Babiak post Ukrainian flags on the Russian Consul Building in protest over Putin’s aggressions in Ukraine. Russian immigrant Helen Pcholka holds the flag of the former USSR while discussing the politics of flagwaving with firstgeneration Ukranian emigrée Boris Oryshchyn, a U.S. Air Force veteran. Pcholka thought the USSR symbolized peaceful relations between Russians and Ukranians while Oryshchyn begged to differ.

Peace Corp member Douglas O’Brien, who taught English in Ukraine, with Oleksandra Tkachenko from Kiev, Ukraine, and University of Denver Journalism Professor Ania Savage with event organizer, Olena Ruth.

Photos by Stefan Krusce

The event was supported by other nationalities that have endured President Putin’s aggressions, Onise from Georgia, Ivano Frankisk, Victor Hnatyk from Ukraine and Oleksandra Tkachenko from Kiev, Ukraine.

Anti Putin demonstrators protest in front of the Colorado State Capitol. The protest was represented and attended by Ukrainians, Poles, Georgians, Belarusians and Coloradans with many more.


PAGE 8 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • March 13, 2014

New effort aims to inspire, enroll underserved communities in the Colorado health insurance marketplace

A

new health advocacy movement called “Keep Living Colorado” aims to extend the lives of underserved communities through healthy living and participation in the Connect for Health Colorado insurance marketplace. Kaiser Permanente sponsors the effort. Other participants include Uptown Media, Ebony, and ESPN Denver. Keep Living Colorado officially launched March 8. Denver Mayor Michael B. Hancock kicked off the event, followed by two panels of experts, which included Tonya Lewis Lee, founder of Healthy You Now;

Celebrity Chef Nikki Shaw; Beverly Bond, founder of Black Girls Rock; and CREA Results CEO Fernando Pineda-Reyes. Also on hand was Kaiser Permanente physicians Jandel Allen-Davis, M.D. and Terri Richardson, M.D. The event will close with remarks by Donna Lynne, DrPH, president of Kaiser Permanente Colorado. More information is available at KeepLivingCO.org. According to the 2011 Colorado Health Access Survey by the Colorado Trust, the number of individuals with no insurance or who are underinsured equals more than 1.5 million or one in three Coloradans. Of those, Colora-

dans of Hispanic descent are more likely to be uninsured than other groups, with 33 percent uninsured. This figure hasn’t changed significantly in more than five years. Furthermore, 52 percent of the uninsured nationally, identify as nonwhite. “Kaiser Permanente believes that everyone in this country should have access to highquality, affordable health care and coverage. Unfortunately, we know that some communities have previously been underrepresented and have not had access to health care services and coverage. Sadly, this can have devastating impacts on health,” said Jandel

Allen-Davis, M.D., Kaiser Permanente Colorado’s vice president of government and external relations. Underserved populations face many health care barriers, including access to coverage and care, income disparities and social and environmental determinants of health. This program will offer important information and resources for individuals who have previously and disproportionately been denied access to care and coverage. Visitors to the website will learn how to purchase coverage through Connect for Health Colorado, as well as how to find out if they qualify

for federal financial help or Medicaid. “We are thrilled with Kaiser Permanente’s commitment to our mission of equality in health care information for all as well as the support of what we believe will be a seismic shift in health rights,” said Chef Nikki Shaw. “These previously underserved audiences will no longer view healthy living as a luxury but as a human right. KeepLivingCO. org will bring them resources in a fun, active way as well as provide the tools they need to live healthy and thrive.”

Calendar of Events

Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to editorial@villagerpublishing.com.

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT Lamont School of Music Concert

March 9, 7:30 p.m., Hamilton Building University of Denver, 2344 E. Iliff Ave. Denver. Free concert, complimentary parking.

‘Ancient Threads: A Celtic Tapestry’

March 14 – 15, 7:30 p.m., March 16, 2:30 p.m., Newman Center for the Performing Arts, University of Denver, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver, www.NewmanTix.com or 303-871-7720.

‘It’s About Time: Eternity’

March 22, 7:30 p.m., Augustana Lutheran Church, 5000 E. Alameda Ave., Denver Presented by Augustana Arts and Musica Sacra Chamber Orchestra featuring Kantori. Tickets at www.augustanaarts.org or 303-388-4962. Insights pre-concert chat hosted by David Rutherford at 7 p m. Free to ticket holders.

Family Day at the Opera

March 22, 1 p.m., Ellie Caulkins Opera House Lobby, 14th and Curtis streets, Denver. This free family performance will feature an abridged production of The Barber of Seville sung in English. Performed by Opera Colorado’s 2014 Young Artists. Since the 10 a.m. performance has sold out, a second event has been added at 1 p.m. RSVP is required. To print out free tickets visit www.eventbrite.com/e/opera-coloradopresents-family-day-at-the-opera-100pmperformance-tickets-10689280927 or call Opera Colorado’s Box Office at 303-468-2030

CLUBS/ORGANIZATIONS Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame

March 20, 5:30 p.m., Denver Marriott City Center, 1701 California St., Denver. Mistress of Ceremonies: Marilyn Van Debur Atler. 2014 inductees are Lauren Casteel, Elizabeth Wright Ingram, Helen Ring Robinson, Diana Wall, Christine Arguello, Penny Hamilton, Joanne Maguire, Morley Ballantine and Julia Archibald Holmes. RSVP by March 10, cogreatwomen.org/event.

EVENTS COmingle kickoff

March 13, 6-9 p.m., History Colorado Center, 1200 Sherman St., Denver. New adult-night-out series that blends outof-the-box activities with plenty of Colorado spirit (and spirits). Tonight’s program: Colorado is the Best. Visit www. historycoloradocenter.org/tickets.

Cherokee Ranch and Castle Vintage Murder Mystery Dinner

March 15, 7 -10 p.m., Castle Great Hall, Cherokee Ranch and Castle, Sedalia. Journey back to 1942 as we join the Society of Winemakers Interested in Local Levity for their Vintage of the Year awards, where foul play is afoot. Limited to 80 people. For reservations visit www.cherokeeranch.org or call 303-688-4600.

Open House and Tour of 17 Mile House Farm Park

March 22, noon – 2 p.m., 8181 S. Parker Road, Centennial. Visitors will learn about the history of the property

and its significance to the Old West. This County-designated heritage area includes a historic house, red barn, silo and milk shed, two replica windmills and 30 acres of open space. Tours are offered one Saturday per month. Otherwise, the house and barn are open by appointment only. 720-874-6540.

Ward Lucas Program at Bemis

March 27, 7 p.m., Bemis Public Library, 6014 S. Datura St., Littleton. Local television journalist Ward Lucas will share stories of his exciting career, 303-795-3691 or www. littletongov.org.

Principles and Priorities

April 5, 9-11 a.m., Columbine High School Commons, 6201 S Pierce St., Littleton. An interactive exercise featuring U.S. Rep. Diana DeGette in which participants learn about the difficulty of balancing the federal budget by making many of the policy decisions facing lawmakers. Free and open to the public, but limited to the first 150 people. RSVP Congresswoman DeGette’s office at 303-844-4988 or degette.rsvp@ mail.house.gov by April 3.

FUNDRAISERS ‘Celebration of the Heart’

March 22, 5:30 – 9 p.m., Pinehurst Country Club, 6255 W. Quincy Ave., Denver. Fundraiser celebrating Community Ministry’s service to the Denver community. Proceeds will go to support the efforts of Community Ministry to meet the basics needs of qualified people in Southwest Denver who are experiencing economic

hardships and related problems. The evening includes a buffet dinner, a silent and live auction and awards presentation. A cash bar will be provided. Tickets online at www.comministry-denver.org.

MEETINGS DPS Meetings to Discuss Update of Denver Plan

Denver Public Schools is updating the Denver Plan, the district’s roadmap for improvement that has been in place since 2005 and was last updated in 2010. This will provide the Denver community with the benchmarks that lead to DPS’ vision of Every Child Succeeds. As part of the update process, DPS Board of Education members are hosting community meetings to discuss the key goals that need to be part of the Denver Plan.

Libertarian Party Annual Business Meeting and Convention

March 28 – 30, Marriott Denver West, 1717 Denver West Blvd., Golden Featuring two-term Governor of New Mexico, Gary Johnson. Tickets for the Libertarian Party of Colorado annual convention are on sale now at www.lpcolorado.org.

SAVE THE DATE Tesoro Indian Market and PowWow

May 17-18, The Fort, 19192 Highway 8, Morrison. Native Southwestern art, cuisine, dance, music and hands-on educational activities for the kids.

ST. PATRICK’S DAY St. Patrick’s Day Party

March 14, 4:30 – 7p.m., Slattery’s Irish Pub @ The Landmark, 5364 Greenwood Plaza Blvd, Greenwood Village. Food and drink freebies, prize giveaways, live music and entertainment, $5 Advance Registration; $10 at the door.

St. Patrick’s Day Festival

March 15, noon – 6 p.m., Historic Olde Town Arvada. Live music, beer, wine, food, family fun and street vendors. In case of heavy snow, March 22 will be the alternate date. Information at www.historicarvada. org.

WHAT’S NEW Cherry Creek Reservoir Open for Boating

Boat inspections for aquatic nuisance species are mandatory at most waters in the state, including state parks and state wildlife areas. Hand-launched, nonmotorized, boats such as canoes or kayaks are allowed on the water and are not subject to inspection. All trailer vessels must go through an Aquatic Nuisance Species (ANS) inspection prior to launching. East Ramp, 6 a.m. - 6 p.m. daily. The West Ramp, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. on weekends through March. If you wish to boat outside of those hours you must obtain a seal from a certified ANS boat inspector and go through the proper Pre-Inspection procedure. Visit www. parks.state.co.us/Parks/cherrycreek/Pages/ CherryCreekHome.aspx.

Advertise your church services for only $12.50 Per week! 303-936-7778 Bethany United Methodist 3501 W. 1st Ave. 303-934-7163

E-Mail BethUMC@juno.com

Rev. Bich Thy (Betty) Nguyen, Pastor

Sunday School . . . . . . . .9:30 am Sunday Fellowship . . . .10:15 am Sunday Worship . . . . . .10:30 am Nursery Provided on Sunday Thursday Brown Bag Lunch & Bible Study . . . . . . . . . .11:30 am

SET FREE Church/Denver

Deliverance Tabernacle

Notre Dame Catholic

DR. GAIL BAILEY, PASTOR

303-455-5130

2190 S. Sheridan Blvd. 303-935-3900

Prayer at 10:00 a.m. Praise & Worship - 10:30 a.m.

Children’s Church & Nursery

SUNDAY SERVICE 11:00 a.m.

Sunday Anticipated Mass: 4:00 p.m. Saturday

WEDNESDAY SERVICES

WEDNESDAY SERVICES 6:00 p.m.

Sunday Schedule: 7:30 a.m. • 9:00 a.m. 10:30 a.m. • 12:00 p.m.

1001 Perry St. 303-825-2135 SUNDAY SERVICES

6:30 & Shared meal at 7:00 p.m. Pastor: John Martinez

Help Us Praise Jesus!

395 Knox Ct. Denver, CO 80219

NEW BELIEVER CLASS • ADULT BIBLE STUDY TEEN MINISTRY • CHILDREN’S MINISTRY FOOD BANK TUES 3-6 P.M. & THURS 12 NOON - 4 P.M.

ALL ARE WELCOME

Harvey Park Christian PASTOR THOM ALBIN

3401 S. Lowell Blvd. (top of hill) 303-789-3142 www. hpccdenver.org SUNDAY SERVICES 9:00 a.m. Sunday School Adult and Children 10:00 a.m. Worship & Kid’s Life Nursery Available SPANISH SERVICE SUNDAY 3:00 p.m. FRIDAY Prayer Service 7:00 p.m. JOYFUL AND WELCOMING COME JOIN US


March 13, 2014 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • PAGE 9

HELP WANTED $2000.00 SIGN-ON BONUS!

SERVICES MASONRY SPECIALIST

Professional Tuck-pointing on Chimneys, Brick Homes and more. We also do Carpentry & Roofing--total Roof Replacement and Repair jobs. Reasonable Prices--Call: Monte at 720-841-2212.

SENSATIONAL SOUNDS PROFESSIONAL DJ SERVICE

is here in Denver ready to help you with your event! Call 719314-5761 or visit our website at www.ssprodj.com to find out more!

PERSONAL ASSISTANCE NEED AN EXTRA HAND? Reliabale professional ready to assist in household, business opportunity, property management, pet sit, event/party planner. Call Diana 303-324-0786

SITUATION WANTED Independent Caregiver, companion and driver Available for person looking for help in the home and still wanting independent living. Will assist with cooking, gardening, shopping, transportation, companionship and other services. References available upon request. Please call Tammy at 303-242-9942

Home Nightly Flatbed Runs. CDL-A, 1yr Exp. Req. Estenson Logistics. Apply: www.goelc.com 1-888-399-5856

PIANO LESSONS PIANOFORTE DENVER

www.carolannbarry.com Professional pianist for special events. Private lessons.

720-524-7285

HANDYMAN/ UTILITY PERSON

for a commercial janitorial it is a full time position must have transportation and valid US license. Salary negotiable with experience. Please call 303-458-1912 to set appointment or mail resume to Summit Maintenance at 1880 W. Evans, Englewood Colorado 80110 ADVERTISE YOUR EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

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To place a 25-word COSCAN network inin 100 To place a 25-word COSCAN Networkadad 84Colorado Colorado newspapers only$250, $250,contact call youryour locallocal newspaper today. or newspapers forfor only newspaper call SYNC2 Media at 303-571-5117. Contact Scott at 303-773-8313 HELP WANTED - DRIVERS 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED! Learn to drive for Swift Transportation at US Truck. Earn $750 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks! 1-800-809-2141 TSL IS currently hiring local, regional, dedicated Class A Drivers in Denver area. Minimum 1 year Tractor-Trailer experience. Full benefits & great hometime! www.4TSL.com, 1-866-HOME-TSL

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HELP WANTED - DRIVERS NEED CLASS A CDL TRAINING? Start a CAREER in trucking today! Swift Academies offer PTDI certified courses and offer “Best-in-Class” training. New Academy Classes Weekly • No Money Down or Credit Check • Certified Mentors Ready and Available • Paid (While Training With Mentor • Regional and Dedicated Opportunities • Great Career Path • Excellent Benefits Package Please Call: (520) 226-9474 PAID CDL TRAINING! HELP WANTED No Experience Needed! Stevens Transport will sponsor the Indian Creek Express cost of your CDL training! Earn up HIRING in North Colorado to $40K first year - $70K third year! and Cheyenne, WY. Excellent benefits! EOE OTR Drivers (single/teams), 888-993-8043 Fleet Technician/ www.becomeadriver.com Truck Mechanics Benefits, Paid/Home Weekly, FULL TIME 40+/wk 877-273-3582 SYNC2 MEDIA

Buy a statewide classified line ad in newspapers across Colorado for just $250 per week. Maximize results with our Frequency Deals! Contact this newspaper or call SYNC2 Media at: 303-571-5117

SERVICES WILLIAM RASBAND, DDS 303-766-4444

ADVERTISE YOUR EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY WITH THE DENVER HERALD DISPATCH Affordable Rates and Advertising that Gets Results!!

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• Digital X- rays & laser dentistry • ClearCorrect™ Clear braces • FREE nitrous (laughing gas) • Natural - looking fillings/sealants

Your Weekly Horoscope – By Gren Chatworth SCORPIO (Oct 23 – Nov 21) You are finally coming of age in regards to your position in life. You have a lot to offer especially at your work place. Make the most of it this week.

PISCES (Feb 19 – March 20) Business matters are excellent for Pisces right now, but your social and home interests are under a cloud of bewilderment. Say little, and pay attention to commercial matters.

CANCER (June 21 – July 22) Gains are indicated for Cancer, but you can be sure of one thing – you are going to have to feel your way very carefully before you can reap the benefits that are coming.

ARIES (March 21 – April 19) Much activity is indicated in all forms at this time. Take your time to examine your financial portfolio carefully as you could reap many rewards with proper guidance.

LEO (July 23 – Aug 22) If you feel resentment with your co-workers, you have only yourself to blame. You must change your attitude and when you do, you will find a great deal of gain and cooperation with everyone.

TAURUS (April 20 – May 20) Channel your energies very carefully at this time. There are some splendid opportunities coming up that will challenge your ability to understand the pattern of “human behavior.”

VIRGO (Aug 23 – Sept 22) Friends are all around you. It is up to you to give it more effort to project yourself. Shyness is your problem, so try and overcome this.

CAPRICORN (Dec 22 – Jan 19) There is a chance that you may be moving shortly, but letters and communications dealing with this won’t look too promising. Don’t jump to conclusions about a move without some very careful consideration.

GEMINI (May 2 – June 20) You have probably made quite a name for yourself in your field of work. The time has come to start reaping your rewards that come from having done such a good job.

LIBRA (Sept 23 – Oct 22) Keep your eyes and ears open for some good opportunities coming your way shortly. There is a possibility that you won’t see the woods for the trees. Be careful before condemning others.

AQUARIUS (Jan 20 – Feb 18) t is possible that sometime this coming week, you will get a new slant on an old problem that will enable you to save a log of time and energy. Pay attention to what you see and hear. It could pay off.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 – Dec 21) Try to avoid getting forced into premature decisions by maintaining an air of quiet assurance. In other words, become more proficient in your work and more assured in your domestic life.


PAGE 10 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • March 13, 2014

HighPointe provides first-class senior living in southeast Denver Hotel-like amenities provided

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By Tom Barry outheast Denver now has a top-notch living environment for seniors wanting to live in the heart of activities ranging from shopping, restaurants, parks and highway access. HighPointe Assisted Living and Memory Care is located at I-25 and Hampden, and is close to the Denver Tech Center and 20 minutes from the Cherry Creek Shopping Center and downtown Denver. This new senior living residence was constructed on the site of the former Marriott Hotel Southeast. Spectrum Retirement Communities, a Denver-based company, constructed this high-end and well-equipped community for seniors older than 55, providing a plethora of amenities with their “At Your Service” resident concierge services. HighPointe is conveniently located at 6383 E Girard Place, immediately north of the neighborhood’s popular Starbucks and near Southmoor Park. “Our residents are as busy as they want to be,” said Annette Hunt, executive director of HighPointe, noting there are daily events and activities directed by life-enrichment specialists who are trained specifically to support residents with memory loss and confusion through their Residence Club program. The lobby is warm and welcoming and reflects a positive and spacious environment for the new community. A concierge greets greets guest and residents alike. There is also staff on duty 24/7 to assist the residents at any time. “This is our residents home, so let’s make it as comfortable and have as many amenities as possible,” said Kathleen MacDonald, vice president marketing of Spectrum Retirement Communities, LLC. “We don’t skimp on anything. We want to make it feel like home.” “It’s kind of a family feel, you are not just a number,” said Chef Brandon Hoyland, who proudly shared that 90 percent of HighPointe’s meals are made from scratch recipes. The trademark of this senior community is quickly becoming the HighPointe’s extensive and nutritious dining experience. Each day starts off with a madeto-order breakfast, well beyond the typical continental offering of other communities. Lunch features a choice of several entrees and an extensive selection of desserts for those with a sweet tooth. The dinnertime menu offers residents and their guests a wide selection of delectable entrees and side dishes. The dining room environment and the high quality of food, along with presentation, are comparable to that of a fine hotel.

Vast array of amenities

HighPointe is exceptionally proud of their physical and occupational room, which features a broad array of fitness and rehabilitation equipment specifically designed for seniors. A licensed practical nurse is on call and able to come to the community at any time, in addition to regularly scheduled hours, to tend to residents needs and issues that arise. One of the most distinguishing features of HighPointe is that 40 percent of their space is dedicated to community rooms ranging from a small theater with surround sound to a library packed with novels and two computer workstations. The community also offers a bistro, a spacious community room with a greenhouse, along with a sideenclosed open-air patio. A full service hair salon and barbershop are also available on-site to residents and the public. HighPointe offers residents a sizable sky lounge, which features breathtaking views of the northern mountains and is complemented with comfy chairs and a stone fireplace. This new four-story high-rise offers 97 apartments, along with several respite rooms that can be utilized for short-term residents. This senior living community features studio-sized apartment homes to more spacious two bedroom accommodations. There are no buy-in fees for the monthto-month residences like other comparable communities. The community offers a 60-day money back satisfaction guarantee, which is rare these days for senior living accommodations. The entire HighPointe facility was designed with seniors needs in mind, including floor surfaces and doorways that are walker and wheelchair friendly. HighPointe officially opened in late December 2013. HighPointe provides interested residents and families collateral material that is jam-packed with helpful information about the community, addressing well designed floor plan choices to meet a wide range of needs to costs and amenities. The staff encourages individuals and families interested in considering the community to add up all the numerous monthly costs associated with owning and maintaining a home. They are confident in many cases the prospective residents will find moving into HighPointe more cost effective, compared to owning a home with all the amenities provided, from housekeeping to an onsite care staff 24/7. Spectrum operates 20 other distinctive senior residences throughout the country. HighPointe is the first urban-based senior living model for Spectrum in their 10-year history. The senior living specialty group has seven other communities under construction. Information on the community is available online at www. highpointeassistedliving.com or by calling 303-756-4567.

A one-bedroom show model at HighPointe features a brightly illuminated room that is decorated beautifully.

The HighPointe community provides residents and guests a wide array of luscious desserts. Life Enrichment Specialists Jill Friedentag Fishman and Linda Aluise are at the Residence Club at HighPointe, which offers a warm and cozy sky lounge with exceptional views.

HighPointe’s Senior Community Executive Director Annette Hunt is joined by Chef Brandon Hoyland and server Ray Santiago, who are each holding a lunch entrée made from scratch.

The HighPointe Assisted Living and Memory Care community has 40 percent of their facility dedicated to community rooms for residents and their guests to enjoy.


March 13, 2014 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • PAGE 11

LEGAL NOTICES PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-1517 To Whom It May Concern: On 12/13/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County. Original Grantor: GENEAVER M WILSON Original Beneficiary: ACADEMY MORTGAGE LLC D/B/A ACADEMY MORTGAGE LENDING GROUPO, LLC Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: REVERSE MORTGAGE SOLUTIONS, INC. Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 9/7/2004 Recording Date of DOT: 10/6/2004 Reception No. of DOT: 2004208916 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $292,500.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $233,217.87 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: the lender declares a violation of the covenants of said deed of trust for reasons including, but not limited to, the failure to pay monthly payments of principal and interest together with all other payments provided for in the deed of trust and note. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOTS 17 AND 18, BLOCK 2, CHAMBERLIN’S COLFAX ADDITION, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 2505 Poplar Street , Denver, CO 80207 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, April 17, 2014, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 2/20/2014 Last Publication: 3/20/2014 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 12/13/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: KLEINSMITH & ASSOCIATES, P.C. PHILIP M KLEINSMITH Colorado Registration #: 1063 6035 ERIN PARK DRIVE, SUITE 203 , COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO 80918 Phone #: (719) 593-1970 Fax #: (719) 593-2193 Attorney File #: 12-0343 Published in the Denver Herald First Published February 20, 2014 Last Published March 20, 2014 Legal #: 2013-1517 _________________________________ PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-1530 To Whom It May Concern: On 12/17/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County.

Original Grantor: BOB HEDGECOCK Original Beneficiary: LINDSAY E BERZ Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: LINDSAY E BERZ Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 10/1/2010 Recording Date of DOT: 10/21/2010 Reception No. of DOT: 2010121397 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $65,000.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $65,000.00 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to make monthly payments of prinicpal and interest together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 20, BLOCK 48, HARVEY PARK ADDITION, FILING NO. 10, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 2283 South Xavier Street , Denver, CO 80219 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, April 17, 2014, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 2/20/2014 Last Publication: 3/20/2014 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 12/18/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: FOSTER GRAHAM MILSTEIN & CALISHER LLP ROBERT GRAHAM Colorado Registration #: 26809 360 SOUTH GARFIELD STREET 6TH FLOOR, DENVER, COLORADO 80209 Phone #: (303) 333-9810 Fax #: (303) 333-9786 Attorney File #: 3018.0028 Published in the Denver Herald First Published February 20, 2014 Last Published March 20, 2014 Legal #: 2013-1530 _________________________________ PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-1563 To Whom It May Concern: On 12/23/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County. Original Grantor: JOY L HARRIS Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: MIDFIRST BANK Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 8/1/2007 Recording Date of DOT: 8/15/2007 Reception No. of DOT: 2007128225

DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $233,856.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $213,663.13 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to make payments of principle and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: SAN RAFAEL ADDITION B2 EAST 30 FEET OF WEST 62.5 FEET OF LTS 16, 2, 19, EXC NORTH 4 FEET OF EAST 30 FEET OF WEST 62.5 FEET OF LOT 19 CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO Which has the address of: 929 East 23rd Avenue , Denver, CO 80205-5110 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, April 24, 2014, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 2/27/2014 Last Publication: 3/27/2014 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 12/27/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC JENNIFER M GRIEST Colorado Registration #: 34830 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201 , DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone #: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax #: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney File #: 13-06759 Published in the Denver Herald First published February 27, 2014 Last published March 27, 2014 Legal #: 2013-1563 _________________________________ PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-1577 To Whom It May Concern: On 12/26/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County. Original Grantor: ASHIA VIGIL AND ANTONIO LOPEZ Original Beneficiary: ZIA TRUST CUSTODIAN FOR ANDREW FELD IRA 20%, MARC LIPPITT 33.333%, KENNETH GOLDBERG DEFINED BENEFIT PENSION PLAN AND TRUST 46.667% Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: ZIA TRUST CUSTODIAN FOR ANDREW FELD IRA 20%, MARC LIPPITT 33.333%, KENNETH GOLDBERG DEFINED BENEFIT PENSION Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 5/9/2013 Recording Date of DOT: 5/15/2013 Reception No. of DOT: 2013069714 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $150,000.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $149,864.12 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: the covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Default has been made in installment due monthly and subsequent installments; principal balance due plus interest. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOTS 25 AND 26 AND 27, BLOCK NUMBERED 110, P.T. BARNUM’S SUBDIVISION TO THE CITY OF DENVER, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 625 Julian Street , Denver, CO 80204 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law

and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, April 24, 2014, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 2/27/2014 Last Publication: 3/27/2014 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 12/27/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: BERENBAUM, WEINSHIENK & EASON, P.C. JENNIFER D DUETTRA Colorado Registration #: 35960 370 17TH STREET REPUBLIC PLAZA, SUITE 4800, DENVER, COLORADO 80202-5698 Phone #: (303) 825-0800 Fax #: Attorney File #: 18132.550 Published in the Denver Herald First published February 27, 2014 Last published March 27, 2014 Legal #: 2013-1577 _________________________________ PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-1596 To Whom It May Concern: On 12/30/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County. Original Grantor: KIM A BELL AND ROBERT C STERLING SR Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FREEDOM MORTGAGE CORPORATION Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 4/15/2008 Recording Date of DOT: 5/2/2008 Reception No. of DOT: 2008059803 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $205,994.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $191,308.27 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to make payments of principle and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 12, BLOCK 7, PARKFIELD FILING NO. 12, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 5551 Laredo Court , Denver, CO 80239-7015 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, May 1, 2014, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 3/6/2014 Last Publication: 4/3/2014 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 12/31/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC JENNIFER M GRIEST Colorado Registration #: 34830 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201 , DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone #: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax #: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney File #: 13-07827 Published in the Denver Herald First published March 6, 2014

Last published April 3, 2014 Legal #: 2013-1596 _________________________________ PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-1609 To Whom It May Concern: On 12/31/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County. Original Grantor: DANIA PURSEL Original Beneficiary: AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE COMPANY Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2002-D Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 10/30/2002 Recording Date of DOT: 11/7/2002 Reception No. of DOT: 2002211130 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $182,000.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $182,701.13 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 6, JOHNSON RESUBDIVISION OF EAST 1/2 BLOCK 15, AND WEST 145 FEET OF BLOCK 16, DENVER GARDENS, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO. **ASSIGNMENT OF DEED OF TRUST DATED DECEMBER 5, 2013; HOME AFFORDABLE MODIFICATION AGREEMENT DATED FEBRUARY 25, 2011.** Which has the address of: 1657 South Locust Street , Denver, CO 80224 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, May 1, 2014, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 3/6/2014 Last Publication: 4/3/2014 Publisher: Herald Dispatch

ance Exchange NAIC Number: 41459 Address: 550 Eisenhower Road City: Leavenworth State: KS Zip: 66048 Assets: $123, 015,714 Liabilities: $61,417,543 Capital and Surplus/Policyholder Surplus: $61,598,171 TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the Armed Forces Insurance Exchange, organized under the laws of Kansas subject to its Articles of Incorporation or other fundamental organizational documents and in consideration of its compliance with the laws of Colorado, is herby licensed to transact business as a property/casualty insurance company, as provided by the Insurance Laws of Colorado, as amended, so long as the insurer continues to conform to the authority granted by its Certificate and its corporate articles, or its Certificate is otherwise revoked, canceled or suspended. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the official seal of my office to be affixed at the City and County of Denver this first day of March, 2014. /s/ Marguerite Salazar Commissioner of Insurance Published in the Denver Herald First published February 27, 2014 Last published March 20, 2014 Legal# 4091 _________________________________ DIVISION OF INSURANCE SYNOPSIS OF ANNUAL STATEMENT FOR PUBLICATION Required pursuant to 10-3-109(1), C.R.S. For year 2013 Corporate Name: Cherokee National Life Insurance Company NAIC Number: 61824 Address: 2960 Riverside Drive City: Macon State: GA Zip: 31204 Assets: $22,171,771 Liabilities: $6,441,366 Capital and Surplus/Policyholder Surplus: $15,730,405 TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the Cherokee National Life Insurance Company, organized under the laws of its compliance with the laws of Colorado, is hereby licensed to transact business as a Credit Life & Credit A&H insurance company, as provided by the Insurance Laws of Colorado, as amended, so long as the insurer continues to conform to the authority granted by its Certificated and its corporate articles, or its Certificate is otherwise revoked, canceled or suspended. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the official seal of my office to be affixed at the City and County of Denver this first day of March, 2014. /s/ Marguerite Salazar Commissioner of Insurance Published in the Villager First published February 27, 2014 Last published March 20, 2014 Legal #: 4092 _________________________________ SYNOPSIS OF ANNUAL STATEMENT FOR PUBLICATION REQUIRED PURSUANT TO 10-3109(1), C.R.S. FOR YEAR 2013

Dated: 12/31/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: HELLERSTEIN AND SHORE, PC DAVID A SHORE Colorado Registration #: 19973 5347 S. VALENTIA WAY SUITE 100, GREENWOOD VILLAGE, COLORADO 80111 Phone #: (303) 573-1080 Fax #: (303) 571-1271 Attorney File #: 13-00998SH

Corporate Name: North American Title Insurance NAIC Number: 50130 Address (Do Not Use Post Office Box): 1855 Gateway Blvd., Suite 600 City: Concord State: CA Zip: 94520

Published in the Denver Herald First published March 6, 2014 Last published April 3, 2014 Legal #2013-1609 _________________________________

TO WHOM IT MAY CONERN:

NOTICE OF SALES Broncos Towing 303-722-3555 Owner: Joe Gallegos 1534 W. Bayoud Ave Denver, CO Will sell the following vehicles if not claimed within 30 days of the first publication of this notice: 1) 87 Toyota Corrola White Vin# Z415063 Published in the Denver Herald First Published February 27, 2014 Last Published March 27, 2014 Legal #: DHD 023 _________________________________ DIVISION OF INSURANCE SYNOPSIS OF ANNUAL STATEMENT FOR PUBLICATION Required pursuant to 10-3-109(1), C.R.S. For year 2013 Corporate Name: Armed Forces Insur-

Assets: $86,346,252.00 Liabilities: $32,744,635.00 Capital and Surplus/Policyholder Surplus: $52,558,993.00 THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the North American Title Insurance Company, organized under the laws of California subject to the Articles of Incorporation or other fundamental organizational documents and in consideration of its compliance with the laws of Colorado, is hereby license to transact business as a insurance company, as provided by the Insurance Laws of Colorado, as amended, so long as the insurer continues to conform to the authority granted by its Certificate and its corporate articles, or its Certificate is otherwise revoked, canceled or suspended. I N WITNESS THEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the official seal of my office to be affixed at the City and County of Denver this first day of March, 2014. /s/ Marguerite Salazar, Commissioner of Insurance Published in the Denver Herald First published March 6, 2014 Last published March 27, 2014 Legal #: 4093

— End of Legals—


PAGE 12 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • March 13, 2014

Locally shot ‘Bee People’ minds its beeswax Buzz-worthy documentary to play Women+Film Festival

may be multiple and wide-ranging: nicotine-based pesticides, mites, an undiscovered virus, maybe even radiation from cellphone towers. But one thing is for sure. Without By Peter Jones bees, man is in trouble. Lest we forWhen amateur beekeeper Susan get, bees produce far more than wax Halstedt first got the idea of bring- and a tasty condiment for sopapiling a beehive onto her large prop- las. Bees play an important role in erty in unincorporated Arapahoe pollination, which enables fertilizaCounty, she had no idea that her tion and reproduction of plants, fruit hive of newly adopted anthophilous and vegetables. About a third of the insects already had neighbors. human food supply is dependent on “She was already a beekeeper insect pollination, most of which is and didn’t even know it,” filmmaker performed by bees. David Knappe said. “Bees had con“One out of every three things on verted the inside of her barn into this your dinner plate would not be there monstrous-sized hive. The walls without honeybees,” Ellis said. “If were dripping with about 50 pounds we lose the bees, we are left with of honey, maybe more.” wind-pollinated crops – oats, corn, What’s a woman to do? Grab the wheat, that’s it. The Chinese now swatter? Google “bee problems?” have people who go out with little Enter Greg dusters and McMahon, the hand-polbuzz of Denver, linate their the industry’s pear trees bee’s knees, “One out because and Colorado’s they’ve lost of every three end-all, bee-all all their things on your authority on bees.” dinner plate would honey-producing While yellowish flying not be there without much is insects. made of an honeybees.” McMahan is intercon- Leslie Ellis, executive the bee whisperer nection producer of of sorts, but he between Bee People calls himself the global “Bee Guru.” warming, Flanked by industrial his team armed pollution with retrofitted and natural shop vacuums, McMahan oversaw disasters, comparatively little has the removal about 40,000 bees – been said of the often-pesky flying and more important, their relocation insects that – along with ants – can to a more experienced beekeeper bring life to any summer picnic. who lived about eight blocks away. Unlike other documentaries that The guru’s local bee rescue is have covered the issue, Bee People shown in some detail in Bee People, is decidedly solution-based. The a new documentary – a Bee-movie, film effectively plays as a sort of if you will – directed by Knappe call to action for viewers – those and produced by Leslie Ellis, a local eccentric enough – to get stung by writer and avid four-year beekeeper. the bee bug. “You have to be a little weird “The solution is more bee peoto be around 70,000 insects, all of ple,” Knappe said. which can sting you right then,” The number of managed beeEllis said. “My older brother said, hives in the United States has ‘It’s so cool that you’re a beekeeper. steadily declined from close to 6 It’s like having a lion tamer in the million after World War II to fewer family.’” than 2.5 million today. Bee People will be screened Ellis got the bug to join that as part of the fourth Women+Film number at the bequest of her husVoices Film Festival, March 18-23, band, who strategically placed an at the Sie Film Center in Denver. assortment of beekeeping supplies Although the documentary under the Christmas tree. Three devotes considerable screen time to years later, she is the founder of the the quirky people of its title, the film implicitly existential Women Who has a more serious message: Bees Bee. are in trouble. “In 2011, I became a beekeeper, These honey-producing insects made this movie and started a beeare disappearing at alarming num- keeping club for women, so I kind bers. The causes for recent die-offs of went at it pretty hard,” she said.

A team member transfers a beehive population.

Like honey to the bee, the co-stars of Bee People do what they do best. The documentary plays the Women+Film Voices Film Festival on March 22.

Denver’s “Bee Guru” gets down to beeswax in Bee People, which plays the Women+Film Voices Film Festival on March 22.

Photos courtesy of Bee People

“The joy of this movie is the potential for more people to become backyard beekeepers.” Ideally, that would mean a beehive every two miles, she says. That is how far the average bee would be able to fly within a hypothetical system of bee hotels. “It’s giving the bees a place to rest over night in their own hive,” Knappe said. “They go out and forage from about 5:30 in the morning

until sundown. They literally work themselves to death in their 30 to 50 days of lifespan.” But what a month and a half it is, to hear bee lovers tell it. “You can just chill in your backyard and watch them wiggle dancing,” Knappe said of the bee’s communication techniques. Those same bees keep warm, up to 80 degrees in the winter, by huddling in their sealed-off hives – all serving at the will of their dominating queen bee. “At the end of the season, the girls kick the boys out because they know they can make more in the spring if they need to,” Knappe said. Of course, a major challenge to documenting the action is the risk of a bee sting. In the end, most of the worker bees on Bee People eventu-

ally wound up on the wrong end of a bee’s stinger – except for the director, that is. “I was the only member of the crew not to get stung,” Knappe said with a laugh. “And that’s the way it should be.”

Bee People Saturday, March 22 Sie Film Center 2510 E. Colfax Ave., Denver Women+Film Voices Film Festival. For tickets and a full schedule, visit www.denverfilm.org or for information, call 303-595-3456.

It’s a sticky job, but someone’s got to do it. Filmmaker Leslie Ellis shows the honey drip of her labors.

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