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POLITICS

Romanoff among Democrats targeted by ‘phony websites’

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A quick visit to www.andrew romanoff2014.com brings the immediate trappings of a selfcongratulatory website, until you take a closer look.

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AUTO NEYS

2014 Highlander Hybrid gets 28-mpg in a 3-row SUV

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The 2014 Toyota Highlander Hybrid is as popular as ever. The roomy SUV’s price starts around $29,000.

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ARTS

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All-Judaic & Israeli Art and Jewelry Festival The All-Judaic Art & Jewelry Festival will feature wall art, glass, textiles, fiber art, ceramics, precious metals and woods, and jewelry.

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50¢ S i n c e 19 2 6 February 20, 2014

D I S P A T C H www.HDnewspaper.com

Vol. 93 No. 09

A Taco House to Remember

Preserving the midcentury touchstones of Littleton Boulevard

By Peter Jones From a distance, Littleton’s Taco House may not look like much – and even up close, its 89-cent tacos and drive-up service are not exactly the promise of fine dining. But look at the quick-service eatery a little longer and you might see the lure of its old-school design, bright yellow coloring and distinctly kitschy charm. To longtime locals, the restaurant at 1390 W. Littleton Blvd., built in 1961, may be a staple of a family-run business and nofrills Mexican food. But to fans of aging architecture and retrocool, Littleton’s Taco House is the whole enchilada. “It took design elements from high-style buildings and put them down to a more pedestrian level,” said Rachel Parris, programs manager for the nonprofit Colorado Preservation Inc. “It’s really an example of what midcentury architecture can be.” Taco House is one of a number of Littleton buildings, constructed between 1949 and 1967, to recently catch the eye of Colorado Preservation and its annual “Endangered Places” list. Each year, the independent nongovernmental organization releases its survey of specific structures or groups of buildings in the state that the association deems worthy of cooperative conservation. In the case of Littleton, Colorado Preservation has created a Continued on page12

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Don and Dora D’Andrea, owners of Littleton’s Taco House, were as surprised as anyone by news that their quick-service restaurant had been marked for possible preservation. Photo by Peter Jones

Free tax assistance, health insurance enrollment available The Piton Foundation and Connect for Health Colorado are partnering to provide free tax assistance and health insurance enrollment assistance to lowerincome Coloradans at joint events across the state throughout February and early March. These events are happening at 21 tax sites across Colorado where 15 organizations called Assistance Sites will provide trained Health Coverage Guides to provide unbiased, in-person help to customers of Connect for Health Colorado. A partnership between The Piton Foundation and the Colorado Community College System, Tax Help Colorado provides free tax filing services to individuals with household incomes less than $50,000 in 2013. Tax Help Colorado operates free tax sites on community

college campuses across the state. At these free tax sites, IRScertified students prepare and e-file tax returns free of charge for individuals and families. Connect for Health Colorado is intensifying outreach activities to educate Coloradans about the open enrollment deadlines and financial help that are available, based on income, to reduce the cost of commercial health insurance. Many of the people who are eligible for free tax help are also eligible for Medicaid or premium tax credits through the Marketplace. Open enrollment ends March 31. “We are excited to partner with The Piton Foundation and Tax Help Colorado to provide Coloradans with more ways to learn about their health insurance options and apply for new financial help to reduce costs,”

said Patty Fontneau, CEO of Connect for Health Colorado. “Many Coloradans who are taking advantage of the free tax assistance sites are also eligible for tax credits that can make health insurance affordable for the first time. We know that many Coloradans also want personalized help with shopping for health insurance and these events are a great way to provide that support.” Diane DiGiacomo of The Piton Foundation said, “By offering free tax assistance, Tax Help Colorado helps alleviate the financial burden of commercial tax preparation on working families while linking them to valuable tax benefits like the Earned Income Tax Credit. We know that many of our tax site clients are living without health insurance, so partnering with

Connect for Health Colorado to provide enrollment assistance is a great fit.” The schedule includes Aurora, Denver, Commerce City, Lakewood and Westminster. The complete schedule is available at www.piton.org. Dates and locations are subject to change. Find all enrollment and outreach events for Connect for Health Colorado at http:// connectforhealthco.com/newsevents/events/. The free tax sites are at community colleges and other locations that are convenient to Coloradans. The partnership involves Assistance Sites who provide certified Health Coverage Guides to participate at the tax sites and help Coloradans with their insurance questions. Learn more at www.connect forhealthco.com.


PAGE 2 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • February 20, 2014

S i n c e 19 2 6

This website may look like it supports Democrat Andrew Romanoff, but take a closer look.

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GOP opens salvo in ’14 digital campaign Romanoff among Democrats targeted by ‘phony websites’ By Peter Jones A quick visit to www.andrew romanoff2014.com brings the immediate trappings of a self-congratulatory website. A flattering photo of the candidate greets viewers along with a headline set in complimenting colors: “Andrew Romanoff for Congress.” Scroll down, though, and you will read verbiage not typically associated with self-interested campaigning: “Andrew Romanoff is a professional politician who will do anything to further his political career – including moving to a congressional district just to run for office.” It would seem unlikely that the 6th District Democrat would frame his own move to Aurora in terms of political expediency – and it is. Romanoff, the former speaker of the Colorado House of Representatives, has nothing to do with the website. “It’s pretty silly,” Romanoff said of the site created by the National Republican Congressional Committee. “I’m going to try to win this race by leveling with the voters of the 6th, not by trying to fool them. It’s a nice picture and they spelled my name right so I can’t complain too much.” The “fake website,” as some critics and media reports have called it, is one of nearly 20 such sites created by the NRCC and aimed at Democratic candidates involved in tight races with Republicans across the United States. NRCC reportedly purchased hundreds of URLs in advance of the 2014 election cycle and has so far aimed its messaging at Romanoff and former U.S. Speaker Nancy Pelosi, among others. The Romanoff site boasts a litany of criticisms of the candidate, calling him a “Denver liberal” who voted for higher fees and thinks the controversial Obamacare “doesn’t go far enough.” Scroll to the bottom and the one-page site includes a donation button – not to Romanoff’s campaign, but to the NRCC, itself. “Had enough of Andrew Romanoff? Sign up today,” the site says. Romanoff, who is challenging incumbent Republican Rep. Mike Coffman in an increasingly competitive district, says he was not particularly surprised by the unusual tactic. “If you’re part of the least productive Congress in modern memory and you had to run on your record, you wouldn’t get very far,” Romanoff said. “This is the only way to win a race like this, by playing games.”

NRCC spokesman Tyler Houlton counters that it is Romanoff who has turned the race into a game of hide and go seek, as far as the Democrat’s record is concerned. “Our goal with these websites is to really educate voters,” he said. “You’ve already seen Andrew Romanoff trying to backtrack a little on his support for Obamacare, his support for Referendum C and other large-scale taxes in Colorado. I would actually argue that his site is the one that’s misleading.”

stitute a violation. Nancy Leong, a professor at the University of Denver’s Sturm College of Law, says the website would not fool a reasonable person. “You have to read the headline in the context of the entire presentation, and if you read anything beyond the first four words, which I think the reasonable person would do before they donate money, it’s clear that this is not a website that’s endorsing Andrew Romanoff,” Leong said. “I think the fundraising is the ultimate test. There’s a line between what is slimy and what’s illegal.”

This is the only way [for the National Too ‘conservative’ on immigration? Republican Perhaps the most ironic section Congressional of the Romanoff site is the one that Committee] to win takes the Democrat to task for sup“some of the strictest immia race like this, by porting gration laws in the nation, including playing games. a law that would bar Colorado’s - Andrew Romanoff, Democratic candidate in 6th Congressional District

The legal question

Although it is anything but new for a political party to spin widely, it is more unusual to do so on websites designed to look – at least at first glance – like an official site of the candidate in question. Denver pollster and political analyst Floyd Ciruli does not think the tactic will have any long-term impact for either side of the hotly contested race. “It’s obviously going to get attention, but the public has a low level of trust in political advertising, in general,” he said. “To be involved in something that is potentially disingenuous is not only going to produce criticism of the sponsor, but completely negates whatever benefit they think they’re pulling off.” Of particular concern has been the fundraising aspect of the sites. In at least one incident, a supporter of Florida Democrat Alex Sink accidently donated to the NRCC. The money was refunded, according to the organization. Romanoff is unaware of any such confusion in connection to the site aimed at his candidacy. Some have also questioned the legality of the websites, citing a federal regulation that prohibits noncandidate committees from using an opposing candidate’s name in headlines or letterheads, unless opposition to the aspirant is clearly stated. Although the headline on the Romanoff site, “Andrew Romanoff for Congress,” is arguably misleading, not all legal scholars agree that the Republican-sponsored sites con-

undocumented immigrants from instate college tuition.” The Republican charge effectively accuses Romanoff of having been too conservative on immigration reform when he backed a bipartisan bill to bring the state into line with federal law – part of an effort, Romanoff says, to keep the issue out of the state Constitution in a competing ballot initiative. In contrast, Houlton points to Republican Rep. Coffman’s support of a “path to citizenship” for illegal immigrants who serve in the military and “legal status” to others. Coffman had previously been an ardent opponent of immigration reform. According to Houlton, immigration reform is no longer an issue owned by Democrats, especially in the redrawn 6th District, which now boasts a virtually even split among Democrats, Republicans and unaffiliated voters. “It may be ironic – but the fact is that this is a district with 14 percent Hispanics,” the NRCC spokesman said. Coffman’s campaign said the congressman would not be available for an interview for this story, but campaign manager Tyler Sandberg issued a statement tying the website issue to comments by a Democratic spokesman who likened Coffman’s opposition to the Affordable Care Act to a “hostage taking … suicide squad.” “We didn’t concoct the spoof Romanoff site, but Mike’s not crying in his beer over being called a terrorist by a Nancy Pelosi spokesman, and Speaker Romanoff should really try to hold back the crocodile tears over a phony boloney website put together by some group in D.C.,” the statement said.


February 20, 2014 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • PAGE 3

Englewood man gets 9 years for real estate fraud By Peter Jones An Englewood man was sentenced last week to nine years in prison for wire fraud and money laundering related to a bogus real estate deal. Roger K. Howard, 51, was also ordered to pay $8.9 million in restitution to his victims and will spend three years on supervised release after his prison sentence. Co-defendant Oai Quang Luong, 45, was sentenced last year to serve 18 months in prison and was ordered to pay restitution totaling $3.2 million. Internal Revenue Service special agent Stephen Boyd said the sentencing is a strong reminder of how serious law enforcement and courts deal with mortgage swindlers. During a period 2006-2007, Howard and Luong were involved the fraudulent purchasing of townhomes in Aurora and other single-family houses in Denver and Castle Rock. Howard and Luong, whose company processed the fraudulent mortgage-loan applications, kept offices in the same Centennial building. Howard was accused in his indictment of purposefully falsifying mortgage applications by overstating the prospective incomes of the buyers he called “investors” by as much as double their actual earnings. In some cases, bank accounts were inflated temporarily when their balances were to be verified. All of the fraudulent mortgages resulted in foreclosures. As many as 12 lenders lost  $7.6 million. “We hope the results of this investigation will deter others who engage in these types of fraud schemes,” said Thomas Ravenelle, the FBI agent in charge of the case.

Mayor Hancock visits new HighPointe community Mayor Michael Hancock toured the 4th District along with Councilwoman Peggy Lehmann to assess the state of the city, particularly as it relates to economic development and growth, Feb. 13. Among their stops was HighPointe Assisted Living and Memory Care, Denver’s newest senior living community, located at 6383 E. Girard Place, which opened in mid-December with 90-units along the full continuum of senior care.  Denver-based Spectrum is one of the nation’s largest developers of senior housing, founded by longtime Denver businessman John Sevo. 

Mayor Michael Hancock greets Frank Quintana at HighPointe Assisted Living and Memory Care. Quintana was the community’s first resident and is a retired assistant fire chief for Denver Fire Department.

Mayor Michael Hancock discusses economic growth with leadership from Spectrum Retirement Communities at its HighPointe community, including Managing Partner Jeff Kraus, Vice President of Marketing Kathleen MacDonald and Senior Vice President Mike Longfellow.  Courtesy photos

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2014 Toyota Highlander Hybrid gets 28-mpg in a 3-row SUV By Don Bain Toyota is the uncontested leader in hybrid technology, as well as a top seller of SUVs such as the RAV4, Highlander, 4Runner and FJ Cruiser. This has always been an important segment to the brand and remains so as the American public gravitates towards midsize SUVs and away from minivans. Last year the sales of such light duty vehicles represented 10 percent of the market totaling 1.5 million units. Over the last four years, sales of the Toyota Highlander have increased annually, culminating in the sale of 127,000 SUVs during 2013, of which 5,070 were hybrid models. This was accomplished despite stiff competition from Ford, Chrysler and GM not to mention the Korean brands. Entries in the mid-size SUV market are increasing along with the accompanying list prices, but the Highlander still starts at $29,215 for the four-cylinder, front-wheel-drive LE trim model. That could well be why they sold 12,000 Highlanders during December 2013, the best monthly performance ever, seizing a full 8.5 percent of the segment. Incidentally, a few of those were the all-new third generation Highlander, which began showing up at dealerships in small numbers late last year. One thousand units were sold just about as quickly as they could be dropped at the dealer, detailed and prepped for sale. The 2014 Toyota Highlander Hybrid is hard to beat for efficiency in a three row SUV capable of carrying seven or eight occupants, depending on options affecting the second row seating. It’s not easy to outdo in terms of efficiency as the mid-size SUV gets 28-mpg combined in a vehicle weighing 4,861 lbs. and capable of towing 3,500 lbs. However, it is in the new features

The 2014 Toyota Highlander Hybrid is as popular as ever. The roomy SUV’s price starts around $29,000.

and enhancements where the 2014 Toyota Highlander Hybrid really begins to shine. Non-hybrid owners first decide on whether a 2.7-liter inline 4-cylinder or a 3.5-liter V-6 should connect to the six-speed transmission. Then the question of front or all wheel drive arises. The Hybrid buyer gets built in all wheel drive powered by the 3.5-liter 24-valve engine plus three electric motors. The first of these provides an engine starter, generator and transmission ratio control. The second drives the front wheels and collects energy via brake regeneration, while the third drives the rear wheels and also collects energy from braking, storing it in a sealed nickel metal hydride battery. The electric motors and gasoline engine together generate 280 horsepower combined.

A new soft touch interior provides many new optional amenities, including heated and cooled front seats, navigation with the Entune multimedia system on an 8-inch touch screen and a panoramic moonroof. The hybrid sits on 19-inch Chromtec wheels, while the body has foam panels in the doors and beneath the flooring, as well as other baffling that greatly reduce noise and vibration within the cabin. Many late models feature voice command systems with varying degrees of functionality. Toyota is going to great lengths with their partners at Nuance and Voicebox to develop a system that works with normal language, using artificial intelligence to adapt to the individual speech patterns of owners. The new generation not only has refined styling but also roomier second and third rows, more cargo space

behind the seats, but also a clever new under dash shelf across two thirds of the cabin and a center console big enough to conceal a Louis Vuitton bag. Double wishbone suspension in the rear adds to the driving dynamics while allowing the extra room inside the Highlander. Another unseen aspect is the advance safety systems such as blind spot monitoring, rear cross traffic alert, rear parking sonar sensors and lane departure alert. Best of all, Toyota has repackaged these options to make them more affordable than ever before. If you watched Super Bowl LXVIII, you may have caught the commercial that embodies Toyota’s marketing push for the 2014 Highlander. In the Super Bowl Spot, the video shows how roomy the Highlander is by accommodating The Muppet Band – Dr. Teeth, Animal plus drum

kit and all. “Highlander families are inspired by curiosity,” said Rick LaFaso of Toyota Motor Sales, at the recent media event in Santa Barbara. “They love to ‘Go Places’ and explore new things and they prefer to go in style. Their growing families need a comfortable, roomy cabin and cargo capacity for road trips. “They also want a vehicle that is spacious enough for their friends on those nights when they have a sitter. A quick trip to the car wash to vacuum out the Cheerios and Highlander is ready for a night on the town.” Yes the 2014 Toyota Highlander is built for families and the Highlander Hybrid will see they go more places with less money spent on fuel. Maybe the commercial is right – the Toyota Highlander has room for everything, but boredom.

Toyota RAV4 is solid on windy roads hill climbing power was needed the shift from drive to gear ratios was smooth as silk. The SUV has a nice interior and excellent speaker system that seemed clearer in tone and sound that is in far more expensive test cars driven. The XM radio was active in the vehicle even at the end of the 2013 model year and is such a great radio channel. If you don’t have it, order it now. List price for the RAV 4 Limited AWD is $28,410 and Toyota dealers along the Front Range must make good deals looking at selling more than 218,000 of them last year. The car is nimble, fun to drive, economical, stylish, and in an affordable price range. Not the cheapest, but less than the upscale mighty Highlander that is this vehicles bigger brother. This is a great choice for those seeking quality, economy, comfort and driving pleasure.

List price for the Toyota RAV4 Limited AWD is $28,410.

By H. Throttle About every other car traveling down Denver freeways is a RAV4 or Toyota product or so it seems, as these cars do get around – “Let’s Go Places” is their theme. I’ve been curious about the RAV4 for years with the first models appearing in 1994. The spare tire is gone from the rear end of the 2013 RAV4 and replaced with a wonderful power lift gate that opens with the smart key and closes with a button on the door. It was used extensively moving luggage

into a stormy night evening in Laramie, Wyo. No messing around, just hit the button and the wind blew us into the hotel. Design is important and the wind hardly moved the sleek new design, very little wind drift from powerful Wyoming winds on U.S. 80 from Cheyenne to Laramie. The RAV4 averages about 30 mpg with normal speeds and the 4-cylinder engine proved powerful and economical. The sixspeed transmission was perfect for all driving conditions and where a little extra passing or

Free junk appliance pickup for Denver residents Did you know that Denver residents serviced by Solid Waste Management can schedule free pick-up of their junk appliances? The city contracts with EcoProjex to allow Denver residents to recycle metal appliances and ensure that Freon gas from refrigerated appliances are handled in a environmentally safe and responsible manner. To schedule a collection appointment, call 1-800-4794159 or visit www.ecoprojex. com/denver-pick-up. Appliances eligible for collection include:

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Refrigerators Freezers Air conditioners Washers & dryers Stoves/Ovens Hot water heaters Furnaces Dishwashers Microwave ovens Once you have your appointment, you will need to set your appliance out by 7 a.m. in the same location that you set out your trash. For safety reasons, remove refrigerator doors or duct tape them shut before setting them out for collection. 


February 20, 2014 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • PAGE 5

OPINION Walt Imhoff was best of the best KINDLING

By Robert Sweeney

One of the nicest men in the metro area passed away last week – business leader, civic pillar, and philanthropist Walt Imhoff. Walt was a friend to the wealthy and the poor, was a devoted advocate for abused children and an ardent supporter of Boy Scouts, to name just a few of his many favorite charities and organizations.

His rosary, high mass, and reception will be past by the time this paper travels around through the mail and delivery routes but thousands of people will have remembered Walt with fond memories and accolades of a life well lived. Highlighted will be his love and care for others who he reached out to help with his caring touch and leadership. He was a man who just got things done! He was a very good guy.

New exhibit

The Denver Museum of Nature & Science unveiled its new 126,000 sq. ft. Morgridge Family Exploration Center and Rocky Mountain Science Center last week, as they cut the ribbon on the new addition to the museum. Museum President and CEO George Sparks acknowledged the many donors for the $57 million project now complete. Carrie

Morgridge thanked supporters for their contributions and work to make the museum a continuing world-class facility. The Cherry Hills couple donated $5 million to move the project forward. The Anschutz Foundation was also a major donor to the project opening The Anschutz Gallery. The Maya Hidden World exhibit is now open in their new gallery through Aug. 24. This traveling exhibit is the largest collection of Mayan culture ever exhibited in the U.S. Local leader Buz Koelbel was part of the development team completing this massive project in cooperation with Denver voters who approved partial funding for this project. George Sparks is an outstanding CEO of the museum and has led the museum to even loftier heights. There is some thought about returning the historic mu-

seum’s name to The Denver Museum of Natural History with Nature and Science wings. The new space also provides secure storage for the great fossils recovered in the Snowmass lakebed several years ago that is a major discovery of well- preserved ancient fossils and plants.

Trader Joe’s

Opening on Valentine’s Day were three new Trader Joe’s grocery stores at 9th and Colorado, Boulder, and Cherry Hills Marketplace in Greenwood Village. Area mayors all turned out to cut the wreath of flowers opening the new California-based specialty food market to Colorado. In Greenwood Village, 400 eager patrons entered the store in the first 20 minutes and the store was buzzing with excitement. It was a busy week in the metro area.

Happy Birthday President Washington REMARKS

By Mort Marks

“First in war, first in peace, first in the hearts of his countrymen” – who – who could Gen. “Light Horse Harry” Lee have been referring to with those words on his death in 1799? He was of course referring to a gentleman who was the Commander-in-Chief of the “Continental Army” during the Ameri-

City to the British later that year, land built on liberty, commerce can Revolution. He was of course referring to he did defeat them in two battles and a spirit of American nationa gentleman who was also one after crossing the Delaware River alism. of the Founding Fathers of the and retaking New Jersey. What is not so well known is George Washington’s lead- Washington’s position on both a United States, who also presided over the convention that drafted ership of our country’s smaller person’s religion and freedom. the United States Constitution Army went on to defeat the larger In 1790, Washington wrote a that (we hope) still remains the British Army at Saratoga in 1777 letter to the Hebrew Congregalaw of the land – and who became and at Yorktown in 1781. Dissatisfied with the weakness tion of Newport, R.I., whose imthe first president of our country. He was, of course, referring to of the Continental Congress, in pact is still immersed in our lives. In his letter, he reassured those 1789, George Washington was George Washington. George Washington was born unanimously elected as our coun- who had fled religious tyranny that life in their new nation would into a wealthy farming family and try’s first president. He attempted to unify our di- be different and that the governafter his father’s death was raised by William Fairfax who educated vided country by bringing rival ment would not interfere with inBy Glory Weisberg By Kenneth W. James, CFA George into becoming both a sur- fractions together, and did guardividuals in matter of conscience, antee us a decade of peace by belief and in the practice of their veyor and soldier. As a soldier, George served proclaiming us neutral in the then own religion. well in the French and Indian ongoing European Wars. When it came in an individual After eight years, his term was War. He was chosen to be the freedom regardless of skin color, commander-in-chief of the Con- over and in 1797, he delivered tinental Army in our country’s his famous “Farewell Address” Washington on his deathbed rewhere he warned us against par- quested and directed his wife to Revolutionary War. Washington’s first military tisanship, sectionalism and in- “free all the slaves who worked their estate.” victory was in 1776 when he volvement in foreign wars. George Washington – a man of He had a vision of our country forced the British out of Boston, and although he lost New York becoming a great and powerful honor, bravery and leadership.

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PAGE 6 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • February 20, 2014

Petrified wood & jet, a mineraloid

More than 200 million years ago stood a lush tropical forest with giant trees and tropical flora. Rivers flowed through green forests like the Amazon does today. Swamps populated with fish, reptiles, logs and thousands of unimaginable insects moved like blue arteries that drained into an inland sea. Volcanic mountains spewed fire and lava in the southern skyline. It’s a scene that is hard to imagine when the same land we see today is an arid desert scattered with wood that has since turned to stone. Petrified wood is real wood that has turned into rock composed of quartz crystals. Petrified wood has been preserved for millions of years by a process call petrification. This process turns the wood into quartz crystal, which is very brittle and shatters. Even though petrified wood is fragile, it is also harder than steel. Petrified wood is known for its exquisite color and detail. Some pieces have retained the original cellular structure of the w o o d and the grain can easily be seen. Petrified wood can be found throughout the desert regions. One of the greatest concentrations of petrified wood in the world is found in the Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona. Logs as long as 200 feet and 10 feet in diameter have been found in the park. This was once part of a large forest that extended from Texas into Utah. The trees were similar to modern-day conifers and existed at the same time as the dinosaurs, fossils of which are often found in the park. Petrified wood (from the Greek root “petro” meaning “rock” or “stone,” literally “wood turned into stone”) is a process that begins with

three raw ingredients: wood, water and mud. Petrification began when the primitive trees fell to the ground and into the waterways on a journey through time. The logs were swept and tumbled downstream with sediment and other debris. The streams traveled through a plain of lakes and swamps where wood, sediment and debris were deposited along the way. The mud that covered the logs contained volcanic ash, which was a key ingredient in the petrification process. When the volcanic ash began to decompose, it released chemicals into the water and mud. As the water seeped into the wood the chemicals from the volcanic ash reacted with the wood and formed into quartz crystals. As the crystals grew over time, the wood became incased in the crystals, which, over millions of years, turned the wood into stone. The petrified logs were buried in the sediment for millions of years, protected from the elements of decay. During this time the land in a particular

area called the Chinle Formation, was covered by an ocean and another layer of sediments on top of the wood-rich formation. About 60 million years ago the ocean moved away and the erosion process began. More than 2000 feet of sediment have eroded to expose the top 100 feet containing the petrified logs. It is not the wood that makes petrified wood colorful, but the chemistry of the petrifying groundwater. Minerals such as manganese, iron and copper were in the water/mud during the petrification process. These minerals give petrified wood a variety of color ranges. Quartz crystals are colorless, but when iron is added to the process, the crystals become stained with a yellow or red tint. The usual color of petrified wood is red, with yellow, black and white bands although other shades such as blue are often found. Sometimes the wood is much less colorful and comes in a dull gray or brown. Petrified wood also can become opalized, that is, instead of the wood being replaced with quartz crystal, it is replaced with fire opal. The opalized wood contains bands or seams of fire opal. The opalized wood is usually found in hard, heavy, clay layers. The clay layers consist of volcanic ash deposited between 12 and 20 million years ago. Opalized petrified wood is rare and expensive. Instant Petrified Wood? Yongsoon Shin and colleagues at the Department of Energy lab have converted wood to mineral, achiev-

ing in days what it takes nature millions of years to do. Shin started the process by giving a one centimeter cube of wood a two-day acid bath, soaked it in a silica solution for two more days, air-dried it, put it into an argon-filled furnace at 1,400 degrees centigrade for two hours, then let it cool in argon to room temperature. The resulting material “replicates exactly the wood architecture,” according to Shin.

Mineraloid Jet

Jet (ignite) is a geological material and is considered to be a minor gemstone. Jet is not considered a true mineral gemstone, but rather a mineraloid, as it has an organic origin, being derived from decaying wood trees under extreme pressure over millions of years. It formed as a result of the compaction of driftwood that sank to the sea bottom and became imbedded in finegrained mud. Jet is found in one of two forms: hard and soft. “Hard” jet is the result of the carbon compression and salt water; “soft” jet is the result of the carbon compression and fresh water.

The name “jet” is an English word derived from the French word “jaiet” of the same meaning. It is usually black and easily polished. It is used in making jewelry as far back as 10,000 BC in parts of modern day Germany. The oldest jet jewelry was found in Asturias, Spain, dating from 17,000 BC. During the days of the Roman occupation of Britain and up to the present time, it has had a varying degree of popularity, finding its widest use as mourning jewelry. Jet as a gem material was highly popular during the reign of Queen Victoria, during which the queen wore jet as part of her mourning dress. Jet was popular jewelry in the 19th century because of its somber color and modest appearance, and has been traditionally fashioned into rosaries for monks. Mourning jewelry is no longer in vogue. Purity of the black color, freedom from inclusions of other minerals and absence of fine cracks increases its value, which is never particularly high. The polish should be bright, a dull polish is considered undesirable. Jet has also been known as black amber, as it may induce an electric charge like that of amber when rubbed. The finest jet has always been found and worked near the coast of Whithy, Yorkshire, England. It occurs in lumps of variable sizes, often retaining the shape of the branches and twigs of the trees of which it evolved. Jet is also found in Spain, Germany and the U.S. Material from El Paso County, Colorado, takes a fine polish and Utah jet from Wayne County is generally an inferior quality with many cracks.

CSU Extension welcomes new 4-H Agent The Colorado State University Extension Office in Arapahoe County has welcomed Jonathan Vrabec as a 4-H Youth Development and Livestock agent. CSU Extension is responsible for delivering research-based information and programs from the university to county residents, including the popular Colorado 4-H youth-development program. Vrabec will lead Arapahoe County 4-H, which reaches more than 5,000 youth each year through traditional 4-H clubs, school enrichment, afterschool and community programs. Currently more than 300 youth members and 90 volunteer leaders are enrolled in 25 traditional 4-H clubs. Vrabec will oversee volunteer recruitment and training for club leaders and will guide all 4-H projects involving horses, cattle, swine, sheep, goats, poultry and shooting sports. He will also support his colleagues who coordinate 4-H general and consumer-science projects and community-outreach programs.

Jonathan Vrabec

Additionally, Vrabec will oversee all horse and livestock contests at the Arapahoe County Fair each July and serve as an advisor to the Fair Planning Committee and liaison to the 4-H Advisory Council. He will work as the county’s livestock agent and part-time agriculture agent by developing educational programs and consulting on natural resource issues for farmers, ranchers and small acreage owners. Vrabec brings more than 15 years of experience in Extension agriculture and 4-H programs. He comes to Arapahoe County from El Paso County’s CSU Exten-

sion Office, where he worked as the 4-H Youth Development and Agriculture agent since 2000. He previously interned for the CSU Extension in Adams County and also was a graduate assistant for the State Extension. Vrabec is an experienced livestock and horse judge, and holds a judge’s card for the National Reining Horse Association and U.S. Equestrian Federation’s Arabian Division. He has served as ring steward for the National Western Stock Show and volunteer coordinator for the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo. Vrabec holds a master’s degree in agriculture in extension education and a bachelor’s in animal sciences from Colorado State University, as well as an associate’s in agriculture from Casper College in Wyoming. He lives in Colorado Springs with his family and a small backyard flock of chickens. His kids participate in the 4-H sheep and dog projects. For more information, visit www.arapahoeextension.org.


February 20, 2014 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • PAGE 7

Dr. Justina Ford fought racial and sexual discrimination In Honor of Black History Month By Rosemary Fetter When Justina Ford applied to practice medicine in Denver, the licensing examiner told her, “Ma’am, I’d feel dishonest taking a fee from you. You’ve got two strikes against you to begin with. First off, you’re a lady. Second, you’re colored.” “I know it,” she replied. “I thought it through before I came. This is just the place I want to practice.” Unthinkable today, the above exchange took place in 1902. Compared to the rest of the nation, however, the city’s race relations were cordial at the time. Denver’s relatively small African American population clustered within a few blocks of the Five Points area, with boundaries at Park Avenue, Downing Street, Stout Street and Tremont Place. Until the Ku Klux Klan took over Colorado during the 1920s, they were a relatively well-educated and prosperous group, with only 222 out of 5,442 blacks older than age 10 categorized as illiterate. Still, segregation was everywhere. The legendary Dr. Ford was never one to let obstacles stand in her way, however. She was born Justina Laurena Carter on Jan. 22, 1871, near Galesburg, Ill. According to most sources, she grew up and attended high school in Knoxville. The daughter of a nurse, Justina knew from childhood that she wanted to practice medicine. But unlike her mother, she wanted to be a doctor. While other little girls were playing with dolls, she was volunteering to dress chickens for dinner, “so I could get in there and see what the insides were like.” With typical humor, she once told a reporter, “I was a seventh child. I wouldn’t play with the others unless we played hospital and I wouldn’t play even that unless they let me be the doctor…I didn’t know the names of sicknesses, so I invented names. I had one standard prescription: tobacco pills. I remember that when neighbor folks were ill, I liked to tend them. I hope I didn’t do any harm.” Ford received her college degree in Chicago and studied at Chicago’s Herring Medical School at a time when African American female medical students were a rarity. After graduating in 1899 she briefly practiced medicine in Normal, Ala., but her race and sex worked against her. Believing correctly that her options were better in the West, she decided to try her luck in Colorado, becoming possibly the first African American female physician west of the Mississippi. Faced with racial and sexual discrimination all her life, “I fought like a tiger against both,” she said. She was granted a Colorado medical license on Oct. 7, 1902. With a no-nonsense attitude and a soft heart, she began a lifelong career in general practice, in Denver, delivering approximately 7,000 babies in the process. Although she cared for what she later called “plain black folks” and “plain white folks,” many of her patients were foreign-born, Latinos, Greeks, Japanese, Koreans and even immigrants from India. Often these ethnic groups preferred a woman physician rather than a man to assist with childbirth. Also, many distrusted or could not afford hospital care, and Denver physicians often refused to deliver a child at home. “Yet there was a little one about to come onto the scene and someone had to bring it, so why not me?” Ford said later. As a result, Ford learned to speak anywhere from eight to 11 languages, including the language of com-

Black America West Museum

Dr. Ford holds her nephew, Gene Carter, one of the 7,000 babies she delivered in Denver during her career. Photo circa 1927, courtesy of the Denver Public Library Western History Department

passion. In 1911, she purchased her own home at 2335 Arapahoe St., where she set up practice. In addition to the special situations created by her constituents, she faced the same problems shared by most physicians – irregular pay, odd hours and the need to be constantly on the move. “I can go two days without sleep,” she once said. “I’ve done it often. The trick is not to slow down.” Often her patients were unable to pay or paid in goods or groceries rather than cash. “Some of the things they gave me are more precious than cash,” she would say, pointing to a brightly colored oriental cloth on her table or a hand-woven Mexican blanket. “You can’t buy things like that.” She traveled first by horse and buggy, then by taxi (during her career she paid a small fortune in taxi fees) and finally by a private car driven by her nephew, Mateo Torres. (Another nephew, Jack Bradley, received a master’s degree from the University of Denver and became one of the few African Americans at the time to play in a major symphony orchestra.) A small, plump woman with prominent cheekbones, Ford was said to have a spiritual quality about her that gave her patients reassurance. She was married twice, originally to a Rev. Ford, minister of Zion Baptist Church. After he died, she wed Albert Allen, but kept “Dr. Ford” as her professional name. Although she served on the staff of Denver General Hospital for years, as late as the 1940s, she was unable to practice at some of Denver’s hospitals. Her race and sex did not allow her to be a member of the Colorado Medical Society, and as a result, of the American Medical Association. Fortunately, that situation was remedied during the post World War II years. Even with a booming obstetrical practice, her financial situation never seemed to change. She was that rare breed of crusader, more interested in humanitarian goals than in money. Four months before she died, she was quoted as saying, “When all the fears, hate and even some death is over, we will really be brothers as God intended us to be in this land. This I believe. For this I have worked all my life.” Dr. Ford worked until two weeks before her death on in Oct. 15, 1952, at age 81. Survived by her second husband and several nieces and nephews, she

was buried at Fairmount Cemetery. In 1983, her home on Arapahoe Street, built in 1890, was slated for the wrecking ball. Community leaders arranged for a stay of execution for the structure, after which the owners donated the house to a nonprofit organization that could pay for relocation. The following year, Historic Denver, Inc. used preservation funds to move the property to a nearby site at the southwest corner of 31st and California streets. In September 1985, the Black America West Museum and Heritage Center (founded in 1971 by Dr. Paul Stewart) obtained a $197,000 grant from the Denver Community Development agency for the restoration of Dr. Ford’s house. By 1988, the Black America West Museum and Heritage Center had opened as a permanent fixture in the neighborhood. The museum houses an extensive collection of more than 35,000 personal artifacts, memorabilia, newspapers, legal documents, clothing, letters, photographs and oral histories celebrating to contributions of African American pioneers. For more information, visit www.blackamericawest.org. In 1998, the Regional Transportation District Art-At-the Stations commissioned Jess. E. DuBois to cast a bronze image of Dr. Ford. The statue stands on the plaza at 30th and Downing, a fitting tribute to the lady who never stopped fighting injustice and a monument to one of Denver’s great humanitarians.

Statue of Dr. Ford at 30th and Downing.


PAGE 8 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • February 20, 2014

All-Judaic & Israeli Art and Jewelry Festival, Feb. 27 – March 3

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olunteers at the Hebrew Educational Alliance are making preparations for a major Denver showing and sale of Israeli and Judaic art, including personal appearances by 50 artists, set to run Feb. 27 through March 3. The All-Judaic & Israeli Art and Jewelry Festival is based on a highly successful show that has been held bi-annually in Chicago for 20 years.   “We’re designing this show to be a unique experience for anyone with a passion for Israeli or Judaic art,” said Arlene Stein, HEA’s vice president of fundraising.  The All-Judaic Art & Jewelry Festival will feature not just wall art, but glass, textiles, fiber art, ceramics, preciou s metals and woods, as well as a wide variety of jewelry.

“These are not just works Sherman, Brandon Knaster, that happen to be by Jewish Essie Perlmutter and Holly artists. All of them are dis& Phil Segel. tinctly Judaic either in theme Rick Rubin, former or motif,” she said.   president of HEA, and his More than half of the artwife Julie were already colists that will accompany the lecting Judaica when they show are coming from Israel, made a tour of Israeli galto include jewelry designer leries in 2010, including Avi Dalya Israeli; Maly Cohen Nadav’s studios on Shlomof Malysilk designs; Ori tzion HaMalka in Jerusalem.  Gabrieli of Gabrieli Hand In a long conversation with Weaving & Art; Michal BenNadav, the Rubins discovdzel Friedman; Amy Gilron ered he and other Israeli artof Etz-Ron-Handcrafted ists were making trips to art Wooden Judaica; Ilan and fairs in major Jewish popuDaphna Hasson (Jaffa); lation centers such as New metalsmith Avia Agayof Jewelry by metalsmith Brandon York City and Chicago. Why of Agayof Art & Judaica; Knaster, among 50 artists exhibiting at not, they wondered, hold a Tamar Messer (Haifa); jew- the art festival. show like that in Denver? elry designer Ariella NachThe art show launches on Courtesy photo shon; paper artist Amalya Thursday, Feb. 27, with a PreHeights).  American artists speNini; Javier Nujimovview Event, 7 – 10 p.m.  The ich of Nuji Judaica; and Yafa cializing in Judaica and jewelry show continues on Friday, 9 a.m. Segev of Yafa Majestic (Golan include Risa Aqua, Nancy Sedar – 2 p.m., Saturday, March 1, 7 –

11 p.m., Sunday, March 2, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., and Monday, March 3, 9 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.  Admission to all events is free. Stein noted that the show is the first of its kind staged west of the Mississippi River, and will reflect works at a wide range of prices, some as low as $20. Artists have contributed numbers of items to be raffled off as a benefit for the congregation. An online preview showing the style, quality and price range of individual artists can be viewed atwww.HEAdenver.org. Hebrew Educational Alliance is located at 3600 S. Ivanhoe St. in Denver, a block west of I-25 to Ivanhoe Street, then south two blocks (near Thomas Jefferson High School).  For more information on the All-Judaic Art & Jewelry Fair, call 303-758-9400, ext. 204.

Calendar of Events

Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to editorial@villagerpublishing.com. ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT ‘Swing’

Through March 23, Littleton Town Hall Arts Center, 2450 W. Main St., Littleton. Combines high energy dancing, singing and acrobatics. There is no dialogue in the show, and the story is told entirely through music and dance. The show tries to recreate the swing style of jazz, which used large bands, fixed musical arrangements and solo-driven improvisations. Visit www. townhallartscenter.org, 303-794-2787.

Arapahoe Philharmonic Tiny Tots Love Music

Feb. 22, 10:30 a.m., Cherry Hills Community Church, 3900 E Grace Blvd, Highlands Ranch. Visit www.denverbrass. org or call 303-832-4676.

Deborah Bryon and Keith Howard at Spark Gallery

Feb. 27 - March 23, Spark Gallery, 900 Santa Fe Drive, Denver, Gallery hours: Thursday – Saturday, noon-5p.m., Sunday 1-4 p.m., Friday evening 5-9 p.m. Opening Reception: Feb. 28, 6-9 p.m. 720-8892200, www.sparkgallery.com.

DPL Classic Film Series: Celluloid Shakespeare

March 4, Richard III, 1955; March 11, Romeo and Juliet, 1968: March 18, Much Ado About Nothing (1993); March 25, Macbeth (1971), Denver Public Library, 10 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. April is the

Bethany United Methodist 3501 W. 1st Ave. 303-934-7163

E-Mail BethUMC@juno.com

Rev. Bich Thy (Betty) Nguyen, Pastor

Sunday School . . . . . . . .9:30 am Sunday Fellowship . . . .10:15 am Sunday Worship . . . . . .10:30 am Nursery Provided on Sunday Thursday Brown Bag Lunch & Bible Study . . . . . . . . . .11:30 am

450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth; DPL is celebrating with films that highlight his literary contributions. See four of the best screen adaptations of Shakespeare plays with our host, classically trained Shakespearean actor and writer, John McDonald. All films are shown at the Central Library, Level B2 Conference Center from 6-9 p.m. unless otherwise noted.

‘Ancient Threads: A Celtic Tapestry’

March 14 – 15, 7:30 p.m., March 16, 2:30 p.m., Newman Center for the Performing Arts, University of Denver, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver, www.NewmanTix.com, 303-871-7720 or 303-871-6412.

CLASSES Egypt in Turmoil

Feb. 28, 10 – 11 a.m., Malley Senior Center, 3380 S. Lincoln St., Englewood. The civil unrest that began in late January 2011 with the ouster of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak continues to roil this critically important Arab country. Active Minds explores the origins and implications of Egypt’s current situation and where this story may go from here. Sponsored by JFS At Home and Balfour at Riverfront Park. Free, RSVP: 303-762-2660

at night by searching for clues such as tracks and scat, discover which animals are on the hunt, which animals soar high above Hudson Gardens, and which animals are still asleep for the winter. Before heading home, children will have a chance to dissect a real owl pellet. Space is limited and preregistration is required. Call 303-797-8565 ext. 306 or visit shop.hudsongardens.org to register.

‘Sudan’

March 12, 3-4 p.m., RiverPointe, 5225 S. Prince St., Littleton After decades of civil war, Sudan split into two countries, only to have conflict arise within in the new country of South Sudan. Active Minds will examine the origins and current status of the conflicts, including the role of colonialism, tribal ethnicity and religion. We will also look at the history of genocide in Darfur and how the international response to war in Sudan impacts the prospects for long-term peace in the region. Free, RSVP: RiverPointe: 303-797-0600.

theresarapstine@yahoo.com or call 303918-6837.

EVENTS Assistance with Tax Preparation for Low Income and Elderly

Through April 11, Fridays, Malley Senior Recreation Center, 3380 S. Lincoln St., Englewood. For more information contact Joyce Musgrove, Facility/Program Supervisor for the Malley Senior Recreation Center, at 303-762-2667.

CWCC Workshop

Feb. 27, 9 – 10:30 a.m., 1350 17th St., Denver. Doing Business with the Federal Government and Federal Certifications. Participants will learn how to obtain certifications within WSOB, EDWOSB, 8a, and Hubzone. The Small Business Administration is the workshop sponsor. Participants can register by visiting www. coloradowomenschamber.chambermaster. com/events.

Restaurant & Pizzeria, 2700 S. Broadway, “Proven Resources to Start or Grow YOUR Business” Lonnie Koyama Lead Economic Development Specialist, US Small Business Administration, Colorado District. RSVP by Feb. 28, 303-789-4473.

FUNDRAISERS Delightful Dishes & Dreamy Getaways

Feb. 21, 7:15 p.m. live auction, Brown Palace Hotel, 321 17th St., Denver. Peruse more than 13 gourmet food tasting stations by Colorado’s top chefs, enjoy a full hosted bar, and bid on more than 120 silent and live auction items from weekend escapes, to mountain hideaways, spa treatments, sporting tickets and more. Proceeds benefit Volunteers of America and the CHLA Readiness Tickets online: www.chla. affiniscape.com/displaycommon.

Susan G. Komen ‘Ski for the Cure’

March 4, 7:30 9 a.m., Colore Italian

March 8, 9 a.m. Event day Registration and check in at the base of Snowmass Mountain 10 a.m.- 2:30 p.m., Ski for the Cure at Snowmass; 2:30 p.m.- 5:30 p.m. Aprés-Ski Party. Enjoy a day on the slopes decked out in pink to honor, remember and celebrate those who are fighting or have fought breast cancer. Participants will be identified with pink arm bands, and receive discounts at participating ASC mountain restaurants and tickets for giveaways. Registration is open until March 7. Participants and teams can register online at www.komencolorado.org.

Harvey Park Baptist

Notre Dame Catholic

Harvey Park Christian

WE ARE THE HANDS AND FEET OF CHRIST

2112 S. Patton Ct. at West Evans www.harveyparkbaptistchurch.org

2190 S. Sheridan Blvd. 303-935-3900

Prayer at 10:00 a.m. Praise & Worship - 10:30 a.m.

303-936-1001

Sunday Anticipated Mass: 4:00 p.m. Saturday

WEDNESDAY SERVICES

Religious Education………………..9:30 a.m. Worship Service…………...10:45 a.m.

Nature Discovery Day: Wildlife Investigation

March 8, 10 a.m. – noon, Hudson Gardens, 6115 S Santa Fe Drive | Littleton. Identify animals that roam Hudson Gardens

SET FREE Church/Denver 1001 Perry St. 303-825-2135 SUNDAY SERVICES

6:30 & Shared meal at 7:00 p.m. Pastor: John Martinez

Help Us Praise Jesus!

SWIC Computer School Expands

Wednesdays and Thursdays, 9:30 a.m. – noon, Westwood Community Center, 1000 S. Lowell Blvd., Denver. Everything --printers, computers, Internet access, Skype and more is provided free. Start any time. Call 303-934-2268 to register.

CLUBS Kiwanis Club of Denver

Wednesdays, Maggiano’s Little Italy, 500 16th St., Denver. Email Theresa at

Sunday Schedule

Englewood Historic Preservation Society presents Lee Whitely

Feb. 28, 3 p.m., Englewood Public Library, 1000 Englewood Parkway. Lee Whitely, a fourth generation Coloradan, author of five books including The Cherokee will talk about early travel in Colorado across the Palmer Divide. All are welcome to attend.

Women in Business Breakfast

Nursery Available

Sunday Schedule: 7:30 a.m. • 9:00 a.m. 10:30 a.m. • 12:00 p.m.

COME JOIN US IN WORSHIP

ALL ARE WELCOME

PASTOR THOM ALBIN

3401 S. Lowell Blvd. (top of hill) 303-789-3142 www. hpccdenver.org SUNDAY SERVICES 9:00 a.m. Sunday School Adult and Children 10:00 a.m. Worship & Kid’s Life Nursery Available SPANISH SERVICE SUNDAY 3:00 p.m. FRIDAY Prayer Service 7:00 p.m. JOYFUL AND WELCOMING COME JOIN US


February 20, 2014 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • PAGE 9

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Who enjoys worshiping the Lord, and singing with a joyful choir. All parts wanted, no auditions. We rehearse on Wednesday from 7:00 to 8:15 p.m., Sunday Service at 10:00 a.m. Call Sally Bishop at 303-935-5137 for more information.

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PAGE 10 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • February 20, 2014

Colorado’s Legendary Tracker: By Linda Wommack

“He could track a grasshopper through the sagebrush.” One of the many attributes paid to Tom Tobin by his friends on the Colorado frontier, Tobin was truly a force to be reckoned with. A trapper, and a scout with excellent tracking Tobin skills, worked with the likes of Cols. Price and Tappan, and Major Grier in forging the frontier of the Colorado Territory. Tom Tobin was an instrumental figure in several famous incidents of Colorado’s early history. It was his exploration, knowledge, and keen insight of the land that helped to bring settlement to the frontier. With these skills and the work with the military, Tobin’s reputation, while well known among the frontiersmen in southeastern Colorado, grew considerably across Colorado Territory. Tobin kept company with the likes of Kit Carson, Jim Bridger, the Bent brothers, Ceran St. Vrain and Dick Wootton, and is considered as one of the last of the famous frontier scouts who blazed the trail for permanent settlement. Thomas Tate Tobin was born in St. Louis, Mo., in 1823. His father, Bartholomew Tobin, was an Irish immigrant who had married a young widow, Sarah Autobees, in St. Louis. The young widow had a son, Charles, from her previous marriage. In 1823, she gave birth to Tom. A year later, a daughter, Catherine was born. In 1828, at age 16, Charles Autobees left home to join the beaver trappers heading west. He returned to St. Louis in 1837, to fetch his half-brother, Tom, then 14. Tobin spent the next few years accompanying his brother Charles on pack trips delivering dry food supplies, and whiskey to frontier outposts and trading for beaver pelts and buffalo skins. Included in their itinerary was Fort Jackson, near what later became Fort Lupton, Bent’s Fort and El Pueblo. The newly acquired pelts and skins were either traded at other forts, or taken to St. Louis annually by William Bent. For the next several years, Tobin stayed with the Bent brothers at their fort on the Arkansas River, where he became an expert trapper and scout. It was also during this time, that Tobin became an expert tracker, his reputation as a great marksman now served him well. By 1846, following the war between Mexico and the United States, Tobin had married, and with his wife Pascuala and their young children, they were living in Arroyo Hondo, a ranch Tobin had built. This was located a few miles north of Taos, N.M., a place Charles Bent had first brought Tobin to. It was here at his ranch, that Tobin received military orders through General Stephen Kearny. Civil unrest remained following the War, particularly

in the Taos area. Traveling alone and with no word to anyone, save the military, Tobin carried dispatches to military authorities at Fort Leavenworth. Returning to his home and family, Tobin found himself involved in a rebellion that would end in murder; the death of his beloved friend, Charles Bent. Boili n g feelings of revenge a n d hatred spilled o v e r Kit Carson onto the streets of Taos on the night of Jan. 19, 1847. A group of Santa Fe men, planning the attack for a month, broke into the home of New Mexico Gov. Charles Bent. They killed Gov. Bent, the sheriff and several men in the immediate area, while women and children fled. Among them were the wives and children of Kit Carson, and Thomas Boggs. Tobin, who was in the area, ran to the aid of his friend, Charles Bent, but to no avail. With buildings burning and fires set in alleyways, Tobin managed to escape the carnage. The following day, an Indian runner came into Taos with a notice from the conspirators promising revenge against the Americans and murder to their enemy: the Catholic Church. Military troops from Santa Fe soon arrived, led by General Stephen Kearny, and

Captain Ceran St. Vrain, who immediately recruited Tobin and his brother, Charles Autobees, to join their detachment in tracking down the conspirators. Another legendary scout joined the military group, James Beckwourth. Following their trail, it was a few short days before the group was surrounded. A short battle of resistance ensued and a few of the conspiring group were killed. Tobin and his men brought the others to Santa Fe. They were later tried, convicted and hanged. By 1852, Tobin had moved his family north to serve as a scout near Fort Massachusetts, (later moved and renamed Fort Garland,) in southern Colorado. He spent his time farming on his small ranch. He sold his produce to the military, including Lt. Col. William Gilpin, (who would later become the first Territorial Governor of Colorado.) The two became friends and Tobin seemed content in this time of his life. Then, in fall 1863, Tobin was called out of retirement. Territory Gov. John Evans, and Col. Sam Tappen, commander of Fort Garland, requested Tobin’s services to help in the apprehension of the Espinosa gang of outlaws. The Espinosas had murdered 28 men from Fairplay to Canon City in the summer of 1863, by the time Tobin took over the search. Tobin was offered a reward of $2,500 to track down the murderous gang. He was given a full militia, but insisted on tracking the vicious killers alone, taking only three military men as backup. Tobin followed their trail from the site of the 28th victim for three days, leading into the Sangre de Cristo mountains. He ambushed the deadly trio in a meadow and methodically shot them one by one. The leader,

Character and wisdom are revealed in an aged Tom Tobin.

Vivian Espinosa was not dead, so Tobin slit his throat, decapitating him. Tobin then cut off the head of Espinosa’s nephew, and placed both heads in a gunnysack. Tobin brought the heads to Gov. Evans

Tom Tobin helped construct Fort Garland, which his friend, Kit Carson later commanded. Photos courtesy of Denver Public Library

in Denver, as proof to collect his reward. He never received the reward, but was given a fine rifle at an honorary dinner. Tom Tobin was known by all for his short temper, and was ready to fight at the worst provocation. He was also known to be a true friend, his loyalty knew no bounds. Yet he was also a man of few words. Kit Carson III, the grandson of both Tom Tobin and Kit Carson, (Tobin’s daughter married Carson’s son,) said in an interview in 1946, “Grandpa Tobin had known Grandpa Carson a long time, they both came from the same town in what is now Missouri, Grandpa Tobin was a lot younger than Grandpa Carson, he looked on him as a sort of hero. Both of my Grandfathers were well respected and trusted.” Tobin’s grandson remembered his childhood at Fort Garland as a happy one, living with his family, and really understanding the importance of his grandfather. And yet the grandfather, Tobin went on to serve the military in 1868 as a chief scout on an Indian-hunting campaign, again under General Kearny. Among the scouts were again, his brother Charles Autobees and a new scout to the frontier, James William Hickok, who later gained fame as “Wild Bill” Hickok. Tom Tobin, trail blazer, scout and tracker led a colorful life and lived among the pioneers of the state. He never thought that of himself. History shows otherwise.


February 20, 2014 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • PAGE 11

Legal Notices What are legal/public notices? “(1) ‘Legal notice’ or ‘advertisement’ means any notice or other written matter required to be published in a newspaper by any laws of this state, or by the ordinances of any city or town, or by the order of any court of record of this state. “(2) ‘Privately supported legal notice or advertisement’ means any legal notice or advertisement which is required by federal, state, or local law or court order which is paid for by a person or entity other than a governmental entity either directly or by direct, specific reimbursement to the governmental entity. “(3) ‘Publicly supported legal notice or advertisement’ means any legal notice or advertisement which is required by federal, state, or local law or court order which is paid for by a governmental entity.” -Legal Publication Laws of Colorado, Colorado Press Association

PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-1447 To Whom It May Concern: On 11/19/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County. Original Grantor: MANUEL TORRES AND LISA TORRES Original Beneficiary: PEOPLE’S CHOICE HOME LOAN, INC., A WYOMING CORPORATION Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: HSBC BANK USA, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF APRIL 1, 2004 PEOPLE’S CHOICE HOME LOANS SECURITIES TRUST SERIES 2004-1 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-1 Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 2/26/2004 Recording Date of DOT: 3/23/2004 Reception No. of DOT: 2004075737 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $95,000.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $85,430.92 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

To Whom It May Concern: On 11/22/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County. Original Grantor: YOLANDA LOBATOS Original Beneficiary: MERS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR DECISION ONE MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: PARTNERS FOR PAYMENT RELIEF DE III, LLC Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 10/17/2005 Recording Date of DOT: 11/21/2005 Reception No. of DOT: 2005199215 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $37,000.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $35,696.81 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: the covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Default under prior mortgages and deeds of trust; charges; liens; deed of trust or lien encumbering or affecting the property and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 30, AND THE NORTH 20 FEET OF LOT 29, BLOCK 3, CHARLOTTE MCKEES ADDITION, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO.

The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust.

Which has the address of: 3747 Milwaukee Street , Denver, CO 80205-3647

Legal Description of Real Property: LOTS 17 AND 18, BLOCK 12, TOWN OF SWANSEA, EXCEPT THE WEST 33 FEET THEREOF, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 4507 Clayton Street , Denver, CO 80216

The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, March 20, 2014, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 1/23/2014 Last Publication: 2/20/2014 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 11/21/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: HELLERSTEIN AND SHORE, PC MARTIN H SHORE Colorado Registration #: 1800 5347 S. VALENTIA WAY SUITE 100, GREENWOOD VILLAGE, COLORADO 80111 Phone #: (303) 573-1080 Fax #: (303) 571-1271 Attorney File #: 13-00792SH Published in the Denver Herald First Published January 23, 2014 Last Published February 20, 2014 Legal #: 2013-1447 _________________________________ PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-1466

NOTICE OF SALE

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, March 27, 2014, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 1/30/2014 Last Publication: 2/27/2014 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 11/29/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: JAMES T. ANEST, P.C. WILLIAM R ARANT Colorado Registration #: 36864 11020 SOUTH PIKES PEAK DRIVE SUITE #210, PARKER, COLORADO 80138 Phone #: (303) 841-9525 Fax #: (303) 841-0881 Attorney File #: 4442 Published in the Denver Herald First Published January 30, 2014 Last Published February 27, 2014 Legal #: 2013-1466 _________________________________ PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-1472 To Whom It May Concern: On 11/22/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described belowto be recorded in Denver County. Original Grantor: RICHARD K BROCK-

HAUS Original Beneficiary: NORTHSTAR BANK NA Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 8/8/2005 Recording Date of DOT: 8/19/2005 Reception No. of DOT: 2005140726 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $143,500.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $127,442.18 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to make payments of principle and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust.

Reception No. of DOT: 2010137326 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $378,484.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $365,436.19 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: the covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated for reasons including, but not limited to, the failure to make timely payments required under said Deed of Trust and the evidence of debt secured thereby. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOTS 9 AND 10, BLOCK 1, HOMER’S ADDITION, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 4660 Bryant Street , Denver, CO 80211 NOTICE OF SALE

Legal Description of Real Property: THE NORTH 145.5 FEET OF LOT 37, BLOCK 10, BOULEVARD GARDENS, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO.

The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

Which has the address of: 2710 West Bates Avenue , Denver, CO 80236

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, March 27, 2014, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, March 27, 2014, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 1/30/2014 Last Publication: 2/27/2014 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 11/29/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC CYNTHIA LOWERY-GRABER Colorado Registration #: 34145 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201 , DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone #: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax #: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney File #: 13-07207 Published in the Denver Herald First Published January 30, 2014 Last Published February 27, 2014 Legal #: 2013-1472 ________________________________ PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-1486 To Whom It May Concern: On 11/26/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County. Original Grantor: JEREMIAH J BROZ AND MICHELLE T BROZ Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICA’S MORTGAGE, LLC Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 11/19/2010 Recording Date of DOT: 11/24/2010

First Publication: 1/30/2014 Last Publication: 2/27/2014 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 11/29/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: MESSNER & REEVES, LLC TORBEN M WELCH Colorado Registration #: 34282 1430 WYNKOOP STREET SUITE #300 , DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone #: (303) 454-5459 Fax #: Attorney File #: 7328.0008 Published in the Denver Herald First Published January 30, 2014 Last Published February 27, 2014 Legal #: 2013-1486 _________________________________ PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-1517 To Whom It May Concern: On 12/13/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County. Original Grantor: GENEAVER M WILSON Original Beneficiary: ACADEMY MORTGAGE LLC D/B/A ACADEMY MORTGAGE LENDING GROUPO, LLC Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: REVERSE MORTGAGE SOLUTIONS, INC. Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 9/7/2004 Recording Date of DOT: 10/6/2004 Reception No. of DOT: 2004208916 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $292,500.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $233,217.87 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: the lender declares a violation of the covenants of said deed of trust for reasons including, but not limited

to, the failure to pay monthly payments of principal and interest together with all other payments provided for in the deed of trust and note. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOTS 17 AND 18, BLOCK 2, CHAMBERLIN’S COLFAX ADDITION, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 2505 Poplar Street , Denver, CO 80207 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, April 17, 2014, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 2/20/2014 Last Publication: 3/20/2014 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 12/13/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: KLEINSMITH & ASSOCIATES, P.C. PHILIP M KLEINSMITH Colorado Registration #: 1063 6035 ERIN PARK DRIVE, SUITE 203 , COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO 80918 Phone #: (719) 593-1970 Fax #: (719) 593-2193 Attorney File #: 12-0343 Published in the Denver Herald First Published February 20, 2014 Last Published March 20, 2014 Legal #: 2013-1517 _________________________________ PUBLIC NOTICE Denver NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2013-1530 To Whom It May Concern: On 12/17/2013 the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Denver County. Original Grantor: BOB HEDGECOCK Original Beneficiary: LINDSAY E BERZ Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: LINDSAY E BERZ Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 10/1/2010 Recording Date of DOT: 10/21/2010 Reception No. of DOT: 2010121397 DOT Recorded in Denver County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $65,000.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $65,000.00 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The covenants of said Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to make monthly payments of prinicpal and interest together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 20, BLOCK 48, HARVEY PARK ADDITION, FILING NO. 10, CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 2283 South Xavier Street , Denver, CO 80219 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued) at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, April 17, 2014, at the Denver County Public Trustee’s Office, 201 West Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 2/20/2014 Last Publication: 3/20/2014 Publisher: Herald Dispatch Dated: 12/18/2013 Debra Johnson DENVER COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: FOSTER GRAHAM MILSTEIN & CALISHER LLP ROBERT GRAHAM Colorado Registration #: 26809 360 SOUTH GARFIELD STREET 6TH FLOOR, DENVER, COLORADO 80209 Phone #: (303) 333-9810 Fax #: (303) 333-9786 Attorney File #: 3018.0028 Published in the Denver Herald First Published February 20, 2014 Last Published March 20, 2014 Legal #: 2013-1530 _________________________________ NOTICE OF SALES Broncos Towing 303-722-3555 Owner: Joe Gallegos 1534 W. Bayoud Ave Denver, CO Will sell the following vehicles if not claimed within 30 days of the first publication of this notice: 1) 91 Ford Warrior E-350 White Vin# HBO7363 2) 78 Chevy Cheyenne Gold Vin# z163639 3) 81 Chevy Van 30 Camper White Vin# 4120971 4) 96 Landrover Discovery SE7 White Vin# A167291 5) 82 Landrover Rangerover White Vin# A120340 6) MG MGB GT Blue Vin# L1117085 7) 92 Lexus 5C300 Green Vin# 0008484 8) 85 Ford Ranger Grey Vin# FUA24641 9) 87 Toyota Corrola White Vin# Z415063 Published in the Denver Herald First Published January 30, 2014 Last Published February 27, 2014 Legal #: DHD 022 ________________________________

— End of Legals—


PAGE 12 • DENVER HERALD-DISPATCH • February 20, 2014

Continued from Page 1 category it calls “Midcentury resources of Littleton Boulevard.” Likewise, the organization has earmarked the neon signs of East Colfax Avenue. Other sites include the 19th century 4 Bar 4 Ranch in Grand County, Hahn’s Peak Lookout at a former mine in Routt County and the Spanish colonial Montoya Ranch in Huerfano County. Although Colorado Preservation’s website does not list any specific buildings in Littleton, Parris cited a few examples that include Taco House, Marlow Bank, the Courthouse office building, the IREA building and the Littleton Law Center, among other structures located on the so-named Littleton Boulevard that runs between Broadway and the Historic Downtown Littleton district. While many efforts have been made over the years to protect the city’s turn-of-the-century historic buildings, Parris says the next generation of architecture, just east of downtown, has so far gotten short shrift. “Littleton’s done a great job with their downtown. There are a lot of protections in place so we’re really just focusing on these midcentury buildings,” Parris said.

“I think the building is unique and the midcentury stuff deserves to receive some appreciation and preservation,” said Golden, noting he has eaten at Taco House since he was a child in the early 1970s. “My other take is I always get a little concerned about preservation groups because they can impact your overall economic value if they start imposing their will.” While Downtown Littleton regulates its historic buildings, no enforcement mechanism exists on Littleton Boulevard. Parris says Colorado Preservation’s emphasis is on voluntary partnerships. The organization hopes to work with interested property owners and the city government. Plans are to apply for a grant to allow a formal survey of the neighborhood’s commercial structures. “So far, everyone’s been on board with that,” Parris said of the

owners she has talked to. “The list is really a way to raise awareness, provide technical assistance and educate the public on these endangered places.” Even so, Parris says she has encountered the occasional “unsympathetic owner.” “When someone has a property they don’t see any value in, it’s going to deteriorate,” she said, noting that formal designation by the local, state or federal government is an eventual prospect worth considering. While Golden is not necessarily opposed to historical recognition in principle and is more than happy with his current tenants, the owner of the Taco House building says he wants to keep his long-term options open. “Our tenants are great people, but at the same time, I would be willing to sell it to somebody that

They just don’t make them like that anymore. A decorative circle screen has adorned the front of the Marlow Bank building since the days its employees wore polyester bellbottoms.

An accidental attraction

The co-owners of Littleton’s Taco House, Don and Dora D’Andrea, were as surprised as anyone by news that their headquarters had made the historic grade. “I was shocked,” Dora said of the Colorado Preservation announcement. Although the D’Andreas bought the restaurant – but not the building – only seven years ago, Dora worked as a waitress there in the mid-1960s and later owned other restaurants in the oncethriving Denver-based Taco House franchise. Like the aging exterior, little else has changed at Taco House – from the simple menu to the brown-paneling décor – since Lyndon Johnson was in the White House. “I think it is something special,” said Don, a first-generation Italian immigrant who found his niche in Mexican cooking. “The customers have been coming for three or four generations. It’s why we can’t change anything.” It is not modification of the hot sauce that worries Colorado Preservation. According to Parris, the most damaging change would be demolition of the building where Littleton has gotten its burrito fix for nearly a half-century. “Littleton Boulevard is looking really attractive to potential developers and that could pose a threat to these underappreciated buildings,” Parris said. “I don’t think people realize the ingenuity that went into building these structures. This particular era of architecture is being demolished probably more quickly than any other era, not only in Colorado, but throughout the country.”

Preserving business

Rob Golden, whose family real estate business owns the Taco House building, is in no rush to level or otherwise alter Littleton’s most idiosyncratic drive-through. But he says he has mixed feelings about outside groups making historical designations.

The distinct yellow folded-plate roof at the Courthouse office building has caught the eye of Colorado Preservation Inc.

I always get a little concerned about preservation groups because they can impact your overall economic value if they start imposing their will. - Rob Golden, owner of Taco House building

might have a different use for it,” the landlord said. “But if someone wanted to preserve it and paid us the right price, I certainly don’t want to give up any of the value. I’m happy with the way it is now.” Parris is quick to note that historic preservation and economic development do necessarily not have to be in conflict – even if Littleton’s taste for inexpensive tacos declines in the 21st century. “There are ways to make these historic buildings work for new uses,” Parris said. “You don’t have to demolish your building and build something new. You can take what is there and work with that to make it viable for 2014.”

[Taco House] took design elements from high-style buildings and put them down to a more pedestrian level. It’s really an example of what midcentury architecture can be. - Rachel Parris, programs manager for Colorado Preservation The sculptured flutist in the front of the Littleton Law Center may have lost her instrument years ago, but the building is among those on Littleton Boulevard to make this year’s Endangered Places list.


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