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Visitor’s Guide | 2017 | 2018


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EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO


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Clearwater County

8 Trees of North Central Idaho

10 Idaho County

16 The Historic Blue Fox Theater

28 Lewis County 32

34 Nez Perce County Woodland Schoolhouse

38 Nez Perce National Historic Park: Spalding 40 Traveling Onward : Chamber Directory

44 Dining Guide y

COVER PHOTO BY Brad Stinson

Advertising Inquiries

SARAH KLEMENT, PUBLISHER

SKLEMENT@IDAHOCOUNTYFREEPRESS.COM

DEB JONES, PUBLISHER (MONEYSAVER) DJONES@LCMONEYSAVER.COM

PHOTO BY

JONATHAN COOPER

Submit Stories

DAVID RAUZI, EDITOR

DRAUZI@IDAHOCOUNTYFREEPRESS.COM

SARAH KLEMENT, PUBLISHER

SKLEMENT@IDAHOCOUNTYFREEPRESS.COM

Publications of Eagle Media Northwest 900 W. Main, PO Box 690, Grangeville ID 83530

208-746-0483, Lewiston; 208-983-1200, Grangeville


County PHOTO BY

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EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

ROBERT MILLAGE


PHOTO BY

PHOTO BY

FISHING THE CLEARWATER RIVER OROFINO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

DAVID RAUZI

Clearwater River along U.S. Highway 12

PHOTO BY

DWORSHAK DAM ANDREW OTTOSON

E

stablished in 1911, Clearwater County encompasses 2,488 square miles and has its county seat at Orofino.

In 1805, Lewis and Clark followed an old Indian trail between the north and middle forks of the Clearwater River and met the Nez Perce Tribe near the present site of Weippe. Gold was first discovered by E. D. Pierce in 1860 and shortly after formed Pierce City that is the oldest mining town in Idaho. The county is named for the Clearwater River whose name was translated from the Nez Perce term Koos-Koos-Kai-Kai, describing clear water. Incorporated cities within Clearwater County include Elk River, Orofino, Pierce and Weippe. Multiple unincorporated communities exist within the richly forested hills and plains including Ahsahka, Cardiff, Cavendish, Dent, Grangemont, Greer, Headquarters, Hollywood, Judge Town, Konkolville, Moose City and Teakean.

PHOTO BY

OROFINO DAVID RAUZI

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Events Elk River

•Elk River Annual Spring Fishing Derby, May 13 •SLORA Jet Boat Races on Elk Creek Reservoir, May 27-28 •ATV/UTV & Cycle Fun Run, May 20 •Elk River ATV Drag Races, June 17 •“Thunder in the Mountains” Fireworks Show, July 1 •Elk River Rec District ATV & Motorbike Endurocourse, July 22 •Elk River Days, Aug. 11-12 •Elk River Classic Car Show, Aug. 12 •Elk River Rec District Fun in the Mud, •Mud Bog Competition, Sept. 2

Orofino

•Rotary Crab Feed, January •The Maniac “The Best Dam Race in Idaho,” June 11 •Year-long golfing events, Orofino Golf Course & Country Club; WWW.OROFINOGOLF.COM •Clearwater County Fair and Orofino Lumberjack Days, September www.OROFINOLUMBERJACKDAYS.ORG •Annual Christmas Festival, Light Parade and Tree Lighting, December

Pierce

•Pierce Winter Festival, February •Annual Deer Creek Fishing Derby, Deer Creek Reservoir, June •Annual 1860 Days, last week in July •Annual Holiday Bazaar, November •Annual Festival of Trees, December WWW.PIERCE-WEIPPECHAMBER.COM

Weippe

•Annual Camas Festival, May 27. •Annual Wild Weippe Rodeo, August WWW.PIERCE-WEIPPECHAMBER.COM

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EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

CLEARWATER COUNTY Elk River

Elk River is a gateway to the region’s outdoor recreation activities including snowmobiling and snowshoeing, ATV riding, hunting and fishing. The community is accessed off State Highway 8 from Bovill.

Orofino

Orofino (in Spanish: fine gold) is the county seat, named from a gold mining camp established in 1861 two miles south of Pierce. Orofino is situated five miles from “Canoe Camp” where the Lewis and Clark Expedition built five dugout canoes to travel downstream to the Pacific Ocean in 1805. The community is four miles north of Dworshak Dam,

the third highest in the U.S., completed in the early 1970s. The community sits alongside U.S. Highway 12, along the Clearwater River, that connects to Lewiston and Missoula, Mont., part of the National Scenic Byway system named the “Northwest Passage Scenic Byway.” WWW.OROFINO.COM

Pierce

The discovery of gold – the first in the state -- drove settlers to Pierce that began the rush that soon moved across the region. Pierce is located on State Highway 11 northeast of Weippe. In recreation, the region offers access to hunting, fishing,

PHOTO BY

ROBERT MILLAGE

hiking, ATV trails, downhill and cross-country skiing, snowmobiling and camping. Bald Mountain Ski Area is 11 miles northwest of Pierce. WWW.PIERCE-WEIPPECHAMBER.COM

Weippe

Weippe is located on State Highway 11, on the Gold Rush Historic Byway, and is part of the National Lewis and Clark Historic Trail. The region is known for its connection to this historic expedition where – on the Weippe Prairie -- the explorers had their first contact with the Nez Perce Tribe. Among the notable areas in the region are the Weippe Prairie, known for its annual rich bloom of camas flowers, as well as the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center at the Weippe Discovery Center, containing historic murals and displays. WWW.PIERCE-WEIPPECHAMBER.COM


Bull Tro ut on Elk River PHOTO BY

ED HAR

VEY

ED HARVEY

PHOTO BY

rwater River. rth Fork Clea Kayaker on No

Maniac Mud Ball event

at Orofin o

City Park . PHOTO BY

DAVID R

AUZI

MIKE HAYS, USFS Middle Elk Creek Falls

PHOTO BY

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

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rees T

A

Of North Central Idaho

mong North Central Idaho’s natural beauties are its forests. Of these, President Franklin D. Roosevelt was quoted, “Forests are the lungs of our land, purifying the air and giving fresh strength to our people.” When traveling through the forests of this region, take a moment to stop and check out the unique trees that give it character For a day trip or a weekend getaway, or an extended packing trip into the back country, outdoors enthusiasts will spot a variety of dynamic and colorful trees. Giant White Pine Where to see: Giant White Pine Campground, 13 miles north of Princeton on State Highway 6; on the Palouse Ranger District. Giant Cedar Where to see: A majestic example can be found in a grove outside Elk River, about two hours from Pullman. This giant cedar is 177 feet tall, 18 feet in diameter and around 3,000 years old. Find this on the Palouse Ranger District.

Giant Western Red Cedar Where to see: Just nine miles west of Lolo Pass on the Idaho/Montana border, U.S. Highway 12 is the Devoto Memorial Cedar Grove, located on the Powell Ranger District.

Subalpine Fir Where to see: On the Lolo Pass Trails across the Powell Ranger District. Western Larch (Tamarack) Where to see: On the Lolo Pass Trails across the Powell Ranger District. Best viewing for these colorful trees is during autumn.

Orange Aspen Where to see: Find these on Boulder Creek Trail no. 211, in the talus fields along the trail; approximately six to eight miles east of Wilderness Gateway Campground, off U.S. Highway 12 (25 miles east of Lowell), on the Lochsa Ranger District. Walnut Where to see: At Slate Creek, south of White Bird on U.S. Highway 95, stands the largest walnut tree west of the Mississippi River.

For information: Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests, 208-983-1950, www.fs.usda.gov/nezperceclearwater ; also on Facebook and Twitter PHOTO BY

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JONATHAN COOPER


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983-0491

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208-983-1237 Grangeville, ID

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PHOTO BY

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EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

ROBERT MILLAGE


SHEEP LAKE, PEAKS OF HE DEVIL, SHE DEVIL PHOTO BY KELLY TURNEY

PHOTO BY

EVAN JONES

Waterfall along the Grangeville-Salmon Road.

I I

daho County spans the Idaho panhandle and borders three states, but imposing geography sets this area apart from the rest of the United States. The famous Lewis and Clark Expedition in 1805 found a struggle in the Bitterroot Mountains, near the present-day Montana state line. To the west, the Snake River carved the continent’s deepest river gorge – Hells Canyon – which today separates Idaho County from Washington and Oregon. Within this vast region, the Snake, Salmon and Clearwater rivers and tributaries fostered the Nimi'ipuu, the Nez Perce people, in ancient times.

PHOTO BY

EVAN JONES

During the centuries since Lewis and Clark charted their route to Oregon, gold rushes and timber booms have brought modern industries and conveniences to the area. Established in 1864, Idaho County has shepherded a frontier spirit into the 21st Century. Within its boundaries are parts of a dozen national parks, forests and wilderness areas that together total more than 4.5 million acres of federal public land. Together, Idaho County’s eight towns and 18 smaller communities are home to 16,000 people.

PHOTO BY

ROBERT MILLAGE

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

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IDAHO COUNTY Events

Grangeville

•Border Days, July 1-4, Idaho’s oldest rodeo; GRANGEVILLEBORDERDAYS.ORG. •Summer Concert Series, July-August; WWW.GRANGEVILLEIDAHO.COM; (208)983-0460. • Farmers Market, July 1 - Sept. 16 • Octoberfest, Sept. 16

Clearwater

•Ground Hog Feed, held the first Sunday in February. •Elk City Wagon Road Days, July 16-17.

Cottonwood

•Idaho County Fair, August 17-20; WWW.IDAHOCOUNTYFAIR.ORG. •Raspberry Festival, Aug. 7, at the Monastery of St. Gertrude; WWW.MYRASPBERRYFESTIVAL.ORG.

Elk City

•Elk City Days, Aug. 12-14, a civic celebration in August.

Kooskia

•Taste of the Clearwater, January, a food and wine tasting. •Kooskia Days, Aug. 6, a civic celebration.

Riggins

•Salmon River Jet Boat Races, April; WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/SALMONRIVERJET BOATRACES •Riggins Rodeo, May; WWW.RIGGINSRODEO.COM •Big Water Blowout River Festival, June; WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/BWBRF •Hot Summer Nights, July; WWW.RIGGINSHOTSUMMERNIGHTS.COM •Salmon Run, a half-marathon, September; WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/RIG GINSSALMONRUN

•Farmers’ Market, July through October.

Stites

•Stites Days, a civic celebration in July.

White Bird

•White Bird Rodeo, June 17-18; WWW.WHITEBIRDRODEO.COM.

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Grangeville

The Camas Prairie is one of the breadbaskets of North Central Idaho, and Grangeville, with roughly 3,200 people, is its most populous place. Grangeville’s heritage as a tightly-knit agricultural community was written right into its name at the time of its founding. During the 1870s, locals established the old Grange Hall to foster area grain-growers’ ability to supply then-booming gold mining districts. Today, Grangeville is the seat of Idaho County government as well as a center of agricultural and timber industry located astride the junction of highways. State Highway 13 and U.S. Highway 95 connect Idaho County residents to each other and the 8,500square mile county to civilization. Beyond the pavement lie wild public forests that harbor a wealth of recreation opportunity: trails suitable for

motorcycles and snowmobiles, mountain bikes, horses and hikers, and beyond the trails, untamed wildernesses suitable for backcountry backpackers of proficient skill. Services available in Grangeville include small-town amenities (restaurants and groceries, fuel, lodging and such) as well as commercial dealers (automotive, furniture, hardware, ag equipment) and public facilities (county courthouse, light aircraft airport, hospital, museum, library, swimming pool and ski hill). The historic movie theater is a destination year-round, and the drive-in is open during the summer. WWW.GRANGEVILLEIDAHO.COM

(208)983-0460.

Clearwater

Just a step off State Highway 13, this community was once the first stop on the wagon road from Stites to Elk City which supplied

DANNY GRIFFIS

miners at the gold fields around Elk City. Today, Clearwater is home to the Elk City Wagon Road museum. A similar route through the deep woods is open to forest visitors during the summer, from which there are vistas of places ancient people considered sacred.

Cottonwood

Cottonwood is located on the western edge of the Camas Prairie at the foot of Cottonwood Butte. The town began as a stage stop for journeys into the mining communities of Florence, Warren and Elk City. It is now an agricultural hub with a population of 900. Services include a hospital, restaurants, groceries, banking, a microbrewery, skiing, an off-road vehicle dealership, and retail shopping. WWW.COTTONWOODIDAHO.ORG

(208)962-3851


Salmon River Motel

Welcome to the

Elk City

Elk City is located about 60 miles east of Grangeville in the heart of the Nez PerceClearwater National Forest. The town has fuel, food, lodging and a small airstrip. Elk City offers a wide range of outdoors opportunities, such as hunting, fishing, horseback riding, gold prospecting and snowmobiling.

Dixie

Located 32 miles south of Elk City, Dixie is a center of outdoor recreation with services including automotive repair and an airfield, as well as food, lodging, groceries and fuel.

Ferdinand

Eight miles north of Cottonwood along U.S. Highway 95, Ferdinand has a post office, a full-service veterinarian, and a brewpub.

Kooskia

PHOTO BY

EVAN JONES

Kooskia rests in a river valley where the Clearwater River’s main forks flow together. State Highway 13 parallels the South Fork Clearwater River to its junction with U.S. Highway 12 at the confluence, above which the federal highway follows the Middle Fork Clearwater River east towards Montana. Kooskia’s major industry is timber. By virtue of its location, this town of 600 is a gateway to some of the most isolated country in the continental United States and a jumpingoff point for all kinds of outdoor adventures, including camping and rafting. Services available in Kooskia include banking and hardware, as well as food, fuel and lodging. WWW.KOOSKIA.COM

(208)926-4362

1203 S. MAIN

RIGGINS, IDAHO

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Salmon River Rafting At Its best! 208-628-3373 or 208-736-1919

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Lowell and Syringa

Syringa, located on the Clearwater River, is named after the state flower. The community of Lowell is located at the confluence of the Lochsa and Selway rivers, where they form the Middle Fork of the Clearwater River. Services include fuel, seasonal restaurants and lodging.

Stites

Stites is located along the South Fork of the Clearwater River, south of Kooskia, on State Highway 13. Services include gas, groceries, dining and hardware.

Riggins

Among the Salmon River breaks in the shadow of the Seven Devils mountains, about an hour’s drive south of Grangeville, Riggins (pop. 400) burgeons during the summer months as river users flood to the famous “River of No Return.” Year-round services include fuel, restaurants, groceries, sporting goods, and an office of the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area. WWW.RIGGINSIDAHO.COM

(208)628-3320

White Bird

White Bird is a creek-bottom community east of the Salmon River, located in a culdesac below the towering grade where U.S. Highway 95 climbs up and over the hills that define the Camas Prairie’s southern boundary. The community is home to a historical site – a battlefield of the Nez Perce War – as well as services such as dining, lodging, RV parking, fuel, antiques and gifts. WWW.VISITWHITEBIRD.COM;

(208)839-2777

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Salmon River Rafting At Its best! 208-628-3373 or 208-736-1919

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At the Riggins River Store we carry a variety of rafting supplies. We are authorized dealers for Aire rafts & inflatable Kayaks, NRS gear, SUP boards and all NRS accessories that you need to make your rafting trip the best yet. We stalk SUP boards and Inflatable Kayaks all summer long. If you’re not ready to buy we rent raft, kayaks ,SUP boards or any accessories you could need.

Clothing Boat Outfitting River Rentals Camping Gear

Authorized dealers:

Maps and Books AIRE Rafts and SUP Boards

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Theater Throughout their history, the Blue Fox Theater and Sunset Auto Vue drive-in have charmed movie-goers the modern way. For the history buff, the Blue Fox, is both a must-see and a can’t-miss standing in the center of Grangeville’s downtown. The marquee and neon lights punctuate the building’s retro aesthetic, but inside, a bit of digital-age technology shines an even brighter light on the classic big screen. With a digital projector putting all the latest hit movies on display, the Blue Fox has made a leap in the interest of keeping up with the times that relatively few smalltown theaters across the country have made. The business that keeps the lights on has roots that run as deep in the area as the owneroperator Wagner family, and the building itself forms a connection to the past that numbers uniquely among Idaho’s historic places. In 1999, the building, built in 1929, was added to the National Register of Historic Places, and registration made the Blue Fox one of about two dozen in the Idaho County Historic Preservation Commission’s most recent publication. While the Blue Fox Theater is unlikely to be overlooked by virtue of its Main Street location, many of the other places a history buff would want to see take a lot more effort to visit. 16

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO


708 N Main Street • Hwy 95 riverviewmotelriggins@gmail.com www.riverviewmotel.com

Riggins, ID Ph. (208) 628-3041

Idaho Adventures Begin Here. Salmon Rapids Lodge is located on the confluence of the two Salmon Rivers. Comfortable accommodations, including breakfast, pool and hot tub, and cookies and milk await your arrival.

www.salmonrapids.com 1-877-95-RAPID (877-957-2743) 208-628-2743 | Fax 208-628-3834 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

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Idaho County Attractions

HISTORIC PLACES Campbell’s Ferry – A key part of

the path to one of the last American gold rushes, Campbell’s Ferry came to be the remote home and sanctuary from which the writings of Frances Zaunmiller Wisner flowed. A beloved local newspaper columnist who more than once gave voice to the popular will and swayed state and federal government, she verged on fame; her writings tell of quiet joys, of independence, and of the spirit that brought so many men to mountains so many years ago. Though the place bears the name of the man who ran first ran the ferryboat in the early 1900s, the pack bridge that replaced it bears her name.

Elk City Wagon Road – Ancient

people, native and white, both followed this prime path to prosperity – the natives for buffalo hunting in Montana in time immemorial, the whites for mining and commerce in Elk City from the mid-1800s to the mid1930s. Today, it is a remote forest road that features long views during the late summer.

First Indian Presbyterian Church – An historic church and

cemetery off the highway east of Kamiah, this is the oldest active church in Idaho. On Sundays, services are held and hymns are sung in the Nez Perce language.

Monastery of St. Gertrude – The women who founded this monastery outside of Cottonwood in 1907 raised the only example of Benedictine architecture in Idaho. Listed in 1979, the monastery is home to an extensive museum. Contact 208-962-3224.

Clearwater Battlefield – This site

where the U.S. Army and the Nez Perce fought a battle that proved costly for both sides in 1877 was listed in 1965. The event is marked by signage south of Stites, but the fighting took place on what today is private agricultural ground that is closed to the public. Contact the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest for details about when and how best to visit the remote locations.

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EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

Arts and Culture: Plan a weekend trip Arts and culture events showcase the vibrant colors and sounds of our communities. Residents and tourists alike can sample the lifestyles and heritages of the people of North Central Idaho by visiting numerous festivals, pow-wows and other attractions. Plan a day-trip or a weekend stay.

Idaho County The annual Raspberry Festival is a fund-raiser for the Historical Museum at St. Gertrude. Held on the scenic grounds of the Monastery of St. Gertrude in Cottonwood, the event attracts more than 3,000 visitors to eat and shop for unique, handmade crafts and gifts. The sisters also offer regular tours of the ornately designed and handcrafted chapel and the historic museum. The event takes place the first Sunday in August every year. The one-day event features a children’s carnival, art show, arts and crafts fair, car show, vintage sale and a Fun Run & Walk. Start your day early with a pancake breakfast and bring money for the grilled hamburgers, BBQ beef sandwiches, raspberry shortcake, jam

and wine. The Salmon River Fall Art Show is a juried art show that takes place the first weekend of October in Riggins. The event draws entries from Idaho, Washington and eastern Oregon. Artwork is submitted in a range of mediums, including photography, painting, pastels, antler carvings and sculpture. Clearwater County Clearwater County has developed an annual event celebrating the history of the region. The Camas Festival in Weippe allows visitors an opportunity to visit the area where Lewis and Clark originally met the Nez Perce. The day and a half festival takes place in midMay and includes food and entertainment on Friday and a mix of events on Saturday. Activities include a Dutch oven cookoff, a Dutch oven dinner, a Haw Hee Show, a Fun Run/Walk, breakfast, music in the park, exhibits and displays, craft and food vendors, a silent auction and a horseshoe tournament. Visit WWW.WEIPPE.COM/EVENTS or call 435-4362 for more information.


Huckleberry Trivia PHOTO BY

PHOTO BY

ROBERT MILLAGE

Shhh …

Huckleberry spots are secret

By Lorie Palmer IDAHO COUNTY FREE PRESS The scent is strong and yet the lips are sealed. It’s huckleberry season in Idaho County and though our neighbors are friendly yearlong, when it comes to the hotspots for the purple treats, you will often meet silence. Hands holding buckets disappear quickly into the woods and the human ear can’t hear even a whisper. Huckleberry pickers are out for their gold, on a claim all their own. The elusive huckleberry can often hide itself well and some years too hot weather, too much rain, too cold temperatures, not enough rain or even forest fires can cause scarcity. Berries ripen in the Grangeville hills anywhere from July through September, depending on the year. Just past Fish Creek and all the way up to the Gospels, many pickers can be seen bringing in generous portions of the much-sought-after purple and reddish berries. Kid pickers often bring their berries home in spill-proof containers — their tummies.

Huckleberries have become an Idaho delicacy, bringing anywhere from $40 to $90 a gallon to those who are willing to pick them to sell. A jar of jam in the local drugstore can cost between $6 and $8, and chocolate-covered huckleberries cost 50 cents each at the grocery store. Of course, huckleberries are also good for pies and in a syrup over pancakes, or, as most young pickers will agree, just to eat straight off the bush. Though the tart purple treats may be somewhat elusive to the untrained eye and those who don’t often pick, the abundance of berries this year looks like enough for everyone. Be sure to look at the underside of bushes for those big berries hiding there. Remember, though, huckleberry etiquette means you’ll have to find your own place to reap your fruit. If you see some pickers, respect their spot and find your own. Huckleberries grow in the mountain areas where they are kept cool by trees and overgrowth. An even mixture of rain and sun seems to be good for huckleberry bushes, allowing them to grow plump, juicy berries.

LORIE PALMER

• Evidence has been found the huckleberry actually got its name from a simple mistake. Early American colonists, upon encountering the native berry, misidentified it as the European blueberry known as the "hurtleberry," by which name it was called until around 1670 it was corrupted to become known as the "huckleberry." • The expression "I'll be your Huckleberry" means just the right person for a given job, and it also means a mark of affection or comradeship to one's partner or sidekick. Doc Holliday said it in the movie “Tombstone” and Toby Keith sings it in his song “Huckleberry.” • The term can also mean somebody inconsequential. Mark Twain borrowed aspects of this meaning to name his famous character, Huckleberry Finn. His idea, as he told an interviewer in 1895, was to establish that he was a boy "of lower extraction or degree" than Tom Sawyer. However, some stories give credence to the possibility that Twain had a friend, Benjamin Finn, who loved huckleberries and he thus named the character for him. • Huckleberries are the Idaho State Fruit and can be found in the Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Northwest. Several huckleberry species are native to Idaho (all belonging to genus Vaccinium, section Myrtillus). The most common and popular is the black or thin-leaved huckleberry (Vaccinium membranaceum). Black huckleberries usually grow from one to six feet tall (taking up to 15 years to reach full maturity) with berries up to 1/2 inch in diameter. Black huckleberries produce single plump, dark purple berries in the axils of leaves on new shoots. • A favorite food of bears, huckleberries grow at elevations between 2,000 and 11,000 feet. They depend on an insulating cover of snow for survival during the winter and have not been successfully grown commercially. The berry is also a food source for deer, birds, rodents and insects. • Huckleberries are often confused with the blueberry due to their close resemblance. The flavor is more tart than blueberries, with an intense wild flavor. Huckleberry season is normally from June through August. EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

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Historic Re-enactors on Corps of Discovery

N

orth Central Idaho is rich in history of its culture and the events that shaped communities throughout the region. Some of this comes alive every summer. This part of Idaho shares in the historic journey of the Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery Expedition, which lasted from May 1804 to September 1806. Under the command of Captain Meriwether Lewis and Second Lieutenant William Clark, this was the first American expedition to cross what is now the western portion of the United States – beginning near St. Louis, and passing across the Continental Divide to reach the Pacific Coast. Helping promote this history and to bring it alive, the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation – through its 40 chapters nationwide – conducts presentations through the year with Lewis and Clark scholars, expedition descendants, re-enactors, in partnership with private and public agencies. Within this region, the Travelers’ Rest Chapter Brigade, formed in 2001, conducts presentations with re-enactors in period-specific clothing, displaying the tools, crafts and firearms that would have been part of the Corps of Discovery. Past summer presentations have been held at the Lolo Pass Visitors Center at the Idaho/Montana border on U.S. Highway 95 in Idaho County. For information on the center, managed by the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests, and on upcoming events: (208) 942-1234; WWW.FS.USDA.GOV/RECAREA/NEZPERCECLEARWATER .

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Wild Ride 26

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A

fter riding 17 miles on the sixth day of his ride from Pittsburg Landing to Nez Perce Pass late in summer of 2016, Brad Arnzen of Grangeville and some of his close friends made camp at the high place that divides Salmon River country from the Selway. There, at 8,000 feet elevation at Dry Saddle, the travelers met the only other people they would see during their 235mile, nine-day journey from the Oregon border to the Montana state line. On the fourth day, the party of eight had passed Buffalo Hump — the outcrop whose evening shadow sets across the high line between Lake Creek and Crooked Creek’s west fork — which they followed down to Dixie. When they broke camp the next morning the group of eight split as planned, five and three. The five went on to Montana, and the three turned back to the roaded world. “They were out of time,” Arnzen said. From Dixie, the five had gone down to the Salmon River — a 25-mile ride on the fifth day. At Rattlesnake Creek, they spent the night alone — the riders and the horses, the river and the sky. Up they went from the Salmon, up to the ridgeline, up to Dry Saddle — a trail head that overlooks the wilderness. A night in the Frank Church-River of No Return stood behind them and a night in the Selway-Bitterroot stood ahead. They resupplied at Dry Saddle by way of the Magruder Road, named after a man murdered in the woods more than a century ago. On this trip, there were no mishaps. The group — Arnzen, and men he has known for decades — takes a pack trip like this every year. But this was the ride of a lifetime. • “We usually go on one pack trip a year somewhere,” Arnzen said. “We usually go for something scenic for about a week. We figured we didn’t know that anybody has ever done

this on the route that we took, and we don’t know of anybody that’s done it in one piece in probably a hundred years.” They stuck to Forest Service trails and trail conditions were poor, at best, Arnzen said, except in the area immediately around Dixie. “Because of the burns, they were in poor shape, but both sides of Dixie, they were outstanding,” he said. “Whoever takes care of the trails in that area is doing a great job.” For these horseback riders, a poor trail was one blocked by a downed tree. “They were all passable and we got through them with minimal cutting, but some of them were pretty hairy,” Arnzen said. “None of the trails except in the Dixie country had been cut out at all since the fires. Didn’t appear to be, anyway. But we didn’t have to turn around anywhere.” Having to reverse course at any point would have introduced some chaos into their itinerary, but the group had a few communication tools at their disposal that would have helped considerably in a pinch. They had not only planned each night’s stop ahead of time, but had a GPS unit that their supporters in the outside world could use to track their progress, as well as a satellite phone they could use to talk to their wives every night. But among the best conveniences — pie and ice cream — were ones they found at private ranches along the Salmon River, which they had arranged in advance to visit. • At the Montana line, Brad Arnzen, Rusty Bentz, Bryan Bentz, Harold Alexander and Rod Parks finished the second leg of a journey two years in the making. Brandon Bentz, Rob Fabin and Fred Fridley rode with them up to Dry Saddle, and all but two stops on the route involved vehicle support from Jay Frazier, Gary Wright and Ed Radke. The riders ended up averaging more than 20 miles per day — and, by intent, very little of it on roads. “We tried to stay on trails that we knew were used and to stay off of roads as much as possible,” Arnzen said. “We were on roads maybe 15 miles of the 200. We tried to pick trails that had been used recently and we had

it worked out to where we had a couple of pickups meet us where we were going to end each night. Two nights out of the nine, we camped out and had to pack our own stuff.” Arnzen had been to Dry Saddle several times — most recently several years ago. The countryside has changed a bit since then. “We never met any other horses and never saw any hikers,” Arnzen said. “At Dry Saddle it was toward the first of September and there was an outfitter there setting up his elk camps. He happened to be standing in the parking lot, and he was the only person we saw.” • “We weren’t in burns all the time, but most of the time we were,” Arnzen said. “There were three things we were really amazed with on this trip. The amount of country that is burned, or has been burned. In that country, as far as you can see, it has been burned.” The view from Dry Saddle extends for miles and, especially to the south, fire has signed its signature in all directions. “The Bitterroot River drainage hadn’t burned too much,” Arnzen said, “and hadn’t had a lot of burn scar in it.” The group’s day at Buffalo Hump also left a big impression. “We rode all around it,” Arnzen said. “It’s a prominent spot — it sticks way up in the air. You can look back after two or three days and see it, barely, and you’re amazed that you were there just a couple of days before. It was amazing how far we had come.” The men — who hunt together — were also amazed at “how much game we didn’t see,” Arnzen said. “We saw a few deer and a few elk and you’d think, going across that much wilderness, you’d see more. Obviously we were traveling by day in the middle of summer time, and on the ridges mostly — so not in likely places — but we were surprised at how much we didn’t see.” They averaged more than 20 miles a day on horseback, riding eight or nine hours a day. “Everything went pretty well as planned,” Arnzen said. “We took this as a huge adventure, but a hundred years ago, this was day-to-day life, how people got around and did business. It amazes me every day.” EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

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County PHOTO BY

ROBERT MILLAGE


PHOTO BY

PHOTO BY

ROBERT MILLAGE

PHOTO BY

ROBERT MILLAGE

DAVID RAUZI

L

ewis County, established in 1911, was named for explorer Meriwether Lewis and includes 480 square miles with Nez Perce as its county seat and Kamiah as its largest city. Its population is 3,821 (2010 Census). Most of Lewis County is within the Nez Perce Indian Reservation though American Indians make up only about 6 percent of the county’s population. Incorporated cities within Lewis County include Craigmont, Kamiah, Nezperce, Reubens and Winchester.

PHOTO BY LORIE PALMER

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in our Visit the Upper Clearwater River Corridor! Kamiah Chamber of Commerce www.kamiahchamber.com www.facebook.com/kamiahchamber (208) 935-2290

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EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

Kamiah to Powell • Elk City to Lapwai in North Central Idaho


LEWIS COUNTY Events

Craigmont

•Citywide yard sale day, May •May Memorial Day services, 11 a.m., at the cemetery •Craigmont June Picnic June 24 •Thursdays in July, Jammin’ in the Park concerts, every Thursday evening; call 924-5432 •American Legion November breakfast, noon, Nov. 4 •Breakfast with Santa at city hall 9 a.m., Dec. 16

Kamiah

•Long Camp Saturday Farmers’ Market, 9 am. to 1 p.m., April through September/October •Community yard sale, May •Glenwood-Caribel Volunteer Fire Department pancake breakfast, TBA •ISBA Spring Jam Bluegrass Festival June 2, 3, 4 •Mat’Alyma Root Festival and Powwow May 19-21 •Youth Fishing Derby May/June •KCPC Youthfest, Riverfront Park, June 3 •Long Camp Classics on the Clearwater TBA •CVRA Parade June 18 •CVRA Rodeo June 17 -18 •Clearwater Valley Fly-In July •40th annual Chief Lookingglass Powwow, Aug. 18-20 •Kamiah Free Barbecue Days Sept. 1-3 •Riverfront Park pumpkin carving Oct. 22 •Christmas Light Parade, Dec. 1

Nezperce

•Citywide yard sale day in May •Nez Perce Prairie Days July 7-8 •Lewis County Fair September •Combine Derby September

Reubens

•Reubens Community Church Annual Reubens Sausage Feed, Spring

Winchester

•Citywide yard sale June •Memorial-Labor days, visitor center is open Friday and Saturday, noon-4 p.m. Museum of Winchester History opens Fridays and Saturdays, 12:30-3 p.m. Summer programs start at Winchester Lake and the Wolf Education Resource Center •Winchester Days and Rodeo June 30-July 1 •Christmas in the Pines at Winchester Community Center Nov. 4 •Christmas Tree Lighting, Dec. 16, 6 p.m.

PHOTO BY

Craigmont

Originally two communities named Ilo and Vollmer, the area was bypassed by the Camas Prairie Railroad in 1904. After a 10-year-feud and the consolidation of school districts, the communities merged in 1920 to become Craigmont. Craigmont is an agricultural town with crops being winter and spring wheat, winter and spring barley, peas, lentils, canola and flaxes. There are also several hay and cattle operations in the area. WWW.CRAIGMONTAREACHAMBER.COM

Kamiah

Kamiah is the largest city in Lewis County and extends a short distance into Idaho County. The Nezperce Appaloosa was first bred in this area. Explorers Lewis and Clark camped in the Kamiah area in 1806. 1-800-847-4843 WWW.KAMIAHCHAMBER.COM

DANNY GRIFFIS

Nezperce

Nezperce is the Lewis County seat. Named for the Nez Perce Tribe, the name is derived from the French (pronounced neigh-percey), literally meaning “pierced nose.” WWW.CO.NEZPERCE.ID.US; WWW.CITYOFNEZPERCE.COM

Reubens

Reubens had a population of just 71 people in the 2010 Census, although it once boasted more than 1,500 residents. The railroad on stilts movies “Breakheart Pass” and “Wild Wild West” were filmed near Reubens.

Winchester

Winchester was named in 1900 after the rifle. Much of the town was destroyed by a fire in 1964 which began at the local mill operated by Boise Cascade. Winchester State Park is located one-half mile outside of town and is a popular recreation area in the summer fishing, boating and camping months. Nordic skiing, snowshoeing, ice fishing and ice skating are just a few of the winter activities. EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

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Lewis County Attractions

STATE PARK

Winchester State Park offers year-round recreation for fishing, as well as seasonal offerings for outdoor activities and wildlife viewing. Winter activities at the park include cross-country skiing, ice skating and ice fishing. Summer offers swimming, boating and fishing opportunities. The lake’s big fishing draw is for rainbow trout, regularly stocked by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Other species include perch, tiger muskie, bass and blue gill. Among the wildlife to be seen at the park are white-tailed deer, Canada geese, muskrats, Steller’s jay and osprey. Winchester Lake offers 46 serviced, 22 standard, and three ADA campsites, as well as four yurts (one ADA), along with rest rooms, showers and a dump station. Reservations can be made for Memorial Day through Labor Day for campsites and year-round for yurts. During spring and summer, the recommended path for your walk or run is the approximate three-mile Lakeshore Trail. The park’s smaller loop trails also offer great terrain for mountain bikes or trail runners. Seasonal bike and canoe rentals are available. The park is located 38 miles south of Lewiston off U.S. Highway 95. For information: 1786 Forest Road, Winchester, ID 83555; (208) 9247563; HTTPS://PARKSANDRECREATION.IDAHO.GOV/P ARKS/WINCHESTER OR FIND THEM ON FACEBOOK.

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EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

Woodland Schoolhouse:

PHOTO BY LORIE PALMER

Self-Guided Tour

WOODLAND — If you’re looking for a hands-on education field trip in Kamiah and the surrounding areas, look no farther than a schoolhouse visit to see how the pioneer children of yesteryear learned and flourished. These historic treasures can be studied on a downloadable brochure entitled “Historic Schoolhouse Field Trip” that can be found at WWW.KAMIAHCHAMBER.COM. One schoolhouse of interest is the Woodland School. Leave Kamiah East on U.S. Highway 12, take a left on Woodland Road immediately after crossing the

Clearwater River. Follow Woodland Road up the grade 11 miles to the Woodland Schoolhouse on your right. The community of Woodland became a thriving settlement in 1895. During its heyday, the three-room schoolhouse offered education through the first two years of high school, and had about 75 students enrolled. In 1957, Woodland high school students began traveling to Kamiah for their education. In 1958, seventh and eighth grade followed suit, and in 1967 the school closed for good.


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County PHOTO BY

BRAD STINSON


PHOTO BY

PHOTO BY

BRAD STINSON

BRAD STINSON

PHOTO BY

BRAD STINSON

PHOTO BY

BRAD STINSON

I

nitially organized by the Territorial Legislature of Washington in 1861, Nez Perce County was established February 4, 1864 by the Idaho Territorial Legislature with its county seat at Lewiston. Nez Perce County has a total area of 856 square miles, of which 8.2 square miles are water; and its population (2010 Census) is 39,265. The county was named after the Nez Perce Tribe, and Lewiston served for 22 months as the territorial capital before it was moved to Boise. The Clearwater and Snake rivers meet in Lewiston. Incorporated cities within Nez Perce County include Lewiston, Culdesac, Lapwai, and Peck. Among the region’s communities are Sweetwater, Gifford, Lenore, Myrtle, Southwick, Spalding and Waha.

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NEZ PERCE COUNTY

Events Lewiston

•Dogwood Festival: late March through April; WWW.LCSC.EDU/CE/DOGWOOD •Art Under the Elms: late April; VISITLCVALLEY.COM/EVENTS/ARTUNDER-THE-ELMS-2/ •Capital Street Dock Concert: early July; BEAUTIFULDOWNTOWNLEWISTON.COM/CAPITAL-STREETDOCK-CONCERT/ •Hot August Nights: Aug. 25-27, 2016; VISITLCVALLEY.COM/EVENTS/HOTAUGUST-NIGHTS/ •Lewiston Round-Up: Sept. 7-10; WWW.LEWISTONROUNDUP.COM •Nez Perce County Fair: Sept. 21-24; WWW.NPCFAIR.ORG/ •Downtown Artwalk: early October; BEAUTIFULDOWNTOWNLEWISTON.COM/ARTWALK/ •Pumpkin Palooza: last weekend of October; BEAUTIFULDOWNTOWNLEWISTON.COM/PUMPKIN-PALOOZA/ HTTP://WWW.LCVALLEYCHAMBER.ORG/; (509) 758-7712 or 800-933-2128

Culdesac

Culdesac was named for its location at the end of the railroad line. Located here is St. Joseph’s Mission (1874), listed on the National Register of Historic Places for being the first Roman Catholic mission among the Nez Perce Indians. Activities include: •Culdesac Sausage Feed: usually first Sunday in March •Culdesac Shebang Days: second Saturday in June

Lapwai

•Lapwai Earth Day Celebration; late April; contact: Lapwai City Hall, (208) 843-2212, CITYOFLAPWAI.COM •Chief Joseph Warrior Memorial Pow Wow; June 16-18; contact: Lapwai City Hall, (208) 843-2212, CITYOFLAPWAI.COM •Lapwai Days: July 7-9; contact: Lapwai City Hall, (208) 843-2212, CITYOFLAPWAI.COM •Young Nations Youth Pow Wow; Nov. 17-19; contact: Lapwai City Hall, (208) 843-2212, CITYOFLAPWAI.COM •Nez Perce National Historic Park Bead Bazaar; Dec. 2; contact: Lapwai City Hall, (208) 843-2212, CITYOFLAPWAI.COM

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EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

PHOTO BY

Lewiston

Lewiston was founded the same year (1861) as the county, spurred by a neighboring gold rush northeast in Pierce. It serves as a hub for recreation into the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area; and its industries include agriculture, timber/paper products, as well as light manufacturing. The Port of Lewiston is the farthest inland port east of the West Coast of the U.S. It is home to Lewis-Clark State College.

Culdesac

Culdesac was named for its location at the end of the railroad line. Located here is St. Joseph’s Mission (1874), listed on the National Register of Historic Places for being the first Roman Catholic mission among the Nez Perce Indians.

Lapwai

Located within the boundaries of Nez Perce

BRAD STINSON

County and the Nez Perce Indian Reservation, Lapwai is also the seat of government for the tribe. Here, Henry H. Spalding established a Protestant mission in 1836. The name, Lapwai, means “place of the butterflies.” In nearby Spalding is the Nez Perce National Historic Park Museum and Visitors Center, highlighting the region’s artifacts and cultural history.

Peck

Located at the mouth of Big Canyon near the Clearwater River, Peck is situated east of Lewiston between Lenore and Ahsahka. The American Women’s League Chapter House was built here in 1900, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places; it currently is in use as the Peck Community Library.


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Spalding PHOTOS BY

Providing a hands-on understanding of the region’s natural and cultural history, the Nez Perce National Historical Park at Spalding, east of Lewiston, offers indoor and outdoor exhibits and activities year-round. Throughout the year, the park film, Nez Perce - Portrait of a People, is shown. It provides an introduction to the Nez Perce story and is also available for purchase. Museum exhibits feature an outstanding collection of clothing, tools, weapons, and ceremonial objects. The Northwest Interpretive Association has a sales outlet where you can purchase items about the Nez Perce and the National Park Service. Generally, from Memorial Day to Labor Day, the park staff provides special walks and talks that include museum tours and tipi pitching demonstrations. Lapwai Creek Trail Among the outdoor activities at the center is the Lapwai Creek Trail (.2 mile). For centuries, Lapwai Creek has flowed into the Clearwater River here at the Spalding site. As you hike along the creek, you will be walking on ancient stream deposits that not only support plants and animals, but have sustained the Nez Perce culture for generations. In the spring and fall you have a chance to see salmon in Lapwai Creek. Check with park rangers to see when the runs are likely to occur. Two important Nez Perce Tribe food plants found along the trail are serviceberry and chokecherry. Serviceberries were the most important fruit for the Nez Perce and were especially important, stored and used in the winter. Chokecherries are commonly found along streams, and were 38

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

BRAD STINSON

eaten fresh as well as dried and stored for winter use. Other trails in the Spalding system: • The Old Townsite Trail (1 mile): views along the Clearwater River, takes visitors to the former Nez Perce Indian agency and homesteading, which was here from 1860 to 1904. Remnants of several buildings are among the fruit trees and lilac bushes. • Picnic Area Trail (.4 mile): Four generations of Nez Perce used this area; the location of a former village site and the Rev. Henry Spalding mission. • Watson’s Trail (.1 mile): The trail is actually an old raceway – a man-made ditch that carried water to the mills. The short trail leads to Watson’s store, a historic building. During certain times of the year, native flowers such as lomatiums and stonecrops can be seen. • Boomgrounds Trail (.2 mile): views of the Clearwater River. Boomground is a logging term that refers to where wood is collected; here, trees and logs were washed downstream and deposited on the beach by spring floods. The center is located 11 miles east of Lewiston on U.S. Highway 95. Visitors services include rest rooms and a bookstore. Campgrounds can be found at Hells Gate State Park in Clarkston, Wash., and Winchester Lake State Park in Winchester. The center is open daily (closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year's). For information: (208) 843-7001 or HTTPS://WWW.NPS.GOV/NEPE/INDEX.HTM .


Lapwai

Visit the City of Lapwai Located off Highway 95, in North Central Idaho, on the Nez Perce Indian Reservation

A Transforming city in the place of the Butterfly.

Old Ft. Lapwai Building

Native Dancers at PowWow

Downtown Lapwai

Lapwai is centered in one of Idaho’s most historic regions. Our past is a story of the joining together of the Nez Perce People, early explorers, settlers, and the U.S. Army. Lapwai’s history includes mission efforts, Indian affairs, and an early educational program. Lapwai is the tribal headquarters for the Nez Perce Tribe. We welcome you to come and visit our unique historical city that remains a blend of the past and present.

Visit the Lapwai web site or city hall for information about events & attractions.

www.cityoflapwai.com

Spalding Museum A park about a People, for all people.

LAPWAI CITY HALL 315 S. Main St, Lapwai, ID 83540 (208) 843-2212

Nez Perce National Historical Park tells the story of Nez Perce Country, from ancient times to today.

Located on US Highway 95 at Spalding, Idaho...

the park headquarters and museum offer films, exhibits, and ranger talks on Nez Perce tribal heritage, history and culture. Admission free.

OPEN 8:30-4 DAILY WITH EXTENDED SUMMER HOURS.

Information: 208-843-7001 • www.nps.gov/nepe https://www.facebook.com/#!/DiscoverNezPerceNationalHistoricalPark • https://twitter.com/NezPerceNP EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

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Regional Chamber Contacts

Traveling further? Here is some chamber contact information for some of the region’s other destinations. Lewiston, Clarkston Visit the Lewis Clark Valley Chamber of Commerce 502 Bridge Street, Clarkston, WA 99403 (509) 758-7712 or 800-933-2128 http://WWW.LCVALLeyChAmBer.org/ Asotin, Wash. Asotin, Wash. Chamber of Commerce po Box 574, Asotin, WA 99402 (509) 243-4242 Pullman, Wash. pullman Chamber of Commerce 415 N grand Ave pullman, WA 99163 1-800-365-6948 | (509) 334-3565 http://puLLmANChAmBer.Com/

Moscow moscow Chamber of Commerce 411 S. main Street moscow, ID 83843 (208) 882-1800 http://WWW.moSCoWChAmBer.Com/ 40

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

McCall mcCall Chamber of Commerce p.o. Box 350, 301 e. Lake Street mcCall, ID 83638 (208) 634-7631 or toll-free 1-800-260-5130 http://mCCALLChAmBer.org/

New Meadows meadows Valley Chamber of Commerce New meadows, Idaho 83654 (208) 347-2647 Council Council Chamber of Commerce p.o. Box 527 Council, ID 83612 http://CouNCILChAmBerofCommerCe.Com/ Cascade Cascade Chamber of Commerce 500 N main Street Cascade, ID 83611 (208) 382-3833 http://CASCADeChAmBer.Com/






  

  

 

 



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We are not just a hotel to stay at and forget about later... WE ARE AN ALL-INCLUSIVE EXPERIENCE! B&B AND A A FULL FULL SER SERVICE LODGE

The cabins provide a quiet and private getaway. The Inn itself can support a large group, for social functions, corporate events, parties, weddings, retreats and more. We welcome bikers to come stay with us and enjoy the many amenities, we have plenty of room for you to stay, and enjoy the scenic beauty of Northern Idaho. When you stay with us, you will leave with unforgettable memories.

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EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO


We Honestly Care! Building with Confidence Since 1987

Mon-Sat 7am-10pm; Sun 8am-8pm

Commercial • Educational • Medical Residential • Public Works

Open 7 Days a Week

Jim Church, Educator

Everyday Low Prices ✤ Video Rental Choice Meats ✤ In-Store Bakery Rug Doctor ✤ Super Specials Fresh Produce ✤ Service Deli Money Orders ✤ Case Sales Cost + 10% Dry Clean Pick-Up ✤ Idaho Lottery

— ANIMAL SCIENCE, BEEF MANAGEMENT —

Kirstin Jensen, Educator — HEALTH & FITNESS/NUTRITION —

Susie Heckman — 4-H COORDINATOR —

Alana Lyons — OFFICE MANAGER —

IDAHO COUNTY COURTHOUSE 320 W. Main St. Rm #3 GRANGEVILLE, ID 208-983-2667 Email – idaho@uidaho.edu

310 Junction / PO Box 447 Cottonwood, Idaho 83522 Ph.208.962.3903 • Fx.208.962.3120 ArnzenConstruction.com

415 W. Main

GRANGEVILLE, ID 983-0680, 800-434-1022

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

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Keuterville Pub & Grub CLOSED MONDAYS Private parties welcome

Located 6 miles west of Cottonwood 962-3090

“Off the beaten path”

Good friends. Good food. Cold beer.

BAR & GRILL “Great Menu and an Even Better Selection of Cra Beers” Downtown Ferdinand, Idaho (208) 962-7233 Hours: Tue-Sat 11-10?; Sun 11-7 CLOSED MONDAYS Like Us on Facebook

124 W. Main • Grangeville 208-983-4203

Breakfast•Lunch•Dinner 7 Days a Week e Great Sandwiches g

Steaks & Pasta Cocktails, Beer & Wine Our Burgers Are Ground Fresh Daily 44

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO


Open for Lunch at 11am

501 4th St. One block off Hwy 12

Orders To Go!

Daily Specials

KAMIAH IDAHO (208) 935-0545

Serving Dinner: 5pm-9pm

Happy Hour: 4pm-5pm

Reservations suggested for large parties.

Prime Rib Fri. & Sat.

NEW EXPANDED MENU

3 Locations

Steaks (aged to perfection) - 1/2 lb Burgers (fresh ground chuck) Ribs - Seafood - Chicken & Pasta New side dishes: Garlic Mashed Potatoes Wild Rice with Herbs & Butter - Three Cheese Fettucini & Baked Potato

To Serve You!

Wine Menu — Desserts This summer enjoy our outdoor seating!

Enjoy food, drinks & games on our covered patio! The Best LIVE BANDS

GRANG EVILLE

On The West Coast!

Right off Highway 95 • Grangeville, Idaho

KAMIAH

LIBERT Y LAKE

Hwy. 12 • Kamiah, Idaho

Liberty Lake, Washington

208/935-7700

509/928-3112

The Historic

Check our facebook or website for schedule

208/983-1335

YACHT CLUB BUILDING

203 E. Lake St., McCall, Idaho

McCall’s Best Location for unobstructed Lake Views!

McCall’s BEST LAKE VIEW PATIO!

Serving dinner 7 days a week

LIVE MUSIC THURSDAYS 6-8 208 634.HOOK (4665) anchor-mccall.com

Sunday brunch 10 am to 1 pm

Bloody Mary Bar Monday-Friday 11 am - 10 pm (summer hours) Saturday 11 am - 10 pm Sunday 10 am - 10 pm EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

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Non-Smoking!

Family Friendly!

OPEN 6am-2:30am 7 days a week

Bar & Grill 406 Main Street, Kamiah, ID

Serving Breakfast-Lunch-Dinner

Taco Tuesday! 6pm-8pm

Karaoke!

Fri & Sat 9pm-1am

the Home of

b Famous Ku Burger!

Tamarack Bowling Lanes

Open bowling every Friday and Saturday from 4pm-9pm

Where Highway 13 Ends

Wilderness Begins!

Offering the best home cooked meals in the valley! Homemade Pies & Desserts

Open 6am 7 days a week!

Catering Available

OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK

6am to 9pm

Kooskia, ID (208) 926-4351 46

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

o me

H

for large parties with an event center across the street!

6 N. Main Street

9 ia, ID 8353 sk o o K • . t S 18 N. Main 8-926-0833 20

Outside dining available.

Jane Wilsey & Joan Renshaw

Dow n

and the

s d a o r k Bac er Din

■ Break

■ Lunch

■ Dinner

g n i k o Co


Dr. Ron Sigler

Dr. Jared Pikus

Dr. Teel Bruner

Dr. Haley Minnehan

Dr. Andy Jones

Dr. Jack Secrest

Dr. Jaron Brunson Brenda Hewlett, FNP

Peg Gehring, FNP Scarlett Uhlenkott, FNP Andrea Krogh, PA Megan Wilson, DNP APRN

Inpatient And Outpatient Services - Surgical Services - Endoscopic Procedures - Visiting Specialists - Pain Management Clinic - Family Centered OB Care - Medical Spa Services MRI, CT & Ultrasound - Treadmill Stress Testing - SMH Cardiac Rehab Program - DOT, Sports & Employment Physicals - Acupuncture - Certified Diabetes Educators - Telehealth Services including Psychiatry, Dermatology, Cardiology, Hospitalist, Emergency Care Visiting Nurse Services (VNS) Program for In-Home Care & Lifeline Monitoring (800) 497-7412

Dr. Kelly McGrath

Dr. Kim Campbell Dr. Karin Schmidova Dr. Charity Robinson

Dr. Vanessa Brown

Dr. Colleen Sholar

Dr. Phil Peterson

Dr. Clayton Bunt Taresa Michna, APRN-C

John Beeh, PA

Ann Lima, MD

Nick Box, PA-C

Tammy Miller, FNP Rebecca Katzman, MD

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EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

Visit us Online at www.smh-cvhc.org


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EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO

Experience North Central Idaho: 2017 Visitor's Guide  
Experience North Central Idaho: 2017 Visitor's Guide  
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