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backstage Editor In Chief Aaron Williams Managing Editor Ty Brown Copy Editor Miriam Hannon Editorial Assistant Taryn Bushrod Journalist Eboyne’ Jackson London Price Brittany Johnson Magaly Fuentes Tony Engelhart Tonya Callihan Melanie Staton Megan Burnbridge Art Directors Aaron Williams Ty Brown Contributing Photographers Rodney Young AW Creative Group Fashion Icons Imax Tree

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iconography the magazine

Email: info@iconographythemagazine.com visit us online. www.iconographythemagazine.com

Iconography the magazine 2113 N. Charles St. Baltimore, MD 21218

For all submissions and inquiries mail to:

Hair and Makeup Melanie Jones (Makeup) Bethany Townes (Makeup) Kahlil Oliver (hair) Sirerra Conney (hair)


Iconography is published by Think Grey Media Group 4 times yearly. No part of this publication may be produced without written permission of the publisher and editors. Iconography does not accept responsibility for unsolicited material. All views expressed are those of the writers alone and do not represent the views of Iconography and its owners. iconography the magazine

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ARTSCAPE presents

seeking talented fashion designers Application deadline is Monday, May 4, 2009

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hink you have what it takes to be the next top designer? Then the Sew Me What You Got Competition, supported by IKEA Baltimore, is looking for you! A new Fashion at Artscape programming component, this competition is seeking skilled and creative fashion designers that have what it takes to create a stylish garment and receive great exposure. The winning designer will receive a $1000 cash prize and a photo spread in Iconography the Magazine. The application deadline is Monday, May 4, 2009 and can be completed online at www.artscape.org. The Sew Me What You Got Competition, a part of Artscape 2009, is supported by IKEA Baltimore and Fashion Icons, presented by Mayor Sheila Dixon and produced by the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts. Contestants, 18 years and older, must design one garment using fabric purchased at IKEA Baltimore, located at 8352 Honeygo Boulevard. Fifteen semifinalists will have their work displayed at IKEA Baltimore from Tuesday, May 26 through Friday, May 29. A showcase will also be held via live models throughout the IKEA Baltimore store on Saturday, May 30 from 1 – 2pm. Customers may vote for their favorite designers garment in-store and online at www. artscape.org, www.fashioniconsonline.com, or on Artscape’s Myspace and Facebook sites. The winner will be announced at Artscape Sunday July, 19 at 7:30pm after a final competition where five semifinalists will showcase their garments.

For more information about the Sew Me What You Got Competition, call 410-752-8632 or visit www.artscape.org.

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Photo copyright of Inter IKEA Systems B.V. 2008

Fashion at Artscape returns this year with exciting local and regional fashion shows at the University of Baltimore campus, Gordon Plaza located at Mt. Royal and Maryland avenues. Guests can purchase one-ofa-kind designs and observe the creativity of designers during weekend-long runway shows. Artscape, America’s largest, free arts festival takes place Friday, July 17 and Saturday, July 18, noon to 10pm and Sunday, July 19, noon to 8pm.


Photo copyright of Inter IKEA Systems B.V. 2007

ARTSCAPE presents

seeking talented fashion designers Application deadline is Monday, May 4, 2009 iconography the magazine

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Someicon nogrpeople haveaanph yinnatethe magknack forathezin evisual... itsicono something yourgborn raphywith aaron williams editor

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PrettyP

owerful words by: eboyne’ jackson

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eisha-Nash Whitaker lives her life with bold mysticm, beauty and charm-qualities so powerful cannot be dispensed without living the life of a true glamazon. Like a chameleon, this wife, mother, and entrepenuer, changes her wardrobe as quickly as a chameleon changes colors, and does so effortlessly. Blessed with an impeccable fashion sense, this influential fashionista chose to influence the world of beauty with the launch of “Kissable Couture,” her luxury lip-gloss line established alongside celebrity makeup artist, AJ Crimson. Mrs. Whitaker fearlessly plunged into this ambitious business venture all the while balancing her family life—mother of three, and her marriage to the acclaimed Academy Award winning actor and director, Forest Whitaker. How does a gal juggle multiple business ventures and still keep the love flowing in her home, without resorting to chapped lips, disheveled hair, and scuffed Jimmy Choos? Keisha Nash-Whitaker knows how... In this very exclusive interview, KeishaNash Whitaker shares her personal story, and reveals how this Bostonian native morphed from wife to business woman, without the compromise of her integrity, family, and personal life. Born to multi-task and do it well, Mrs. Whitaker takes some time out of her industrious life cunveil her business and personal life, (which in her case, ‘never turns off’) because family, always comes first.

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eisha: First off, let me say thank you for all of the lovely compliments! (Laughs) Before AJ and I launched Kissable Couture, we had already been working together professionally for many years. We both always knew that a luxury lip gloss/ makeup line was missing, so our inspiration in creating our collection was to fill that void. We wanted to create lip-gloss for all women. Ultimately, we wanted to create a “very grown up” lip gloss, that was luxurious, creamy and soft. We launched our first collection in the fall of ’07, which was “The First Kiss Collection.” This collection featured seven different lip-gloss shades, and each shade was named after a boy that each of my friends and I have kissed, so you know I had to name a shade after my husband, Forest! (Laughs)

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: Yes, of course! (Laughs) So, is it safe to say that Forest is your favorite lip-gloss from your collection?

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conography: Keisha, you are an inspiration to women everywhere. You are a testament that women can have it all. You are a wife, a mother, a fashion icon, and a viable entrepreneur. You have created every woman’s fantasy with the launch of your luxury lip- gloss line, Kissable Couture-- (Lord knows) we are always looking for the perfect lip- gloss! (Laughs) What inspired you to collaborate with celebrity makeup artist, AJ Crimson, to create Kissable Couture?

K

: Yes, bet you didn’t see that one coming! (Laughs) I absolutely love the color; it’s a beautiful deep, crimson shade. And yes, I love it even more because it is named after my husband!

I K

: So tell me, Keisha, what is the inspiration behind the name, “Kissable Couture?”

: Well, lip-gloss should be kissable, and we wanted our collection to be chic, almost like a beautifully wrapped gift. Being that my background has always


been in fashion, it only seemed right to merge beauty with fashion—so that’s why AJ and I decided to name our line Kissable Couture—“kissable” represents the way your lips should feel once you’ve used our product, and we added “couture” to give it a touch of fashion.

K

: Yes, we plan to expand into a complete luxury makeup line. Next fall, we will be merging into eye shadows, (expect lots of creams and shimmer,) and blush.

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: The name definitely fits. Are you pleased with the reception from your collection?

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: No! It’s all very humbling. (Laughs) Georges Chakra designed that dress. My good friend, Phillip Locke, went shopping with me, and we set our eyes on that dress. I bought the dress awhile back, and honestly hadn’t tried it on until Forest was nominated for his role in the “Last King of Scotland” for the 2007 Academy awards. I waited because I didn’t want to jinx anything! (Laughs) The response was very flattering.

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: Oh yes, we are very pleased. We have amazing fans, they are very positive. The responses we’ve been receiving truly surpassed our expectations.

: Well, apparently the dress did not jinx a thing, because your man took home an Oscar for “Best Actor” for his role in “The Last King of Scotland,” that night! (Laughs)

: What were some of the challenges you faced when creating Kissable Couture, and how did you overcome them?

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: Well, like with anything that’s new you just want people to take you seriously. Of course there was this stigma; I didn’t want people to think I was just another celebrity wife trying to dabble unknowingly into business. I mean, my background has always been in fashion, and beauty has always been a passion of mine. So I just worked hard to establish the brand and push people to believe in it as much as I do.

I

: You’ve done a job well done--Kissable Couture speaks for itself, the lip-glosses are rich and the colors are powerful. I love the brand; my favorite collection is the “Bare Your Soul” Collection. I am all about the nudes! (Laughs)

“...I didn’t want people to think I was just another celebrity wife trying to dabble unknowingly into business.”

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K I K

: Not only are you an entrepreneur, you are also a TV personality. I love your new show on TLC, “Who Are You Wearing?” You always look like you are having fun, and you always look fabulous, by the way. How has it been hosting the show?

K

: So you want an exclusive, huh! (Laughs) OK, well, the Spring Collection will definitely celebrate all of the beautiful flowers of the spring. I have this huge obsession with flowers. Yes, I am a diehard flower girl. I mean, I can’t stay in a hotel with out having flowers surrounding me! (Laughs) So the Spring Collection will be a reflection of that—expect hotter pinks and deep, luscious colors. The collection is definitely going to have the s pring feel, it will be fun and trendy.

: Thank you. I love hosting “Who Are You Wearing?” The show has featured some of the greatest guests and talents from all around the world. Laila Ali, came on the show before the birth of her baby, and made a guest appearance. I think the concept of the show is so brilliant—to see would-be designers from all walks of life competing to dress a top celebrity, and have them wear their creation on the red carpet, is amazing to me. Each contestant has a touching story; families put their dreams on hold only to have them resurrected through the show. It’s moving, and it’s what people like to see, (at least for me.) We taped ten episodes, and right now we are waiting to see if the show is geared to come back for another season. I am hopeful, and very positive about it. I have a great feeling about the show, and I am just so honored to be apart of it.

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: Thank you. See, that’s what I am talking about! (Laughs)

: We love exclusives here at Iconography! (Laughs) What can we expect from Kissable Couture’s 2009 Spring Collection?

: Sounds like the Spring Collection is definitely something we should anticipate. Keisha, do you plan on expanding Kissable Couture beyond lipgloss?

: That day was a great day for us! (Laughs)

: Now you know I have to ask you about Forest. We’ve been throwing his name around during the entire interview! (Laughs) : Of course, shoot! (Laughs)

: How did you two meet?

: We met in Boston on the set of the movie, Blown Away. That’s where I grew up, by the way. I was chosen by the

: You are quite the fashionista! The first time I was introduced to you was when you wore that famous canary-yellow goldsatin dress with the flower vines etched in the back, to the 79th Academy Awards with your husband, Forest. Did you have any idea that that dress would solidify you as a fashion innovator? iconography the magazine

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casting director to play Forest’s girlfriend in the movie. We became friends instantly, and then we started dating awhile later. We definitely had an instant connection; whenever I spoke with him, he always made me realize that I had never met anyone quite like him.

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: That is so beautiful. You two have been married for twelve years, which is impressive especially in the world of Tinsel Town! So what’s it like being married to Forest?

K

: Well, if the question were reversed, I know he’d have something more animated to say! (Laughs) It’s wonderful being married to Forest. He is so understanding, and he always cheers me

K I K

: (Pauses) Well, if I tell you, you just might laugh! (Laughs)

: Try me. (Laughs)

: Well, I am out and about right now, as we speak, and you won’t guess where I am at! (Laughs and pauses dramatically before answering) I am at Marshalls!

I K

: There is nothing wrong with that! (Laughs) I call that sensible shopping! : I live in Los Angeles, and I do shop at some of the best boutiques and major department stores, but there is something that I just love about Marshalls. I am here, just picking up a few linens, and a few other things my kids and my husband might need.

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: It’s so apparent that fashion is in your divine birthright. Do you have any aspirations to launch a clothing line of your own?

K

: Establishing a clothing line is very intense. Right now I am focused on expanding Kissable Couture as complete makeup line. AJ and I enjoy playing with make- up; it’s what we love. Maybe at

on. He is such an incredibly supportive husband and best friend. I truly couldn’t have asked for more. When we first met I was just so fascinated with his intellect and his philosophies. He is so refreshing. He is one of the most humble men I have ever met, and he sees the world through this great set of eyes. With our marriage, I always learn and expect something new. He truly is a genuine, humble, sweet man.

: Where do you typically shop at?

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: He mentioned all that! (Laughs) Awww, how sweet!

: Your kindness and humility is sacred, Keisha. Never loose that. At the end of the day, what gives your life meaning?

K

: My family and friends ground me. The people around me give my life so much substance. My husband, Forest, my three girls, Autumn, Sonnet, and True, all make my life complete. I am blessed-my family supports me 100%. We all have goals and dreams and we all just work together, systemically.

I K

: You are a busy woman! How do you find balance?

: Some days are better than others. But overall, I have always been a multi tasker, so I don’t know any other way to be. Somehow I manage to find a way. Like right now, I just left the store, and now I am having lunch with my kids while conducting this interview! (Laughs) You learn the art of multi-tasking when you have a family—family first, career, second. : What else can we expect from you, Mrs. Whitaker, for 2009 and beyond?

: How would you describe your signature style, Keisha?

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K I

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: I’m the kind of girl who wears clothes that I do not have to worry about. I don’t wear garments that require me to worry about tape flashing out. I don’t wear clothes where my stuff will be falling out of place. I have kids, I am a mother of three girls, and I have to be a good role model for them. I love clothes, and I know what works for me. My look is stylish and classic. I love a great pair of jeans, (preferably Earnest Sewn.) At night, I dress them up my jeans with a great blazer or a chic cashmere sweater. I absolutely love Marni flats. I also love button up collar shirts, which when paired with the right ensemble, adds a touch of versatility. I am a classic woman. I love Donna Karan and Michael Kors, as well as up-and-coming designers.

his birthday in style. Damon also said that you all partied like rock stars that night! (Laughs)

some point, I’d consider starting off with something small. I’ve learned to never say never, so we’ll see what happens.

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: I’ve heard that not only are you a fashion connsignor, but you’re also a good person. I interviewed Celebrity Image Consultant, Damon Campbell, awhile back, and he gushed about how amazing you are as a person. He said that you threw him a lavish surprise birthday party at “Butter” in Manhattan, and invited guests, Kimora Lee Simmons, and her beau, Djimon Hounsou, to help celebrate

:Well, Forest and I are very much involved with Hope North, an orphanage dear to our hearts. Hope North is based in Northern Uganda, and cares for misplaced children soldiers from the war. Children are fed and clothed, and recently a dorm was built for the children. This is a project we both believe in; Forest met the children personally, and immediately took a liking to them. For 2009 and beyond, we will contribute to this cause as much as we can. I am also producing a documentary along with Forest called “Kasmin: The Dream,” based out of Uganda. I am also planning to write a lifestyle self-help book about finding “balance” in life. Similar to my own life experiences, this book will encourage the average gal trying to do it and do it right!

I

: Reflecting back over everything you have accomplished, ultimately, what do you want people to know about you?

K

: I want them to remember that I was a hard worker, kind and loving, with a killer fashion sense! For More on Keisha Whitaker & Kissable Couture Log Onto:

www.kissablecouture.com


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green is... words by: magaly fuentes

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G

oing Green is not just the environmentally sound and responsible choice, it’s also the most fashionable choice. Eco fashion is reaching new heights daily by raising awareness and raising the bar through innovation with a stylish twist. It’s 2009, there is a new U.S. president in office and everyone is talking about change. Change, by definition, is to cause to be different, to give a completely different form or appearance transform. We have damaged and transformed our earth due to lack of education and we now have a choice to either continue on the path of destruction or gain knowledge about the many ways we can positively support our earth’s health. Conversations abound regarding going green and it’s important to know that everyONE can make a difference! The fashion industry is one of the many industries making exponential strides in the environmentally conscious movement, but as with everything, change requires education and voices to spread the message. Historically, change supported by strong voices shows accelerated progress and some of the strongest voices belong to those in the entertainment industry due to their massive exposure across the world. So what better way to have our messages supported than by those who are already in the public eye? Thanks to some powerful voices in Hollywood, eco fashion is gaining “in your face” status quickly. Maggie Gyllenhaal is among the Hollywood elite who has shown a genuine and concerted interest in supporting eco fashion. Gyllenhaal, who is known for embracing a natural lifestyle and is particularly interested in supporting the growing trend of eco-friendly fashion, hosted The Eco-Fashion Runway show presented by Gen Art to kick off L.A.’s Fashion Week. The event took place inside The Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles. A highlighted trend in eco fashion, evident on the runway, continues to be the use of bamboo-based fabrics. Some people are not aware of the fact that bamboo is not a tree but a grass, which is easily sustainable as it can handle drought as well as flooding. Farming bamboo is not harmful to the environment because it does not require any pesticides or herbicides. In addition, bamboo can be replanted each year. One of its greatest qualities with respect to textile production is that it is very fast growing. Bamboo can grow 75 feet in 45 to 60 days. Moso bamboo is the type of bamboo that is used to produce fabric. This is not the same kind of bamboo that pandas eat. Moso bamboo is grown on farms that cover several million acres in China, so no tropical forests are damaged to produce organic bamboo fabric. Organic bamboo fabric is made from the pulp of bamboo. The pulp is separated into very thin fibers that are then spun

into yards or directly woven into cloth, which is easily dyed and made into garments. Bamboo is commonly woven with cotton in order to make it cost effective to produce as well as to allow for more stability and color variations. In addition to its ability to keep moisture away from the skin, organic bamboo fabric can kill odor-causing bacteria. Most companies who sell clothes and linens made from bamboo fabric have found that this quality lasts for up to 50 washings. Bamboo fabric is often compared to cashmere because it has a soft and smooth hand. Clothing made from organic bamboo fabric tends to be warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer making it a versatile option that is easy on the pocketbook as well as the environment. It is our duty to protect our environment and there are many eco friendly clothing labels available today making it possible for us to do that while we shop. One particularly eco friendly clothing label carving it’s path in the fashion world is the fun, flirty and feminine collection of Brigid Catiis. Co-owned by partners Raissa and Damien, Brigid Catiis has been providing the masses with sustainable fashions made of recycled vintage fabrics cut into unique, chic styles. The collections provide the wearer with not only a beautiful garment but also a feeling of accomplishment for supporting our earth. Brigid Catiis was established in 2005 and is now represented by 5 store fronts in New York, Japan, Mississippi, Texas and California as well as the label’s website www.brigidcatiis.com. The website provides you with a wealth of information regarding past and present collections, the goals of the company as well as the progress the company is experiencing in congruency with those goals, and tips they have simply labeled green facts geared toward educating people on eco fashion. Included in the sites green facts: “By reusing fabric Brigid Catiis is helping to reduce the production of new textiles, preventing waste water from entering irrigation systems, carbon monoxide emissions are reduced by 107 million pounds, and 342,000 fewer pounds of pesticides are used to maintain cotton fields.” The educated fashionista prides him/herself in not only making a statement with their style but also continually fueling their knowledge bank. Making it a point to keep up to date on how you can look great and simultaneously help the environment… that could formidably be termed eco sass. The tools are within our reach – we have eco-friendly fabrics, clothing labels which support the cause and the voices, both in Hollywood and within ourselves, to spread the word and go green. Our choices in apparel not only express our style but also play a role in protecting our home, this miraculously giving and endlessly beautiful place we call earth. Spread the word, support eco fashion and save the world one bamboo thread at a time!

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Selected as a ‘standout festival worth planing for now’ by O, The Oprah Magazine, April 2008 issue

why should you be apart of fashion @ artscape? For the fifth consecutive year, Fashion @ Artscape returns, showcasing the cutting-edge talents of the region’s most innovative designers. The highlight of Artscape’s fashio block is the elevated 50’ ruway where approximately 10 fashion shows are featured per day. Bordering the runway is 30 of the top local and regional designers displaying, promoting and selling their works. Artscape is FREE and open to the public and is open Friday, July 17, noon - 10pm; Saturday, July 18, noon - 10pm; Sunday, July 19, noon - 8pm If you are a Fashion Designer or Boutique interested in participating in an Artscape Fashion Show simply LOG ONTO WWW.ARTSCAPE.ORG AND CLICK ON JOIN ARTSCAPE!


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amantha Cole London is an International award winning contemporary British Brand that draws influences from modern day trends without completely relying on it for direction and purpose of her collections. She’s a designer who has always had a passion and flair for fashion and was able to explore and develop this through working in the design room of Burberry, attending The London College of Fashion were she graduated with a degree and The Southampton Institute of Higher Education. The Typical SCL customer wears this label to make a statement and convey a characteristic of their personality through unspoken words. She challenges the definition of style and beauty and aims to make each garment an independant design capable of holding it’s own but still conveniently resides within the scope of the collection.

SCL’s philosophy is to interprete a trend, a thought, a mood by de-constructing the obvious signals projected and redefining the concept to produce silhouettes that acknowledge the past, have a sense of the future and recognises that their are no limits or boundaries to fashion just to ourselves...... SCL is currently focused on developing her womenswear brand that caters to image conscious, confident, independant discerning women who dare to be different, set-apart, unapologetic and enjoy a cosmopolitan lifestyle. www.samanthacolelondon.co.uk www.myspace.com/samanthacolelondon iconography the magazine

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Photographer: Joanna Briggs Stylist: Samantha Cole Model: Monika Vaskelyte MUA: Lauren Baker/Amie Ingram


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hances are, you have probably never heard of fashion designer William Tempest. No, he wasn’t on Bravo’s Project Runway, no, his clothing hasn’t been featured in a Vogue fashion spread and no, his clothing isn’t available in your local department store. But, the 22 year old fabric artificer has only produced two collections and has since become one of the most sought-after new designers in London. Tempest recently took part in this years Fashion Fringe program and had his show at London Fashion Week. He was selected for this by a panel including known fashion veterans as, Donatella Versace, Rouland Mouret and Lucinda Chambers, (Fashion Director Vogue UK). He garnered a lot of interest in the collection – celebrities such as Dita Von Teese, Emma Watson and Jade Parfait have all requested pieces to wear. The designer’s first collection was featured in The Sunday Times Style, ES magazine and on Vogue.com. With the buzz surrounding Tempest, it seems world wide-side recognition is just around the corner. William Tempest grew up intrigued by the arts and knew he wanted to do something creative at a very

words by tony engelhart

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young age. At first, he dabbled with thoughts of becoming an architect or interior designer. Fashion was another area of interest for the artistically inclined adolescent, “I’ve always been interested in different identities and used to really enjoy dressing up when I was younger” said Tempest. “I was fascinated with how garments were made and wanted to learn how to pattern cut and construct them.” William grew up in the rural country-side of Cheshire – not exactly a fashion Mecca. His trips into the more fashionable city of Manchester as a young lad would be the catalyst that would define his destiny, “I started to look in the department stores and designer shops. I used to enjoy it so much”, said Tempest. “I decided on a career in Fashion when I was 15, it was a natural progression, and I was always interested in art and making things.” At age sixteen, Tempest decided to leave high school and enrolled on a BTEC Diploma – a vocational qualifier in the UK – to study fashion

design and pattern making. At eighteen, he moved to London and enrolled in the London College of Fashion, but he already had a two-year head start in design, “I had already been studying fashion for two years since I was 16 so I found the first two years of university relatively easy,” said Tempest. “I think more than anything it was learning to be responsible for myself and to stand on my own two feet” While in college, Tempest worked under famed London fashion designer Giles Deacon, “I started as an intern but, after 10 weeks I was offered a position as a pattern cutter,” said Tempest. “I think the most valuable thing I learned is seeing how the business operates and the timing of how it fits together.” Tempest’s graduate collection was inspired by 1940’s film noir which made a bold statement at “Graduate Fashion Week”, “I was inspired by the drama and glamour of the story lines and the way some scenes are shot with such harsh lightning,” said Tempest. “My graduate collection is where I learned the most. Mostly learning that making a collection requires so many people to perform well and on time to enable you

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to reach your deadlines, its things like fabric suppliers, deliveries being made on time, sample machinists etc…” The collection was also selected to be shown at The Royal Academy of the Arts and received tons of media attention from the likes of vogue.com, Harpers Bazaar and the BBC London News. It was also shown on stage during the Bryan Ferry performance at the “Concert for Diana” at Wembley Stadium. Upon graduation, Tempest moved to Paris to work under Jean Charles de Castelbajac. While at Castelbajac he was given a project to design boxing robes and a sports outfit for Madonna which was used in a photo shoot to promote her latest album, “I was working none stop on the project and was constantly between London and Paris each day,” said Tempest. “The most important thing I learned from Jean Charles is to go with what you feel, regardless of anyone else’s opinion and don’t compromise on anything.” In January 2008, Tempest returned to London to create his own label. He is currently designing and producing his collection for S/S 09. The collection will be shown at ‘London Fashion Week’ this September,

“My initial inspiration was from the great age of travel and I visited Mauritius where I took photographs, some under water, to inspire prints and colors,” said Tempest. “There is a lot of art deco influence in the collection in terms of silhouette and style lines. Look for streamline, razor-sharp and beautifully cut evening-wear.” The clothing is said to be ready-to-wear with a couture edge. Currently, Tempest’s clothing is produced on a special order basis and the prices reflect the attention to detail which run upwards of $4000.00. The garments from his last collection are made to order and are sold through www.ninaandlola.com - a London based online store. William Tempest is well on his way to becoming a global success. His clothing is modern, fun and impeccably made. All I can say is watch this designer.

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A Fashion Week Dream words by aaron williams

As retold to you. this was written in my sleep.

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take one... W

hy would they have scheduled both in the same week?’ “You’re kidding me right? How in the hell are we going to do both?” Yes those were the questions I asked when we learned that we were invited to cover Mercedes Benz fashion week and Couture fashion week ALL IN THE SAME WEEK!!! I already work on about 3hrs of sleep a day. Oh what the hell, I am pretty sure that the fun will outweigh the lack of sleep. With the hotel booked, the travel arrangements made, I had to get it done at any cost. I will sleep on the trip up and on the trip back. “That’s it!” Better yet I just sleep when I am dead how about that. What are a few more days of snapping pictures of famous people, eating with super models (yes contrary to what one believes models do eat), getting caught up in backstage mayhem, rubbing elbows with celebrated fashion designers; chatting as if we knew each other for years, attending after parties, getting the VIP treatment while sucking down all of the free cocktails I can before Eddie my limo driver comes to pick me up at 3 am only to take me past Mickey D’s for a late night bite to eat before I get to my hotel room. Yes that is a run on sentence but I had to get that in all in one breath.

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n between my travels I talked to my partner about how great the Kati Stern Venexiana fashion show was. I remember vividly the conversation that I had with her (Kati). “It’s crazy how I spend 6 months out of the year preparing for this one day. This 15 minutes take months for me to plan. It is a roller coaster, all the commotion, all the bouncing off of the walls. I spend many days making sure that everything is just right. I would not trade this for anything in the world. This to me is so exciting!” I can remember her smile and the excitement in Kati’s voice as she smiled. She reminded me of a little kid on Christmas morning.

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designer kati stern

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conversed more with my cohort about how nice the Tuleh show was going to be on Sunday. I could only mention how the New York Design Center was such a great location for a fashion showcase. It was going to be refreshing to see something not the norm, something different than your typical runway event. We chatted about the opportunity to see yet another super model, her favorite model, Sessilee Lopez walk the runway. Ahhh! The life of a fashionista… wouldn’t trade it for anything in the world.

“BEEP! BEEP! BEEP!” My alarm clock goes off “DAMMIT!” as I quickly hit the snooze button.

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take three

10 am I jet to the far side of Manhattan to do it all over again at the Waldorf Astoria for Couture Fashion week. In my travels I am trying to figure out how I was going to fit in Soucha Couture, Jorge Diep, Vocce Couture, and Andres Aquino and make it back across town to Bryant Park to catch the Barbie 50th anniversary fashion show and still fit a decent meal in between. Looks like another Red Bull and McDonalds day. Sounds impossible but I made it work. As the day wore on, after countless hours of shooting runway shows my trigger finger finally told me it was time to call it quits. My camera bag at this moment feels as if I am carrying a $100 sack of quarters. I could only think of getting back to my hotel room and plopping my head on a pillow and resting up for yet another day of the same. Ahhh! The life of a fashionista… wouldn’t trade it for anything in the world. “BEEP! BEEP! BEEP!” My alarm clock goes off “DAMMIT!” as I quickly hit the snooze button. I slowly awaken wondering exactly where I am, and then it hits me… I am home in my bed and that’s when I realized that it was all a dream. Please don’t be confused I wrote this in my sleep. to see more from fashion week Fall 2009 log on to

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THE HOUSE OF YESLAM THE DEMANDS OF TODAY’S WORLD

ATCH this... 56

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“In history, man has always been fascinated with two virtually unreachable concepts, time and free flight. The watch and an airplane are as close as we can get to either.”

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eslam, The Man, The Brand, artist, designer and businessman, Yeslam, is from a traditional oriental culture, in which fragrances have always occupied an important place since his childhood in Saudi Arabia and his student years in the Lebanon. It was, in fact, during these early years that he promised himself he would one day create perfumes and other luxury merchandise in honour of the influences of his formative years. The art of discreet hedonism His long exposure to the cultures of the Middle East gave Yeslam a philosophical and aesthetic instinct. Then, having developed an ongoing appreciation of Occidental science and technology from an early age, this unusual artist successfully wanted to unite the ageold refinement of the Orient with modern European stateof-the-art expertise. Yeslam started by launching his first fragrances «Yeslam» For Him and For Her in 2005. This early success was swiftly followed by the opening of five «Yeslam» brand boutiques stocked with the finest leather goods, luxurious accessories such as sunglasses, cufflinks, silk scarves and other precious items that are hard to resist for the cognoscenti who appreciates the very best and understand the value of true luxury. The finest and most singular materials are used in the creation of all of the hand-crafted Yeslam branded products including leather goods, fragrances and accessories, which convey that instant feel and appearance of a product of the very highest quality. The same fundamental desire to achieve the highest standards and attention to detail are applied to all of Yeslam’s luxurious merchandise. In order to enhance this high-end universe of excellence, Yeslam has inaugurated his own workshop dedicated to its luxury watchmaking, where two experts watchmakers work in accordance with the purest watchmaking traditions. With this new collection of «Haute Horlogerie» timekeepers, Yeslam clearly demonstrates the perfect fusion of Oriental styling with the great traditions of the Geneva watch masters.


Enter the world of «Yeslam»... At the «Yeslam» stores in Geneva, Riyadh, Jeddah, Dammam and Mekkah and other fine stores. Swiss Watchmaking Workshop In order to create exclusive timekeeping instruments, the pre-eminence of which meet the demands of its prestigious clientele, Yeslam inaugurated a workshop dedicated to luxury watch making in the summer of 2006. Located in the heart of Geneva, it houses a team of expert watchmakers who apply the same traditional and rigorous standards of excellence as those which made Geneva world-famous for fine, innovative and precise timepieces. Thus, every exceptional watch, including those with multiple complications signed by Yeslam® is subject to the greatest attention, each of its components being meticulously worked and decorated before it is finally assembled. With this new workshop, Yeslam has written the first pages of a long history that will assuredly be illustrated by many masterpieces of ingenuity and creativity: the 2007 collection is composed of Flying Tourbillon, Moon phase, Réveil Dual time, exceptional pieces engraved with arabescs or set with full size diamonds… It comes to no surprise that the worlds of aviation and watch-making has common synergy. The exchange of discoveries and skills being profitable to both worlds. So the watchmakers benefited from aerospace researches which allowed them to appropriate materials such as titanium, carbon fibers and ceramics. On the other hand, watchmaking proposes for more than half a century watches, certainly intended for the airmen, but who are very often only the fruit of an adaptation in terms of legibility or handiness. If The Aviator is the first watch to supply an indication specifically useful for the piloting of aircrafts, it is certainly note a fate. Her inventor indeed adds up more than 3500 hours of flight time on various types of aircraft. Thanks to his experience and his watchmaking craft, he saw that a gap exists of what is on offer in the watch-making industry. And so was born the idea to create “The Aviator”, first watch able to calculate the true airspeed of an airplane. Naturally today’s airplanes are all equipped with intergrated flight computer which calculates exactly the true airspeed of an airplane. However, the electronic breakdowns of the instrumentation do not constitute an extremely rare phenomenon. Furthermore, it can also be useful to anticipate - even before being on board a scheduled flight. Here were two of the main reasons that drove to the development of a mechanism of bidirectional rotating bezels allowing to perform in an instant this calculation. For that purpose, it was necessary to create a complex graduation, this one not being linear. The result is an international patent.

The AVIATOR

a watch that will give True airspeed for any combination of flight level (altitude) and Indicated airspeed*²)

Most of the existing rotating bezels are invented for divers, hence their rotation is unidirectional and rotate 360°. For The Aviator, it was necessary to imagine a new construction iconography the magazine

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whereby the bezel of The Aviator align themselves exactly in front of the graduations. The rotation is bi-directional and has an angular limit to its movement. The set can be disassembled entirely to guarantee an irreproachable maintenance. The sobriety of the aspect of The Aviator hides the big complexity of its case. Aerospace industry materials such as titanium and ceramic were used. As usual at Yeslam, dials are produced in a single block in the heart of the workshop of the brand according to a unique and exclusive process. In the gold and titanium versions, the dial is an openwork letting appear disks and cogs of the mechanism of big date. The motive evoks the fans of a reactor and is decorated with “côtes de Genève” in helixes by the technicians of the brand for this model. The luxurious colour anthracite of these is obtained by treatment with electrolysis in black rhodium made possible by the recent opening of a workshop of galvanoplasty. The construction staged bezel, dial and movement give to The Aviator the balanced perspectives evoking the volume and the depth of the engines of jets. Available in steel with vulcanized rubber “surmoulage”of the bezel or in titanium with pink or white gold 750, The Aviator is adorned with a thick bracelet drilled in calf closed by a folding clasp. According to the versions, The Aviator contains a mechanical automatic movement indicating the date, the day, the month and moon phases or the date as well as a second time zone “indispensable” to the travellers many of whom are pilots. Conceived to be a supplementary instrument for the use of the aeronautic professionals, The Aviator is not less than an invitation to the dream. As the one to fly over the miracles of this world for example hides the big complexity of its case. Aerospace industry materials such as titanium andceramic were used. As usual at Yeslam, dials are produced in a single block in the heart of the workshop of the brand according to a unique and exclusive process. In the gold and titanium versions, the dial is an openwork letting appear disks and cogs of the mechanism of big date. The motive evoks the fans of a reactor and is decorated with “côtes de Genève” in helixes by the technicians of the brand for this model. The luxurious colour anthracite of these is obtained by treatment with electrolysis in black rhodium made possible by the recent opening of a workshop of galvanoplasty. The construction staged bezel, dial and movement give to The Aviator the balanced perspectives evoking the volume and the depth of the engines of jets. Available in steel with vulcanized rubber “surmoulage”of the bezel or in titanium with pink or white gold 750, The Aviator is adorned with a thick bracelet drilled in calf closed by a folding clasp. According to the versions, The Aviator contains a mechanical automatic movement indicating the date, the day, the month and moon phases or the date as well as a second time zone “indispensable” to the travellers many of whom are pilots. Conceived to be a supplementary instrument for the use of the aeronautic professionals, The Aviator is not less than an invitation to the dream. As the one to fly over the miracles of this world for example.

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retro redux retro redux

designer : lady clothing by jessica townsend hair : kahlil oliver make up : bethany townes models : nicole - tanesha photography : aaron williams c/o awcreative group

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Plaid skirt and double collar shirt---a sporty plaid pencil skirt with a double collar polo shirt accented with a ascot and red pockets with white stitching

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Yellow/black--- Extended collar with an illusion of buttons accenting the piece... with the classic armpatches, classy pencil skirt and the sophistication of a black and white check ascot..

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Yellow and Brown - mix of the old metro yellow and brown extended collar shirt ,with large yellow buttons and straps on the sleeves and collar of shirt and pleat in back, with a feminine pencil skirt accented with matching yellow straps on back pockets and a yellow and white check ascot iconography the magazine

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Black and white skirt---a reverse blend of a white and black..... extended black collar shirt with white stitching and armpacthes, with white cuffs and cubic stud cuff links, with a white with black stich a-line skirt with a black skiirt patch in the middle accented with a black and white poc-a-dot ascot 66

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Word Jacket and jean skirt - a 80�s baby piece with words of inspiration written by Poet AliMari, embroider on back of jacket, with tube lines around the jacket for a sporty feel, with a pencil black jean skirt detailed with LADY signature accented with the throwback leg warmers iconography the magazine

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F

ashion is not just about dressing to impress, its dressing smart and having savvy to know which designers and garments best accentuate your body type. Women are often faced with the decision to trim the extra weight off their prim figures, but sufficing to these measures doesn’t mean it’s worth doing so. For women, knowing these four categorical shapes that define your silhouettes are key to developing a mere, fashionable figure. The Hourglass is a definitive shape that most women long to have – curvaceous figure with big bust, small waits and wide hips. Such women should wear fitting clothes, pencil cut skirts and v-neck tops. Shy away from loose-fitted clothing and tops that conceal your shape, it will make you look older and plump.

words by: brittany johnson

The Apple shape is for women who are top heavy but have small hips and thighs. The assets that most women with apple shapes should enhance are their calves, ankles and their cleavage. One mistake that most women make are layering levels of clothing, and wearing pants with buttons to the front-instead try wearing jeans with zippers

Dress

Responsibly words by brittany johnson

or buttons to the side to draw attention away from the tummy. Opt for solid colors and A-line dresses. Most women who belong to this category have slimmer legs and can wear knee-length skirts and formal tops. Choose a nice fabric with a nice fall that doesn’t hug the body. Rectangle shapes are women who have an athletic figure and have an equally distributed weight throughout their body with lesser curves. Recommended designs to enhance this figure, is wearing dresses and patterns, which adds dimensions to the body. Wearing blouses with ruffles and extreme designs helps to break the straight line of the shape. Pear shapes are women who are bottom-heavy with plump thighs and petite breasts. Wearing bareback dresses, flowy-skirts with high heel boots helps to hide the busty thighs and draws attention away from areas that are not as flattering. Also, wearing boot-cut pants with longer tops moves the eye toward the upper area of the body. 72

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Petite shapes are women who are short and have small frames. Women in this category need clothes that will fit well, use of vertical lines will elongate the body and embellish the necklines with U or V-shaped tops. It’s recommended that women wear lighter fabrics and avoid wearing short skirts. Since shot skirts are best used for women with longer legs, try using knee-length skirts. Whichever shape best describes your figure, take light in knowing the simple add-ons that can highlight your fashion sense and silhouette, whether its accessories or the readjustment with the height of your pants or length of skirts. Details are important and make a significant affect to elongating your figure and drawing attention to the better areas of your figure. In any fashion you only need to balance the proportions by selecting clothes that blend with your personality and figure.


designer tracey reese

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t o n i m at i c e v s k i . c o m 212.941.7057


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s

pring ummer ensations

Navy worsted cashmere 2-button blazer Paul Stuart, $1,884.

leather pointed moccasins www.bihigginsshoes.com

Y

es, thank goodness it is time for the fun filled days of spring and summer! After the extremely cold winter we have had lets look for those sultry, slick sensations of spring and summer clothing. Gentleman you must have these items in your wardrobe. We will discuss the casual and business wardrobe. In your casual wardrobe one should have the following: v-neck sweaters, cardigan sweaters, vibrant polo shirts, chinos, and a pair of white nubuc saddle shoes or a pair of leather moccasins. For your business attire it is necessary to have a navy blue blazer, poplin suit, tan suit and a prince of wails plaid suit with a pair of monk strap shoes.

J. Crew’s Millbrook Leather Driving Moccasins ($118)

The V-neck sweater is a great accent to your wardrobe when wearing a vibrant striped polo shirt underneath. Keep in mind if you did not choose to do the polo shirt, one could just wear a v-neck t-shirt. The cardigan sweater has made a comeback for the spring. Yet it is a preppy look you will pull it off with a crisp white button down shirt and a pair of chinos. Please make sure that the chinos are cropped or rolled up. You can wear the saddle shoes or the moccasins.

Hickey Freeman Solid Tan Suit $1,195 hickeyfreeman.com

For the gentleman that has to wear the business attire, the navy blazer has made its comeback. Please keep in mind that you can wear the blazer to the office as well or you can wear it while you are in your casual attire. During those chilly spring nights you can wear the navy blazer overtop the v-neck sweater along with the polo shirt while wearing the chinos. It is wise to purchase a poplin suit for the spring and summer months. The poplin suit is a great piece because it breaths against your skin extremely well. Also, you can wear this suit to the office and when the whistle blows you can dress the suit down to go to your happy hour with your co-workers and friends. A tan suit made of gabardine will be a good choice for the season. The tan suit with a pastel color shirt with a nice tie that stands out will definitely set you apart from your peers. To be totally of the wall the prince of wails plaid suit will be a good piece to purchase. Please keep in mind that when wearing this suit one can make this a conservative or a bold look depending on what shirt and tie combination you choose. The shoe that would best fit would be a black cap toe.

Men’s White/Brown Saddle Shoe $125 robertsshoestore.com

Your wardrobe speaks volumes about who you are and who you want to be viewed as in your day to day life. Feel free to express yourself within reason and the items listed above are a great start to enhancing your spring, summer sensation attire! For any questions or for a consultation please feel free to contact me using the information listed below: Phil Houston Professional Clothier Phillip765@hotmail.com 443-846-4474 V-neck Argyle Sweater ($98) Banana Republic

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Men’s Saddle Shoes White/Black $125 robertsshoestore.com


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Keeping a Cool Head: words by: Meagan Burbidge

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lassic film is quite often the first thing that springs to mind when I am addressed with the concept of “black and white”. Perhaps it is because many of the things that I have a strong affinity for were introduced to me through it: the drama, the architecture, the fashions; all from an era (Wartime, Big Band/Swing) that manages to conceptualize “classic” in the truest sense of the word. Perhaps it is the current social climate that calls for review in such high contrast, leading me towards a focus on a time and a place rather than a runway or boutique. 2008 had its fair share of gray areas: historical presidential elections and crashing economies, everyone waited for cut and dry answers as the information avenues left us in desperate anticipation. Trying times merit the minds desire to work in fantasy; to picture life as it once was or how it could be or in no way as it is out in the real world at that moment. Perhaps I interpret it in this way because as Technicolor took hold, filmmakers worked with what they knew; revamping the standard with harsher, dramatic angles and lighting, providing a series of etchings in memory and making them like new again (in true Fashion form). Screenwriter Daniel Fuchs wrote of the B&W film era: “An excitement filled the theater, a thralldom. 88

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People forgot they were sitting on the seats; they forgot themselves, their bodies. They lived only for the film.” I recently came across a piece about the reaction this generation has to the novelty of black and white classic films. Evidentially, other than cultural negligence, biology is responsible for part of the adversity to it. The human eye has approximately 3 million rods determining black, white and gray on a consistent basis, leaving a rough 120 million cones in strong pursuit of colorinfused stimuli. Perhaps this is some excuse for what I would consider to be the visual assaults by the brightly colored legging paired flannel epidemic. The increasing popularity of American Apparel and its slew of M&Minspired leisurewear have come into full effect, and, as a society, we will be dealing with that. However, as the atmospheric quality of any non-descript location tended to feel more like a lumberjack slumber party rather than what it should have been (Starbucks parking lot, Bendel’s, courts of law, church), it’s no wonder (and a bit of a relief) to see black and white print dresses coming down the runway in anticipation of the coming season. Regardless, I began to visualize what life would be like if everything weren’t so casual. Women and men


in suits Monday through Friday, glitz in the evening, gloves, handbags, heels; all the standard then is too much even for a wedding now. I began searching for a fashion-focus that not only knew who Audrey Hepburn was, but celebrated her on a regular basis. It isn’t that people shouldn’t feel like themselves and dress accordingly, or, as though they have to impress the people around them, however, it is my contention that one who respects

oneself maintains presentability. How self-respecting can you be in a mangopink one piece aerobics suit with a gold belt and tweed vest, I ask you? I myself am immediately drawn to shirtdresses or pencil skirts and blouses with belts, and simplistic romantic up-dos with buckled heels and short gloves; all the makings of a “Roman Holiday” cafe or “Sabrina” train station platform. However, I still maintain that I live on a realistic plane (somehow) and will settle for baby steps. One of the many things that define the fashions of the 1940s is the presence of the hat. Surely, they were there before but perhaps not on such a grand and elegant scale. The hat encapsulates the quality of the day: when it was consider one of the

most fatal faux-pas to even consider attending a light lunch without so much as a dramatic feather fastened to your pin curls. If only the hat could be implemented back into the world as it once was, purely for form and rarely (if never) for function, then maybe, just maybe I could be satisfied with the way of things. Marc Jacobs, as expected, continued to save the (my) day. Never ceasing to amaze me, (even managing to

Joanna Mastroianni and Nicole Miller broadened the spectrum with fitted caps and turbans, in respectable Joan Crawford fashion.

make me tolerate flannel) he sent his models down the runway in his spring collection, each adorned in a casual, rimmed hat ranging from straw and simple to sparkling and vibrant. Anna Sui contributed to my cause: filling her collection with a variety spanning the genres of time and space, including cowboy chic, swing and the Renaissance. Y3 offered up some simple delivery-boy style caps and visors (at least they are contributing), and Ports 1961 outdid itself with an entire line in the spirit of the classic headwear; displaying distinct and artful pieces with art-deco line and shape, alongside more delicate and sweeter styles of cream-colored berets to accompany (or lead) any ensemble for a variety of occasions. Other pieces by designers such as

that which followed a situation similar to that we live in now. We can look in reverse to a time of prosperity and order: when the men held the doors open and the women wore white gloves; when you may not have been employed, but that was no reason to curse or spit or wear your circumstances out the door. The state of things may make your hair stand on end, but will be so well accessorized that one cannot help but hope that the current grave and doleful shadows will be outweighed by the bright and auspicious highlights of the bigger picture.

I believe that now more than ever is a time for retrospective. Times are rough and people are rougher: of course the world could not be fixed with a run of hats out to brunch or on the way to the supermarket. However, the era that I am so infatuated with is

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Make up and Hair: Jasmine Ibrahim

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issue

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showers flowers &dreams

spring

april may

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Issue 2 - The Black & White Issue

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