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ICG MAGAZINE

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CRAZY EX-GIRLFRIEND MANIAC / BARRY



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46 BARRY

HBO’s new series, shot by Paula Huidobro, stretches the boundaries of episodic comedy.

CRAZY EX-GIRLFRIEND

Two-time ECA honoree Todd A. Dos Reis, ASC, taps his music-video roots for the ambitious musical comedy/drama series.

DEPARTMENTS GEAR GUIDE / 14 DEEP FOCUS / 22 FIRST LOOK / 26 EXPOSURE / 30 PRODUCTION CREDITS / 94 STOP MOTION / 106

SPECIALS AUTO PILOT / 68

Shooting a pilot is anything but automatic, as this group of TV DP’s reveals.

INNOVATE, INITIATE, INVIGORATE / 74

The ECA Class of 2018 is a passionate bunch of filmmakers (and film lovers).

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58 MANIAC

Emmy-winner Cary Fukunaga’s new series, Maniac, shot by Darren Lew, is mind-bending entertainment.


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P R E S I D E N T ’ S L E T T E R

THOSE WHO WAIT… Learning the virtue of patience is not an easy thing. But patience can often bring life’s most desired rewards. More than 20 years ago, a small group of filmmakers, myself included, began talking about the transition from film to digital cinematography; we expressed great concern that the display of our work would not be accurately represented, particularly on television, which we knew was the way most people would see our films. This group included Rob Hummel, ASC, who began his career at Technicolor and later worked with Douglas Trumbull when Showscan was being developed, and then many other studios over the years. One of the most important ideas that originated within our group was that there was enough room in digital recording to include what we called “a header descriptor” and what today would be described as “metadata,” that could adjust the TV for a nominally better signal than what is normally watched at home. Why was a self-adjusting television so important? Well, I can remember going to my parents’ house in Chicago and always wondering why they sat there and watched purple TV! Usually after 15 minutes of trying to adjust the TV and my father yelling, “Stop! I just want to watch the baseball game,” I would realize there were only so many houses we as filmmakers could go to and adjust television displays. By way of some context: there’s a week each winter called the Hollywood Professional Association’s (HPA) Technology Retreat, where some of the deepest tech-heads in the industry go to the desert to talk about such obtuse subjects as parametric appearance compensation, blockchain technology, and black-level visibility as a function of ambient illumination. (No joke!) The ICG started attending this event eight years ago, and when we showed up for the first time, people asked, “Why are you cinematographers here?” Then, after a number of years of contributing to the retreat, we were asked to make our own technological presentations. This past February, we put together a panel that included Rob Hummel, Kelly Mendelsohn, Bill Mandel, Michael Chambliss, and myself. The objective was to discuss the same ideas Rob and I had tried to advance 20 years ago: delivered content should control the TV display so that the best representation of the filmmaker’s work can be seen. Nowadays, of course, we have smart TV’s, the

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Internet and ways of passing signals to and from our houses to absolutely make it possible to have such controls implemented. But it’s important to note that in the historical development of smart TV’s, engineers sought to provide what they thought was an image enhancement, better known as “motion interpolation.” This development solved visual problems, like judder, and made sports and reality shows look better (at least to the engineers), but, unfortunately, made narrative shows look like telenovelas, removing the ability for an audience to suspend disbelief. When you read a book or hear a story on a podcast (or even on the radio!), your mind fills in the image, and broadcast images, at least in narrative storytelling, need to do the same thing for audiences to buy in to the experience. Of course, motion interpolation can be turned off manually in many TV’s. But whose parents are going to go deep into the menu settings to do something they don’t even know about? Which brings me to Netflix, a streaming platform whose roots in leading-edge technology have helped to foster an internal culture that seeks to preserve artistic intent. Netflix, in all its infinite wisdom, has finally made good on the ideas our group first advanced decades ago. They call it “Calibrated Mode,” a new feature developed by Sony picture quality and device experts in collaboration with Netflix color scientists and available on Sony’s new BRAVIA Master Series A9F OLED and Z9F LED displays. Michael Keegan, manager, partnership outreach at Netflix says “it’s a static set of display tuning values that gets the displays to look exactly like they do in post,” i.e., as the filmmakers intended, with precise colors, accurate dynamic contrast, proper aspect ratio, and no motion interpolation. And this technology from Netflix and Sony is just the beginning. Given the ferocious competition in consumer electronics, we will no doubt be seeing similar technology built into smart displays from Samsung, LG, Vizio, etc. We’ll also see the suppliers of screen video, and perhaps even the broadcast suppliers, adopt the same controls on their content as well. This new momentum will finally enhance the work that our Local 600 camera teams do on set, as well as those IATSE members in the postproduction community, ensuring that creative intent is paramount all the way through the content supply chain. Or as I told Rob Hummel at the HPA panel this past winter, “Our patience has finally been rewarded, my friend.” Good things can come to those who wait.

Steven Poster, ASC National President International Cinematographers Guild IATSE Local 600


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September 2018 vol. 89 no. 07

Publisher Teresa Muñoz Executive Editor David Geffner Art Director Wes Driver EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Tyler Bourdeau STAFF WRITER Pauline Rogers ACCOUNTING Glenn Berger Dominique Ibarra COPY EDITORS Peter Bonilla Maureen Kingsley CONTRIBUTORS David Geffner Margot Lester Kevin Martin Michele K. Short

INTERNATIONAL CINEMATOGRAPHERS GUILD Local 600 IATSE NATIONAL PRESIDENT Steven Poster, ASC NATIONAL VICE-PRESIDENT Heather Norton 1ST NATIONAL VICE-PRESIDENT Paul Varrieur 2ND NATIONAL VICE-PRESIDENT John Lindley, ASC NATIONAL SECRETARY-TREASURER Eddie Avila NATIONAL ASSISTANT SECRETARY-TREASURER Douglas C. Hart NATIONAL SERGEANT-AT-ARMS Christy Fiers NATIONAL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Rebecca Rhine

PUBLICATIONS & PUBLICITY COMMITTEE Henri Bollinger, Chair

CIRCULATION OFFICE 7755 Sunset Boulevard Hollywood, CA 90046 Tel: (323) 876-0160 Fax: (323) 878-1180 Email: circulation@icgmagazine.com

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ADVERTISING POLICY: Readers should not assume that any products or services advertised in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine are endorsed by the International Cinematographers Guild. Although the Editorial staff adheres to standard industry practices in requiring advertisers to be “truthful and forthright,” there has been no extensive screening process by either International Cinematographers Guild Magazine or the International Cinematographers Guild. EDITORIAL POLICY: The International Cinematographers Guild neither implicitly nor explicitly endorses opinions or political statements expressed in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. ICG Magazine considers unsolicited material via email only, provided all submissions are within current Contributor Guideline standards. All published material is subject to editing for length, style and content, with inclusion at the discretion of the Executive Editor and Art Director. Local 600, International Cinematographers Guild, retains all ancillary and expressed rights of content and photos published in ICG Magazine and icgmagazine.com, subject to any negotiated prior arrangement. ICG Magazine regrets that it cannot publish letters to the editor. ICG (ISSN 1527-6007) Published Monthly by The International Cinematographers Guild 7755 Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, CA, 90046, U.S.A. Periodical postage paid at Los Angeles, California. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ICG 7755 Sunset Boulevard Hollywood, California 90046 Copyright 2018, by Local 600, International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employes, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States and Canada. Entered as Periodical matter, September 30, 1930, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under the act of March 3, 1879. Subscriptions: $92.00 of each International Cinematographers Guild member’s annual dues is allocated for an annual subscription to International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. Non-members may purchase an annual subscription for $48.00 (U.S.), $82.00 (Foreign and Canada) surface mail and $117.00 air mail per year. Single Copy: $4.95 The International Cinematographers Guild Magazine has been published monthly since 1929. International Cinematographers Guild Magazine is a registered trademark.

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oviemaking has changed a lot since I was in film school. Although video editing was overtaking flatbeds, low-cost, full-frame digital cameras as small as your hand and on-set tools like color management and iPad-controlled lighting were decades away. Film was the capture medium, and even with begging, borrowing (or stealing) stock from Kodak (or Fuji), there was no clear end in sight if your ambitions were ever rising. In comparison, today’s young filmmakers have a rainbow of options, with gear, viewing platforms, and knowledge-base access more plentiful than my generation ever imagined. But the downside to all that easy luxury is a tendency to encourage a shortcut mentality toward learning craft. I say this because the cinematographer highlighted in our September TV-themed issue, Todd A. Dos Reis, ASC, came up through the ranks; his years of dedicated service with more experienced mentors ultimately served him well when opportunity met preparation, i.e., a break came his way. Dos Reis graduated from USC Film School back in the late 80’s, when, as an African-American cinematographer, few doors were open other than shooting low-end music videos (mostly with other young black filmmakers as his crew). “I became king of the $80,000-and-below music video for bands no one ever heard of,” he told me in this month’s cover story on Crazy ExGirlfriend (page 36). “I was a loader, a camera assistant for Russell Carpenter [ASC], a focus puller, and an operator for many years before moving up to DP on Entourage, where we had, literally, dozens of locations every episode that you’d walk into with 30 minutes to light – zero prep.” All of which created an ideal template for Dos Reis to thrive on one of TV’s most unique and creatively demanding series. Crazy Ex-Girlfriend showrunners Rachel Bloom and Aline Brosh McKenna shoot two to three music videos every episode, some on stage, some on location, like a Mojave Desert lakebed in July. And yet working with IA crewmembers like 1st AC Eric Dyson, Gaffer Mazi Mitchell, and A-camera Operator/DP Ian Dodd, most of whom Dos Reis met during his halcyon music video days, this up-through-the-ranks DP has more than met the challenge.

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Did I also mention that Dos Reis is a twotime Emerging Cinematographer Awards winner, back when the ECA’s were humbly dubbed the “ICG Film Showcase”? No doubt so many dues paid sculpted a terrific role model for this year’s crop of ECA honorees (page 72), but there’s more. Not only did Dos Reis go on to carve out a superb career in television (next up is a TV series from Moonlight Oscar winner Tarell McCraney; Dodd will shoot CXG’s fourth and final season); but he’s also made the effort to hire diverse crews. Dyson, Mitchell, and B-camera 2nd AC Eric Wheeler are all African-American, and his female 2nd AC, Megan Morris, has been running CXG’s camera department. In fact, Dos Reis, along with other ICG cinematographers also featured in this issue – First Look’s Zoë White (page 26) who alternated on Season Two of the Emmy-winning Hulu series The Handmaid’s Tale, Paula Huidobro, who shot the first season of HBO’s hit comedy Barry (page 46), and Darren Lew, who met Emmy-winning showrunner Cary Fukunaga (Exposure, page 30) years ago at Sundance, and is now shooting Maniac (page 56) – not only represent the best in television, they’re standard-bearers for this union. Passion, dedication, creativity, and professionalism, in the face of many challenges, social and otherwise, have underscored the careers of all those ntoted above. Crazy Ex-Girlfriend co-creator Rachel Bloom said it best in my article in describing why she loves working with Dos Reis: “There’s this joy in Todd when he’s being creative, and challenged in the moment. It’s just really fun to see.” It is fun, but it’s also essential to sustaining a career in this industry. Back in film school, Dos Reis didn’t have micro-sized 4K digital cameras, LED lights that can tape onto the wall, or apps that calculate the movement of the sun for an entire shooting day, so the path was more … traditional – apprentice, shoot anything you can, and treat every job as a learning opportunity. Apparently, it worked.

CONTRIBUTORS

Margot Carmichael Lester (Innovate, Initiate, Invigorate)

“It’s fascinating to identify through lines across different DPs’ experiences, and even more interesting to see how their specific interests inform their work. It’s why I love creating the ECA winner profiles each year – they give us a quick glimpse into how these talented creators make movies.”

Michele K. Short

(Eight Miles High, Stop Motion) “I thrive when working on projects of epic visual scope, and Maniac is a highlight. Shooting on set was the equivalent of being a kid in a different candy store every day for months. Filming at many practical locations in New York City, Long Island and the Hudson Valley also greatly appealed to my sense of adventure.”

CORRECTION The photo on Page 20 (ZOOM-IN Jacqueline Stahl) in last month's August issue was taken by Lisa Rose.

ICG MAGAZINE

the

tv

issue

featuring

CRAZY EX-GIRLFRIEND MANIAC / BARRY

David Geffner

Executive Editor

Twitter: @DGeffner Email: david@icgmagazine.com

cover photo: Scott Everett White


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EMMY NOMINATIONS ®

INCLUDING

OUTSTANDING DRAMA SERIES CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR A SINGLE-CAMERA SERIES (ONE HOUR)

TIM IVES


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In episodic filmmaking, the one thing you never have is time. Even as budgets have grown and productions have become more ambitious with big sets and large crews, you’re still under pressure to work very fast. On House of Cards, you’re making an hour-long episode in 10 days, consistently shooting six pages every day. On a show with more stunts, like Daredevil, you may have a two-page day of fight choreography and then a 10-page day of dialogue to make up for it. The hierarchy of creative decision-making in episodic is different from that of features; directors answer to showrunners, writers, and networks, and need to create inside of the framework of an established series. As a DP, you need to provide continuity in the look of the show, but I also think it’s my responsibility to embrace the energy and fresh ideas of new directors, to take the series further and to explore new territory. Pilots are creative but can also be heartbreaking. There is so much work that goes into setting up a new show, and when it’s not picked up, not even that first episode gets seen. Amazon streams its pilots to let the audience decide, so at least they don’t just disappear. On the other hand, with a direct pick-up of a whole season, like on Netflix, you have a chance to finish the complete vision without worrying about selling it all in the first episode. Some producers think they’re saving money and “putting it all on the screen” by hiring one DP to shoot all episodes (rather than hiring alternating DP’s). Seriously, we don’t cost that much money, and if you’re interested in putting money on the screen, you’re better off having a DP with enough time to come in well prepared instead of just flying by the seat of their pants.

MARTIN AHLGREN photo courtesy of Martin Ahlgren

On Altered Carbon, we did two-episode blocks as alternating cinematographers. When one block was ending, a new director would take over the main unit with the other cinematographer, while the outgoing director and DP would continue with the standing tandem crew to finish the block. This made it possible for us to finish our own episodes, while also allowing time in between blocks to prep with the next director. Some old-school television directors will tell you we need to get more coverage because “they” will want options. No, not necessarily. “They” like a strong point of view, and you can be bold. On House of Cards, we would look at a scene and try to figure out (cont'd on page 24)

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EMMY NOMINATIONS ®

INCLUDING

OUTSTANDING TELEVISION MOVIE OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE

Stephan Pehrsson

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the most efficient way of telling the story and communicate the point of view, without creating unnecessary coverage just for the sake of it. On Daredevil it was possible to think up and execute extended long takes, with no coverage outside of the “oner.” The old thinking that television needs to be brightly lit talking heads no longer holds true. Stories can be told visually with moody lighting and wider shots. And that rule that every actor with a line of dialogue needs a close-up? I have worked with directors who, for the close-up, will roll camera late and only for a few specific sentences, to make sure that there won’t be the option of editing together the scene only with tight shots, as sometimes happens in conventional television. You need tandem units, second units, third units, and a crew shooting plates for visual effects. With bigger ambitions but still tight

schedules, more things need to be shot simultaneously. The main unit starts fight sequences with the principal actors, and they’re finished the following day on the same set by second unit and stunt doubles. On Altered Carbon, a fully staffed and equipped tandem unit ran about 50 percent of the time, and we had to bring in additional crew for second-unit cleanups. Toward the end of the season, we were running four units on a few days to get it all done in time. Sometimes it’s better to spend more money up front to get it incamera instead of relying on post. For Altered Carbon, we were creating a world that was 350 years in the future and that required some extensive visual-effects work. However, because we were making 10 hours of finished film, it actually made sense to spend more to build complete sets that worked 360 degrees, and that way keep the visualeffects shot count down. We only shot on green screen a handful of times the entire season. (Flying cars, hello!)

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ZOË WHITE by Pauline Rogers / photo courtesy of Zoë White

It was her grandfather’s Pentax 35mm with a fixed 50mm lens that got Sydney, Australiaborn and -raised Zoë White, ACS, interested in movies. She says still photography taught her how to find the frame “and to be in control of what you show and what you leave out.” White was also fascinated with marrying her love for music – she played violin and viola and went to a conservatory high school and toured with youth orchestras – to images. When it came to a career, filmmaking won out. “My first job in the industry was as assistant to Newton Thomas Sigel [ASC], while he was shooting Superman Returns in Sydney,

Australia,” she explains. “I got to be a fly on the wall and observe the mechanics of that large-scale production, watching the way Tom maintained his own creative voice.” While at film school, White attended the Budapest Cinematography Masterclass with Vilmos Zsigmond, ASC, and Laszlo Kovacs, ASC. “I think my experiences with these mentors allowed me to demystify the idea of who a DP is at the top of their game,” she adds, “and that shooting and filmmaking centers around the same very human relationships and approaches in telling a story, no matter how big or small the production.”

After studying at the University of North Carolina’s School of the Arts and later at Australian Film Television and Radio School, White settled in New York City with a focus on becoming a cinematographer. These days she finds shooting narrative the most invigorating, and the “examination of character and the cinematic journey of a story,” which gets under her skin. In Australia, White shot two shorts for director Andrew Carbone – Waiting for Rain and Shooter. Both are quiet, soulful stories set in the outback and exploring mental health issues in rural regions. White points to a (cont'd on page 28)

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tradition of Australian filmmaking of using that continent’s vast, wild landscape as a visual metaphor for the unknowable, or as a mirror to the human spirit. “We connected with our characters by following them closely with a handheld camera,” she elaborates, “and intercutting with other characters in separate environments – giant paddocks, and dense, dry bush forests – to emphasize their delicate psychological states and disconnect from each other. We complemented that approach with also shooting extreme wide shots that swallowed our characters in the frame and heightened their sense of being lost.” White enjoys commercials as well. One of her most interesting was an Under Armour campaign with Director Georgia Hudson, whose dance-like camera choreography approach was a good fit. “We shot with six powerhouse female athletes, including Misty Copeland and Natasha Hastings, pairing long, circling

Steadicam moves with spoken-word poetry,” White details. “We added a rotating Z-axis with the use of an MK-V Omega Revolution System mounted on top of the Steadicam rig. This resulted in a gravity-defying feeling to the movement, framing our heroines so that they seemed on another physical, powerful plane. “It was great to have the agency support to create this in-camera, rather than having post simulate that rotation,” White continues. “It meant that I could control the pace and timing [via an iPhone app] in reaction to what I was seeing on the monitor and in tandem with the instincts of our Steadicam operator [Devon Catucci].” White joined Local 600 on Season 2 of Hulu’s runaway hit series The Handmaid’s Tale. “[The show] speaks so directly to my own artistic sensibilities with its expressive, elevated style,” she relates. “It was a challenge to be immersed in the shooting mechanics and to find my own approach within the

[existing] construct: the specifics of lenses, camera placement, approach to lighting and color, and then thinking about how to apply my own instincts through those methods when reading the scripts. I’d start with my own emotional connection to our main character, Offred/June (Elisabeth Moss). Everything is informed through her perspective and experience.” The young Aussie says it’s an exciting time to be a cinematographer, although she has no set plans for where the road will take her. “I’m happiest when I’m making images that resonate in abstract ways, and on multiple levels of understanding,” she concludes. “It’s in those moments on set – in the collaboration with your team – that you find a way to transcend beyond conventional ways of shooting. That’s when I feel most alive, and like I’m contributing something that’s unique to the cinematography craft.”

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Though he made films in his youth, Cary Fukunaga’s early focus, while growing up in the San Francisco Bay Area, was to become a professional snowboarder. But the urge toward filmmaking never left him, and Fukunaga wound up in the graduate film program at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, focused on cinematography. One of the shorts he made at Tisch, Victoria Para Chino, was accepted at Sundance. In the Sundance Institute’s Writer’s Lab, the notion of a feature film version arose, and that resulted in Sin Nombre, a Focus Features release about the travails of crossing the U.S. border. Fukunaga followed up Sin Nombre with an adaptation of Jane Eyre, before turning his attention back to a longstanding interest, the adaptation of novelist Uzodinma Iweala’s Beasts of No Nation, though it would not come to fruition (with the filmmaker writing, directing, DPing and even serving as camera operator) till 2015. By that time, Fukunaga’s star had risen, owing to his direction of all eight installments of the HBO limited series True Detective, for which he received an Emmy. More recently, Fukunaga served as executive producer on TNT’s The Alienist, which received six Emmy nominations. The writer/director’s next feature is a biography of Leonard Bernstein (played by Jake Gyllenhaal), which will reunite him with Beasts producer Riva Marker; his newest small-screen project is for Netflix, courtesy of Anonymous Content and Paramount TV. Titled Maniac, it is an adaptation of the Norwegian comedic fantasy series and follows the plight of a subject-patient (Jonah Hill) who is induced to experience a variety of hallucinations in an experimental pharmaceutical lab. Despite the pre-release

secrecy, Maniac is likely to demonstrate more of Fukunaga’s trademark strong visuals and memorable characterizations. IGG: How did you become involved with Maniac? Cary Fukunaga: [Executive] Producer Michael Sugar approached me. There were just Emma Stone and me at first, and then Jonah Hill came on – it was the eleventh anniversary of their having worked together on Superbad. Maniac is a complete departure, in both style and execution, from the Norwegian series. What attracted me, initially, was that it sounded like a lot of fun to play in different genres, and that it wouldn’t take a tremendous commitment of time and energy. [Laughs.] Ambition and reality soon made it clear that it wasn’t going to be as light a project as I first thought. There seems to be a very strong emphasis on color in the initial images released promoting the series. We did a lot of research about that, and credit needs to go to our production designer, Alex DiGerlando, along with a researcher named Leanne Macomber. We worked with writer Patrick Somerville on how to implement these aspects. The premise is based on a clinical drug trial, a product with hallucinogenic properties that creates delusions. There’s a mix of real science and pseudo-science, how, when interacting with the brain, you might write and rewrite its pathways, and the drama comes with playing how this hit the people. The real science stuff builds on aspects like sensory deprivation and color therapy. There are mood interactions based on color, and we explore the evocative nature of what colors suggest in the form of temperament. We use an aggressive amount of changes in colors, but then a more soothing transition.

How did visual effects fit into your vision for this series? We found a lot of locations that worked as they were, so most often we used VFX simply for cleanup on elements that didn’t fit the period. We don’t even have that many set extensions, which is just as well since we didn’t have a huge VFX budget, and that had to figure into our scouting and shooting plan. Can you discuss your choice of cameras and lenses? Some digital sensors interpret color – especially certain frequencies of color – in their own ways, and that is sometimes bizarre and doesn’t represent what the human eye is seeing. So we did a lot of testing to hone in on that natural look. I wanted our LUT, and subsequently the DI, to mimic reality as much as possible. Since the Panavision DXL is a firstgeneration system, we spent some time trying to ensure the transmitted colors were being recorded in an authentic way. Building on that authenticity in the image was key to your vision? I didn’t want to resort to tricking out the dream scenes. The idea of creating different worlds by varying lenses or film stocks has been done before. And I’m not sure you even need that to give the audience some special visual departure from what they’ve been experiencing, just because by this point that is almost a conventional expectation. When I was coming out of film school, what was going on with features marked the height of visually treated looks. There was Saving Private Ryan with the skip bleach, while Tony Scott and Soderbergh did a heavy amount of experimentation with color to differentiate narratives. Even back then, I felt that when I went out into the world to create my look (cont'd on page 34)

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“Writing, shooting and directing engage three different parts of the brain, which are not always connected.”

go somewhere and make something in the moment. That’s what happened with the short films. Darren Lew and I had met through friends years back, at Sundance. My first commercial came up four years later, for a Levi’s campaign that used a lot of handheld, as a celebration of youth. He and I both got cameras and went off to shoot actors and non-actors in something almost like a documentary style. There was an evolving trust happening. Then, when I got the idea to make the short, Sleepwalking in the Rift, Darren decided to come along. We split up, with me shooting the actors while he shot the extras. I’d get some of the meat of the scene done while he shot stuff that gave us needed scale in bigger shots. Then we’d reconvene and review. Beasts wasn’t an impulse decision; that one was long in the making. I’d wanted to make a film about Sierra Leone since college, and it took a while to get the script right, and to get financing. Netflix only picked it up afterward.

the scene rather than get a lot of separately shot coverage. We did have to do a certain number of close-ups, but the way I shoot, I don’t do a lot of storyboarding or shot-listing. It’s much more about location, as I mentioned, and what comes out in rehearsal. I’m reminded of an extended take for a police raid in True Detective that had to be worked out in some detail. I knew ahead of time what I wanted that shot to do. On a practical level, I knew I had to let production know ahead of time so they could plan accordingly, allocating the resources for that day to be able to get it in one. I don’t think there are many sequences like that [in Maniac], owing to the time schedule and the speed at which we shot, which was usually about seven days per episode. Even after your initial feature success, you shot some commercials and shorts, which is not a traditional career arc. A lot of that is just deciding that I want to

There’s a tendency on some shows to make the day by just throwing a lot of cameras at each setup. I love nothing more than single-camera – if I can do it! The choreography of camera work, staging to get maximum excitement without killing ourselves over the number of setups, is good stuff. As for having a bunch of cameras on a scene, I wouldn’t even know how to do that. There’s a particular frame that tells the story as I see it. Do filmmakers like yourself, who are known for indie fare, take on studio projects as a way of raising their profile or is it because they’ve been encouraged to do so? Regardless of size, I don’t think I’d ever do a project unless I was 100 percent committed. I haven’t ever really thought about the next thing needing to be higher in budget or a bigger deal in some way. I have considered the idea of doing a historical epic, but really, I just want to take advantage of the opportunities I’ve been afforded – and to enjoy my life while I’m doing that.


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Dos Reis breaks down a shot with CXG co-writer/creator Aline Brosh McKenna

Talk about a trial by fire. When Todd A. Dos Reis, ASC, took over cinematography chores from his friend Charles Papert on the critically acclaimed CW series Crazy ExGirlfriend, it was not only in the middle of the season but also in the middle of an episode. 38


D Dos Reis had been shooting additional photography for Papert during that first season. But he’d had no prep when he took over the show, which included one of CXG’s notoriously ambitious musical numbers. “My first day was this party-bus sequence, riding from West Covina to the beach,” Dos Reis recounts. “After everyone has gotten off the bus, Rebecca (Rachel Bloom) and Josh (Vincent Rodriguez III) have this intense emotional moment, and then break into song. I only saw the scene once in rehearsal, so my thought was to take all the lights on the party bus down and bring up this warm sunset. The idea was to have a romantic glow where the real world drops away.” Although Dos Reis had had a brief conversation with co-writer/creator Aline Brosh McKenna, who cited the clean, classic photography of The Devil Wears Prada as a visual template for the show, nothing had been said about the wide-ranging musical numbers, which number from two to four per episode. “Fortunately, I had seen some of the numbers Charles had done, which were fantastic,” he continues. “I could see what was possible, given the budget and time constraints.” Bringing in Dos Reis was also fortuitous for Bloom and Brosh McKenna, because, as the twotime ECA honoree recalls, “all I shot, when I left USC Film School in the early 90’s, were music videos. I did more than 100, all in the $80,000 budget range and below. I was the king of the mid-range music video for bands no one had ever seen,” he laughs. “Also having DP’d on Entourage, where we shot up to 20 practical locations every episode – restaurants, bars, places you’d get to see for 30 minutes and then have to light – was a great foundation for Crazy Ex.”

The foundation of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, now entering its fourth and final season, is the musical theater/comedy sketch world from which Bloom hails. “The scripts always come first,” she explains. “And since we script out every song, there are specific ideas for the style, genre and look. I think what makes the musical numbers on this show different from music videos is that everything has to serve the narrative, and then the visuals all have to fall in line with that.” After Bloom has scripted the song, the episode’s director works with a storyboard artist. “While I’m approving those boards,” Bloom adds, “Todd is brainstorming on the photography, often based on references I’ve been sending him.” The numbers are produced in controlled stage environments (like a former ice cream factory in North Hollywood, dubbed “the Fosse Stage” for the Fosse-inspired musical number “Strip Away My Conscience,” from Season Three) to desolate locations in L.A.’s high desert. One ambitious number from Season Two, “Love Kernels,” was directed by Marc Webb (The Amazing Spider-Man, 500 Days of Summer) and modeled after Beyoncé’s long-form music video album, “Lemonade.” Bloom, Brosh McKenna and Webb (who is also a co-executive producer on the series) chose locations and a visual style that would pay homage to “Lemonade” while still accurately reflecting Rebecca’s starved emotional state for Josh’s attention. CXG’s gaffer, Mazi Mitchell, worked on the Lemonade visual album and was able to develop some valuable elements for the aesthetic of “Love Kernels.” Mitchell met Dos Reis in the heyday of music videos, and they’ve retained a creative bond. “I brought Mazi on as an electric when I started on Entourage as an operator,” Dos Reis recalls. “Danny Gonzalez, who was gaffing for Charles [Papert], stayed for the rest of Season One before going to Mindhunter. Mazi, who is a DP in his own right and still shoots music videos, came in for seasons two and three, and our shared history has been really helpful.” Beyoncé-inspired elements for “Love Kernels” were shot on the Fosse Stage using what Mitchell calls a “Magic Box” and which Dos Reis says gave off an “angelically soft light” for Bloom and the other women in the number. As Mitchell details: “It’s a 12-foot-long, four-foot-wide, four-foot-deep Softbox that has Magic Cloth as the diffusion on the front, and six ARRI SkyPanel 60c’s inside. We also had eight to ten ARRI LED L7’s for backlight and to edge the talent. The L7’s produce great color and that sharp, clean look we wanted.” The major practical location for “Love Kernels” was the El Mirage dry lakebed, in the high elevation of the Mojave Desert. Being the first episode of the season, Dos Reis shot in the searing July heat, capturing both color and black-andwhite footage and using multiple LUT’s. “It was Day Zero,” the DP remembers, “which is the new thing in television, where the prep

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“WE USED 18K HMI’S AND A HUGE 20-BY-20-FOOT NATURAL GRAY, WHICH DOESN’T REFLECT INTO PEOPLE’S SKIN LIKE A WHITE SILK.” Todd A. Dos Reis, ASC

day – Day Zero – actually becomes a shooting day. I needed light on their faces to compete with all that beautiful background sunlight, so we used 18K HMI’s and a huge 20-by-20-foot natural gray, which doesn’t reflect into people’s skin like a white silk. Our former key grip from Season Two, Chuck Smallwood, turned me on to the natural gray, and we’ve been using it ever since.” Bloom says, “Lemonade was an inspiration [for Love Kernels] because of the general trend of music videos becoming these long, epic artsy films. But we didn’t want to specifically parody Beyoncé,” she notes. “So by using our own settings, there was much more freedom to be experimental, visually speaking. All of those beauty shots in that number were basically Marc [Webb] and Todd getting very creative in the desert.” The transitions into and out of CXG’s musical numbers are also filled with innovation. For “Let’s Have Intercourse,” where Bloom and McKenna wanted to emulate the Ed Sheeran music video “Thinking Out Loud” (shot by Daniel Pearl, ASC), Rebecca and her shallow attorney boss, Nathaniel (Scott Michael Foster), are stuck in an elevator, when he abruptly decides they should have sex (hence the title of the number). The scene is triggered by a fade to black in the elevator and fade-in to the ballroom at L.A.’s Park Plaza Hotel. “Those transitions are almost as important as the look of each number,” Dos Reis explains, “because I always need to know: How do we get out of the real world and into these fantasies Rebecca is having? Our dimmer-board operator needs to know what kind of programming we’ll use for ins and outs, and any color transitions.” In the Ed Sheeran video, Pearl had lighting operators on spotlights following the performers. But, limited by the physical space at the Park Plaza, Dos Reis and Mitchell instead placed two PRG GroundControl Remote Head Bad Boy Spot Luminaires into each corner of the ballroom to follow behind Bloom and Foster as they danced alone together in the room. Lighting operators,

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Emmy-winning choreographer Kat Burns says Dos Reis “programs as many big sweeping wide shots,” in each music video “as time allows.”

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hidden behind stage curtains and working off monitors, remotely controlled each unit. Choreographer Kathryn Burns, who won an Emmy for the show’s first season musical number, “I’m So Good At Yoga,” “A Boy Band of Four Joshes” and “Settle For Me” has choreographed every episode of the series; Dos Reis says having a choreographer who fully understands camera movement “as well as someone who is able to make changes on the spot” has been one of the best partnerships of his career. Likewise for Burns, who describes Dos Reis as a choreographer’s dream. “I know he will prioritize as many beautiful dance frames as time allows,” she says, “like the big sweeping wide shots. The choreography for ‘Let’s Have Intercourse’ was romantic with a touch of raunchy. The lifts were purposefully awkward and difficult and could only be executed a few times, so camera and choreo had to work in tandem. “Like all of my work on Crazy Ex,” Burns continues, “Todd will check in to make sure we are in sync and inspired. I can adjust spacing to make shooting more efficient for lighting, and that way we can spend our precious shooting time, normally half a day for one entire music video, capturing the dance as many times as possible.” Dos Reis often uses multiple cameras for the musical numbers; for “Intercourse” he employed Steadicam, dolly and a 15-foot Technocrane. Each of the rigs was designed to move in as the other moved out, working in sync with Burns’ choreography. “My operators – Ian Dodd and Taj Teffaha (on Steadicam) – are so remarkable, we sometimes shoot the rehearsal,” Dos Reis exclaims. “With only one DP, you don’t really get prep, so I came up with a system that the tech scout day becomes my prep day with the new director for the musical numbers. Ian then moves up to DP, Taj goes to A-camera, and we bring in another operator to shoot that day, which are practicals/dialogue scenes on stage or location.” Dodd, who will take over DP chores for Season Four as Dos Reis moves on to shoot the new OWN series, David Makes Man (created by Moonlight Oscar winner Tarell McCraney), describes Crazy Ex-Girlfriend as a cross of Arrested Development meets Glee. “I was actually the A-camera operator on the original Arrested series,” Dodd says, “and that delighted Rachel Bloom because [Arrested Development] is a big influence on her brand of comedy.” Dodd and Dos Reis met more than 20 years ago when they were both focus-pullers. “When Todd called me to join CXG on Season Two,” Dodd

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outlines, “it was with the idea that I would cover him as DP one or two days per episode when he was prepping with the next director. So, for two seasons I’ve been working with Mazi [Mitchell] to keep the show looking the way Todd wants; and if I’ve done my job, nobody can see a difference between the days Todd was lighting and the ones I was covering for him.” Dodd says it’s gratifying there wasn’t “much of a conversation” about who would fill Todd’s shoes for Season Four. “I know the look, the cast, the crew and most of the directors,” he adds. “Rachel and Aline felt confident in having me take the reins. And I’m excited to have the opportunity.” Papert’s setup for the first season was to use three to four Angénieux zoom lenses, which helped to keep costs under control. Dos Reis continued that trend for the remainder of Season One, and again for Season Two. “In Season Three, Joseph Kahn came in to direct an episode, and he wanted primes,” Dos Reis says with a broad smile. “I had been asking if I could use Leica primes for awhile, and had always been turned down, so I sensed an opportunity.” After Joe Kahn’s episode, Dos Reis was successful in having the show change over to prime lenses. “I first used the [Leica primes] on Entourage, which was shot entirely on 35mm,” he recounts, “and I could literally see the difference in the viewfinder. They render skin tones so beautifully; it’s almost like having a wrap-around light even when you don’t have a light on the actor’s face.” First Assistant Eric Dyson says falling behind schedule on a TV show is not an option, so adding an element [like prime lenses] that can increase set-up time left him skeptical, at first. “The last time Todd was this excited was when the Celtics won the championship,” Dyson laughs. “But we all got on board with the Leica primes

pretty quickly. The cinematic quality of those lenses is outstanding. When the department head has an insatiable zest for cinematography, you’re either with him or against him. I’m happy to say we were all with him.” The Leica primes are showcased well on a musical number from Season Three, “Strip Away My Conscience,” that seems to harness all of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend’s creative synergy. Inspired by the airplane striptease segment from Bob Fosse’s All That Jazz, and more centrally, the “All That Jazz” musical number from Chicago (shot by Dion Beebe, ASC, ACS), Dos Reis and Mitchell bathed the Fosse stage in reds, pinks, and Tungsten to pay homage to the famed Broadway musical director’s use of spare scene design punctuated by pools of hard spotlighting. The scene begins with Rebecca speaking to Nathaniel in his apartment, with the latter backed up to a large king bed. The camera, behind Nathaniel and facing Rebecca, suddenly pivots 180 degrees as the apartment transforms into a Fosse-like stage, with pools of colored light shining down, and the bed alone in the center of the room. “That was one transition I could not do in-camera,” Dos Reis laughs, “as it had to be a visual effect. The end of the number, however, was all done in-camera, as we are on a static frame on Rachel as she takes off all her clothes. We can’t show that on television, of course, so we had an electrician manually narrow down a spotlight to black. If we had a bigger budget it would have all been digitally programmed, but we didn’t, so it had to all be old school. And it looked great!” Bloom’s main concern with the number was how the action would be staged to support the writing – Rebecca “stripping away her conscience (and clothes)” to sleep with the shallow corporate shill, Nathaniel. Bloom says an homage blending Fosse with a high-end bordello was key to the number. “I love how it feels like we’re on a stage with the bedroom so stark,” she relates. Burns says the dance number was one of her favorites to choreograph. “Fosse’s work is so iconic, so I wanted to honor it,” she describes. “But without stealing, and also making it funny, and keeping it cool like a Jack Cole jazz number. The number was meant to be captured from many angles at once, so communication between departments was key.” Dodd, who describes camera movement on CXG as a “literal dance” between the operator, focus-puller, dolly grip and the actors, was on the Technocrane for “Strip Away Your Conscience.” He says he and Dolly Grip Dwayne Barr would be working on their own camera choreography – often in real time over the headsets – to enhance the actors’ movements. “Rather than be fixated on the monitor [while operating the remote head], I love moving with the flow of the music, camera, and actors,” Dodd shares. “Crewmembers who saw my private dance at the wheels

“WHEN THE DEPARTMENT HEAD HAS AN INSATIABLE ZEST FOR CINEMATOGRAPHY, YOU’RE EITHER WITH HIM OR AGAINST HIM. I’M HAPPY TO SAY WE WERE ALL WITH HIM.” First Assistant Eric Dyson

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@ Dos Reis and Gaffer Mazi Mitchell used hard (colored) spotlighting for the Bob Fosseinspired number, “Strip Away My Conscience.�

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[on “Strip Away”] said it was almost as entertaining to watch as Kat Burns’ carefully-rehearsed choreography,” he laughs. What’s also a joy to watch, according to co-showrunner Bloom, is Dos Reis in the throes of a creative moment on set. “Todd cares so much about the work,” she concludes. “I really respect his input, and value so much those conversations we’ve had on set, where he’ll bring an idea that’s not only visually interesting but truly serves the writing. I’m like: ‘Wow, I never would have thought of it.’ Really glad he’s here.” Dos Reis says such creative energy is a common sight in television these days. “The content coming from the streaming platforms, as well as the creative risks being taken from traditional networks, is unprecedented,” states Dos Reis, who adds that his career path is slightly ironic “given that all I learned at USC Film School was the auteur system of features. When I started in episodic, I was like: ‘Wait, I have a new director every seven days?!’ That’s not how it was when [I began as] a camera assistant [for Russell Carpenter, ASC].” As for this year’s crop of ECA honorees, he notes that “they have a lot more options in television than I had [after winning] my first ECA [in 1999], as I couldn’t jump from 1st AC to DP at that time. So many producers are looking for fresh eyes these days. I’ve been a judge [for the ECA’s] for a while, and the quality just seems to rise every year.” Reflecting on his time with Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, Dos Reis says the best part is having the luxury “to do something amazingly different every single episode. Entourage offered a similar kind of freshness, and the musical numbers on Crazy Ex allow me to do that three times every week. Also, this show is unique because three amazingly creative women run it – Rachel Bloom, Aline Brosh McKenna and [Executive Producer] Sarah Caplan. I’ve always had diverse crews, going back to my music video days. [A-camera 1st AC] Eric Dyson, [B-Camera 2nd AC] Eric Wheeler, and Mazi Mitchell [Gaffer] are all African-American, and [Second AC] Megan Morris runs my camera department. That range of experience, along with our female showrunners and producers, makes for a very special type of energy on the set. And I love that!”

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LOCAL 600 CREW SEASONS 2 & 3 Director of Photography Todd A. Dos Reis, ASC A-Camera Operator Additional Dir. of Photography Ian Dodd A-Camera 1st AC Eric Dyson A-Camera 2nd AC Megan Morris B-Camera Operator/Steadicam Taj Teffaha (Season 2) Richard Crow, SOC (Season 3) B-Camera 1st AC Joel Perkal B-Camera 2nd AC Eric Wheeler Utility Genna Palermo (Season 2) Andres Raygoza (Season 3) Loader Sam McConville Still Photographers Scott E. White Robert Voets


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S E RIES

R E BO UN D ARI E S

PAULINE

F N Y

ROGERS

T OF /

PHOTOS

C H E PISODIC COURTESY

BARRY E S COMEDY OF

HBO

U N Or


DIE PHOTO

BY

JOHN

P.

JOHNSON

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Photo by Jordin Althaus

The pressure was on. Bill Hader and his partner, Alec Berg, had a deal with HBO and needed a concept. They met once a week for a month at a diner in Culver City trying to come up with ideas. A hit man, perhaps? “Skinny tie and two guns?” Hader questioned. “There’s nothing cool about me.” But what about polar opposites – a character that can traverse two worlds? Like a hit man who becomes enthralled with acting? A bizarre idea, yes. But would HBO love it? 48


Photo by Jordin Althaus

T

To shoot the pilot of Barry, writer/producer/director/actor Hader (who plays Barry) and the production team wanted someone to create an emotional and suspenseful story that wasn’t bright but was impactful visually. Their choice was ICG DP Brandon Trost. “Bill wanted a focused but simplistic look and didn’t want it to feel like your average comedy,” Trost recounts. “They wanted to support the reality of the violence in a way that would juxtapose the comedy.” Hader, who directed three episodes, and Berg, who directed two, also wanted dynamic blocking, whenever possible, and framing that would allow them to use fewer shots to tell the story. They wanted wide-angle lenses and a single camera. “A wider lens, when used for a single or close up, would bring the viewer into the scene,” Trost explains. To emphasize this approach, the team chose ALEXA with Zeiss Super Speed lenses. “The texture and color of the camera just felt right, and I love using older lenses,” Trost adds. “Barry is definitely a comedy, and you tend to forget that he’s a trained killer as we move through the lighter scenes. But when he’s in kill mode, we really wanted to shift gears. We wanted the audience to cringe at the harsh reality of Barry’s killings.” Hader says the opening shot of the series sells the approach. “Barry walks out of the bathroom, the camera pans as he gets his gun, and we see a dead body. It might as well be a towel on the bed. It’s in his face, but he’s not looking at it. The camera then pans to the door.” “We also had to show the opposite side of Barry,” adds Trost. After he’s made the move to L.A., from his bland Midwestern base, Barry wanders into an acting class and ends up in his first performance. The audience sees Barry absorbed in this moment like it’s changing his life. “We achieved this with a simple push into a CU on Bill as he looks out at the crowd,” Trost adds. “It’s not complex, but story-wise it’s huge, as it sets up the whole series.” For the series, Hader’s producer, Aida Rogers, brought in

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“WE USED FRESNELS, BOOK LIGHTS AND CHINESE LATERNS, INSTEAD OF LEDS, WHICH ARE NOW THE NORM. PAULA LIKES THE WARMTH OF THE SOURCE LIGHTS ON THE ACTOR'S FACES.” Gaffer Paul McIlvaine

cinematographer Paula Huidobro (ICG April 2016, Ladies Choice) as a first option. It was now a series production schedule, so the team knew there were times when they would need a second camera. “Bill wanted to preserve the studio mode in which the pilot had been shot, and he was a fan of wider lenses, which we continued to use throughout the season,” Huidobro describes. “He was clear that he didn’t want to glorify violence, and he thought that a way to do that was by not over-covering those sequences or stylizing them with multiple angles and shots that would somehow remove the audience from the violence.” Berg says Huidobro is “very good at finding a way to use a second camera in a way that never feels like an afterthought,” and shooting the series proved him right. “Obviously, a TV schedule is always tight, and sometimes it can feel like a compromise. But thanks to Paula, we’d always end up getting two shots that seemed like primary camera placements,” Berg adds. The discussion of what capture system to use for the series included, according to First AC Alan Cohen, Huidobro shooting with the ARRI 65. “But that would not suit the show,” Cohen says. “So, we went with ALEXA Minis because of Bill’s preference for wide lenses up close. We got our package from Otto Nemenz – Minis with Optimo zooms, 15 to 49, 28 to 76, and 45 to 120.”

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The visual plan of using both wide-angle and close-up lenses resulted in what Operator Nathan Levine-Heaney calls “a very deliberate approach” to moving the camera. “We wanted strong compositions that didn’t move unnecessarily,” he offers. “And that necessitated working closely with the art department because sets and props were a big part of the comic tone. We had some fun frames; for instance, in Goran’s garage, his daughters’ toys in just the right place made everyone behind the monitors laugh, and we went with it.” Steadicam Operator Craig Fikse recalls many times where Hader would be acting to small, carefully placed eye lines in the matte box. “Once, during a party scene,” Fikse describes, “my camera had a 21mm. I remember explaining four small tape marks in the matte box that represented multiple people. Bill did a great job showing complex emotions to tape marks three feet in front of his face.” Huidobro wanted to work closely with the operators and keys in each department to help bring the complex camera style to fruition. That left DIT Kevin Britton with the task of working closely with the AC’s “to come up with solutions that would make that possible in any situation,” Britton explains. “If the main DIT cart couldn’t be close enough, we would utilize a smaller, dual, 17inch monitor setup to which I would feed correct


51 Photos by John P. Johnson


PHOTOS: Top: John P. Johnson / Middle: Michele K. Short / Bottom: Jordin Althaus

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“THE SCRIPTS

CHALLENGED US TO DISCOVER A VISUAL STYLE THAT WOULD FIT BOTH

THE COMEDY AND THE DARKNESS OF THE CRIME WORLD.” Paula Huidobro

images.” Britton used a live color DIT station with Pomfort Livegrade for CDL–based color workflow and video distribution, and a mobile color station and long-range wireless for carchase sequences. Production Designer Tyler Robinson says there wasn’t much carryover from the pilot. “We ended up building Barry’s apartment on stage,” he recalls. “Bill and Alec wanted his Cleveland apartment to feel cold to contrast the L.A. weather. They also wanted his space to feel somewhat empty, so using practical lamps to light space felt counter-intuitive. I worked with Paula to find creative solutions to lighting cues including a light-up Cleveland Indians wall clock, a closet with a missing door with a single bare bulb hanging inside it, and frosty windows with streetlights behind them.” Robinson worked with the camera team to recreate the real theater from the pilot on stage. “We took some creative license and added wall sconces throughout, and then I used clamp-on work lights throughout the backstage area,” he says. “We added bare bulbs around makeup mirrors, and on an adjacent wall we created a painted-over window, which allowed light to leak through the paint, creating a cool soft glow.” According to Gaffer Paul McIlvaine, lighting Barry sets was an interesting challenge – a balance in studio lighting with close-up lenses, and the story. “We wanted the light to be as soft as possible, so we went with a more old-school approach using Fresnels, book lights and Chinese lanterns instead of the LED technology which is now the norm,” McIlvaine explains. “Paula liked the warmth of the source lights and the glowy quality they would have in the actors’ faces. We had big sources through the windows with 20Ks set on motors that were easily adjusted.

“I like soft sources, but also to keep the light shaped in an interesting way,” Huidobro adds. “I didn’t ever want to drift into flat comedic lighting, but we also avoided hard lighting for the most part. Even though there is a lot of dark drama, we didn’t want distracting shadows, and it’s nice when the actors look good. We generally used book lights to give the faces some interesting shapes and make the eyes look great.” Huidobro credits her Key Grip Paul Perkins for always being prepared to cut and for oftendiffuse location lighting schemes. “Paula does love the book lights,” Perkins smiles. “Most of the time we would double-up on the diffusion as well as bounce the light. Whenever we were exterior, we used overhead diffusion, usually on Condors (flyswatters) to knock down as much overhead light as possible and still balance the background.” McIlvaine says the size and logistics of some locations added to the challenge. “Sometimes we were in small rooms with the camera tucked into a corner or night exteriors looking at the world,” he recounts. “Sometimes we’d need small units to be hidden from camera, other times 80-foot Condors to be used as lighting platforms. And sometimes we had both,” he laughs. “Our last day of the show we were shooting around Clear Lake up in Big Bear,” McIlvaine continues. “We had a scene with Barry out on a floating dock. We had rigged a small unit to

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the edge of the dock, just above the water to be out of the shot. After two cameras and crew piled onto one side of the floating dock, it started leaning – and our light was under water!” While Barry’s crewmembers all cite different sequences that display the show’s wide range, a scene from Episode 7 stands out as a consensus example. The sequence begins with the camera booming down from a placid sky and an airplane gliding to reveal armed gangsters getting ready for their boss to arrive. Elements preceding the landing involved Barry racing down dirt roads in an SUV. When the SUV arrives, the peace is shattered. The men have no choice – shoot at it. And the SUV explodes. “The tranquil juxtaposition – completely opposite what you’d expect in this heightened dangerous situation – is what makes it, for me, even funnier and what seems to be the style of Barry as a whole,” Huidobro describes. “We used several different pieces of equipment to get the sequence,” Perkins adds. “For the safety of the actor, and so they could do their job without having to worry about driving the car at high speed on the dirt roads, we put them on the biscuit rig – an insert car built by Allan Padelford. It’s guided by a stunt driver and has a driver’s pod that can be moved to different parts of the rig to keep the driver and the control pod out of different camera angles. The SUV is secured to the insert car chassis. We used several car mounts as well – the Edge camera from Filmworks, a 26-foot crane mounted on top of a Mercedes ML63 AG, with

a stabilized head. It’s outfitted so the driver, the crane arm, operator, and camera operator can all remotely operate the equipment from safely inside the car off monitors.” Perkins says safety starts at the top with the directors, producers, and the DP. “To make everyone safe, it takes a lot of dialog from the director, cinematographer, and in this example, our stunt coordinator,” Perkins says. “Wade Allen told us what he thought was a safe distance, and that helped us decide which camera would be manned and which unmanned. We also put a camera on a 40-foot crane to reach in close to the action that was out of the path of the rolling SUV. [Producer] Aida [Rodgers] even got involved to double-check that we were all on the same page and that all safety concerns were met.” Huidobro cites a scene from Episode 8 of Barry as a prime example of how she collaborated with coshowrunner/director Berg. The scene features Barry coming back to his hotel room to get his money from his handler, Monroe Fuches (Stephen Root). Fuches is relieved, as he thought Barry was dead, but is in for a surprise as Barry takes his money and punches him in the face. After the betrayal, Fuches goes to Goran’s house to offer information on Barry, but Goran is extremely upset and decides to ask Fuches to be killed. “I particularly enjoyed working with Alec on this episode,” Huidobro shares. “It’s where all the characters start to unravel and alliances shift. It’s very dark, but also incredibly funny and composed. The lighting, framing, blocking and camera movement are completely in sync. Alec and I shot-listed the sequences,

“BILL WAS CLEAR THAT HE DIDN’T WANT TO GLORIFY VIOLENCE, AND HE THOUGHT THAT A WAY TO DO THAT WAS BY NOT OVER-COVERING THOSE SEQUENCES OR STYLIZING THEM WITH MULTIPLE ANGLES AND SHOTS.” Paula Huidobro

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55

Photos by John P. Johnson


Photo by Jordin Althaus

and we enjoyed capturing the dark humor in the way we framed our characters, how we surrounded them in the frame by others, or the group shots that show the power dynamics and how desperate Fuches has become and how angry and somehow tragic Goran’s situation is, as he exercises in his running machine. We did moving masters where we would play the whole scene, keeping the shot dynamic by letting the actors move from full body to their close-up or a 50/50, shifting the characters’ perspective or weight in the frame.” Huidobro, who was born in Mexico City and was formally educated at AFI and the London International Film School, has festival success and a Student Academy Award on her résumé. She cites three-time Oscar winner Emmanuel “Chivo” Lubezki, ASC, AMC (for whom she operated) and two-time Oscar nominee Rodrigo Prieto, ASC, AMC, as having helped pave the way for Mexican cinematographers working in Hollywood. “Barry was definitely a great experience,” the newly minted Academy and AMC member concludes. “Bill and Alec knew exactly what they wanted, and they would place their trust in all of us as a crew to make their vision our own. They genuinely cared about the look of the show, and the scripts challenged us to discover a visual style that would fit both the comedy and the darkness of the crime world. Barry was my first TV show, and I couldn’t have been happier.”

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LOCAL 600 CREW Pilot

SEASON 1

Director of Photography Brandon Trost

Director of Photography Paula Huidobro

A-Camera Operator Jesse Michael Feldman, SOC

A-Camera Operator Craig Fikse

A-Camera 1st AC Markus Mentzer

A-Camera 1st AC Alan Cohen

A-Camera 2nd AC Dennis Geraghty

A-Camera 2nd AC Ryan Pilon

B-Camera Operator Taj Teffaha

B-Camera Operator Nathan Levine-Heaney

B-Camera 1st AC Eric Guerin

B-Camera 1st AC Yoshihiro Kinoshita

B-Camera 2nd AC Oliver Ponce

B-Camera 2nd AC Alicia Pharris DIT Kevin Britton Loader Bryce Marraro Still Photographers Jordin Althaus John P. Johnson Michele K. Short


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EIGHT H I 58


MILES G H EM M Y -WI N N E R NE W S HO T BY

BY KEVIN

CA RY

D ARRE N MARTIN

SERIES, LE W, IS /

PHOTOS

FU K U NAGA’S

MIND-B ENDING BY

MICHELE

MANIAC , ENTERTA INMEN T K.

SHORT

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In the new series Maniac, Jonah Hill and Emma Stone play a pair of unnamed patients undergoing product testing by a large pharmaceutical firm. In the course of the series, they inhabit a series of fantasy dreams induced by doctor James Mantleray (Justin Theroux) and his HAL-like computer. Complications arise when a malfunction causes the pair to inhabit one another’s visions, which occur in different time periods and possibly alternate realities. 60


L

Loosely based on a Swedish series of the same name, the show was developed by Paramount TV and Anonymous Content and released via Netflix. Emmy-winner Cary Fukunaga [Exposure, page 30] directed all 10 episodes for writer/creator Patrick Somerville. Director of Photography Darren Lew shot the entire series, allowing for a consistency of vision not often seen in episodic TV. Lew met Fukunaga at the Sundance Film Festival more than 12 years ago. Commercial shoots together and a short followed before Lew then took on 2nd Unit Directing/DP duties on four episodes of Fukunaga’s critically acclaimed series True Detective. Lew says it’s a challenge to work for a director who is also an experienced cinematographer. “Cary’s a very visual director who often sets up very ambitious shots,” Lew describes. “But his experience as a DP lets him know what can be done practically. He challenged me with situations where I had to problem-solve in order to facilitate his style of shooting, which was usually single-camera and almost no cross-coverage. His camera moves a lot and looks around in every direction, which meant our lighting had to be integrated into the sets.” Given the radically different environments for each episode, varying visual treatments would have seemed to be in order. But as Lew adds: “Although Jonah and Emma get transported to different times and places, and they’re playing different characters from one episode to the next, we wanted it all to seem like their actual reality, not like

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an overly stylized dream sequence. So we used the same lenses and color palette; the image treatment was always the same.” Lew says TV’s conventional route to differentiation is to use a particular LUT and lens for an older time period, and another for the modern era. “I believe it would have been heavyhanded to embellish the look for different periods,” he continues. “Instead, Production Designer Alex DiGerlando created a world where we could take a subtler camera approach.” Fukunaga and Lew agreed anamorphic lenses and a larger-format camera were required. “Originally, we considered the Alexa 65, which has one of the most beautiful chips I’ve ever seen,” Lew shares. “Cary and I did a commercial on the 65 with Panavision large-format lenses. But [for Maniac] we wanted to shoot the C-series and E-series anamorphics, which would not cover the ALEXA 65 sensor.” So, Panavision’s DXL, backed by its Light Iron color science, was chosen. “Dan Sasaki at Panavision and Michael Cioni at Light Iron [which also handled the DI], really came through,” Lew adds. “They worked around the clock to get things ready, and you can see their work on screen as much as our own.” Classic C- and E-series lenses were frequently used, plus more modern T-series units for low-light situations. Another unusual lens, carried over from Fukunaga’s hit indie feature, Beasts of No Nation, was the PanaFocal T4 50–95mm zoom. Lew says while they captured at 7K because at 8K the lenses weren’t covering, “at 7K, the glass was also working hard to cover the chip, and we got some natural vignetting that provided a nice painterly feeling. “We didn’t shoot thinking we’d crop or zoom after the fact,” he adds. “Our A-camera operator introduced us to the Artemis Prime finder, made by DP Nic Sadler. He’s put a Panavision mount on an iPad where one can take photos and record video. The Artemis was invaluable in finding a specific frame and was more accurate than a traditional director’s finder. With it, we could provide the operators with very specific ideas about composition.” Except for some occasional dark night shooting, which mandated a modified ISO, Lew worked from a single LUT, with DIT Jeff Flohr (aided by Light Iron Supervising Digital Colorist Steven Bodner) helping to create the desired look straight from the camera. “I didn’t need to color-correct [the night footage] and send it to Light Iron because dailies, stills, and all on-set correction looked good,” Lew explains. “And we knew what to expect with the visual effects, since Cary’s VFX supervisor, Ilia Mokhtareizadeh, had worked on our commercials.

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“THE ARTEMIS WAS INVALUABLE IN

FINDING A SPECIFIC FRAME AND WAS

MORE ACCURATE THAN A TRADITIONAL DIRECTOR’S FINDER.” Darren Lew

He ensured any embellishments were consistent with my location footage.” Lew describes Maniac as having ambitious elements, including miniatures and physical effects. “Outside of some pickups for night shoots and some of the driving, we didn’t shoot much green screen, which is my preference,” the DP adds. “How do you duplicate all the reflective aspects of the original set when you’re shooting against green? The lamps are responsible for much of the look a DP sets, but I would argue that it’s almost as much the surrounding area, in terms of where the walls are and how they are colored and how the light plays off them, especially when we see hues on an actor in closeup. How low is the ceiling? How reflective the floor? Those elements are usually lost when shooting green screen.” Maniac’s approach to camera movement built on the director’s established inclinations. “Cary and I worked primarily with a classic, almost basic camera style, tracking shots and crane work, with no MōVi,” Lew details. “We only used Steadicam on occasion, and Key Grip Mike Yurich would lay track or dance floor for dolly shots whenever possible.” A-Camera/Steadicam operator Jim McConkey, SOC, acknowledges Fukunaga’s preference for formal frames and precise tracking shots, but adds, “There are times when that isn’t appropriate for Cary’s vision, and he gets excited about creating more abstract frames. “When shooting in what was supposed to be a near-future Chinatown pawnshop,” McConkey adds, “we go into a back room where there are pneumatic tubes that people use to send messages, and he had the camera zooming up through the plastic tubes! For Steadicam shots, we used The Wave stabilization device, which freed me to think about other aspects beyond just keeping the image level. Weight-wise, although the DXL is light for a large format camera, it was preferable to go with a RED VistaVision 8K camera, which has a similar chip but a smaller body when using The Wave on the Steadicam. That was my go-to for handheld and Steadicam, and whenever there were issues of maneuverability.”


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“CARY WAS EMPHATIC ABOUT NOT WANTING ACTORS TO HAVE TO WAIT AROUND THE LIGHTING,

WHILE WE SET

WHICH MEANT WE NEEDED A SELF-LIGHTING SET.” Gaffer Andy Day

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Maniac’s bold use of color – primarily in the many scenes set in the pharmaceutical firm’s elaborate lab – involved research in color science and light testing. “We turned to color science because we needed to understand how colored stimuli, the sequence of the stimuli, and the actual source of the color impacted emotions,” Lew recounts. “In production meetings, Cary and Patrick would describe the emotional content of a scene and we’d be tasked with trying to help tell a large part of the story with light and color.” In those meetings, Production Designer Alex DiGerlando, along with his department, showed numerous art references to visually describe how the concepts of analogous colors, split compliments, and afterimage effect could relate both to the set design and the lighting. “Our gaffer, Andy Day,” Lew continues, “ran with those concepts and designed a system where he could program not just a look but a sequence of color changes, strobing, or imperceptible light changes that would be appropriate to the shifting tone of the scene in the lab. Sometimes he’d have to do that on the fly.” The lab consists of a control room, living quarters, mainframe room and the experiment area where the subjects experience their dream-realities. “The living area is where the subjects have their sleeping pods,” Day notes. “We created lighting accents in the form of trim on the pods and within [the pods] with RGBA Lite Gear tape. Construction electrician Gene Lynch installed miles of LED tape as set dressing.” Day found the most challenging setups in the experiment room. “Cary was emphatic about not wanting actors to

have to wait around while we set the lighting,” Day adds, “which meant we needed a self-lighting set. We collaborated with the art department to build-in some units and had good decking above so we could drop stuff in. They hadn’t platformed the lab, which would have been a useful approach when projecting up from beneath, but Gene was watchdogging things, so he was able to get some power and DMX cabling snaked in before they added their layers of flooring. My main rigging gaffer, Matt Hale, and stage rigger, Joel Minnich, did great work here and throughout the series.” The subjects are administered three different kinds of pills, each creating a unique “trip,” and each requiring a different color sequence, programmed for entering into and leaving the experience. Much of the varying color comes from overhead lighting, originally envisioned as a dome before being simplified into a disk, which Day wanted to be produced via RP material. “The disc described a circle 16 to 18 feet in diameter and was, like most of the lab, done with ARRI S60 SkyPanels,” Day continues. “There was a surrounding ring where we used 1-foot Chroma-Qs because the SkyPanel would have been too broad a source. We could let the ring color be a contrast to the disc or match to it; it was really about having the flexibility to vary the programmable color effects. Caleb Smith did a great job on the board, mixing the colors.” While LED lighting has become almost a de facto approach in series television Lew still sees the validity in mixing more traditional lighting when appropriate. “While LEDs do give us color-change options,” Lew states, “there is a certain feeling from filament lights, or from a single large powerful source positioned far

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away, that I wouldn’t want to lose as an option. Working with larger, more powerful lamps provides more choices in moving the light closer or further away to modify the quality and fall-off of the light. Too many [younger filmmakers] don’t understand the physics of how the fall-off of a big light over distance can make all the difference and look wonderful. We had days working just with firelight, or shooting natural light with bounce boards, too.”

stopping at 7 feet, the dolly pushing in the entire time,” Silano relates. “In the old days, I would have dropped marks back from the computer and again back from the actress’ end mark, winging the rest while clutching the focus knob, and hoping she hit her mark, which I couldn’t see, all while wondering if the operator had repositioned the ratchet offset. With Light Ranger, I manually tracked the keyboard and then switched to autofocus mode when the camera framed up the monitor. As the camera continued tilting, autofocus locked onto the actress. I switched back to manual as we hit our end frames to let her exit without the focus automatically zinging to the background.” At press time, the series was still in post, with VFX coming in from various vendors overseen by Mokhtareizadeh, whom Lew characterizes as “a real artist with the right spirit to deal with the pace and style of this show. The cuts aren’t yet locked, but the colorist has seen the material from the start of shooting, so that is a terrific plus.” One of Lew’s takeaways from Maniac was the unique approach to crew staffing, relative to other episodics. “Most other shows have multiple DP’s and AD’s, so you’ve got one group prepping while another is shooting,” he relates. “We had just one AD, one DP, and one director the whole time. The creative aspect was so important that having these people together throughout was essential. “My dream is that TV shows in the future will be allowed the time to create a project that features have typically been allowed,” Lew concludes. “There is such a huge benefit to all parties involved to have the continuity and singular vision of the same collaborators throughout the project. I hope the studios and streaming services are reading this!”

With Fukunaga’s inclination toward innovative camera movement, A-camera 1st AC Chris Silano’s focus pulling would have seemed to be quite challenging. But, as Silano describes, Preston’s Light Ranger 2 was “the key” that unlocks all the other tools. “Had we not used Light Ranger, there is no doubt the photography would have been constricted and the drama stifled,” Silano insists. “The LR-2 is a video graphic overlay with a series of focus bars indicating depth, allowing the AC to see where the focus is set, illuminating ‘green’ when the subject is within the calculated depth of field. And while that may sound complicated, it translates to [playing] an effortless video game. The LR-2 encouraged the camera and actors to move wherever they wanted, without rehearsals or marks. It gives the focus puller the confidence to truly own the focal plane. No more calculating, marking, mapping, or guessing. Just that calm feeling when the ball connects with the bat and you know it’s going over the fence.” One example Silano cites of the LR-2’s usefulness began with a dolly-in to a computer from seven feet to four feet on a 100mm lens. “The camera tilts up to find our lead actress walking toward us from a distance of 15 feet and

LOCAL 600 CREW Director of Photography Darren Lew A-Camera Operator Jim C. McConkey, SOC A-Camera 1st AC Christopher Silano A-Camera 2nd AC Troy Solá B-Camera Operator Peter Agliata B-Camera 1st AC John A. Clemens B-Camera 2nd AC Scott Hall Miller DIT Jeffrey Flohr Loader Taneice “Neicy” McFadden Additional Loaders Eddie Goldblatt David Gallagher Still Photographer Michele K. Short Publicist Julie Kuehndorf

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B Y

SHOOTIN G

A

P ILOT

PA U L I N E

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A NY TH ING

R O G E R S

IS /

BUT

U P H O T O S

A U TOMATIC,

AS C O U R T E S Y

TH IS

G RO UP

T O F

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D P’ S

M E M B E R S

REVEALS

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P I L O T

Tami Reiker, ASC on location for Cloak and Dagger / Photo by Alfonso Bresciani

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How much has shooting a pilot, circa 2018, changed from years past? Gone are the days of three dominant networks and a uniform cycle of content creation and debut. As cinematographer Alex Disenhof describes: “Competition between networks and streaming services has opened up a whole new world of filmmaking for television, encouraging content creators to push boundaries and find stories that will grab people’s attention.” Reboots (of previously successful properties) are still prevalent, of course. Two such examples are Disenhof ’s work on The Exorcist for Fox, and Tami Reiker, ASC, lensing a new version of Charmed for the CW network. But narratively speaking, nothing is out of bounds in television these days, and that includes pilots with high-level feature-like VFX and many complex narrative threads, i.e., physical locations. Cinematographers who thrive in the pilot world are a special breed, as the pressure placed on a single hour of television – to potentially create a multi-year franchise property in series – is enormous. “From a creative perspective,” Disenhof continues, “I find pilots very satisfying because you get to build a world from the ground up, much like shooting a movie. This has allowed me to explore the visuals and the performances in a more nuanced way. When shooting a series, a lot of creative energy goes into finding the most time-efficient way to do certain things, because the schedule is so tight.” Christian La Fountaine, ASC, who counts the recent History of Them among his many pilots, says show creators are looking for “someone who will help give life to their story and someone they can trust. There is a fair amount of pressure in that, as the entire crew knows that the payoff can be really huge if the show goes to series; every single detail is important.” On the flipside, La Fountaine adds, “if [the pilot] doesn’t make it, it could be their last opportunity. So, it takes on a more life-and-death aspect and can get serious real fast.”

It can also be a little disconcerting. Manuel Billeter, who shot Run For Your Life from Blumhouse TV/SyFy and Red Line for Berlanti Productions/Ava Duvernay and CBS, says pilots are challenging, because “you just don’t know what their fate will be once they’re completed and presented. The knowledge that all your hard work and creative involvement might very well be just itemized as an R&D loss for the studio is always hanging over you. But you can’t get discouraged. You have to step up and make something original that will hopefully resonate with test audiences.” While the conventional wisdom is that shooting a pilot equals more money and time than an episode of a series, not all DP’s see the benefits. “You do have more days and more money,” Reiker confirms. “Pilots are usually given 13 to 18 days to shoot an hour episode, where the show will usually get nine days per episode. But, even with more days and more money, time is always the biggest consideration.” La Fountaine adds that “although more money is spent on a pilot, the budgets feel just as tight [as a series] because it doesn’t seem to go very far.” There’s an unwritten rule among script readers that if you’re not hooked by the first 10 pages, the project is pretty much DOA. The same thing goes for readers at a publishing house of a novel, and for writers/directors and producers creating the first scene in a pilot. “It’s the first time you introduce the story to your viewers and will often determine whether they turn off the TV or keep watching, so you need to deliver,” Disenhof states. For The Exorcist, Disenhof showed the large scope of the show by shooting in Mexico City. “I used very deep blacks; expressionistic, angular shadows; and bold colors to grab the viewer’s attention, inspired by the real architecture

“I FIND PILOTS VERY SATISFYING BECAUSE YOU GET TO BUILD A WORLD FROM THE GROUND UP, MUCH LIKE SHOOTING A MOVIE.” Alex Disenhof 70


Top: Alexander Disenhof shooting The Exorcist / Photo by Chuck Hodes/Fox Television Bottom: Chris La Fountaine shooting The Neighborhood / Photo by Bill Inoshita/CBS

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Top: Tami Reiker/ Cloak and Dagger / Photo by Alfonso Bresciani Bottom: Manuel Billeter on The Red Line / Photo by Elizabeth Morris /CBS

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THERE IS ANOTHER CHALLENGE THAT PILOT DP’S MUST KEEP IN MIND: SETTING A TONE THAT, AS BILLETER SAYS, CAN

“BE REPLICATED AND MAINTAINED ONCE THE BUDGET AND TIME RESTRICTIONS KICK IN FOR THE SERIES ORDER.”

and classic horror films, which use shadows to such great (and harrowing) effect.” For Showtime’s City on a Hill, Disenhof ’s opening gambit went in a different direction by showcasing Kevin Bacon’s performance as a charming but corrupt FBI agent, and introducing “the kinetic energy that the camera maintains throughout the show,” he explains. “Even though the first scene consists of two guys standing at a bar talking, director Michael Cuesta and I moved the camera a lot, and used wide lenses very close to the actors to exaggerate movement and put the viewers right in the action.” For History of Them, La Fountaine concentrated on making the community relatable to different segments of the viewing audience. “I knew the first time we see ‘The Park’ would be important because we set up the feeling of this food-truck courtyard,” he explains. “All the romance of the Portland skyline in this culturally diverse neighborhood is wrapped up in this pod of food trucks where our characters soak in the food and music among friends and family.” Production Designer Bernie Vyzga created a collection of color, texture, and space for La Fountaine, which allowed him to play with light and to capture this community of small family businesses, each having their own unique design. “We experimented with a wide assortment of colors and different qualities of light,” La Fountaine continues. “Our hero Cuban food truck – Hispanic Attack – included several styles of practicals, which inspired us to mix color temperatures that reflected the variety

of light sources. We had an old Mercedes truck cab that they customized as a craft beer ale truck, with a completely different vibe. We plated it much cooler. Our overall approach was to keep the warmth in the space.” Reiker, too, was concerned about balancing time and budget with the Marvel comic pilot Cloak and Dagger, an interracial romance featuring two teenagers from very different backgrounds who find themselves awakened to (and burdened by) their newly aquired superpowers. Instinct told Reiker where some of the most exciting scenes would fall – and she worked to balance time and budget to get the best out of the shot. “For me, it was a flashback sequence in which young Tandy and her father are driving at night,” she recalls. “It’s pouring rain on the causeway, and they swerve to miss an oncoming tractor-trailer. Their car flies off into the dark murky waters of the Mississippi, with the tractor-trailer following right behind. Tandy is trapped, the car fills with water and the headlights of the tractor-trailer are quickly approaching as a shock wave hits the water and a hand reaches through the sunroof to pull her to safety. “Time and budget didn’t allow us to fly to a shooting tank,” Reiker continues, “and young Tandy was six years old, so studio rules only allowed her to be in waist-deep water. The visual effects department built an amazing rig that we dubbed the ‘aquarium car,’ which was a bit larger than a typical car, with aquarium tanks attached to each window so young Tandy could sit inside the car, with murky moving water outside of each window, as water is slowly filling up inside the car.” Reiker

says the unique rig and shooting approach helped her and her team to “sell” an element of this potential series. Billeter also considered engaging the audience’s emotions as a key element to selling the pilot for Red Line. “We wanted to make everything very thoughtful and in a gripping but simple way, without much exposition – but with much emotion and authenticity,” he explains. The element that sets the story in play is a tragic incident: the shooting of an innocent African-American doctor at the hands of a white police officer. “The lighting and composition changed after this irreversible act,” Billeter explains. “I wanted to create a shift in attitude to underscore the tough consequences of a single violent act, in order to comment on real and relevant current sociopolitical events. While in the beginning, the approach is more classic, afterward I wanted to show the feeling of desperate loss in the survivors, by framing them in the more marginal areas of the shot, and in contrast signaling the scrutiny and the pressure the perpetrator faces, now crowded in a more packed frame.” There is another challenge that pilot DP’s must keep in mind: setting a tone that, as Billeter says, can “be replicated and maintained once the budget and time restrictions kick in for the series order.” But many pilot DP’s say they know that what they have done to sell their story might not be viable in the series. Or, as Reiker concludes: “Even though you are setting the look for the series, the next DP usually brings their own touch.”

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I A T O R A T Earning an ECA is huge for cinematographers on the rise; it brings attention to their skills and opens doors to new opportunities. That’s particularly important in an industry already crowded with talent and technology. Showing how to apply that talent and technology to make art is a true competitive advantage, as innovation continues to lower the barriers to the industry. “Technology has made [this industry] more accessible to anyone who wants to try making films,” notes 2018 honoree T. Acton Fitzgerald [operator]. “Once we get to a certain level of experience, we want to use higher caliber equipment, but it’s cool that any kid with a phone can learn fundamentals

like framing and screen direction, and even edit their movies on their phone. It’s not unlike how my friends and I used to make skate films on camcorders when we were kids, editing in camera or tape to tape.” Operator and fellow honoree Alicia Robbins, SOC, adds that “great cameras have become smaller, cheaper and easier to shoot with in virtually any environment. I fully embrace all of the innovations that make our art simpler – some have been amazingly helpful in my creations and others not so much.” “People are able to create, experiment and iterate faster than ever before, resulting in such a rich universe of content for us to build on as filmmakers,” describes Tommy PHOTO BY CRAIG T. MATHEW

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Daguanno [operator]. “On the flipside, I think we need to be careful, because although we are able to learn the technical side of the craft much more easily, experience still needs to be hard-earned. It’s easier than ever for young filmmakers to get in over their heads, because even though they’re technically proficient, they may not have the experience needed to manage a large crew or stick to a demanding schedule.” Adds Robbins: “Now it comes down to the artistry, the story, the camera angles you choose and how you position your lights. It’s finding the right balance between the traditional ways of creating cinema in combination with new technology that I’m fascinated with.”

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2018 EMERGING CINEMATOGRAPHER AWARDS

HUNTER ROBERT BAKER DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY BROOKLYN

Winning Film: Peacock Killer Gear Used: ARRI ALEXA Plus, 1970’s Bausch + Lomb Super Baltar Prime Lenses Years in Guild: 6 Best thing about being in the Guild: ICG and ASC represent the best in the craft. The true camaraderie and mentorship amongst the Guild members is unparalleled.

Peacock Killer, an adaptation of Sam Shepard’s Hawk Moon, follows the close bond between a man and his dog on an unlikely journey of reconciliation. Shot in Upstate New York during winter, DP Hunter Robert Baker recalls that “it was so cold, the fluid in the O’Connor 2575D head froze.” The most challenging scene: a 100-foot tracking shot of the lead, Shea Whigham, trudging through a snowy night in the backcountry at –15 degrees, which required just enough light to see his performance. “Thankfully at this location, the ground banked downwards towards a river,” Baker, an East Coast native, adds. “I decided to hide a row of 4K HMIs gelled ¼ CTO pointed into the night sky, catching the moisture and giving the deep background a beautiful, soft edge.” Shea carried a high-powered flashlight that kicked off the snow, and the grips carried a piece of muslin-covered show card that gave him a soft key from below. A smaller backlight was placed at one end of the track to fill in some of the shadows. “Throughout the process, I try to be as vulnerable as possible and turn that vulnerability and emotionality into causality for why the light should have a certain quality and how the camera and the actors will dance,” Baker adds. The Guild member has previously earned an Emmy Award, the Arri Volker Bahnemann Award, one Silver and two Bronze Cannes Lions, a Clio and three One Show Merit Awards.

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“My dream has always been to help bring great stories to life. I’ve wanted to be a DP since age 17 when I met a mentor who taught me the craft and great responsibility of being a director of photography.”

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“Back when I was 14, I would shoot short films on my friend’s Hi8 video camera. Around that time I learned the term Director of Photography. When I found out the DP was responsible for lighting and composing the images, I said, ‘That’s what I want to do!’”

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2018 EMERGING CINEMATOGRAPHER AWARDS

TOMMY DAGUANNO OPERATOR LOS ANGELES & DETROIT

Winning Film: Detroit Diamond Gear Used: ARRI ALEXA Mini, Kowa Anamorphics Years in Guild: 7 Best thing about being in the Guild: Working with some of the best in the business, and their continued support in promoting the craft.

Based on a true story, Detroit Diamond focuses on a young, drug-addicted mother battling to save her son from Child Protective Services. The drama’s second act was particularly tricky, according to DP Tommy Daguanno, a Detroit native. “It was 4-plus pages of two people talking at a desk. I had to figure out how I was going to keep the scene from getting stale without distracting from the story. I settled on traditional coverage that turns into a slow 360 and settles on the other side of the 180 line before going in tight and transitioning to handheld for the remaining tense moments. It was tricky, but with some clever editing it all worked out.” The Cleveland International Film Festival premiered the short as an official selection; it also screened at Salute Your Shorts Fest and Rendezvous With Madness Toronto. Director Hamoody Jaafar appreciates Daguanno’s passion, collaborative spirit and innovation. “I’ll ask him to do some sketchy things from time to time – from a camera operating perspective or a logistical one like a gritty location. If it’s beneficial to the story, then he is always on-board,” Jaafar explains. “He’s a natural leader with a genuine soul. I absolutely adore working with him.”

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2018 EMERGING CINEMATOGRAPHER AWARDS

DREW DAWSON 2ND AC LOS ANGELES

Winning Film: Demon Gear Used: Panasonic Varicam S35 and Panavision Lenses Years in Guild: 7 Best thing about being in the Guild: The mentorship and camaraderie amongst peers.

A psychological thriller, Demon, follows a man recuperating at a desert homestead who discovers a woman held hostage there. “Demon was one of the toughest productions I have ever taken on – and that’s important to say, because it’s also one of the projects I’m most proud of,” says DP Drew Dawson. “The power of the script transported me to a place that I didn’t know I could go with my work.” The film is an 18-minute continuous shot under a full moon. “By holding on shots, the camera becomes one of the characters in the scene,” explains Dawson, a Michigan native. He tested several formats and settings to get the moonlight right. “I sent my Varicam moonlight tests to our colorist Chad Terpstra, who graded the raw footage in DaVinci Resolve. I screened them on a 25-inch Flanders Scientific monitor to determine what settings would give us the best final image. We de-noised the chroma noise a little bit, and decided to keep some texture in the image.” Demon won Best Narrative Short Film at the 2017 Austin Film Festival and was a 2018 Cinegear Official Selection. Director Caleb Slain describes Dawson as “willing to take visual risks to elevate the script,” and he “doubles down in the face of sometimes profound challenges – even when it might be personally convenient or professionally expedient to take an easier path. Drew’s unique combination of humility, ambition and loyalty to a story will take him to great places.”

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“I knew I wanted to be a DP shortly after I finished my first independent feature as a camera assistant. I worked on three more films back-to-back that summer and learned so much. I knew that I wanted to make films for the rest of my life.”


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T. ACTON FITZGERALD OPERATOR BOSTON

“I was making a bunch of skateboard and snowboard movies, but I didn’t really think I could make a career of that. A really great teacher named Miss O encouraged me to seek out a 9-month film program through Boston University called CDIA. As I learned more about the industry and started collaborating with other filmmakers, I realized I really enjoyed cinematography.”

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2018 EMERGING CINEMATOGRAPHER AWARDS

Winning Film: Intrusions Gear Used: ARRI ALEXA, Panavision Anamorphic Primos, Zeiss Superspeeds Years in Guild: 6 Best thing about being in the Guild: The opportunity to work with and learn from people who are more experienced than I am.

Intrusions is a spec short for a larger sci-fi project that tells the story of a young man augmenting his lucid dreams with software. Principal photography was done in two shoots a couple of months apart, and when the anamorphic primos weren’t available for the final period, T. Acton Fitzgerald subbed in an anamorphic adapter. “Since this part of the film was supposed to feel different,” notes the Townsend, MA, native, “the director and I were okay with the slightly different feel of this setup.” For the scene where the protagonist plugs into his self-built software system, the crew used different setups, including going underslung on the dolly to get low, and out on the Mitchell offset to get directly overhead. The sequences’ final shot was supposed to move nodal, but due to budget limitations and gear, Fitzgerald elected to rotate the touch and go 90 degrees to achieve the same feeling. “It worked great,” he says. Cinematographer Hillary Spera has worked with Fitzgerald since 2005. “I am forever grateful for his intuition, incredible skills, and friendship,” she says. “As a cinematographer, Tom’s instincts and ability to understand the nuances and layers of a scene are things I don’t see often and hugely admire. His images have a voice that I am excited to hear.”

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2018 EMERGING CINEMATOGRAPHER AWARDS

CLIFFORD JONES DIT LOS ANGELES

A tale of lifelong friends, Baby Steps explores how childhood experiences inform the decisions we make as adults. The budget and locations pushed DP Clifford Jones to get innovative. “On a shoot with a bigger budget, I would have 18Ks and 12-by-12s or 20-by-20s and a crew to be able to handle bright sunlight on the actors,” the Apex, NC native says of shooting a beach scene. “Thankfully, it ended up being overcast all day.” The story comes to a head in Kenny’s dark apartment, which presented a different challenge. “To balance keeping the mood of the scene and being able to see the actor’s eyes, I let the windows blow out, created some hard edge lights on the actors and used floor bounces to get light into the faces,” Jones adds. “The floor bounces can be harsh, but they worked well with the nature of the scenes.” The film screened at the 2018 Phoenix Film Festival and won the Copper Wing Award for Best African American Directed Short Film. Jones also earned an ECA in 2016 for In Memory. Baby Steps’ writer/director, Eric A. Dyson (himself a 25-year Guild member), met Jones in 2007. “What Cliff created with such a low budget is nothing short of amazing,” he asserts. “Cliff takes into consideration what all the departments need. He gets the credit for the cinematic end result, but he’s the first to admit it’s truly a group effort.”

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Winning Film: Baby Steps Gear Used: ARRI ALEXA Years in Guild: 19 Best thing about being in the Guild: The relationships – many of my longestlasting friends are members, and I know that they always have my back.


“I started taking pictures in 6th grade with an old rangefinder camera my dad let me use. In college, I took a TV production course and was immediately hooked. With my photography background, it just felt natural to start shooting.�

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MARTIN MOODY 2ND AC LOS ANGELES

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2018 EMERGING CINEMATOGRAPHER AWARDS

Winning Film: Goldblooded Gear Used: ARRI ALEXA, Cooke Anamorphic Primes Years in Guild: 6 Best thing about being in the Guild: Being surrounded by passionate professionals I can learn from and trust that also get excited about my new ideas and approaches to shooting.

Goldblooded, a tale of greed and its physiological anomalies, is the third collaboration between DP Martin Moody and director Tom Botchii. The duo also teamed up for multiple award-winning projects such as 11 Minutes and the upcoming feature film Artik. Much of Goldblooded’s lighting had to accommodate a broad shooting area required to whip the camera around, but a scene shot in an ambulance was the biggest challenge. “We worked with a large camera and 2× anamorphic primes in a tiny box filled with numerous actors,” the Munich-born Moody recalls. “The ambulance had to be lit from the inside, and it never actually moved for interior shots.” The sequence also involved one of the characters falling out of the vehicle’s back door. “We had no stunt team, so the action was choreographed by Tom and done by our actors,” continues Moody, who spent about six months of last year abroad shooting narrative feature work and viewing filmmaking from so many different diverse standpoints. “I used camera movement to sell the action.” Botchii says that before “Martin works his magic behind the lens, there are countless hours of research to make sure the feel and tone are adhered to within the frame. He enjoys being pushed to his limits, and challenging what filmmaking can be. That kind of thinking outside the box is key when creating compelling images!”

“I always enjoyed working with cameras, filming action sports while in high school and working on video projects. But I never thought I could build a career from shooting. After two weeks of film school studying technical sound recording, I switched majors, and the rest is history.”

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2018 EMERGING CINEMATOGRAPHER AWARDS

ALICIA ROBBINS, SOC OPERATOR BURBANK

Winning Film: Internet Gangsters Gear Used: Canon C300 Mark II, XEEN Cinema Prime Lenses Years in Guild: 10 Best thing about being in the Guild: It opens up doors that would otherwise be closed to you as a non-member.

Shot in one night, Internet Gangsters is a comedy about two Mafiosi, one of whom has a detailed Wikipedia page chronicling his exploits. One of the film’s challenges was that it featured five pages of talking heads as the hitmen sit in a car on a stakeout. “The director and I decided that there would be critical moments where we would shift the stage line and even do a dolly move across the line to signify a character shift to keep the frames interesting,” Robbins describes. “We also preferred very controlled and intentional movement until the climax of the film, where we go handheld.” The final scene featured an elaborate gunshot gag, requiring a pneumatic sprayer to go off simultaneously with the gunshot flash. “We took a Cineo Matchstix and wired it to two screws that we could manually strike as a flash,” recalls the Trussville, AL, native. “This had to be coordinated with our slider move, the sprayer and the flash.” They had wardrobe doubles for only two tries, and ended up using the first take. “Alicia’s a problem-solver – she comes to the table with solutions,” explains writer/ director Rainy Kerwin, a frequent collaborator. “Alicia manages to weave from genre to genre seamlessly and is always at the forefront of technology.”

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“I knew I wanted to be a DP at 18 when I saw Wally Pfister, ASC, in action on a small film shooting in Alabama. I was fascinated with what he was doing! I talked to him about his job and how to pursue this craft, and he suggested I look into AFI for grad school, which I attended from 2001 to 2003.�

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“I wanted to be behind the camera since I was nine years old. I fell for the artistry of Spielberg movies like ET and Close Encounters of the Third Kind. I got a VHS-C camcorder and went from there. I owe a lot to my wife for letting me pursue my dreams, and the film community in L.A. for embracing me.�

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2018 EMERGING CINEMATOGRAPHER AWARDS

GUS SACKS DIT LOS ANGELES

Winning Film: Embalmer Gear Used: Sony FS7 Super 35 Camcorder, Rokinon Primes Years in Guild: 5 Best thing about being in the Guild: Being able to learn from experienced professionals in every craft.

Embalmer follows a mortician and his apprentice as they muse about life, death and what it means to prepare for one’s passing. Ironically, the two-day shoot about death had to be postponed for eight weeks, when DP Gus Sacks’ son was born a month early. “That 3 a.m. call to [director] Jimmy [Moreno] and [producer] Stephen [Barnes] was difficult to make considering how much work went into getting the film to that point,” remembers Sacks, a Philadelphia native. “They were incredibly gracious and congratulatory and pushed the shoot to allow me to remain involved.” The hallway scene, which tracks the mortician and apprentice ferrying a body from the elevator to the embalming room, stands out for Sacks. “We lit it and then started turning off lights. We ended up playing just a few diffused overhead fluorescent units, and a raking top light for the stairs,” he notes. “I like the deep contrast of the hallway and the embalming room. It sets a great tone for the content of the film.” Moreno was drawn to Sacks’ style. “There was something energetic and moody about his work that I didn’t see in other reels. I’m most impressed with Gus’ instinct. He knows just the right way to approach the scene. Also, he seems to be immune to fatigue – a trait I wish I had.”

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2018 EMERGING CINEMATOGRAPHER AWARDS

DAVID STRAGMEISTER OPERATOR LOS ANGELES & TEL AVIV

Winning Film: Intergalactic Samurai Gear Used: ARRI ALEXA, Zeiss Hi-Speed Years in Guild: 4 Best thing about being in the Guild: Sharing knowledge and helping each other.

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Intergalactic Samurai is a drama about a young girl escaping the adult person she is expected to be. It culminates with her climbing a hill with her younger sister and surveying the world from a new perspective. “The project is structured and designed, yet very immediate and almost documentary with the characters,” notes DP David Stragmeister. “The main challenge was keeping a specific design to the film while maintaining a coherent style,” adds the Tel-Aviv native. “It all came down to capturing the moment at some point. It took me a while to combine those two seemingly separate approaches. At the end I think that what we have is a performance-driven piece that pays attention to subtle nuances. The visuals feel specific, which I’m happy about because the process was very intuitive.” Stragmeister learned to “let go of the preciousness of a preconceived plan,” he explains. (Work requirements for the young actors forced him to abandon the original shot list.) “It felt right to let go of some of my old stylistic approaches. And it made a much better film.” Director Hagar Ben-Asher works frequently with the DP. “David, when shooting a scene, has a very interesting way of being ‘in it’ and ‘out of it’ at the same time,” she notes. “His ability of looking at a scene and experiencing it emotionally is, for me, a rare quality; it’s one of the main reasons I’d like him to be shooting all my future projects.”


“My grandfather and I printed black-and-white photos in his basement when I was six, and I got my first still camera from my father when I was eight. Cinematography felt like a natural progression and allowed more sequential storytelling.�

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PRODUCTION CREDITS

COMPILED BY TERESA MUÑOZ – AS OF AUGUST 1, 2018 ICG Magazine strives to maintain an up-to-date and accurate record of all crew members for the Production Credits section. In order for us to continue to provide this service, your input is of the utmost importance. You are our only source of information. Please take note of the following requests. They will allow us to better serve you. Please provide up-to-date and complete crew information (including Still Photographers, Publicists, Additional Units, etc.). Please note that the deadline for the Production Credits is on the first of the preceding cover month (excluding weekends & holidays).

Submit your jobs online by visiting: www.icg600.com/MY600/Report-Your-Job Any questions regarding the Production Credits should be address to Teresa Muñoz at teresa@icgmagazine.com

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20th CENTURY FOX “911” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Joaquín Sedillo, ASC Operators: Brice Reid, SOC, Duane Mieliwocki, SOC, Phil Miller Assistants: Ken Little, Noah Thomson, Eric Guerin, Roger Spain, Naomi Villanueva, Jihane Mrad Steadicam Operator: Brice Reid, SOC, Steadicam Assistant: Ken Little Loader: Paulina Gomez Utility: Joshua Smith “AMERICAN HORROR STORY” SEASON 8 Director of Photography: Gavin Kelly Operators: BJ McDonnell, Nathan Levine-Heaney Assistants: Mike Vejar, Gary Johnson, Beaudine Credle, Dawn Nakamura Camera Utility: Zac Prange Digital Utility: Gabriela Hirata “REL” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: George Mooradian, ASC Operators: Jack Chisholm, Ron Hirschman, Bruce Pasternack, John Boyd Assistants: Jeff Lorenz, Michele McKinley, Hunt Hibler, Kevin Menteer Camera Utility: Kate Steinhebel Digital Utlity: Selvyn Price Jib Arm Operator: Jack Chisolm Jib Arm Assistant: Hunt Hibler Video Controller: Keith Anderson “STAR” SEASON 3 Directors of Photography: Crescenzo Notarile, ASC, AIC, Bobby La Bonge Operators: Aiken Weiss, Jim Gucciardo Assistants: Maurizio Dotto, Chad Brock, April Ruane Crowley, Grace Preller Chambers Steadicam Operator: Aiken Weiss Loader: Trent Walker Utility: Anna-Marie Aloia “STUBER” Director of Photography: Bobby Shore Operators: William O’Drobinak, Tim Fabrizio Assistants: Max Junquera, Ryan Weisen, Sterling Wiggins, Paul Saunders Steadicam Operator: Tim Fabrizio Digital Imaging Tech: Joe Elrom Loader: Trey Volpe Still Photographer: Hopper Stone Publicist: Rachel Roth LA UNIT Director of Photography: Bobby Shore Operator: Orlando Duguay Assistants: Patrick Blanchet, Liam Miller, Jorge Devotto, Jule Fontana Digital Imaging Tech: Michael Borenstein Loader: Lindsey Gross Still Photographer: Karen Ballard “THE GIFTED” SEASON 2 Directors of Photography: Bart Tau, Peter Kowalski Operators: Matt Doll, Andrew Fisher, Christian Satrazemis Assistants: Justin DeGuire, Cristian Trova,

Joe Waistell, Taylor Case, Lauren Gentry, Justin Cooley Steadicam Operator: Matt Doll Steadicam Assistant: Justin Deguire Digital Imaging Tech: Joe Dare Loader: Peter Johnston Digital Utility: Becca Bennett Still Photographers: Eliza Morse, Guy D’Alema ABC STUDIOS “JESSICA JONES” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Manuel Billeter Operators: Michael F. O’Shea, Kate Larose Assistants: Marc Hillygus, Jason Rihaly, Vincent Tuths, Ryan Toussieng Loaders: Kelsey Middleton, Jonathan Peralta “JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE!” SEASON 16 Lighting Director: Christian Hibbard Operators: Greg Grouwinkel, Parker Bartlett, Garrett Hurt, Mark Gonzales Steadicam Operator: Kris Wilson Jib Operators: Marc Hunter, Randy Gomez, Jr., Nick Gomez Camera Utilities: Charles Fernandez, Scott Spiegel, Travis Wilson, David Fernandez, Adam Barker Video Controller: Guy Jones Still Photographers: Karen Neal, Michael Desmond 2ND UNIT Directors of Photography: Bernd Reinbardt, Steve Garrett “THE PUNISHER (AKA CRIME)” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Petr Hlinomaz Operators: Dana Altomare, Todd Armitage Assistants: Robert Becchio, John Oliveri, Alisa Colley, Niknaz Tavakolian Loaders: AJ Strauman, Toni Sheppard AFN PRODUCTIONS-TELEPICTURES “THE REAL” SEASON 5 Lighting Director: Earl Woody, LD Operators: Kevin Michel, David Kanehann, Steve Russell, Bob Berkowitz Steadicam Operator: Will Demeritt Camera Utilities: James Magdalin, Henry Vereen, John Markese Jib Arm Operator: Jim Cirrito Video Controller: Jeff Messenger

Still Photographer: Scott Garfield 2ND UNIT Director of Photography: Michael Svitak Operators: Jody Miller Assistants: Nick Infield, Jared Jordan, Steve Wolfe, Rudy Pahoyo Digital Utility: Cameron Burrell Digital Imaging Tech: Jake LaGuardia Steadicam Operator: Jody Miller AMERICAN HIGHT “BIG TIME ADOLESCENCE” Director of Photography: Andrew Huebscher Operator: Tom Wills Assistants: Camille Freer, Malcolm Purnell Digital Imaging Tech: James Notari Steadicam Operator: Tom Wills Loader: Todd Thompson A VERY GOOD PRODUCTION, INC. & WAD PRODUCTIONS “THE ELLEN DEGENERES SHOW” SEASON 16 Lighting Director: Tom Beck Ped Operators: David Weeks, Paul Wileman, Tim O’Neill Hand Held Operator: Chip Fraser Jib Operator: David Rhea Steadicam Operator: Donovan Gilbuena Video Controller: James Moran Head Utility: Craig “Zzo” Marazzo Utilities: Arlo Gilbuena, Wally Lancaster, Diego Avalos BASHIRA NEW YORK, INC. “BASHIRA” Director of Photography: Chris Norr Operator: Shannon Madden Assistants: Cory Stambler, Brett Roedel Digital Imaging Tech: Dan Brosnan Still Photographer: Ben Knight BEACHWOOD SERVICES “DAYS OF OUR LIVES” SEASON 53 Directors of Photography: Mark Levin, Ted Polmanski Operators: John Sizemore, Mark Warshaw, Vickie Walker, Michael J. Denton, Steve Clark Utilities: Steve Bagdadi, Gary Cypher Video Controller: Alexis Dellar Hanson

AFTER, PS LLC “AFTER” Director of Photography: Adam Silver Operators: Josiah Morgan, Peter Hawkins Assistants: Roberto Delgado, Tyler Harrison, Trisha Solyn, Alex Hooper Loader: Erin Strickland Still Photographer: Erika Doss

BIG BEACH TV “SORRY FOR YOUR LOSS” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Xavier Grobet, ASC Operators: Bud Kremp, Eduardo Fierro Assistants: Dennis Seawright, Dale White, Mike Alvarez, Rich Kent Digital Imaging Tech: James Notari Loader: Dustin Keller Digital Utility: Nico Rich Still Photographer: Beth Dubber

AMAZON/PICROW STREAMING INC. “TOO OLD TO DIE YOUNG” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Eric Zimmerman Operators: John Pingry, Todd Bell Assistants: Sarah Ingram, Layna McAllister, Gayle Hilary, Rafiel Chait Digital Imaging Tech: Daniel Satinoff Camera Utility: Jake LaGuardia Digital Utility: DJ Williams

BLUE BLUES “BIG LITTLE LIES” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Jim Frohna Operators: Shelly Gurzi, DJ Harder Assistants: Faith Brewer, Laura Goldberg, Daisy Smith, Eric Matos, Michael Ashe Loader: Dagmara Krecioch Camera Utility: Amanda Hamaday Still Photographer: Jennifer Clasen

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BROADWAY VIDEO “VAMPIRES VS THE BRONX” Director of Photography: Blake McClure Operator: Andy Kugler Assistants: Kevin Walter, Scott Miller Loader: Amanda Uribe CBS “BULL” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Derick Underschultz Operators: Barnaby Shapiro, Doug Pellegrino Assistants: Roman Lukiw, Soren Nash, Mike Lobb, Trevor Wolfson Digital Imaging Tech: Gabe Kolodny Loaders: Wyatt Maker, Nialaney Rodriguez “CRAZY EX-GIRLFRIEND” SEASON 4 Director of Photography: Ian Dodd Operators: Shasta Spahn, Bonnie Blake, Taj Teffaha Assistants: Eric Dyson, Eric Wheeler, Freddy Rosado, Blake Hooks Digital Imaging Tech: Sam McConville Utility: James Dunham “ENTERTAINMENT TONIGHT” SEASON 37 Lighting Designer: Darren Langer Director of Photography: Kurt Braun Operators: Jaimie Cantrell, James B. Patrick, Allen Voss, Ed Sartori, Henry Zinman, Bob Campi, Rodney McMahon, Anthony Salerno Camera Utility: Terry Ahern Video Controllers: Mike Doyle, Peter Stendal “MAN WITH A PLAN” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Gary Baum, ASC Operators: Glenn Shimada, Travers Hill, Lance Billitzer, Ed Fine Assistants: Adrian Licciardi, Jeff Goldenberg, Alec Elizondo, Clint Palmer, Jason Herring Utilities: Danny Lorenze, Sean Askins Digital Imaging Tech: Derek Lantz Video Controller: John O’Brien

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“NCIS” SEASON 16 Director of Photography: William Webb, ASC Operators: Gregory Paul Collier, George Loomis Assistants: Chad Erickson, James Troost, Nathan Lopez, Helen Tadesse, Anna Ferrarie “NCIS: LOS ANGELES” SEASON 10 Director of Photography: Victor Hammer Operators: Terence Nightingall, Tim Beavers Assistants: Keith Banks, Richie Hughes, Peter Caronia, Jacqueline Nivens Steadicam Operators: Terence Nightingall, Tim Beavers Steadicam Assistants: Keith Banks, Richie Hughes Digital Imaging Tech: John Mills Digital Utility: Trevor Beeler Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe Publicist: Kathleen Tanji “NCIS: NEW ORLEANS” SEASON 5 Director of Photography: Gordon Lonsdale, ASC Operators: Jerry Jacob, Tony Politis, Vincent Bearden Assistants: Peter Roome, Brouke Franklin, Jeff Taylor, Toni Weick, Dave Edwards, Sienna Pinderhughes Steadicam Operator: Vincent Bearden Digital Loader: Christian Wells Digital Utility: Kolby Heid Still Photographer: Sam Lothridge “NO ACTIVITY” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Judd Overton Operators: Damian Church, Paul Horn, Robert Draper Assistants: Symon Mink, Jefferson Jones, Brian Udoff, Kirsten Laube, Brendan Devanie, Matthew Freedman Steadicam Operator: Damian Church Digital Imaging Tech: Dane Brehm Digital Utility: Tim Balcomb

“THE TALK” SEASON 8 Lighting Director: Marisa Davis Ped Operators: Art Taylor, Mark Gonzales, Ed Staebler Hand Held Operators: Ron Barnes, Kevin Michel, Jeff Johnson Jib Operator: Randy Gomez Head Utility: Charlie Fernandez Utilities: Mike Bushner, Doug Bain, Dean Frizzel, Bill Greiner, Jon Zuccaro Video Controller: Richard Strock Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe COLUMBIA “TOSH.0” SEASON 10 STAGE CREW Operator: Jason Cochard Camera Utilities: Benjamin Steeples, Kyle Kimbriel, Roger Cohen FIELD CREW Director of Photography: Andrew Huebscher Operator: Jason Cochard Assistants: Benjamin Steeples, Kyle Kimbriel, Roger Cohen, Delfina Garfias CONACO “CONAN” SEASON 8 Operators: Ted Ashton, Nick Kober, Kosta Krstic, James Palczewski, Bart Ping, Seth Saint Vincent Head Utility: Chris Savage Utilities: Baron Johnson, Josh Gwilt “SHE’S GOTTA HAVE IT” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Daniel Patterson Operators: Richard Sarmiento, Kerwin DeVonish Assistants: Michael Garofalo, Jamie Marlowe, Patrick Bracey, Marc Charbonneau Loader: Zakiya Lucas Still Photographer: David Lee


CRANETOWN “AWKWAFINA” PILOT Director of Photography: Michelle Lawler Operators: Eli Aronoff, Pierre Colonna Assistants: Timothy Trotman, Carolyn Pender, Zach Grace, Kyle Parsons Loader: Yayo Vang Still Photographer: Sarah Shatz CRASH FOR GOLD PRODUCTIONS, LLC “CRASHING” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Rodney Taylor Operators: Rod Calarco, Frank Godwin Assistants: Jerome Williams, Christopher Silano, Chris Cafaro, Cameron Sizemore Loader: Billy Holman Still Photographer: Craig Blankenhorn DROLE PRODUCTIONS, LLC “HUGE IN FRANCE” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Tommy Maddox Operators: Pauline Edwards, Robert Arnold Assistants: Prentice Sinclair Smith, Jose De Los Angeles, Alex Lim, Gina Victoria Digital Imaging Tech: Tyson Birmann Still Photographer: Adam Rose EYE PRODUCTIONS, INC. “$1” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Darran Tiernan Operators: Chris Cuevas, Rich Schutte

Assistants: Norris Fox, Colin Sheehy, Jonathan Clark, Jason Cianella Digital Imaging Tech: Jamie Metzger Loader: Brian Bresnehan Digital Utility: Samar Kauss Still Photographer: Patrick Harbron “BLUE BLOODS” SEASON 9 Director of Photography: Gene Engels Operators: Stephen Consentino, Geoff Frost Assistants: Graham Burt, Jacob Stahlman, Chris Seehase, Kenny Martell Digital Imaging Tech: Ryan Heide Loaders: Neicy McFadden, Caleb Keeler “ELEMENTARY” SEASON 7 Director of Photography: Thomas Houghton, ASC Operators: Carlos Guerra, Jeremy Weishaar Assistants: Jason Cleary, Charlie Foerschner, Kyle Blackman, Patrick O’Shea Loaders: Dylan Endyke, Ryan Haddon Still Photographer: Elizabeth Fisher “MADAM SECRETARY” SEASON 5 Director of Photography: Learan Kahanov Operators: Jamie Silverstein, Peter Vietro-Hannum Assistants: Heather Norton, Jamie Fitzpatrick, Amanda Rotzler, Damon LeMay Digital Imaging Tech: Keith Putnam Loaders: Christopher Patrikis, Kristina Lally

FAYLEURE PRODUCTIONS, LTD “TIMMY FAILURE” Director of Photography: Masanobu Takayanagi Operator: Bela Trutz Assistants: Patrick LaValley, Danielle Eddington Steadicam Operator: Bela Trutz Loader: Jasmine Karcey FOX 21 “THE CHI” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Abe Martinez Operators: Garret Benson, Richard Crow Assistants: Paul DeMarte, Rachel Donofrie, Michael Fierros, J’mme Love Loader: Tom Zimmerman Utility: Josh Smith Still Photographer: Parrish Lewis FUNNY OR DIE “NO ACTIVITY” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Judd Overton Operators: Damian Church, Paul Horn, Rob Draper Assistants: Symon Mink, Jefferson Jones, Brian Udoff, Kirsten Laube, Brendan Devanie Steadicam Operator: Damian Church Steadicam Assistant: Symon Mink Digital Imaging Tech: Dane Brehm Loader: Tim Balcomb

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Assistants: Johnny Sousa, Elizabeth Singer, Robert Wrase, Katie Waalkes Loaders: Tyler Swanek, Kansas Ballesteros Still Photographer: Patrick Harbron, Linda Kallerus LATE SEVENTIES “MINDHUNTER” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Eric Messerschmidt Operators: Brian Osmond, William Dearborn Assistants: Alex Scott, David Edsall, Gary Bevans Loader: Liam Doyle Still Photographer: Merrick Morton LONG TERM 2, LLC “THE CONTENDER” SEASON 5 Director of Photography: Jason Hafer Operators: John Lovell, Alex Wentworth, Dan Kavanaugh, Tayler Knight, Gene Bradford, Chris Lobreglio, MacGregor Barron, Andrew Kwon, Michael Dean, Alex Garcia, Dana Pustetta, Brandon Haberman, Art Peña, Dax Rhorer, Sherri Kauk, Mo Frahm, Vince Acosta, Sharra Romany, Andrei Cranach, Bret Smith, Andy Waruszewski, Mitch Kim, Rob Cammidge Assistants: Joe Prudente, Ian Mosley, Danaya Wattanapan, Mike Warfel, Armando Muñoz, Cameron Kahangi, Chad Nagel, Dave Hawes, Orlin Ivanov, Corey Bringas, Rickie Gustilo, Matt Hackbarth, Will Im, Keith Wilson, Josh Collinsworth, Bernie Smith, Tony Perez

HBO “ACCESS” Directors of Photography: Alison Kelly, Donald A. Morgan, ASC, Carmen Cabana Operators: Michelle Crenshaw, Dianne Farrington Assistants: Michele McKinley, Maricella Ramirez, Diona Mavis, Katie Santore, Jeannette Hjorth, Tim Tillman, Loren Azlein Digital Imaging Tech: Von Thomas HGTM, INC. “HIGH MAINTENANCE” SEASON 3 Directors of Photography: Brian Lannin, Dagmar Weaver-Madsen Operator: Zack Schamberg Assistants: Pedro Corcega, Olga Abramson, Matthew Montalto, Haffe Acosta Loader: Jeff Makarauskas HOP, SKIP AND JUMP PRODUCTIONS “GOOD TROUBLE” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Marco Fargnoli Operators: Nick Franco, Patrick Rousseau Assistants: Seth Kotok, Danny Gardner, Jeff Saldin Steadicam Operator: Nick Franco Steadicam Assistant: Seth Kotok Loader: Ryan Polack Digital Utility: Dylan Neal

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HORIZON “ANDI MACK” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Matthew Williams Operator: Scott Hoffman Assistants: John Williams, David Rhineer, Kurtis Burr, Nick Nebeker Steadicam Operator: Scott Hoffman Digital Imaging Tech: Sean McAllister JAY SQUARED PRODUCTIONS, LLC “BLINDSPOT” SEASON 4 Director of Photography: Andrew Priestley Operators: Pyare Fortunato, Peter Ramos Assistants: Andrew Smith, Aleksandr Allen, Jonathan Monk, Bryant Bailey Digital Imaging Tech: Chloe Walker Loaders: Darnell McDonald, Andrew Laboy Still Photographer: Phil Caruso KINGO GONDO COMPANY, LLC “NOW APOCALYPSE” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Sandra Valde Operators: Yvonne Chu, Jesse Bactat Assistants: Derek Plough, Michaela Angelique, Paul Auerbach, Brittany Meadows Digital Loader: Isaac Guy Still Photographer: Katrina Marcinowski KAPITAL ENTERTAINMENT “TELL ME A STORY” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Doug Emmett Operators: Afton Grant, Gabor Kover

MIXED BAG PRODUCTIONS, LLC “THE RIGHTEOUS GEMSTONES” PILOT Director of Photography: Brandon Trost Operators: Kevin Atkinson, John Lehman Assistants: David White, Matthew Mebane, Justin Urban Digital Imaging Tech: Andy Bader Still Photographer: Fred Norris MRC: MEDIA RIGHT CAPITAL/STARZ “COUNTERPART” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Tobias Datum Operators: Karsten Jacobsen, Collin Davis Assistants: Kevin Akers, Kathryn Moss, Bram Weinkselbaum, Alexandra Weiss Steadicam Operator: Karsten Jacobsen Loader: Charles Alexander Still Photographer: Nicole Wilder 2ND UNIT Director of Photography: Brett Juskalian NBC “AMERICAN NINJA WARRIOR” SEASON 10 Director of Photography: Tim Baker Operators: Bry Sanders, John Armstrong, Jay Mack Arnette, Rob Cammidge, Brian Connolly, Megan Drew, Jason Hafer, SOC, Jeff Hamby, Ashley Hughes, Jeremiah Smith, Rodrigo Rodrigues, Brett Smith, Jed Udall, Danny Whiteneck, Brenda Zuniga, SOC Techno Jib Operator: Michael Ryan Fletchal Jib Operator: Brian Gaetke Techno Jib Puller: Chris Dickon, Jason Kay Lead Assistant: Dominic DeFrank Assistants: Patrick Bellante, Shelby Cipolla,


Andres Cuevas, Gerry Lano, Jesse Martinez Steadicam Operators: Brian Freesh, SOC Austin Rock Digital Imaging Tech: Lorie Moulton, Trevor Cohen Utilities: Timothy Farmer, Sherwin Maglanoc Steadicam Assistant: Rick Smith BTS Operator: Andrew Kwon BTS Assitant: James Martinez Video Controller: Alan Pineda Still Photographer: Eddy Chen “CHICAGO FIRE” SEASON 7 Director of Photography: Jayson Crothers Operators: Rob Stenger, William R. Nielsen Assistants: Melvina Rapozo, Zach Gannaway, Brian Romano, Gary Malouf Digital Loader: J’mme Love Digital Utility: Nathan D. Sullivan Still Photographer: Elizabeth Morris 2ND UNIT Director of Photography: William R. Nielsen “CHICAGO MED” SEASON 4 Director of Photography: Lex duPont, ASC Operators: Faires Anderson Sekiya, Chris Hood, Joe Tolitano Assistants: George Olson, Keith Hueffmeier, Jason Bonner, Laura Difiglio, Sam Knapp, Patrick Dooley Steadicam Operator: Faires Anderson Sekiya

Steadicam Assistant: George Olson Loader: Joey Richardson Digital Utility: Matt Brown “CHICAGO PD” SEASON 6 Director of Photography: Rohn Schmidt Operators: James Zucal, Will Eichler, Seth Thomas Assistants: John Young, Don Carlson, David “YT” Wightman, Jamison Acker, Phillip Walter, Kyle Belousek Steadicam Operator: William Eichler Digital Loader: Nicholas Wilson Digital Utilities: Michael Gleeson, Marion Tucker 2ND UNIT Director of Photography: James Zucal “MIDNIGHT, TEXAS” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Mike Spragg, BSC Operators: Matthew Pearce, Josh Turner Assistants: David Leb, Matt Cabinum, Betty Chow, John Hamilton Steadicam Operator: Matthew Pearce Steadicam Assistant: David Leb Digital Imaging Tech: Tim Gregoire Loader: Taylor Hilburn Digital Utility: Katy Jones “TALES OF THE CITY” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Federico Cesca

Operators: George Bianchini, Jennie Jeddry Assistants: Ben Spaner, John Fitzpatrick, Brent Weichsel, Tsyen Shen Digital Imaging Tech: Paul Schilens Loaders: Holly McCarthy, Katherine Rivera “WILL & GRACE” SEASON 10 Director of Photography: Gary Baum, ASC Operators: Glenn Shimada, Travers Hill, Lance Billitzer, Ed Fine Assistants: Adrian Licciardi, Jeff Goldenberg, Alec Elizondo, Clint Palmer, Jason Herring Utilities: Danny Lorenze, Sean Askins Digital Imaging Tech: Derek Lantz Video Controller: Stuart Wesolik Still Photographer: Chris Haston NETFLIX “SANTA CLARITA DIET” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Paul Maibaum, ASC Operators: Gary Camp, Heather Brown Assistants: Jon Sharpe, Jim Thibo, Kyle Sauer, Mike Cahoon Steadicam Operator: Gary Camp Steadicam Assistant: Jon Sharpe Loader: Sarah Lankford Camera Utility: John Mentzer PENNY LANE PRODUCTIONS, LLC “THE DEUCE” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Yaron Orbach Operators: Phil Martinez, Luke Owen

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Assistants: Waris Supanpong, Becki Heller, Randy Schwartz, Nathalie Rodriguez Loaders: Joshua Waterman, Brian Lynch Still Photographer: Paul Schiraldi PICROW STREAMING, INC. “THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL” SEASON 2 Directors of Photography: Eric Moynier, M.D. Mullen, ASC Operators: Jim McConkey, Greg Principato Assistants: Anthony Cappello, Rossana Rizzo, Kellon Innocent, Andrea Bias Digital Imaging Tech: Charlie Anderson Loader: James Dan Drummond Still Photographer: Nicole Rivelli POKE PRODUCTIONS “WALK RIDE RODEO” Director of Photography: Thomas Callaway Operators: Ralph Watson, Juergen Heinemann Assistants: Lane Luper, Steve Banister, Daniel Maestas Steadicam Operator: Ralph Watson Steadicam Assistant: Lane Luper Loader: Bishop Pattison Digital Utility: Michael “Fernie” Fernandez Technocrane Operator: Curtis Smith Still Photographer: Greg Peters POMS PICTURES, LLC “POMS” Director of Photography: Tim Orr Operator: J. Christopher Campbell Assistants: Tim Risch, Jackson McDonald, Kate Roberson, Aaron Willis, Mark Gilmer Steadicam Operator: J. Christopher Campbell Steadicam Assistant: Tim Risch Digital Imaging Tech: Caroline Oelkers POSSIBLE PRODUCTIONS “KIDDING” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Shawn Kim Operators: Shasta Spahn, Dennis Noyes Assistants: Lila Byall, Kira Hernandez, Ignacio Musich, Arthur Zajac Digital Imaging Tech: Dylan Johnson Loader: Estefania Garcia

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“RAY DONOVAN” SEASON 6 Directors of Photography: Robert McLachlan, ASC, David Franco Operators: Eric Schilling, Patrick Quinn Assistants: Michael Endler, Yvonne Vairma, Justin Whitacre, Martin Peterson Digital Imaging Tech: Tim Nagasawa Loaders: Kyle Gorjanc, Brian Grant Still Photographers: Jeff Neumann, Mark Schafer, Christopher Saunders

“WHEEL OF FORTUNE” SEASON 36 Director of Photography: Jeff Engel Operators: Diane L. Farrell, SOC, Jeff Schuster, Ray Gonzales, Steve Simmons, L. David Irete, Mike Corwin Camera Utility: Ray Thompson Head Utility: Tino Marquez Video Controller: Gary Taillon Jib Arm Operator: Randy Gomez, Sr. Still Photographer: Carol Kaelson

SONY “CAPTAIN MARVEL AKA OPEN WORLD” Director of Photography: Ben Davis Operators: Geoff Haley, Sarah Levy Assistants: Bill Coe, Robert McMahan, Steve Wong, Trevor Carroll-Coe, Ryan Creasy Digital Imaging Tech: Daniel Hernandez Digital Loader: Colleen Mleziva Digital Utility: Luis Hernandez Maxima Rig: Brice Reid Still Photographer: Chuck Zlotnick Publicist: John Pisani EPK: Sean Ricigliano

RED PEPPER FARMS “INTERVIEW 104” Director of Photography: James King Operators: Dave Howard, Alan Thatcher Digital Imaging Tech: John Waterman THE TAX COLLECTOR PRODUCTIONS, LLC “THE TAX COLLECTOR” Director of Photography: Sal Totino, ASC Operator: Will Arnot Assistants: Andrae Crawford, Robert Campbell, Lucas Deans, Kyler Jae, Travis Daking Steadicam Operator: Will Arnot Digital Imaging Tech: Francesco Sauta Still Photographer: Justin Lubin

“JEOPARDY!” SEASON 35 Director of Photography: Jeff Engel Operators: Diane L. Farrell, SOC, Mike Tribble, Jeff Schuster, L. David Irete Jib Arm Operator: Marc Hunter Head Utility: Tino Marquez Camera Utility: Ray Thompson Video Controller: Gary Taillon Still Photographer: Carol Kaelson

TLA FILMS “THE OPENING ACT” Director of Photography: Eric Edwards Operators: Bud Kremp, Nils Benson Assistants: Dennis Seawright, Dale White, Steven Magrath Loader: Nico Rich Still Photographer: Lisa Rose

“THE GOLDBERGS” SEASON 6 Director of Photography: Jason Blount Operators: Scott Browner, Kris Denton Assistants: Tracy Davey, Nate Havens, Gary Webster, Jen Bell-Price Digital Imaging Tech: Kevin Mills Digital Utility: Dilshan Herath Still Photographers: Nicole Wilder, Adam Taylor

TOPANGA PRODUCTIONS, INC. “SWAT” SEASON 2 Directors of Photography: Francis Kenny, ASC, Craig Fikse Operators: Tim Dolan, Brian Pitts, Michael Otis Ropert Assistants: Ryan Parks, Logan Turner, Thane Characky, Riley Padelford, Esther Woodworth, Mike Fauntleroy Camera Utility: Carl Lammi


SCH_Baum_ICG_Final.qxp_Layout 1 6/25/18 1:30 PM Page 1

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Loader: Jonathan Taylor Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe TURNER NORTH CENTER PRODUCTIONS, INC. “THE LAST O.G.” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Antoine Vivas Denisov Operators: Robert Pagliaro, David Taicher Assistants: Paul Colangelo, Cai Hall, Mabel Santos Haugen, Andrew Hamilton Loader: Joshua Bote Still Photographer: Macall Polay UNIVERSAL “DIRTY JOHN” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Todd McMullen Operators: Chris Murphy, Erdem Ertal Assistants: Dave Egerstrom, Eric Guthrie, Matt Guiza, Jerry Patton Loader: Michael Langford Camera Utility: Ben Shurtleff Still Photographer: Nicole Wilder “THE SINNER” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Radium Cheung, HKSC Operators: Justin Foster, David Kimelman Assistants: Gus Limberis, Glen Chin, Nicholas Koda, Ian Carmody Digital Imaging Tech: Anthony Hechanova Loaders: Sean McNamara, Chris Charmel

WARNER BROS. “BIG BANG THEORY” SEASON 12 Director of Photography: Steven V. Silver, ASC Operators: John Dechene, Richard Price, SOC, Jamie Hitchcock, Brian Armstrong Assistants: Nigel Stewart, Chris Hinojosa, Steve Lund, Meggins Moore, Whitney Jones Camera Utilities: Colin Brown, Jeannette Hjorth Video Controller: John O’Brien Digital Imaging Tech: Benjamin Steeples

“MOM” SEASON 6 Director of Photography: Steven V. Silver, ASC Operators: Cary McCrystal, Jamie Hitchcock, Larry Gaudette, Candy Edwards Assistants: Meggins Moore, R. Nigel Stewart, Damian Della Santina, Mark Johnson, Whitney Jones Camera Utilities: Alicia Brauns, Andrew Pauling Video Controller: Kevin Faust Digital Imaging Tech: Benjamin Steeples

“BLINDSPOT” SEASON 4 Director of Photography: Andrew Priestley Operators: Pyare Fortunato, Peter Ramos Assistants: Andrew Smith, Aleksandr Allen, Jonathan Monk, Bryant Bailey Digital Imaging Tech: Chloe Walker Loaders: Darnell McDonald, Andrew Laboy Still Photographer: Phil Caruso

“YOUNG SHELDON” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Buzz Feitshans, IV Operators: Neil Toussaint, SOC, Aaron Schuh Assistants: Matt Del Ruth, Tom Vandermillen, Grant Yellen, Brad Gilson, Jr., Megan Boundy Digital Loader: James Cobb Digital Utility: Joe Sutera Still Photographers: Bill Inoshita, Michael Desmond

“LETHAL WEAPON” SEASON 3 Directors of Photography: Andy Strahorn, William Wages, ASC Operators: Victor Macias, Joseph Broderick Assistants: James Rydings, Kaoru “Q” Ishizuka, Troy Blischok, Kelsey Castellitto Digital Imaging Tech: Peter Russ Digital Utility: Spencer Shwetz Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe

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EPOCH “ALDI” Director of Photography: Mott Hupfel Operator: Dana Morris Assistants: Ethan McDonald, Jordan Pellegrini, Garret Curtis Digital Imaging Tech: Michele DeLorimier FULL MOON FILMS, LLC “STEYER SPEECH” Director of Photography: Jim Simeone Operators: Mike Mulvey, Nate Swingle Assistants: Tim Sweeney, Darryl Byrne Digital Imaging Tech: Leonard Mazzone GIFTED YOUTH “TRUTH” Director of Photography: Jeff Powers Assistants: Alicia Pharris, Renni Pollock Digital Imaging Tech: Michael Borenstein “VITAMIN WATER” Director of Photography: Jeff Powers Assistants: Jared Wennberg, Julia Pasternak Digital Imaging Tech: Michael Borenstein HONOR SOCIETY “STOUFFER’S” Director of Photography: Justin Gurnari Assistant: Geoff Storts HUNGRY MAN “STATE FARM” Director of Photography: Eric Schmidt Operator: Ian Clampett Assistants: Daniel Hanych, Josh Greer, Jordan Pellegrini Digital Imaging Tech: John Spellman

COMMERCIALS ANONYMOUS CONTENT “JIM BEAM” Director of Photography: Nic Restrepo Assistant: Eric Hingst Digital Imaging Tech: Eric Almond ART CLASS PRODUCTIONS “SIMON MALLS” Director of Photography: Michael Belcher Assistant: Kyle Parsons Steadicam Operator: Matt Fleischmann ART & SCIENCES “ESPN SPORTS CENTER” Director of Photography: Ryley Brown Assistants: Conrad Castor, Noah Glazer Digital Imaging Tech: Dean Georgopoulos BULLY PICTURES “COGNIZANT” Director of Photography: Martin Ahlgren Operators: Claudio Rietti, Ryan Toussieng Assistants: Stanley Fernandez, Kevin Walter, Chris Eng Digital Imaging Tech: Eric Camp CAVIAR “AMEX” Director of Photography: Adam Newport-Berra Assistants: Brett Checkelsky, Alec Nickel,

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Sachi Bahra Steadicam Operator: Joe Belack CMS “STUBER” Director of Photography: David R Jones Operator: Keith Dunkerley Assistants: Ethan McDonald, Chris Slany, Ryan Monelli Digital Imaging Tech: Daniel Applegate “HARVARD PILGRIM HEALTH CARE” Director of Photography: Sean Bagley Assistants: Darryl Byrne, Michael Rodriguez-Torrent Digital Imaging Tech: Matt Dorris “TOMMY HILFIGER ADAPTIVE” Director of Photography: Matthias Koenigswieser Assistants: Ethan McDonald, Ryan Monelli Digital Imaging Tech: Jamie Metzger DANGART FILMS “STIHL” Director of Photography: Tristan Nyby Assistant: Anne Freivogel DUMMY “BOJANGLES” Director of Photography: Jay Feather Assistant: Daniel Ferrell, Nate Cummings Digital Imaging Tech: Michael Borenstein

IMPERIAL WOODPECKER “BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD” Director of Photography: Darren Lew Operator: Charlie Beyer Assistants: Jon Clemens, James Hair, Scott Miller Digital Imaging Tech: Jeff Flohr M SS NG P ECES “ALLSTATE” Director of Photography: Patrick Scola Assistants: Josh Coffin, Matt Brewer, Elver Hernandez Digital Imaging Tech: Michael Borenstein PRETTYBIRD “CROWN ROYAL” Director of Photography: Max Malkin Assistants: Hector Rodriguez, John Szajner Digital Imaging Tech: Michael Borenstein RADICAL MEDIA “AETNA” Director of Photography: Minka Farthing-Kohl Assistants: Evan Walsh, Jon Jeng Digital Imaging Tech: Tom Wong RATTLING STICK “OYSTER” Director of Photography: Jess Hall Operator: Scott Sakamoto, SOC Assistants: Craig Grossmueller,


Jonas Steadman, Harrison Reynolds, Noah Glazer Digital Imaging Tech: Alex Carr

TOOL “TOYOTA” Director of Photography: Justin Gurnari Assistant: Trevor Tufano Digital Imaging Tech: Nathan Borck

SUPERLOUNGE “GM” Director of Photography: Mark Plummer Operator: John Veleta Assistants: Micah Bisagni, Jason Alegre, Kymm Swank Digital Imaging Tech: Scott Beckley SUPERPRIME “SUPERPRIME” Director of Photography: Daniel Voldheim Assistants: Michael Leonard, Leon Sanginiti Digital Imaging Tech: Dustin Raysik TASTE IN MOTION, INC. “PAPA JOHN’S” Operator: Paul Goroff Assistant: John Clemens Digital Imaging Tech: Joe Belack TECHNOBABBLE “NBC EMMY PROMO BTS” Director of Photography: Gary Nardilla THE RESERVE CREATIVE GROUP “PANERA” Director of Photography: Justin Gurnari Assistants: Jared Wennberg, Josh Vandermeer Digital Imaging Tech/Phantom Tech: Ben Hopkins

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S T O P

M O T I O N

MICHELE K. SHORT MANIAC IS AN EXTRAORDINARY PROJECT. NOT ONLY IS IT A PURE VISUAL DELIGHT, WITH DYNAMIC AND INNOVATIVE DESIGN ELEMENTS AND AN EXCEPTIONAL CAST AND CREW, BUT EACH OF THE TEN EPISODES WAS UNIQUE IN TIME AND PLACE. UNUSUAL FOR A TV SERIES, WE HAD ONLY ONE WRITER, ONE DIRECTOR, ONE A.D. TEAM, AND ONE CINEMATOGRAPHER – ALL OF WHICH WAS GREAT FOR CREATIVE CONTINUITY. DARREN LEW (PICTURED HERE) MADE SURE TO SHARE DETAILS OF THE INTENDED LOOK, ALLOWING ME TO ADJUST CAPTURE ACCORDINGLY. THIS CLOSE COLLABORATION HELPED WITH MY COMMUNICATION FROM FIELD TO STUDIO, SO THE STILLS COULD ACCURATELY REFLECT THE SPIRIT OF THE PRODUCTION.

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2 0 1 8 E M E R G I N G CINEMATOGRAPHER A W A R D S

LOS ANGELES

Sunday, September 30, 2018 Directors Guild Theater / 5pm

NEW YORK CITY Sunday, October 28, 2018 SVA Theatre / 3pm

ATLANTA

Sunday, November 4, 2018 SCADshow / 3pm

“LAUNCHING CAREERS” WWW.ECAWARDS.NET

CHICAGO

Sunday, November 4, 2018 The Logan Theatre / 3pm