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ICG MAGAZINE

NOVEMBER

2019

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UNSCRIPTED

ISSUE

hyperdrive FORD

V

UNSCRIPTED

FERRARI

+

RUPAUL’S STILLS

DRAG

RACE GALLERY


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contents

UNSCRIPTED ISSUE November 2019 / Vol. 90 No. 9

DEPARTMENTS gear guide ................ 14 zoom-in ................ 22 master class ................ 26 exposure ................ 30 production credits ................ 70 stop motion .............. 82

SPECIAL

34

PHOTO BY DANIEL MCFADDEN/NETFLIX

unscripted stills gallery ........ 66

HYPERDRIVE

Check out the biggest, baddest (and safest) reality competition show to ever hit the small screen.

FORD V FERRARI Phedon Papamichael, ASC, GSC puts pedal-to-the-metal for the scorching new period racing drama.

RUPAUL'S DRAG RACE Working on the Emmy-winning reality series is a wild ride of experience, technique, and creativity.

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48 58


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PRE SI DE NT 'S LE T TE R

Celebration Time, Come On! This month’s ICG Magazine brings me back to my roots. I started in this industry working primarily in the live-events and magazine-show worlds. I can even remember carrying a Sony BVH-500 1-inch machine on my shoulder, chasing my camera operator as we both weaved through the National Puerto Rican Day Parade in New York City. I also have fond memories of an Ikegami HL79 on my shoulder, hooked up to a Sony BVU 110 ¾-inch U-matic recorder. And how could I forget the year that I derailed the setup of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade? Shooting from a cherry-picker rig on my 1979 Dodge van, I caused the entire caravan to go the wrong way because I decided to break the detailed route to get a better angle of the float I was covering! I consider myself blessed to have been a part of such experiences; shooting for shows like Entertainment Tonight, Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous, and The Reporters, and for MTV, VH-1 and ESPN will last forever in my memory. And that’s why this month’s issue, themed around unscripted content, is so near and dear to my heart. The Guild members who work in unscripted and live events have a tremendous array of skills, which often go unnoticed and unmentioned, and I am so pleased we are acknowledging the work of these unsung heroes. Having spent the last two decades working in episodic television and features, I, too, have been guilty of neglecting to recognize the incredibly diverse skills required to be successful in the unscripted arena. It’s a place where you don’t get another take to get it right, where you can’t rehearse every move until you feel you are ready to shoot, where you don’t have the luxury of perfectly setting the lighting. It takes a special person to excel under those conditions, and these are the kinds of Guild members readers will meet as they turn these pages. The diversity of talent in Local 600 never ceases to amaze. Sure, we have Oscar- and ASC-winning cinematographers, and SOC-winning camera operators, but the many Technical Emmys our crews have won in unscripted are just

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as impressive. Representing such a wide variety of members, with so many different issues and concerns, is a daunting task for our elected leaders, and, more importantly, our professional staff. In fact, I have yet to speak to a member who doesn’t feel his or her classification, or area of work, isn’t under-represented. But considering that we have almost nine thousand members, in almost fifty states and territories, the amount of representation every member does receive is actually quite impressive. Yes, we miss things, but that’s certainly not for lack of effort. I’m very proud of the extraordinary effort our staff puts into representing this large body of workers, as well as issues like this one, by the ICG Magazine team, to highlight all areas of this union. As an organization, we are taking many steps to be more efficient. We are conducting an in-depth analysis of how our professional staff functions, and we are implementing recommendations from this analysis to make us function at a higher level. Elected officers and executive staff are spending many hours trying to determine the best ways for us to work as a cohesive unit. In short, we are listening to you, our members, to prioritize the issues that matter most. When we hear of issues that concern the membership, we are moving quickly to try and solve the problem. The work I’m describing may sometimes go unnoticed, not unlike the terrific work being done every day by the unsung heroes in the live-event and unscripted worlds. But that doesn’t mean that the work isn’t happening, or that it’s any less important. Or that it shouldn’t, like the theme of this month’s ICG Magazine, be celebrated and shouted out from every possible organizational platform.

Lewis Rothenberg National President International Cinematographers Guild IATSE Local 600


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November 2019 vol. 90 no. 09

Publisher Teresa Muñoz Executive Editor David Geffner Art Director Wes Driver EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Tyler Bourdeau STAFF WRITER Pauline Rogers ACCOUNTING Glenn Berger Dominique Ibarra COPY EDITORS Peter Bonilla Maureen Kingsley CONTRIBUTORS David Geffner Ted Elrick Eric Liebowitz Daniel McFadden

INTERNATIONAL CINEMATOGRAPHERS GUILD Local 600 IATSE NATIONAL PRESIDENT Lewis Rothenberg NATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT Dejan Georgevich, ASC 1ST NATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT Christy Fiers 2ND NATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT John Lindley, ASC NATIONAL SECRETARY-TREASURER Stephen Wong NATIONAL ASSISTANT SECRETARY-TREASURER Jamie Silverstein NATIONAL SERGEANT-AT-ARMS Deborah Lipman NATIONAL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Rebecca Rhine

COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE Spooky Stevens, Chair

CIRCULATION OFFICE 7755 Sunset Boulevard Hollywood, CA 90046 Tel: (323) 876-0160 Fax: (323) 878-1180 Email: circulation@icgmagazine.com

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES WEST COAST & CANADA Rombeau, Inc. Sharon Rombeau Tel: (818) 762 – 6020 Fax: (818) 760 – 0860 Email: sharonrombeau@gmail.com EAST COAST, EUROPE, & ASIA Alan Braden, Inc. Alan Braden Tel: (818) 850-9398 Email: alanbradenmedia@gmail.com

ADVERTISING POLICY: Readers should not assume that any products or services advertised in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine are endorsed by the International Cinematographers Guild. Although the Editorial staff adheres to standard industry practices in requiring advertisers to be “truthful and forthright,” there has been no extensive screening process by either International Cinematographers Guild Magazine or the International Cinematographers Guild. EDITORIAL POLICY: The International Cinematographers Guild neither implicitly nor explicitly endorses opinions or political statements expressed in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. ICG Magazine considers unsolicited material via email only, provided all submissions are within current Contributor Guideline standards. All published material is subject to editing for length, style and content, with inclusion at the discretion of the Executive Editor and Art Director. Local 600, International Cinematographers Guild, retains all ancillary and expressed rights of content and photos published in ICG Magazine and icgmagazine.com, subject to any negotiated prior arrangement. ICG Magazine regrets that it cannot publish letters to the editor. ICG (ISSN 1527-6007) Ten issues published annually by The International Cinematographers Guild 7755 Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, CA, 90046, U.S.A. Periodical postage paid at Los Angeles, California. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ICG 7755 Sunset Boulevard Hollywood, California 90046 Copyright 2018, by Local 600, International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employes, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States and Canada. Entered as Periodical matter, September 30, 1930, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under the act of March 3, 1879. Subscriptions: $88.00 of each International Cinematographers Guild member’s annual dues is allocated for an annual subscription to International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. Nonmembers may purchase an annual subscription for $48.00 (U.S.), $82.00 (Foreign and Canada) surface mail and $117.00 air mail per year. Single Copy: $4.95 The International Cinematographers Guild Magazine has been published monthly since 1929. International Cinematographers Guild Magazine is a registered trademark.

www.icgmagazine.com www.icg600.com


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W IDE ANGL E

E

ven after watching all ten episodes Netflix provided of its reality competition series Hyperdrive, which premiered in mid-August, I didn’t quite grasp what this team of union filmmakers (including DGA Director Patrick McManus, ICG Director of Photography Adam Biggs, DGA First AD Dave Massey, and a large group of Local 600 camera team members) had accomplished. Even after I saw the stunning unit and BTS images from Hyperdrive’s onset photographer Daniel McFadden (Wheels of Steel and Stop Motion, pages 34 & 82), the enormity of the crew’s achievement had yet to sink in. When did I realize this wildly entertaining hybrid, the likes of which unscripted television has never seen, was truly epic? Not epic as in “compared to a Marvel movie,” or epic as in “compared to a Game of Thrones episode.” We’re talking audaciously epic by any industry standard; we’re talking epic as in laying five miles of cable around the former Eastman-Kodak film manufacturing plant, in Rochester, NY; epic as in rigging some 900 LED light tubes around alleys, dark corners, and a maze of factory piping; epic as in Guild operator Jeremiah Smith strapped into a minivan driving in reverse, and pulling his own focus to keep the racecar (which is doing donuts) in focus and frame. Epic as in creating safety protocols for hundreds of crewmembers across a 120-acre “set,” on which cars are traveling 100 miles per hour, at night. The moment I truly embraced Hyperdrive’s greatness came after McManus sent me images from a scout he did with Biggs 18 months before the series premiered, revealing the Kodak facility before the filmmakers worked their unscripted magic. Riddled with potholes and aging railroad tracks, fields of gravel, and patchy snow (the scout was in winter), it was as far from the spectacular “Blade Runner meets Grand Theft Auto” look the finished cut (and unit stills) displayed. That was also the moment when I vowed to never use the phrase “it was great…as far as reality television goes,” again. Hyperdrive looked amazing; Hyperdrive had an amazing

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crew; Hyperdrive had an amazing safety record – not a single incident despite the high potential for serious injury. Or as track designer and safety advisor Martyn Thake (a man who oversaw safety for the televised IndyCar racing series) told me: “Hyperdrive is a huge leap forward in showing this industry how to keep production crews safe without having to compromise content.” For me (and hopefully this entire industry), it’s time to lose the qualifiers that are often placed before unscripted television. Hyperdrive is great filmmaking, period. And the same goes for our second November feature on RuPaul’s Drag Race (page 58). Director of Photography Jake Kerber and his Guild camera team must wildly toggle between a range of shooting styles and environments – intimate vérité in the practically lit “queens’ workroom,” to elaborate grip and camera “dances” during the theatrically lit and designed “runway” stage. During one memorable runway moment, Operator Jay Mack Arnette II, working alongside Key Grip Austin Taylor, recalls a challenging dolly shot tracking multiple contestants on the stage while pulling his own focus. Operator Jon “Sarge” Schneider was equally tested during the outrageous “Draglympics” segment, and then he bravely stepped out from behind his viewfinder to be transformed by a show contestant (on camera) during the Makeover Challenge. Kerber says RuPaul, which recently won four Primetime Emmys, including Outstanding Reality-Competition Program, bringing its total to 13 Primetime Emmys in the last three years, fosters an environment in which key collaborators must consistently “adapt to changes on the fly.” It’s a show where the dynamic host coaxes contestants to never “be afraid to use all the colors in the crayon box,” the same bold mindset Kerber says he and his Local 600 camera team apply every day to a show Executive Producer Randy Barbato describes as having “massive photographic challenges.” Both of these series – Hyperdrive and RuPaul’s Drag Race – along with all the other unscripted content covered in this issue, feel bigger than life; and the union crews who are so dedicated to this world are as skilled as any in the entertainment industry. That’s just reality.

CONTRIBUTORS

Eric Liebowitz

(Unscripted Stills Gallery) “During my thousands of hours working on sets, I’ve experienced a range of human emotions: anticipation, anxiety, surprise, contempt, admiration, joy, excitement, anger, amusement, boredom, awe, pride, disappointment, satisfaction, euphoria, confusion, and triumph.”

Daniel McFadden

(Wheels of Steel, Stop Motion) “I enjoy shooting unscripted projects because you’re able to shape the narrative based on your approach. For Hyperdrive, I was brought in to photograph ‘The Finale,’ and I had a lot of ground to cover in two days – from the cars on the track zooming by at 100-plus miles per hour to the uncontrollable energy that filled the control booth, it was a challenging (and) exhilarating assignment.”

ICG MAGAZINE

David Geffner Executive Editor

Twitter: @DGeffner Email: david@icgmagazine.com

NOVEMBER

2019

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UNSCRIPTED

ISSUE

hyperdrive FORD

V

UNSCRIPTED

FERRARI

+

RUPAUL’S STILLS

DRAG

RACE GALLERY

Cover photo by Daniel McFadden


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ZOOM-IN

11.2019

Helena Jackson BY PAULINE ROGERS PHOTO BY TRAE PATTON/NBC

As Helena Jackson, a three-time Primetime Emmy nominee, tells it, she grew up in California’s Bay Area, watching a PBS talk show hosted by Geraldine (Geri) Lange (mother of actor Ted Lange). While in high school, Jackson was interviewed by San Francisco local CBS news reporter Belva Davis about the violence in schools. That experience made her want to be a female Walter Cronkite. However, when she saw herself on camera, Jackson didn’t like it. What she liked was the actual camera. For nine years, Jackson shot public affairs talk shows, parades, and marathon races for what was then KNTV/ABC in San Jose. She was even part of the crew that captured Pope John Paul II when he appeared at Laguna Seca Raceway in 1987. Eventually, Jackson went freelance, working

on The Rolling Stones Steel Wheels concert tour, where she says she learned a lot, “like when your truck tips [opens its doors and unloads], you’d better be there,” she smiles. “Stagehands don’t know where to take your equipment, and the production manager doesn’t want to chase you down. Leave something behind after your truck is off to the next city, and you have to sleep with that piece of equipment in your tour-bus bunk. That means a lot of teasing, to say the least.” Moving to L.A. resulted in six years on the CBS sitcom The Nanny, and then six different soap operas. As Jackson recalls of her soap days: “The actors are always moving, coming in a room, leaving a room, picking up props, throwing props [like drinking glasses], fighting and slapping one another. I can still remember operator John

Bromberek [aka Johnnie B.], who trained me, saying: ‘If they face you – shoot ’em.’ I remember I once had a shot that read: ‘The Door.’ So I was holding on the door waiting for the actor to enter. But there were three doors on the set. When the actor entered, I got yelled at because I was on the wrong door. Unbeknownst to me, the other two doors were prop doors. Lesson learned: if you are going to fill in on anything, watch a few episodes.” Jackson says even after so many years in the trenches, she still gets a little nervous the first few minutes of a live show before the nerves quickly go away. “In live TV, once the train leaves the station, there’s no redo,” she insists. “I remember on American Idol with 10 minutes to air, one of the judges was stuck in traffic. Ryan Seacrest explained (cont'd on page 24)

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ZOOM-IN

her absence. When she showed up, we had to shoot her wearing Jackie O–type shades and a hoodie on her head. That’s working live!” Shooting awards shows present their own challenges, “but they do have a pattern,” she shares. “The host comes out, gives the monologue, introduces the first presenters, and we are off. That doesn’t mean there aren’t glitches every so often. I was on a center [pedestal] camera for The NAACP Image Awards when Stevie Wonder was given a Lifetime Achievement Award. Stevie Wonder was told how long to make his song. However, when you are running out of time, it’s not like you can just get his attention to cut the song short. The producers told the host to end the show and head to the stage-left podium. I was directed to leave my close-up of Stevie and go to the host. They opened his mic, there were no lights on the host; he said, ‘Thank you and goodnight’ in the dark, all while Stevie was still playing! Not the best way to end a twohour live show.” Jackson, whose experience on game shows ranges from Ellen’s Game of Games to Family Feud to Beat Shazam likens that format to athletic events. “You have to know

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how to play the game and anticipate where the action will be when the contestant answers,” she relates. “Your camera is a puzzle piece that helps follow the action. “I was working on Beat Shazam with host Jaime Foxx,” she adds. “I had a loose single of Jamie talking with a woman contestant. Jaime turned around to the audience with his back to me. The woman’s husband was in my frame, so using my soap-opera experience, I just racked focus to the husband while he was speaking to Jaime. It wasn’t planned. But then ‘if they face you – shoot ‘em’ kicked in.” As for the live-event world, Jackson says it’s mostly about experience and paying attention. Performers are expected to do the same thing during the show as in the dress rehearsal. But that’s rarely the case. “The director may make a change, as per the producers, or think a shot might be better, based on the performer,” Jackson describes. “That’s scary because you don’t get a chance to rehearse the last-minute change, and you have to think fast. You have to be aware of what is on the program line at the time, which you can see when you press a button under the camera pan handle, and

jump cuts are a no-no.” Despite (or perhaps because of ) these many challenges, Jackson calls it a “golden time” for experienced live camera crews. Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, Amazon, and Facebook, as well as traditional studios/ networks such as Disney, Sony and Warner Bros, have all made streaming television an exciting new platform. “They all want those shows to sparkle and shine like Broadcast,” Jackson offers. Live crews are called for everything from competition judge shows to award shows to the recently popular fan after shows. Even live musicals of Broadway plays are becoming live TV events. “The call for experienced camera crews that can meet these demands and continue the high standards of live television is growing,” she concludes. “Producers and directors don’t want mistakes, and it’s always our goal, as union camera operators, not to make any mistakes – though, of course, we aren’t robots. We rely on our experience, our rehearsal time, and to concentrate on the show ahead – whether it is taped or live. If the operator can’t rise to the occasion – then as a freelancer, your phone won’t ring much.”

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Keith Winikoff BY PAULINE ROGERS PHOTO BY TOBIN YELLAND

Fifty years? Really? That’s right. Technical Director and Video Engineer Keith Winikoff just hit his fiftieth year in the industry, having won 11 Primetime Emmys (and earned another 26 Emmy nominations) and worked every conceivable type of live event production – from Cher Live in Las Vegas and Bette Midler Live to The Emmy Awards, The Academy Awards, and many others. Winikoff calls it all “a fun ride,” and not just the many different kinds of live programming he’s overseen, but also the many technological changes he’s experienced. Winikoff says he can still remember, as a child, sitting with his nose up to his parents’ black and white television and seeing the scan lines. “When NBC’s peacock came on, I could tell it was in color watching the subcarrier on our old 21-inch round TV,” he laughs. The day he entered his first control room, located beneath the library of the black and white UHF station at the College of San Mateo, CA, he knew he had found his place. After two summers at ABC’s KGO in San Francisco, a job offer from Herb Kraft to be a video engineer at ABC Hollywood led to working on specials for Julie Andrews, John Denver, and Lawrence Welk; such game shows as Let’s Make a Deal; and such soaps as General Hospital; as well as sitcoms, including Welcome Back, Kotter and Barney Miller. “I worked with Norelco PC 60 cameras, which took one video engineer for two cameras,” he recalls. “We had an hour-and-a-half ESU [engineering setup]. The equipment was highly unstable, so keeping the cameras registered was a real-time job. Then ABC built two new stages [the one-time Busby Berkeley pool], and I was asked to do the checkout – Ikegami HK 312 cameras with a computer-aided setup.” Winikoff calls it the most interesting time of his career, working hand-in-hand with the design engineers from the factory to modify and test the cameras. “I learned more about the equipment, and the design engineers learned about our real-world needs,” he states. What also began to occupy his time was fieldwork for ABC Sports. “I’m a pilot, so I loved doing Monday nights in the blimp for football,” he chuckles. Winikoff tested out color RF cameras as ABC’s Engineering department was developing them. “I was assigned to the 1972 Democratic and Republican Conventions [both in Miami] to engineer the AMPEX BCC 200, which was a two-tube camera – it had one luminance, one color, with a spinning wheel similar to the old CBS recommended standard in the mid1950s,” he explains. (cont'd on page 28)

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“I was fortunate to have started using the first generation of broadcast equipment and ending with today’s UHD/HDR technology.” After the 1977 strike, Winikoff left ABC and went freelance, working with Local 600 President Emeritus George Spiro Dibie, ASC, on Barney Miller. He also did live comedy shows for more than a decade – Billy Crystal, Robin Williams, Whoopi Goldberg, Comic Relief and more. But it’s the technology challenges he remembers most. “In 1983, for Diana Ross Live from Central Park, we were stretching the current technology based on the physical distances and venue restrictions,” he recounts. “As Technical Director, it was a challenge, working in a space the size of Central Park’s Great Sheep Meadow, with cameras that were RCA TK 47 and Ikegami HL 79’s. “When we went live, we were faced with yet another obstacle – wind and rain,” he adds. “Diana was the consummate performer and continued until we couldn’t – for the safety of the crowd and crew. We came back the next day, but that performance was memorable.” Distant locations, like the first show broadcast from China after Nixon restored relations, posed technical – and political – challenges. As the lone American video engineer in China, Winikoff had to be completely self-contained, using Compact Video’s gear and engineering support back in the U.S. Serving as both technical director and technical manager for Live from the Giza Pyramids, Winikoff had to arrange a small trailer with marginal HVAC, as well as book a complete video/audio package from Paris. “We had to get an uplink facility to the location,” he says. “The company was based in Israel, and when their mobile unit crossed the Egypt border, they wouldn’t allow the vehicle to pass. So all the equipment had to be removed and transported via automobiles. Sensitive transmission equipment, without proper air conditioning or wiring racks, spread in the Egyptian sand with crude wiring and power coming from a small generator, with some bare wires providing the power – all for a live show on FOX! I lost 10 years and gained a few gray hairs.” Winikoff says live TV crews thrive on last-minute challenges, and the skills to fix anything. “On Dick Clark’s Most Beautiful Girl

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in the World from Sydney, Australia, we had an Australian mobile unit,” he begins. “About a half-hour before airing, the technical director [Gene Crowe] came into the truck, and we noticed the GVC 300 switcher wasn’t working. I scrambled with the truck engineers and found a VERT Pulse [signal to trigger the switching] wasn’t getting to a module, so Dick Clark announced to the world that we might ‘go off the air,’ while I was on my knees holding a clip lead from one module to another until we went to the first break and soldered it.” What has made Winikoff a perfect fit for such last-minute technical challenges? Besides talent and quick decision-making, it’s his many years working through the system. As a video engineer, he learned the best way to collaborate with the lighting designer and available technology, using “my judgment and technology to reproduce what the LD’s vision is.” As a technical director, Winikoff has learned to keep his crews focused, despite the challenges. “It’s all about real-time editing, switching the video along with adding effects and merging graphics on a live event,” he says. And, finally, as a technical supervisor or technical manager, Winikoff finds the proper crew and resources to bring the production to the live audience, the technical linchpin that holds it all together. “I was fortunate to have started using the first generation of broadcast equipment and ending with today’s UHD/HDR technology,” he describes. “It started with a donated 1948 ABC remote truck [tube technology] at the College of San Mateo. It was fun – keeping the tube cameras working. In the beginning, some of the vintage RCA equipment was the early field version TK 10 cameras with one DR back S/N 0001 Zoomar lens. Today’s 4K infrastructure – with 24 cameras and almost no downtime – is so far ahead. In the old days, losing four out of eight cameras was common. To get something like the Image Orthicon functioning, you needed a complete knowledge of tube theory, setting bias, beam landings, grid voltages, focus, and an understanding of who-knows-how-many knobs,” he laughs.

Once CCD solid-state images came in, Winikoff says he could concentrate on the art of real-time color timing, “with stability, registration, and tube parameter drifts a thing of the past,” he adds. “Modern digital cameras fully implement all the capabilities of the film world with many advantages in real-time electronic processing and the film dynamic latitudes never before achievable – HDR, S-Log, a variety of Gamma curves. The tools are great.” Winikoff has also seen dramatic changes in lighting. “The older tube cameras required 400 foot-candles just to make a broadcastable signal,” he says. “Now, the sensors can reproduce images your eye can sometimes not even discern. When video projection and the early LED walls were used for awards shows, the difference in light levels between the talent and the light output of the screens/ walls was beyond the capabilities of the video processing’s dynamic range. “As the video display technology has matured and found its way into scenic design,” he continues, “the industry has embraced the infinite looks available, and the cameras have improved the integration of physical sets and electronic displays. I have worked on The Grammy Awards for 40 years and have seen the scenic designers do incredible looks using, at first, a marriage of old-school wood and fabric to 100-percentvideo displays, which opens a myriad of looks and allows for scenic to work with lighting cues and audio tracks. The Grammys has used as many as 60 displays, fed by servers, which creates an impressive look at such a large scale.” Technically, Keith Winikoff is “retired.” Riding his motorcycle across the country or flying his plane where he’s always wanted to go nurtures his freedom, he says. But, he admits, he can’t totally disconnect from the industry to which he’s given so many years. “I’m sure I’ll get drawn back in because things are just too exciting,” he concludes. “And I’m too addicted to seeing just how far we can push the new technology. Although I’m pretty sure my days of crawling around with a live wire to save a show may be gone forever.”


EXPOSURE

Aaron Catling BY DAVID GEFFNER PHOTO BY TOBIN YELLAND

Aaron Catling knows his way around a reality competition series, having executiveproduced four seasons of BattleBots and co-executive-produced multiple seasons of MasterChef and MasterChef Junior, as well as unscripted versions in his home country of Australia of hit U.S.-born shows like Shark Tank, So You Think You Can Dance, and Big Brother. But even Catling admits to being awed by the sheer scale of Hyperdrive (see page 34), which debuted on Netflix this past August. 30

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to take shape, William Morris connected Chris and Charlize [Theron], who came on as a co-executive producer.

With a set that covered more than 100 acres and a pre-production process that involved laying some five miles of cable, the physical logistics were daunting enough. But Catling also points to Hyperdrive’s car-racingbased world as a true narrative challenge. “Unlike American Ninja Warrior, where the emotions are plain to see,” he explained a few weeks before Hyperdrive’s debut, “driving is a solitary journey, with racing suits and helmets, in dark car interiors. Any good unscripted show relies on the personal drama, so we knew finding a way into each character’s journey was the key.” While Catling says the show could easily have turned into a photocopy of The Fast and the Furious: the Unscripted World, he was after something more compelling. And with a veteran Local 600 camera crew onboard (many of whom have long supported Hyperdrive DP/Lighting Designer Adam Biggs on Ninja), Catling was confident of success, if still a bit twitchy given the scope and challenges. “Our catchphrase was: ‘If it’s cars on the track, we lose, if it’s hopes and dreams, we win,’” he adds. “This was a real moment of greatness for many of these contestants, and I kind of felt the same way for everyone on our production team.” ICG: Tell us how you got involved with Hyperdrive. Aaron Catling: I had the good fortune of show-running the reboot of BattleBots, with Chris Cowan of Whalerock Industries. Seasons three and four of that show moved over to Discovery Network, but during Season Two [on ABC], Chris was developing Hyperdrive. He had made a show called Bullrun, for Spike TV, more than a decade ago, and I think he was eager to get back into the car space. Whalerock is a boutique unscripted company, and under Lloyd Braun, they always try to do things bigger and better. As the show was starting

Theron is an Oscar-winning movie star who has produced many features, but an unscripted show with racing cars would not be an obvious choice. Well, Charlize has many car movies in her background – Mad Max, The Fast and the Furious, The Italian Job. She’s always loved cars and learned to drive at an early age in South Africa, so she was actually very excited to get involved. Her company, Denver and Delilah Productions, partnered with Whalerock, and they sold the show to Netflix. Since I had just done a big sports-entertainment unscripted show with Chris, he thought I was the right guy to executive-produce this new car show. After Charlize and Netflix agreed with Chris, my life was booked for the next two to three years. [Laughs.] Adam Biggs really emphasized how important the location – the old Kodak facility in Rochester, New York – was to this show. Do you agree? Absolutely. We knew from the very beginning we were after a massive spectacle. We didn’t want to replicate a NASCAR/IndyCar format, with an oval track, so we began a worldwide search for something more urban, with size and scope. We looked at everything 40 acres and up that had some sort of structure – abandoned factories in Georgia, abandoned cement areas in Florida, even a location in Medellin, Colombia! It was crazy. But when we stumbled onto the old Eastman-Kodak plant in Rochester, I think Biggsy and I both felt the same way – there was something so poetic about using a place with all this film history to bring a cinematic unscripted show to life. That juxtaposition of a dystopian 1920s industrial look combined with these wildly customized cars and shooting 4K, at night, was a perfect fit. Why the added challenges of shooting at night, which is not typical of most car racing on television? Of course, it would have been cheaper and easier to shoot during the day, but the aesthetic would have been wrong. Essentially, this is a 430-minute feature broken up into 10 episodes. The closest parallels were Spartan and Ninja Warrior, both of which are shot and lit by Biggsy, so he was obviously the right person for the job. Who else would be so audacious as to try and light 100 acres simultaneously?

[Laughs.] This wasn’t “Let’s do 20 setups in a day and cover 100 acres.” This was “We need to shoot 360 degrees over 100 acres every day for ten days to make the show.” That’s why you get the best people in the business – Adam and his [Local 600] camera team, [director] Patrick McManus, [course designer] Martyn Thake, [stunt coordinator] Andrew Comrie-Picard, [1st AD] Dave Massey, the technical and challenge teams – for a monumental undertaking that was so far beyond anything ever done in this format. What were the concerns of Production when the course was first being designed by Martyn Thake, who has created professional tracks all over the world? We had to approach this like a live sporting event, and take great care to keep the audience grounded – where the cars started, where they traveled, where they end up. It’s something that’s actually carried all the way through the edit. We knew we’d have to cut several minutes out of each run for television, being careful that those jumps in time are not too much of a temporal shift for the viewer. As for building the track, we really began with the obstacles, and that began with meeting with drivers from around the world to ask, “What is something you’ve always wanted to do in a race car that you’ve never been able to?” And their answers were…? [Laughs.] Visually amazing, but hard to conceive of for television, at least at first. It really became a puzzle, where we would move Matchbox cars around this birds-eye, Google Maps-type view of the Kodak facility to see how it could all work. Patrick and Biggsy are masters at moving cameras and lighting setups – very quickly – as so many things had to land at once. How much asphalt could we put down? How big could the obstacles go within the budget? How could it all be done safely?, which was always the first consideration. It would have been easy to just tell Martyn, “Hey, go out and design whatever you want,” and work backward, but that would have been cost-prohibitive. In the end, it was at least seven or eight departments coming together in a true collaboration. The Leveler is the obstacle that lords over the entire course. Who came up with that idea, and how early did it gestate? It was there from the very start – we were inspired by this epic Toyota Tundra ad from 12 years ago and found the engineers who built the

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suspension bridge for that ad. Ninja Warrior has its iconic Warped Wall, and we quickly realized The Leveler was our version. To conquer the course you had to beat it. And it was a microcosm for the whole show – The Leveler looked great on a whiteboard. But how do you build it, light it, shoot it, and still make it safe for the contestants and the crew? And it was on camera 12 times a night for 10 straight nights! By the way, every single obstacle had a different team overseeing the operation and safety, with many of the engineers coming from the feature-film world. Safety is the first thing anyone on this show brings up. The potential for catastrophic injury was high, yet there was not a single incident. How does Hyperdrive compare to previous unscripted series you’ve overseen? I remember being on the Paramount Lot for MasterChef when I heard about Sarah Jones, and it hit us all so hard. We’re bringing our passions and talents to bear in a unique industry, but everyone has to be able to go home at the end of the day to their families, and nothing else supersedes that. I bring that philosophy to every show I work on, but with Hyperdrive, safety was elevated to the next level because you have cars going 100 miles per hour in an area that wasn’t designed for that. We’re talking a 100-acre set with multiple entry points where, in

theory, anyone could get onto the track. I still remember our first meeting and telling the entire crew that safety must be the first goal above all else. We created a very serious tone of keeping a safe set, and that filtered down through every aspect of the production. Saving 10 minutes by doing something with any risk was not an option. It shouldn’t ever be, but on this show, there simply could not be any compromises. From the “crafties” to the person laying cable, the message was: “Take your time. Don’t cut corners. If you see something unsafe, raise your hand and speak up because we will shut it all down there and then. Guaranteed.” Can you give an example of safety being taken to another level, relative to the dangers of the show? The lighting system that [First AD] Dave Massey created was one example. Different colored cues indicated when the track was “hot” and “cold,” which helped account for such a large set. But even within that, whenever a car went hot, we’d check in with 15 different areas around the track to make sure we were good to go. Dave was a superstar, as was Martyn Thake, who was such a key part of the safety team. In Episode 7, one of the contestants’ cars stalls under the Water Cannon, and the force of the water crushes her windshield, requiring an ambulance to take her off the track. Immediately

“I still remember our first meeting and telling the entire crew that safety must be the first goal above all else.”

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afterward, the obstacle is shut down – on camera. That’s impressive. I’m glad you picked up on that, because we had tested that obstacle for every possible outcome, and the hit when Corinna was driving, with the car being stationary and right in the sweet spot of the blast – was just a perfect storm. I made the call in the truck to shut it down, and everyone immediately agreed. It was one of the things we did not expect on the day, but the moment we announced, “We’re shutting down the water cannon for safety,” everyone got it. What’s it like to be in the truck with a director/DP team like Patrick and Adam, who have so much history together in unscripted? I cut my teeth in the control room in Australia on Big Brother, so I’ve got a lot of hours in the truck and wanted a symbiotic partner for this show in that respect. I’m not only functioning as Patrick’s helpful navigator through the story of each run, but also trying to communicate that to the rest of the team in terms of the pre-and post-rollup. The key was all of us merging minds in preproduction on how the show would look and run. Patrick’s dynamic with Biggsy, who’s one of the easiest people I’ve ever worked with, creates a natural repartee that allowed for a calm and steady control room, which isn’t always the case. Because of the enormity of this show, there just couldn’t be any back-of-the-room distractions, and with those guys as my partners in the truck, it was certain we’d get that result. Hyperdrive may signal a new direction for unscripted, given its blend of live sports television and cinema-like drama. Where do you see things going in the unscriptedcompetition genre? With the constant evolution of streaming/OTT media and the TV paradigm itself, I think the unscriptedcompetition genre will continue to change with the times and find its place. Subscribers/ viewers want it all, and so they should – they want the next extrapolation of a fun, studiobased cooking show, and they also want a bigger-than-Ben-Hur car show on a scale they never imagined, which tells vibrant and dramatic stories in a cinematic way. That’s what excites me about the industry right now, regardless of budget: fresh, bold ideas are getting an opportunity to shine, especially with partners like Netflix, who are willing to take a chance and be bold with what they commission. 


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Check out the biggest, baddest (and safest) reality competition show to ever hit the small screen.

steel

BY DAVID GEFFNER PHOTOS BY DANIEL MCFADDEN


HOW BEST TO DESCRIBE HYPERDRIVE TO A REALITY TV FAN? IMAGINING AN UNLIKELY (BUT SPECTACULAR) AMALGAM OF THREE DIVERSE CULTURAL ICONS – NASCAR, BLADE RUNNER, AND A M E R I C A N N I N J A W A R R I O R ­– IS A GOOD START. ENSURING THAT THE INHERENT DANGERS (FOR BOTH CONTESTANT AND CREW) OF A SHOW WITH VEHICLES TRAVELING MORE THAN 90 MPH ARE MINIMIZED IN EVERY RESPECT IS ANOTHER ROAD DOWN WHICH THIS ONE-OF-A-KIND UNSCRIPTED SHOW TRAVELS.

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H Hyperdrive, at its core, is an automotive spectacle, similar to America’s most popular televised race series, NASCAR, where the combination of speed and lightning-quick decisions mean disaster is ever-present. And, like NASCAR, Hyperdrive benefited from the highly specialized work of Broadcast Sports International (BSI), which pioneered onboard action cams. BSI’s 13-person team installed six to eight GoPros (shooting 4K linear footage) around each racer’s car, and two Blackmagic Design 4K cameras (with ARRI/Fujinon zooms) inside each vehicle, as well as RF audio feeds back to the mobile production truck. But that’s mostly where the similarities end. Hyperdrive contestants (hailing from Japan, Brazil, Poland, France, U.K., Germany, and the U.S.) are “drifters,” who intentionally oversteer their vehicles at high speed (typically losing traction in just the rear wheels), while navigating a series of obstacles à la American Ninja Warrior. Like Ninja, each obstacle is named, often for its degree of ferocity –­– “Supernova,” “The Water Cannon,” “Pipe City,” “The Gauntlet,” and the show’s most iconic obstacle, “The Leveler,” which looms over the course like a T-Rex waiting to gobble up the (comparatively) Tonka toy-sized race cars. As for Blade Runner, that look came courtesy of Director of Photography/Lighting Designer Adam Biggs, who made the most of an epic location – the former Eastman-Kodak film manufacturing plant in Rochester, NY. Biggs bathed the 112acre “film set” in a stark, cyber-punk feel – menacing blues, grays and purples that highlighted the plant’s steam-bellowing industrial chimneys. Working closely with director Patrick McManus, Biggs gave the big canvas an appropriate capture platform, using two DJI Inspire drones (equipped with Zenmuse X8 fixed lens cameras), two Spidercams (rigged on 150-foot-high lifts with Sony HDC-P43 4K cameras and Fujinon wide-angle zooms), which were vital for dynamic aerial counter moves, and establishing the overall gameplay of the course, and two RED DRAGONs, with Zeiss Ultra Primes, shooting 240 frames-persecond specialty shots at the start/finish line. As Biggs, who also shot the car reality series Top Gear USA, tells it: “I came on through Brandon Riegg [VP Unscripted Originals & Acquisitions at Netflix], who was the EP at Ninja Warrior. He said there’s this very cool show, co-produced by Charlize Theron’s company that is a mega-car obstacle/ challenge series shot at night. I don’t think I paused more than four seconds before saying: ‘I’m in!’” In fact, Biggs says Hyperdrive’s unique location impacted the lighting, gameplay, and camera coverage areas more than any other project he’s shot in his many years in unscripted television, with Production scouting for many months to find the right fit.


TOP: 1ST AD DAVE MASSEY WORKED WITH DP ADAM BIGGS TO CREATE SET-WIDE SAFETY CUES - ALL-MAGENTA LIGHTING MEANT PRODUCTION COULD ENACT A RE-SET/ PHOTO COURTESY OF ADAM BIGGS BOT TOM: BIGGS’ LIGHTING WAS A NOD TO THE OSCAR-NOMINATED SCI-FI CLASSIC BLADE RUNNER .

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“We needed the proper surface for all the different competitors’ cars, and the look had to just feel monstrous,” Biggs continues. “When we first visited the Kodak facility in Rochester, it was over the winter holidays, and it was bitterly cold with snow on the ground. There were mercury vapor and sodium lights everywhere, and these amazing steam stacks, because it’s still a working factory. It was, literally, straight out of Blade Runner. I even referenced that film for the producers when showing them how we wanted to light the series, as it was crucial to keep the gritty, steampunk look of the Kodak factory both cinematically and creatively.” Biggs employed hundreds of Quasar LED tubes, along with programmable Elation Lighting units that included Pixel Bars, Paladins, Cuepix, and Proteus. He says both Hyperdrive’s producers and Netflix executives wanted the Kodak plant to be “a mind-blowing character,” in the series, so while Biggs did some enhancement with lighting and fog, “the place was already bleak and menacing,” he insists. “There were alleys, tunnels, and black corners everywhere; knowing we couldn’t light every square foot, our mantra was to make ‘darkness our friend.’ We wanted a fresh, cinematic style that looked nothing like NASCAR, Ninja or Top Gear, trending toward a video game look. Combine that with these colorful cars and Patrick’s skill to cover it all like a sporting event, [Hyperdrive] feels totally fresh for unscripted TV.” Executive Producer Aaron Catling [Exposure, page 30] shares that McManus was at the top of a very short list when it came to hiring a director for Hyperdrive. “Who else but Patrick has all that experience from an obstacle show like Ninja, televised racing like IndyCar, and has the best long-lensed cameraman in the business on speed-dial?” Catling states. “The budget did not allow for a lot of fixed/studio-type cameras, so we’ve got footage happening on specialties – [more than 25] GoPros [placed each night], handheld [RED DRAGON cameras] in the pits – which we didn’t necessarily have eyes on. Patrick’s experience in creating that narrative in the truck, with the cameras he had available, was huge.” With a résumé that includes

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Indianapolis 500, Long Beach Grand Prix, Watkins Glen, Michigan 500, Daytona 500 and Le Mans, along with large-scale sporting events like the Super Bowl PreGame and the Rose Bowl, McManus was the perfect fit for a new hybrid type of racing show. “I knew there was a market for [Hyperdrive] because today’s younger audiences don’t relate their vehicles to NASCAR, as my generation did,” he states. “But the challenge was how to create a visually compelling narrative from nothing – there was no template for this show.” When McManus and Biggs first saw the Rochester location, the producers wanted to shoot in an area about three square miles. “Adam and I said, ‘There’s no way you can light it,’” he remembers. “That car going 125 miles per hour will pass those $80,000 lights in two seconds. Even after they scaled the course back, it was still enormous. And I knew the show couldn’t just be the drivers in the car. We needed a ‘spotter’ to guide them, and the announcers [standing on a special bridge over the start/finish line and

covered by Guild operator Steve Ritchie on Technocrane] had to see the spotter. That type of interaction was crucial to building a narrative.” Having spent his whole career in broadcast trailers, McManus praises the mobile production truck provided by Clark Media – specifically designed for Netflix’s 4K/HD parameters. “Usually a truck is designed either for sports or entertainment,” he shares. “But this truck has the agility to serve both. Highlights were the OLED 4K monitors and scopes in a daylight shading suite, the multiple EVS XT4s that enable quick replay in unpredictable content, and twenty-four 4K 23.98PSF S-log3 ISO records to the post team for complete color correction.” The veteran unscripted director says he also wanted full visual coverage of the course, without blind spots, “especially if there was a safety issue,” he adds. “Since we only had six hard cameras, I knew the high-speed footage had to rotate throughout the different obstacles every


TOP/BOT TOM: BIGGS MADE THE MOST OF THE KODAK FACTORY’S BLEAK NOOKS AND CRANNIES, NOTING: “WE COULDN’T LIGHT EVERY SQUARE FOOT, SO THE MANTRA WAS: ‘LET’S MAKE DARKNESS OUR FRIEND.’”

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MCMANUS TURNED TO VETERAN BROADCAST RACING FIRM BSI TO OUTFIT CAR INTERIORS – 4K BLACKMAGIC DESIGN CAMERA RIGGED INSIDE OF HYPERDRIVE WINNER DIEGO HIGA’S 2006 FORD MUSTANG GT.

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night to keep it visually interesting. That was also challenging because the cameras could easily have failed if any of the five miles of fiber-optic cabling we ran was compromised. I’m very proud to say we did not have a single failure on the camera side, which is amazing.” What’s also amazing, according to the Guild operators who regularly work with Biggs and McManus, is the consideration both men evince for the operator’s craft. John Armstrong, who has worked on 10 of American Ninja Warrior’s 11 seasons, doing mainly handheld work, shot long-lens fixed coverage on Hyperdrive. An amateur racecar driver (and Porsche 996 GT3 owner), Armstrong knows fast cars. “The racing I do has nothing to do with going up huge ramps or spinning out through water,” he offers. “But I am acutely aware of what can happen to a vehicle moving 90 miles per hour if something goes wrong. There were so many moving parts to this show that every aspect had to be perfectly coordinated. I really

the “Supernova,” where the drivers must race forward and backward – with a 360 spin in the middle – between vertically parallel rows of LED light tubes (wireless/ battery-controlled units provided by PRG), and the “Head-to-Heads,” where drivers did a short version of the course side-by-side, trying to stave off elimination. “One very cool position I had was at the end of ‘Pipe Alley’ [an industrialized maze of metal scaffolding where Biggs rigged chasing tubes of light], where the drivers come directly toward me,” Armstrong adds. “Not everyone may know that [unscripted operators] pull their own focus and control iris, which is interesting when the subject’s going 90 miles per hour, and you also need to see the obstacle in the shot. Unless told otherwise by Patrick, I usually kept the framing as tight as I could on the car, while still getting all the key atmosphere around it.” All of Hyperdrive’s operators say the relationship McManus has with them is unique in the unscripted world. “He’s so accepting of input, and also tolerant of

“I WAS WEDGED BEHIND THE FRONT PASSENGER SEAT, AND THE GRIP TEAM HAD BOLTED EVERYTHING. I FELT COMPLETELY SAFE AT ALL TIMES.” OPERATOR JEREMIAH SMITH

appreciate how serious they were about safety in all areas of the production.” According to Armstrong, all of Hyperdrive’s fixed camera positions were put in places with a direct line of sight to the car, “but we were far enough away that even if [the car] crashed into a barrier, it wasn’t going to hit us,” he adds. “Patrick and Biggsy always made sure we had enough glass [Fujinon 107-×-8.4-mm Sports Box telephoto lenses on Sony PXW-Z450 4K cameras] to be far enough away to be safe.” McManus’s extensive experience directing car racing helped to keep Hyperdrive’s operators safe. As he explains: “The only way to get down low and near a car traveling at that speed was with a robotic camera. And those would not have the long glass look we wanted or the feel provided by our fixed-cam ops. The only way to get a camera over the track was with a Condor, with the base behind the barrier, arming it over the track, and tethering it. That’s 15 feet up in the air so there would be no issues with the operator’s safety, even if a car lost control and flipped.” Armstrong covered such segments as

any side-banter or insights we may have,” Armstrong notes. “When your director is not being hypercritical and letting you just do your job the way you see fit, that makes for a great working environment.” Operator Jeremiah Smith, who also works on Ninja, says Hyperdrive was an adrenaline-filled show where each shot was like a mini-action movie that got his heart pumping. “I was on ‘Rapid Response,’ where the drivers would weave through LED tubes, do a 360 and come back around, before going on to do the donuts in ‘Light Box,’” Smith recalls. “We were in a minivan with the Sony Z450, and the Fujinon 4K lenses [Netflix requires 4K deliverables] strapped down with the door open, following the car on the course. There was no time to turn around when the racers did their spins, so the van had to go in reverse to get the action going the other way.” Smith says working off an eyepiece (instead of a monitor) “created another point of contact” with the van. “I was wedged behind the front passenger seat, and the grip team had bolted everything,” he continues. “The base, tripod, and van door were all

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ratcheted, so the only thing not locked in was the camera itself, which is on a quick-release plate. I felt completely safe at all times, as there were barricades between the van and racer at all times. Of course, that’s a concern – when cars do donuts at such a high speed, things can happen.” Things did happen in front of Hyperdrive’s cameras – nail-biting moments that define the best of unscripted television. Examples include German drifting champion Corinna Gräff (part of a husband-and-wife duo who both made the final round) stalling her Mercedes E500 V8 under the “Water Cannon.” When the full force of the watery blast pancakes her windshield, Graff is sent to the hospital for evaluation. There was also Austin, TX wild-man Fielding Shredder crashing his 1997 Nissan 240SX into a brick wall just beyond the course, 28-year-old former veterinary assistant Brittany Williams screaming with delight as her 2008 Nissan 350z careens down a watery rail slide on two wheels in one of the knockout rounds, and perhaps most memorably, Japanese drifting veteran Atsushi Taniguchi jumping his 2002 Toyota Crown over a safety barrier on the monstrous “Leveler” before the obstacle has reset. Course designer and safety advisor Martyn Thake (who was in the control truck behind McManus each night) has overseen safety for professional racetracks all over the globe, but even he says Hyperdrive was something new to his portfolio. “I was involved from the start with the concept and engineering design, and provided lots of input into the obstacle design from the racing and safety side,” Thake recalls. “Because the obstacles and their placement evolved, my first challenge was connecting the dots – getting the drivers from one place to another – safely.” Thake says that after the start/finish line was determined – per the needs of production design, lighting, and camera – he started paving over existing asphalt, particularly in areas where there was iron that could pop tires. “Some roads on the course didn’t even exist,” he adds, “like the one up to the ‘Leveler’ – and had to be paved in. Areas where we knew the drivers would hit high speeds required asphalt replacement.” Figuring out where to place all the safety barriers was a prime focus for Thake. “Some were concrete, others water-filled,” he describes. “And because the circuit changed each night, we were moving 400-500 water barriers every afternoon.” Thake, who was the director of circuit development for IndyCar

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“WHEN YOUR DIRECTOR IS NOT BEING HYPERCRITICAL AND LETTING YOU JUST DO YOUR JOB THE WAY YOU SEE FIT, THAT MAKES FOR A GREAT WORKING ENVIRONMENT.” OPERATOR JOHN ARMSTRONG


TOP: PATRICK MCMANUS (R) WAS A “PERFECT FIT” TO DIRECT HYPERDRIVE - YEARS OF INDY CAR RACING AND A DECADE IN THE TRUCK FOR AMERICAN NINJA WARRIOR . BOT TOM: WHEN THE WINDSHIELD OF RACER CORINNA GRAFF’S CAR IMPLODED UNDER THE WATER CANON, THE OBSTACLE WAS IMMEDIATELY FROZEN FOR A SAFETY RECHECK.

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TOP: DESCRIBING HYPERDRIVE’S ICONIC “LEVELER” BIGGS NOTES: “IT WAS A TRICKY OBSTACLE BECAUSE IT MOVES UP AND DOWN. JUST MOUNTING AND CABLING LIGHTS WHEN YOU’RE FOUR STORIES IN THE AIR, EVEN IF THE RIG IS STABILIZED, IS NO EASY MAT TER.” BOT TOM: AC RICK SMITH PREPS SONY Z450 CAMERAS FOR HANDHELD COVERAGE IN “THE PITS.”

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series for six years, says he’s used to interfacing with a TV production company to field their requirements. “So, if Patrick and Adam needed to put a camera where it couldn’t be I’d say: ‘Hey, guys, let’s have a walk-about on the course to figure out another way.’” DGA 1st AD Dave Massey was the other key player, along with Thake, in creating the show’s extensive safety protocols. Massey describes Hyperdrive as not only the largest set he’s had to control but also the most dangerous. “We had to figure out the simplest method of communication for a crew of more than 150 people spread out over two square miles,” Massey explains. “The usual 16-channel two-way walkie-talkie approach wasn’t feasible, so we came up with two systems – one audio and one visual.” As Massey describes it, his voice boomed out on a massive P.A. system, aka a “Voice of God,” heard throughout the entire set (replaced with a computerized female voice in the final edit), and announced when the track was “hot,” which is racing protocol for when a car is on the course, and when it is “cold,” i.e. when crewmembers could safely access an obstacle for re-set, lighting tweak or camera displacement. “We worked closely with Adam to use his show lighting for visual communication,” Massey continues. “The

‘There’s a guy who needs to get to his truck’ a minute before race start,” Massey smiles. “But I credit my other AD’s – Ben Simms, J.R. Osborne, Sean Galvin, and J.C. Babas – and all those local P.A.’s, who had the thankless job of standing all night in dark corners and alleyways, to make sure we had a complete lock-up.” Daily safety meetings went well beyond standard cautions about hydration, fatigue, and set awareness. “Every single person on the crew had to wear a safety vest at all times,” Massey describes. “And reviewing the lighting safety system, along with encouraging respect for these young local P.A.’s, was always on the agenda. This is a crew that has worked together a long time, and there’s a strong level of trust. It’s late at night, in the middle of nowhere, and I said: ‘If you need a break, for whatever reason, talk to me on my dedicated channel and I will make sure that happens without the producers being overly concerned the schedule or content will suffer.’” Eventually, all roads (and conversation) on Hyperdrive lead to “The Leveler.” By virtue of its massive size, it garnered the most attention from Production; gameplay wise, it was often the make-orbreak moment in each contestant’s run. Smith, who says he’s always searching

“THIS IS A CREW THAT HAS WORKED TOGETHER A LONG TIME, AND THERE’S A STRONG LEVEL OF TRUST.” 1ST AD DAVE MASSEY

normal show lighting meant the track was hot; all magenta lighting meant it was safe for a re-set, flashing magenta and yellow meant we were one minute to race-start. If anyone needed to hold the race they would communicate directly with me or with Martyn.” Massey’s AD team also had to contend with a handful of working Kodak employees, who would communicate with one of his 20 local P.A.’s if they needed to move from their location. “It’s a little disconcerting to hear,

for “cinematic frames” that will lift reality coverage beyond conventional expectations, points to Biggs’ lighting throughout the show, but particularly on “The Leveler,” as making it easy to create “beautiful images whenever I pointed my camera.” Thake calls the obstacle a “Bailey Bridge erector set” made up of parts and pieces. “Once it was built,” he recounts, “we knew we had to have a safety stop, but we weren’t sure exactly what that would be.

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EXECUTIVE PRODUCER AARON CATLING SAYS COURSE DESIGN “BEGAN WITH THE OBSTACLES” AND ASKING THE WORLD’S TOP DRIFTERS WHAT THEY’D NEVER DONE ON A RACE TRACK. TOP: “FORCED PERSPECTIVE” AT DUSK. BOT TOM: BRAZILIAN DRIVER JOAO BARION NAVIGATING “THE GAUNTLET.”

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LOCAL 600 CREW Director of Photography Lighting Designer Adam Biggs Operators (Hard) Jeff Rhoads Markos Alvarado Megan Drew, SOC Mark Renaudin Dave Anderko Operators (Handheld) Daniel Whiteneck Jeremiah Smith John Armstrong Operator (Spidercam) Darren Sanders Operators (Techno) Adam Vessels Jason Kay, SOC Steve Ritchie Operators (Reality/Paddocks) Mario Pendilla Jed Udall Rodrigo Rodrigues David Ortkiese Lead AC Dominic DeFrank ACs Shelby Cipolla Patrick Bellante Andres Cuevas Rick Smith Ian Mosley Video Controller Alan Pineda Lead Utility Austin Rock Utility Sean Cross Video Utilities Mike Vinyard Ryan Jordan Tim Farmer Nicholas Kent Matt Trujillo DITs Stuart Hammond Chase Parson Loader CJ Miller Lead POV GoPro Camera James Martinez Assistants (POV GoPro Camera) Jesse Martinez Jared Link Still Photographer Daniel McFadden

We came up with water barriers strapped underneath, and a dampening mechanism to slow the thing down. When a car was actually on ‘The Leveler,’ there was a driver coordinator responsible for saying, ‘Turn the lights from red to green.’ He was keyed off a spotter, who was underneath ‘The Leveler,’ who determined when it was all the way down in the water, and the ramp and platform were actually level.” Biggs says one of the main photographic challenges to “The Leveler,” indeed the entire series, was trying to fuse two different styles of lighting. “[Executive Producer] Charlize Theron comes from cinema, and she wanted a very filmic look,” he explains. “But we also had to make sure the sporting aspect was satisfied – viewers had to see where the car was at all times. Fortunately, we had a camera and lighting team that bridged both worlds seamlessly. “Part of the compliance/gameplay mandate,” Biggs continues, “is that the lights we placed could not be in the drivers’ eyes, blinding them coming into an obstacle. So that meant everything had to be up cranes and truss, or low from a three-quarters back edge like they do in pro racing. ‘The Leveler’ was made of iron girders, like a suspension bridge, and it needed a menacing look that would stand out from the background. The lighting [and production design] also had to be a part of the gameplay, insofar as they had to provide a visual signal for when a driver leveled [or was unable to level] the bridge and could move on!” Thake says that because Hyperdrive was “brand new for everyone, even though we all had plenty of experience in different areas of the show, one key to keeping everyone safe” was to send out test cars – with a professional stunt driver – every day at full speed. “After so many years on racetracks,” he continues, “I know the best places to artificially slow a driver down and protect them from their own best/worst instincts. And if something does happen, there must be a plan already in place. We had a plan if a car was on ‘The Leveler’ and its engine blew. We had our safety truck within five seconds of ‘The Leveler,’ even though you never saw them in the shot, and equipment to make sure no one ever fell off. Hyperdrive will stand out, not only as a large step forward in keeping film crews safe on productions where there is a very high risk for serious injury, but as an example of everyone working toward making the set safer, without having to take anything away from the creative intent of the show.” Biggs says there was a lot of off-camera lighting he placed to ensure the drivers could see where they were going throughout the course. He placed 200 light beams and fog in the deep background for added texture, and to help “The Leveler” further pop out. “It was tricky because the obstacle moves up and down,” Biggs smiles. “So just mounting and cabling lights when you’re four stories in the air, even if the rig is stabilized, is no easy matter. Of course, those challenges are what made Hyperdrive so fantastic. I’ve never lit a ‘Leveler’ before. The closest I’ve ever been to a Leveler was back in England when I was four years old on a seesaw. It’s kind of similar, I suppose, if you’re a few hundred feet off the ground with a car!”

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Phedon Papamichael, ASC, GSC puts pedal-to-the-metal for the scorching new period racing drama, Ford v Ferrari .

the way

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BY TED ELRICK PHOTOS BY MERRICK MORTON, SMPSP FRAMEGRABS COURTESY OF TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX

forward

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Recreating a major car race from the 1960s, on the big screen, is a true challenge. Yet the creators behind Ford v Ferrari, like the film’s protagonists, doggedly pushed this true-life story ahead despite its years in the development pipeline. In the early 1960s, America’s premier car-maker, the Ford Motor Company, desperately sought to add sex appeal to a brand that was losing market share. Spurred on by Henry Ford II, the Detroit-based company decided to take on the European racing giant, Ferrari, at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in France, the most grueling race in motorsports, and one Ferrari had been dominating. 50

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To beat Enzo Ferrari (Remo Girone) at his own game, Ford II (Tracy Letts) turns to legendary car designer Carroll Shelby (a terrific Matt Damon), the only American driver to win at Le Mans, who stopped racing for health reasons. Approached by Lee Iacocca (Jon Bernthal), Shelby lobbies for a brand-new design (what will be Ford’s GT40), manned by the best driver in the world, Ken Miles (Christian Bale), an iconoclastic Brit working in a California auto shop. Oscar-nominated writer/producer/ director James Mangold (Girl, Interrupted, Walk the Line) says the main appeal of the project was trying to capture the spark of

the mid-1960s. “Most sports have become so corporate,” he reflects. “There’s so much money tied up in endorsements and branding. And here was this moment of true discovery, with this ragtag group of idealists coming together around a passion for cars. If they had an idea, it wasn’t modeled on a computer screen – they built it, and someone risked their life test-driving. The romance of that seemed exciting to put on film because, in this digital world, there are much fewer people risking it all.” Ford v Ferrari benefited from some idealism as well, with the cost of making a period racecar movie bogging forward movement for years. Phedon Papamichael,

ASC, GSC had shot Mangold’s Identity, 3:10 to Yuma, Walk the Line, and Knight and Day. He says although the budget was brought down to $100 million, “the actual Ford GT40s – the bronze car that came in third at Le Mans – was auctioned off for $14 million. And the Ferraris sell for $30 million.” The one period car, used in the film (for a sequence at the Ferrari factory in Northern Italy, and shot at a DWP substation in Eagle Rock, CA), the 1961 Le Mans winner, “cost 48 million dollars,” Papamichael says. “So, obviously, we could not film them racing on a track.” Thirty cars were built for the film from companies like Superformance in Irvine, CA, which specializes in replicas. “Those cars each came at a cost of $90,000, with the Ford GTs costing $80,000 to $100,000,” Papamichael adds. “We had them go as fast as we safely could, but these are not actual race cars. They’re picture cars. The original racecars can do 200 miles an hour. We [First Unit with the principal actors] would get over 120 miles per hour on the straightaways.” [Second unit went even faster – 160185 mph for fast sections on the Mulsanne straight.] Papamichael shot on the popular ALEXA LF (Large Format) system, even though, he says, “our anamorphic lenses wouldn’t fully cover the LF sensor.” He tested other lenses before Panavision’s Dan Sasaki was able to add another element to the lens that would expand the image and cover the sensor. “We had prototypes we were still tweaking as we started production,” Papamichael recalls. “But the results were my favorite digital capture yet; combining the ALEXA LF with these Panavision C-series and B-series. T-series lenses were used for close focus, a bit of extra stop or when the sun was low and the flaring was too extreme on the C and B series. Expanding the T-series lenses took the edge off [the digital sensor] without having to diffuse it, and gave this beautiful fall-off in the background that looks quite painterly. It was similar to the large-format Spheros, but with the addition of the characteristic of an anamorphic.” Mangold wanted the period look to “evolve organically” from set design, wardrobe, and props. That meant Papamichael had a close working relationship with Production Designer François Audouy to create the film’s color palette. “The world of Ford is cooler and less saturated – all blues, grays, and rectangles,” Audouy details. “Enzo Ferrari’s factory, in Italy, is earthy reds and warm tones. In California and also Florida, we have these warm-tone colors bathed in sunshine. The

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movie comes together in this kaleidoscope of color at Le Mans, which is inspired by the primary hues we associate with the 1960s.” “The only thing we did photographically,” Papamichael adds, “was to try to emulate the Kodak stock of that period, which had strong contrast and solid blacks. I embraced the hard light of the desert, which gave it those rich primary colors that the Kodak stocks had. The vintage glass also helped with getting that beautiful saturation of the period. Working with [EFILM DI Colorist] Skip Kimball, we also dialed-in some film grain to emulate a film texture.” Audouy says one of the largest builds was the Le Mans pit area, with the start and finish line. It was constructed on the runway at the Agua Dulce Airpark, just north of Los Angeles, and consisted of 400 feet built as a 1:1 full-scale recreation of the structure from 1966. “The construction drawings were based on 300 photographs from the era,” the designer shares. Similar attention was given to the many turns and chicanes at Le Mans, recreated in Georgia. The “Dunlop Bridge” was a full size, 1:1 scale, double-sided bridge built at Road Atlanta, while more than 500 period-correct banners were recreated to line the racetrack. The Art department produced a total of 281 drawings to build and dress the 80-plus sets in the film. Papamichael says the decision was made early on to avoid cranes or drones for the racing scenes, using mostly low, fixed camera placement to convey speed. “The only film we looked at was John Frankenheimer’s Grand Prix because it was 70mm, and it was Kodak,” he reveals. “You have cameras hard-mounted to the cars with no vibration isolators, so you get all these shifts and vibrations. In the mix you also get these parts rattling because these were not very sophisticated cars from a comfort standpoint, and that helps convey to the audience we’re trapped in this little box.” An avid motorcycle racer, Bale went through the Bob Bondurant School of High Performance Driving in Chandler, AZ. “There is no stage work for Christian’s closeups driving,” Papamichael conveys. “He’s on what we call a Pod Car, which means our chassis was mounted on a very low-sitting self-driving car that can perform at high speeds. That’s why the close-ups have all these g-force shakes, and interactive light kicks on the chrome. That’s something you see in his face that you can’t manufacture.”

Spielberg) says the one- to two-mile stretches of rural roads in Georgia had to be monitored by 20 production assistants to prevent wayward residents from wandering on set. Somner also recalls an on-camera wall built for the pit crews to stand behind. “I asked, ‘What is this wall made of ?’ And when they said, ‘Wood,’ I said: ‘What happens if a car, God forbid, comes hurtling down the track, loses it and goes through this wall?’ That became a 150,000-dollar studio decision,” Somner recalls. “Instead of a set-built wall of wood, it became a concrete wall that a car could hit at speed and protect those on the other side.” “We had to put in concrete barriers that were engineered for a one hundred mile-per-hour crash,” Audouy adds. “The foundations went down ten feet and were critical for safety.” Safety concerns carried through to the many stunt drivers. Stunt Coordinator Robert Nagle says that among the 20 professional racing drivers hired was Derek Hill, son of the legendary Phil Hill. “Derek had been to Le Mans in the early 1970s with his father,” Nagle offers. “He brought his sister out to show her the Agua Dulce Pit Area set, and you could just see them go back to their childhood.” Other drivers also had ties to Le Mans, including Alex Gurney, son of Dan Gurney, and Jeff Bucknam, son of Ronnie Bucknam, one of the drivers of the Number 5 car in the 1966 Le Mans. As Nagle observes: “This wasn’t normal stunt driving. If something went wrong [like when a Ferrari clipped stunt driver Allan

Padelford], they had to know what to do. It’s not something you teach. It’s having the seat time.” The scene where a Ferrari cartwheels alongside the track as Miles’ Ford is coming through the fray, began with a real vehicle, and then another partial vehicle mounted on an air cannon that would launch it 150 feet. “It was timed so that as soon as we cleared the Dunlop Bridge,” Nagle recounts, “it would land next to the camera car that Allan was driving for a composite shot we see with Christian. The second time we did it the car – a frame with wheels – hit the ground, righted, and T-boned the camera car Allan was driving. We were doing about 70 miles per hour, so we sent Allan to the ER to have him checked out. You don’t want to play around with head injuries. Turned out Allan was fine, but you can never be too safe.” Padelford, a racing veteran who has developed many camera car rigs going back to Tony Scott’s Days of Thunder, is also the designer of The Biscuit, used on Seabiscuit (and Ford v Ferrari). He says Nagle was the best choice for this film. “Because of his racing experience, he was very demanding on car safety and preparation, including for the camera crews,” Padelford notes. “One example was the racing suits. It was extremely hot and humid in Georgia, so he had all the drivers wear cool suits, with a team of people replacing ice in cool-suit bags. A stunt coordinator with no racing experience probably would not have thought of that.

Given the subject matter, safety was uppermost. DGA 1st AD Adam Somner (known for his many films with Steven

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The drivers all looked out for me, whether I was in the Biscuit or the Pod Car. They would crash into the woods before they would ever touch me.”

flying around the track with an ex-racecar driver, and because we were dealing with the extreme heat of racetracks in the summer, and A-list actors in period race suits, we had to make the most of each setup.” The Guild 1st and 2nd Unit camera teams A custom Preston long-range setup covering the racing also had a challenging was built specifically for Ford v Ferrari’s road before them. Operator P. Scott 2nd Unit team. “The guys could control Sakamoto, SOC, details how the A-unit shot focus at extremely long distances,” notes racing sequences with the principal actors, 2nd Unit DIT Jordan Harriman. “And I Matt Damon and Christian Bale, “while could control iris inside the van, which Second Unit shot when the stunt doubles was nice for [2nd Unit DP] Igor Meglic, in were driving,” he explains. “They tended to the middle of an action shot.” Ask 2nd Unit get the wider, exterior shots of the race itself. 1st AC Greg Luntzel whether focus (aka And we concentrated more on the actor’s intentionally blurring) is still critical with drama within the racecars and the pits.” the cars traveling at such a high rate of Sakamoto remembers shots where speed, and he responds: “You’ll never hear the cameras would be strapped down, a focus puller say that,” Luntzel laughs. “and the assistants would be following in “We try to get every single frame sharp. a chase vehicle to keep up with iris and We’re also working with a very wide lens focus changes,” he says. “They got a good [in 2nd Unit] because we don’t have the ride because they were strapped in and actors involved. We want to be able to see traveling as fast as the race cars. And the the cars interacting with each other.” decision to hard-mount [up to four] tight Meglic says that in the Steve McQueen cameras on the cars was a conscious one, film Le Mans, they were driving at speed as we wanted to feel the power and energy because part of it was the actual race, and of each race, and capture that through the the rest was recreated with drivers in the driver’s eyes.” days following. Chasing the cars presented an “We couldn’t do that, so to convey the interesting dynamic for the focus pullers. speed you have to resort to tricks like low A-Camera 1st AC Cary Lalonde says, “We camera angles,” Meglic reveals. “The Ford solved the reception limitations of our FIZ GT40 is already super low, and then you units by racing with the picture vehicle in a go that extra inch lower with the mount, pursuit car set up with our focus monitors, you’re almost scraping. But the proximity to often pulling focus on multiple cameras at the pavement will give you more speed. We once. Craig Grossmueller and I would be also mixed spherical and anamorphic, the

spherical for the lower and the anamorphic to make the cars look nicer. It was tricky. What lens is best for what shot?” Interspersed within the dynamic racing are quieter moments, like the map of Le Mans that Miles’ son, Peter (Noah Jupe), draws and proudly shows his father; or another in an airplane hangar where Peter asks race car engineer Phil Remington (Ray McKinnon) if he ever saw a car catch on fire with the driver inside. “In the course of the movie, with everything else, that was such a simple little scene to shoot,” A-Camera Operator David Luckenbach recalls. Another quietly touching scene is Miles, on the runway at Ontario International Airport (subbing for LAX where the GT40s were tested) explaining to Peter his notion of “the perfect lap.” Luckenbach says shooting at a working airport came “with limitations on where you could place a light and where we could go − and we had to shoot at sunset,” he adds. Lalonde describes the scene as “a scramble. We pared the equipment and personnel down to the minimum, leaving the DIT and monitors on a stake bed out of the way,” he recalls. “Jim and Phedon stuck close to the camera, and we got some amazing shots as the sun went down.” A scene between Miles and his wife, Mollie (Caitriona Balfe), at his garage, as he listens to the radio broadcast from Le Mans and airplanes are seen through the open hangar doors taxiing on the runway, features dramatic shadows cast on the

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back wall. Gaffer Michael Bauman laughs when he says, “That shot damn near killed us. We had a lens-less Fresnel out there, and two grips following along outside, so it was hit or miss. But the shadow effect turned out great.” Bauman recalls another sequence at Ford’s Michigan factory where Henry Ford II addresses his workers on the assembly line. It was shot in an abandoned California warehouse, dressed to represent three conveyors of Ford Falcons in various stages of assembly. Falcons, all sharing the same period blue, were brought in from around the U.S. and cleaned up. “Lighting that area was a challenge,” Bauman adds, “because of space restrictions, and we couldn’t mount lights outside as there was a working business behind the location. So we built this giant 40 by 60foot box that tapped the entire three stories and had a bunch of LiteTile from LightGear units inside. We just glowed it with that, and it was able to be consistent.” One especially compelling section of the Le Mans race occurs at night, in the rain. With the cars traveling at such high speeds, the water towers used to simulate the rain were less than effective. So a car with a water tank driving ahead of the racers was used. “The spray we got from the tires helped to visually track the cars,” Papamichael remembers. “Also being very low and close with a wide-angle lens helped give a sense of the road movement. We always tried to frame with a bit of asphalt so you see the ground moving and track as close as possible.” For these rainy night scenes, the audience needed to differentiate the cars in the dark. “So we had yellow headlights installed in the Ferraris,” Papamichael says. “The Fords had tungsten white lights. The Ferraris have yellow headlights, so when they’re coming up in the rearview mirror you can see the difference. It’s subtle, but it was very helpful to identify the two teams. I didn’t research it, but I knew from my childhood that cars in France at that time all had yellow headlights, so it was a great solution.” In reflecting on what made Ford v Ferrari special Mangold says: “We’ve gotten so bifurcated as filmmakers – action movies are mainly identified by outlandish spectacle and hollow drama, and dramatic films are defined by enriching drama and an absence of spectacle. There was a time when filmmakers had the confidence to stage intimate moments with some restraint, so that the action seems even grander, being interspersed with scenes built on the smallest movements and feelings.”

Papamichael feels the stor y is reminiscent of a classic western, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. “It’s about friendship, and people not fitting into the corporate structure. I remember my mandatory military service, where I was a photographer in the German Air Force and was surrounded by fighter pilots,” he concludes. “They weren’t soldiers so much as adrenaline junkies. And the characters

in this film are similar – they put the biggest engine in this tiny contraption, and go around a country road at 220 miles an hour. And, in the end, it’s all about the chemistry between Christian Bale and Matt Damon, their friendship and emotions. No matter how exciting the action footage, if you don’t connect to the characters, it becomes meaningless and boring.”

LOCAL 600 CREW Director of Photography Phedon Papamichael, ASC

DIT Jordan Harriman

A-Camera Operator David Luckenbach

Utility Kalia Prescott

A-Camera 1st AC Cary Lalonde

Loader Dylan Neal

A-Camera 2nd AC Dan Schroer

2ND UNIT - GEORGIA

B-Camera Operator/Steadicam P. Scott Sakamoto, SOC B-Camera 1st AC Craig Grossmueller B-Camera 2nd AC Miki Janicin DIT Lonny Danler Utility Kevin Sun Loader Chris McGovern Still Photographer Merrick Morton, SMPSP Publicist Alex Worman

Director of Photography Igor Meglic, ZFS A-Camera Operator/Talon Nino Pansini B-Camera Operator Maurice McGuire Key 1st AC Greg Luntzel Key 2nd AC Matt Jackson Talon 1st AC Rob Sagaser Talon 2nd AC Andrew Crankshaw Arm Car 1st AC Tommy Tieche

2ND UNIT - CALIFORNIA

Arm Car 2nd AC Zsolt Haraszti

Director of Photography Igor Meglic, ZFS

Crash Camera 1st AC Thomas Nemy

A-Camera Operator Nino Pansini

Crash Camera 2nd AC Wil Hughes

Key 1st AC Greg Luntzel

Array 1st AC Nino Neuboeck

A-Camera 1st AC Rob Sagaser

Array 2nd AC Jamie Pair

A-Camera 2nd AC Sarah Galley

Additional 1st AC Manning Tillman

B-Camera Operator Maurice McGuire

DIT Jordan Harriman

B-Camera 1st AC Tommy Tieche

Utility Samantha Gardella

B-Camera 2nd AC Andrew Crankshaw

Loader Leland Haushalter

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fast VEMBER 2019 58 PHOTO COURTESY OF LUX NO MACHINA/LUCASFILM, LTD.

Working on the Emmy-winning reality series RuPaul’s Drag Race is a wild ride of experience, technique, and creativity. BY PAULINE ROGERS PHOTOS BY DENISE MALONE


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There are several ways to look at the multipleEmmy-winning reality series on VH1, RuPaul’s Drag Race, airing its 12th season. There is RuPaul’s determination to bring drag culture into the mainstream with outrageous and visually lavish images. There is also another story revealing how the contestants are more than genderbusting performers and that their journeys are metaphors for anyone who’s ever gathered up the courage to attack the world on their own terms. Whichever way viewers see it, this lush, unscripted series is a rollercoaster ride from the moment the contestants walk into the workroom to the last moment of the finale when “the queen” is celebrated. Executive Producer Randy Barbato describes it as a “massive challenge” from a photography perspective. “Within a given day,” Barbato explains, “the camera team is racing to capture docu-style vérité as well as epic musical dance numbers, runway presentations and many other visual extravaganzas. And doing it with an artful eye and nuance for the story.” Director of Photography Jake Kerber says it’s the kind of show for which the camera crew has to be “intellectually and emotionally connected to the stories we have the honor of capturing. On a technical level, just like the queens must perform well in a variety of situations, our camera crew must be able to work in a range of styles. Operators

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must listen, follow the story, and anticipate conversation and movement, and handle Studio mode for the stage, runway, music video, et cetera. They must have a great compositional eye and be capable of finding the right frame, live, while pulling focus and listening for adjustments from the director and myself. Also, our enthusiastic subjects are not familiar with ‘camera’ per se, so even when we have rehearsals, they often do what’s not expected.” Although there are many shooting formats, the basic show package consists of eight Sony F800s, often on tripods with casters for easier repositioning and an array of Fujinon HD lenses –standard 22×, wide 14×, and a 42× for RuPaul’s judge-panel shots. “I often use a half Soft FX filter, which takes a bit of the edge off without oversoftening the image, and does not lift the shadows too much,” Kerber continues. “In Studio mode, we use on-board Blackmagic monitors, which allow us to see color and offer helpful focus and exposure tools. We sometimes order and use a RED, a Sony F55, a Canon DSLR, or GoPros for different

elements in the show.” The easiest way to break down those “elements” is by stages. For example, Stage 1, the workroom intro, is made up of fluid camera movement where the audience meets the queens for the first time. “Very little time is allotted for repositioning or to make adjustments,” Kerber explains. “We don’t rehearse these, so everything has to be thought out ahead of time and executed in the moment. If Ru’s mark is going to be different than his usual position, Jenny [Bloom’s] lighting team has a second key light already hung and ready to go.” As Bloom explains, “lighting this stage has evolved over the years. We have general illumination in most areas for vérité, along with special seating areas and some marks for various beats and mini-challenges. We started with hot power Socapex distros, and the balancing had to be done with scrims, diffusion or even just moving the fixtures. We use more dimmers now, to help speed along the balancing process.” Stage 2 is the “Challenge space,” “basically a blank space for swing sets,”


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choreography “needed a lot of floor space for the queens to do their routines, plus the design included a steel deck and bleachers for an audience. James built-out the set curtain-wall to curtain-wall, meaning the cameras would not have much space on our fourth wall side. It was something [Director] Nick Murray, myself and James worked out ahead.” Three shot s needed specific consideration: a low-angle dolly tracking left to right, a jib and an extreme high angle that had Schneider operating up in a lift. “The other cameras lined up right against the dolly track and shot over the dolly to follow their specific queen,” Kerber says. “I remember Jay Mack [Operator Jay Mack Arnette II] had to make himself as ‘small’ as possible on the dolly so as not to bump tripod legs as he moved left and right.” Bloom recalls a challenge for All-Stars 3, a one-take music video shot that started in the back of a cube truck, followed the drag queens through the loading dock area, past catering, between two stages, and finally As for creating sets for each challenge, onto the Runway Stage. “The only equipment I ordered was Production Designer James McGowan recalls having limited space for the outrageous some battery-powered LED up-lights to Draglympics. “The drag queens were tasked spice up the cube truck and the backgrounds with taking part in an Olympics-style along the path. The rest was our generic gymnastics floor challenge,” he explains. package,” she says. “Peter Ozarowski was Steadicam for “One part dance; two parts twerking; three parts death-dropping onto the floor, and all that challenge, and he did a heroic job,” in a pink poppy sports arena that could only Kerber adds. “The pace at which Pete had be shot from one angle. Jake worked out a to move was impressive, as he was leading way to get up close to the action without the women and couldn’t slow them down. inhibiting the performers. Participating in He also had a couple of whip-pans that were perfectly executed in terms of the off-camera rehearsals helped immensely.” Kerber remembers how that precise framing and maintaining the Bloom describes, “where there is an opportunity for Production to stretch their creative muscles,” Kerber adds. “Sometimes it involves bringing in a different camera or special lights, changing the aspect ratio, or giving the look special treatment.” Kerber cites Season 6’s Drag Race Me To Hell acting challenge, shot in black and white and in anamorphic aspect ratio. “Normally, an acting challenge is shot sitcom style, from the outside of the set, with each camera having a position, and we roll through an entire section of the script,” he relates. “In the Drag Race Me To Hell challenge, Sarge [operator Jon Schneider] and I shot it like single camera, with the cameras at times on the set. We were allowed to break up moments in the script for specific shots that helped punctuate the story. Because of the horror theme and shooting in black and white, the lighting was more contrasty, and because the cameras repositioned more, we could tweak specific shots as needed.”

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horizon. Gaffer Christian Killingsworth ran alongside Peter with a battery-powered Cineo Maverick LED light on a stick to help fill in the queens’ faces.” Few moments have left as lasting an impression on the Guild crew as the Makeover Challenge, for which each queen was assigned one guest and tasked with getting that person into drag, with the “guest” being a crewmember. “I was terrified,” Schneider recalls. “I wasn’t embarrassed about putting on a wig and heels; I was petrified of not being any good at it. I’d witnessed plenty of awkward moments over the years, but, after recording the surprise from the queens upon hearing who was going to be made over, I took off my PL, pulled out my surveillance and stepped out from behind the safety of my viewfinder. Suddenly, I was seeing the show from the glass of my friends’ lenses pointing in my direction.” “I had a smile on my face the entire time Sarge was on camera,” Kerber remembers. “It’s incredible to watch a close friend and colleague go through a drag transformation, and Sarge truly became his persona, ‘Wintergreen.’ To this day, I believe he could have a second career.” Stage 3 is the all-important “Runway Stage,” and as Bloom shares, “it’s all about performance. We use a mix of conventional LED and moving lights. There is no soft light, except for an occasional 2K zip on a stand for an on-the-fly interview. We balance different cues for the judges based on the camera angles in each segment. We


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DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY JAKE KERBER

light the runway with follow spots for walks and performances and a static wash for big groups.” Bloom programs everything with a GrandMA2. (Craig Housenick from The Voice is lead programmer, with Dan Howe as his cover.) “We’ve had everything from backflips to queens jumping in the air and landing off the stage decking in the splits,” she continues. “Once a drag queen threw her wig into the air, and it caught on one of our high-side Fresnels. We had to kill the light and rescue the wig to prevent it from burning.” Kerber says there have been more than 150 queens on the Runway Stage, including RuPaul. “The level of performance and artistry demonstrated on the runway over the years makes it impossible to pick a favorite,” he insists, “but RuPaul on the runway transcends the visual and brings an elevated energy and consciousness that I largely credit for the show’s mass appeal.” Runway shots allow the camera and grip team to “dance,” as Arnette (working with Key Grip Austin Taylor) calls it. “The dolly track runs parallel to the front of the stage,” he offers, “and then turns at the corner to

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run parallel with the side of the stage for runway walks. Each contestant walks the runway, and, depending on their outfit or character, their walking speed changes. Their speed determines how fast Austin is pushing the dolly. He has to match the contestant. I have to match my zoom, pan, tilt and focus pull to his speed.” Arnette points out two sequences, shot on a dolly, where he has to pull his own focus. “I set a certain spot and memorize where to go, depending on the subject on stage,” he continues. “It’s important because I’m zooming in and out consistently. The first walk is a parallel tracking shot with a back and forth rock and roll when the contestant is downstage left. The second, we start stage right, and meet the talent in the middle when they land downstage – then we move to stage left while the contestant walks to stage right, and then a counter move that ends as I zoom into a single. They’re fast, dynamic and fun.” Fun is the operative word for Drag Race’s creative team. RuPaul’s costume designer, Zaldy, remembers the Season 10 promo, for which the directors envisioned a blacklight,

hyper-disco feel in which all of the queens were in Day-Glo/black-light looks. “They asked for a Day-Glo outfit for Ru as well,” Zaldy describes. “And, of course, I wanted Ru to stand apart, so I suggested why not create a black-and-white look that would also react to the UV lighting, but in a different way than the rest of the cast.” RuPaul wore the outfit for Episode 1 – and Zaldy won a second Emmy for the outfit. Kerber says RuPaul’s key light for the runway walk, “is a Super Trouper follow spotlight, and to make the outfit glow we added Congo Blue, which is a very heavy blue gel that approximates UV wavelengths,” he says. “I bumped up the cameras plus three DB to help get us more exposure, and dialedback the black gamma and contrast a little.” Even the “smaller moments” on Drag Race avoid the mundane. “The queens spend a lot of time doing their make-up in two-way mirrors,” Kerber reveals. “It’s a place in the workroom where they talk to each other and we, as the audience, get to know them better, so it’s


LOCAL 600 CREW Season 11 Director of Photography Michael Jacob Kerber Lighting Designer Jenny Bloom Operators Jay Mack Arnette Greg Montes Marios Panagiotopoulos Jon Schneider Brett Smith Jib Operator Justin Umphenour

LIGHTING DESIGNER JENNY BLOOM POSING ON HER LIT SET FROM SEASON 11, EPISODE 1

Camera Utilities Steve Anson Clarence Nelson DIT Daniel Hernandez

imperative that we capture these moments. “It’s a challenge to shoot both from the workroom side or the blind,” he continues. “We often have cameras on the floor and behind the two-way at the same time, and operators must coordinate their shots to avoid each other, while still getting their coverage. There is a two-and-a-half-stop loss and a strong color cast to the mirrors, so we open the iris to f1.7, increase gain, lose the shutter, and create custom white balances. They’re giant make-up mirrors with light bulbs all around them, so that area is a bit brighter. We also have three 100-watt peppers above each mirror to help make the faces pop and give some needed additional foot-candles.” One touching moment in the workroom is when the eliminated queen writes with lipstick on the mirror. “It is one of the last times we will see that queen on the show, and emotions are high,” says Kerber. “It’s their opportunity to give a final message to the remaining queens. The look is moodier, with the soft glow of the make-up mirrors providing light for her face. The crew must shoot a very technical sequence with great sensitivity to the environment. Jenny and Christian turn off the ambient, broader sources, like space lights and zip lights, and add a couple of 2K Fresnels specifically placed based on the camera positions and queen blocking. There are marks for this moment so that the lighting can be more precise.” Where does it all lead? To a lavish Reunion and Finale, which Bloom says are her favorites. “The reunion shows are choreographed and rehearsed, and shot on stage looking out at the empty theater,”

Bloom relates. “Then we tape the finale with a live audience looking at the stage, so it’s a 360-degree design with a short turn-around to reconfigure some fixtures and build cues for the backgrounds/performances. For Season 11, we used five PRG Ground Control Followspots, which saved audience sightlines and reduced seat kills. That freed our programmer, Andrew Law, to focus on the numerous musical performances in a severe time crunch.” Kerber says that each finale takes on a personality. “What’s consistent is the variety of tasks our team takes on,” he shares “The reality crew for RuPaul’s Drag Race is unique, and must call upon all of its skill and knowledge to meet the show’s high creative bar.” Adds Camera Utility Steve Anson: “Live shooting is a rollercoaster, and it’s amazing to find the inner beauty in the performances. Sometimes the queens and the crew are thrown too much too fast, so it’s nice to be able to shout out to the director or producers about a possible oversight before filming. Thankfully, we’ve worked with each other for years, and we can approach these [challenges] with ease.” Concludes Kerber: “On RuPaul’s Drag Race, there exists an environment where key collaborators must excel at many shooting styles, and adapt to changes on the fly. RuPaul regularly says to the queens, ‘Don’t be afraid to use all the colors in the crayon box.’ I think that sentiment applies to the crew of Drag Race as well, and we take it to heart and deliver.”

Still Photographer Denise Malone

Season 12 Director of Photography Michael Jacob Kerber Lighting Designer Jenny Bloom Operators Jay Mack Arnette Greg Montes Marios Panagiotopoulos Jon Schneider Brett Smith Jib Operator Justin Umphenour Head Utilities Steve Anson Clarence Nelson Camera Utilities Gino Hernandez Carlos Camacho DIT Daniel Hernandez Still Photographer Jordin Althaus

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Eric JOHN LEGEND, JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR LIVE IN CONCERT , 2018

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Liebowitz SEAL, CHRISTMAS IN ROCKEFELLER CENTER , 2017

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Unit still photographer Eric Liebowitz began his career editing political campaign commercials in Washington D.C., before later shooting stills for Time and Fortune, and critically acclaimed episodic series like Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, The Americans, and Sneaky Pete. But he’s also shot a broad range of unscripted content ­– everything from behind the scenes at America’s Got Talent to last year’s live NBC broadcast of Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert. Liebowitz (who recently switched from using Canon’s 5D Mark III to the fullframe mirrorless Canon EOS R) has shot the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade for 10 years running, 100 episodes of HBO’s Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, and a handful of intensely emotional reveals for Extreme Makeover: Home Edition. (Hint: avoid getting in the way of the video cameras even as thousands of people are screaming, “Move that bus!”) He says the lack of retakes in the unscripted world makes every day unpredictable. “There’s so much adrenaline going when you only get one chance,” Liebowitz shares. “I get to the Macy’s Parade at 7:00 a.m. to see the rehearsal of the Broadway musicals. I can’t shoot until 9:00 a.m., when the crowd is in the bleachers, but making mental notes helps get me prepared.” As one of four photographers to capture Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert, Liebowitz says the common thread for much of his unscripted work is “taking a journalistic approach to location and positioning. But also, because it’s entertainment, making sure to identify who is the star of the shot.” Some jobs – like “being ten feet away from John Legend” for JCS Live – are “thrilling.” Others, like shooting then-presidential candidate Donald Trump’s interview for FOX Entertainment’s Megyn Kelly Presents, provide a different experience. “It was after the debate, when he had made those comments about [Kelly], and it was such a tense morning,” he recalls. “It was in [Candidate Trump’s] office, and they had bomb dogs sniffing my equipment, and the Secret Service [present].” Such memories are hard to come by anywhere but in the unscripted world, or as Liebowitz concludes: “It’s like shooting a pop-culture carnival. Fast, chaotic and always entertaining.”

“ [UNSCRIPTED

TELEVISION] IS LIKE SHOOTING A POPCULTURE CARNIVAL. FAST, CHAOTIC, AND ALWAYS ENTERTAINING.”

(UNKNOWN CONTESTANT), AMERICA’S GOT TALENT , 2016

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JOHN OLIVER WITH “WEIRD AL” YANKOVIC, LAST WEEK TONIGHT WITH JOHN OLIVER , 2018

MACY’S THANKSGIVING DAY PARADE , 2017

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PRODUCTION CREDITS COMPILED BY TERESA MUÑOZ – AS OF OCTOBER 1, 2019 The input of Local 600 members is of the utmost importance, and we rely on our membership as the prime (and often the only) source of information. In order for us to continue to provide this service, we ask that Guild members submitting information take note of the following requests: Please provide up-to-date and complete crew information (including that the deadline for the Production Credits is on the first of the preceding cover month (excluding weekends & holidays).

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First Man / Photo by Daniel McFadden

Still Photographers, Publicists, Additional Units, etc.). Please note


3 DOORS PRODUCTIONS INC.

“LET’S MAKE A DEAL” SEASON 11 LIGHTING DESIGNER: JOSH HUTCHINGS PED OPERATORS: GEORGE APONTE, SCOTT HYLTON, DAVID CARLINE JIB OPERATOR: CRAIG HAMPTON STEADICAM OPERATOR: RANDY GOMEZ HEAD UTILITY: CHRIS SAVAGE UTILITIES: BERNIE MENDIBLES, HENRY VEREEN, SHERWIN MAGLANOC VIDEO CONTROLLERS: JAY GRIFFITHS, JR., JAY GRIFFITH, SR., HEATHER GRIFFITHS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RON JAFFE

20TH CENTURY FOX “911” SEASON 3

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOAQUÍN SEDILLO, ASC OPERATORS: CONNOR O’BRIEN, DUANE MIELIWOCKI, SOC, PHIL MILLER, SOC ASSISTANTS: KEN LITTLE, CLAUDIO BANKS, ERIC GUERIN, DAVID STELLHORN, MAX MACAT, JIHANE MRAD STEADICAM OPERATOR: CONNOR O’BRIEN STEADICAM ASSISTANT: KEN LITTLE CAMERA UTILITY: PAULINA GOMEZ DIGITAL UTILITY: JOSHUA SMITH

“911: LOAN STAR” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDY STRAHORN OPERATORS: BRICE REID, JOE BRODERICK, DEAN MORIN ASSISTANTS: JAMES RYDINGS, KAORU ISHIZUKA, CARLOS DOERR, RON ELLIOT, MATTHEW KING, KELLY MITCHELL STEADICAM OPERATOR: BRICE REID STEADICAM ASSISTANT: JAMES RYDINGS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: PETER RUSS CAMERA UTILITY: JOE PACELLA DIGITAL UTILITY: BASSEM BALAA 2ND UNIT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOE BRODERICK

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“EMERGENCE” SEASON 1

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GREG MATTHEWS OPERATORS: JOEY MORENA, ADAM KOLKMAN ASSISTANTS: RAY DIER, TOMOKA IZUMI, CHRISTIAN COBB, AJIRI AKPOLO STEADICAM OPERATOR: JOEY MORENA CAMERA UTILITY: LESLIE KOLTER

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROBERT HUMPHREYS OPERATORS: FRANCIS SPIELDENNER, TODD ARMITAGE ASSISTANTS: TONY COAN, CHRISTOPHER ENG, MARC LOFORTE, RONALD WRASE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MATTHEW SELKIRK LOADERS: KEITH ANDERSON, AMBER MATHES STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CARA HOWE

“LAST MAN STANDING” SEASON 8

“GROWN-ISH” SEASON 3

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DONALD A. MORGAN, ASC OPERATORS: GARY ALLEN, RANDY BAER, DAMIAN DELLA SANTINA, JOHN BOYD ASSISTANTS: MISSY TOY-OZEAS, SEAN ASKINS, AL MYERS CAMERA UTILITY: JOHN WEISS, STEVE MASIAS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: VON THOMAS

“LOVE, SIMON” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MARK SCHWARTZBARD OPERATORS: JOSEPH B. HERNANDEZ, YVONNE CHU ASSISTANTS: CHRIS GEUKENS, DEREK PLOUGH, GENNA PALERMO, LOREN AZLEIN STEADICAM OPERATOR: JOSEPH B. HERNANDEZ LOADER: LINDSEY GROSS

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DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MARK DOERING-POWELL, ASC OPERATORS: PAUL SANCHEZ, CHRIS SQUIRES ASSISTANTS: ROBERT SCHIERER, MICHAEL KLEIMAN, GEORGE HESSE, WILL DICENSO STEADICAM OPERATOR: JENS PIOTROWSKI CAMERA UTILITY: ANDREW OLIVER STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RON JAFFE

“GREY’S ANATOMY” SEASON 16 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: HERB DAVIS, ALICIA ROBBINS OPERATORS: FRED IANNONE, STEVE ULLMAN, LESLIE MORRIS ASSISTANTS: NICK MCLEAN, FORREST THURMAN, KIRK BLOOM, LISA BONACCORSO STEADICAM OPERATOR: STEVE ULLMAN STEADICAM ASSISTANT: FORREST THURMAN CAMERA UTILITY: MARTE POST

“JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE!” SEASON 17 LIGHTING DIRECTOR: CHRISTIAN HIBBARD OPERATORS: GREG GROUWINKEL, PARKER BARTLETT, GARRETT HURT, MARK GONZALES

STEADICAM OPERATOR: KRIS WILSON JIB OPERATORS: MARC HUNTER, RANDY GOMEZ, JR., NICK GOMEZ CAMERA UTILITIES: CHARLES FERNANDEZ, SCOTT SPIEGEL, TRAVIS WILSON, DAVID FERNANDEZ, ADAM BARKER VIDEO CONTROLLER: GUY JONES STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: KAREN NEAL, MICHAEL DESMOND 2ND UNIT DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BERND REINBARDT, STEVE GARRETT

“STATION 19” SEASON 3 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DARYN OKADA, ASC, NANCY SCHREIBER, ASC OPERATORS: RON SCHLAEGER, MARIANA ANTUNANO, BILL BOATMAN ASSISTANTS: TONY SCHULTZ, HANNAH LEVIN, MICHAEL ALVAREZ, SUMMER MARSH, ADAM COWAN, DUSTIN FRUGE STEADICAM OPERATOR: RON SCHLAEGER STEADICAM ASSISTANT: TONY SCHULTZ DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ANDREW LEMON UTILITY: GEORGE MONTEJANO, III

“WINSLOW” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TREVOR FORREST, JEFFREY WALDRON OPERATORS: MARK MEYERS, SARAH LEVY ASSISTANTS: SAM BUTT, MELISSA FISHER, JORDAN CRAMER, GISELLE GONZALEZ STEADICAM OPERATOR: MARK MEYERS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CHARLES ALEXANDER UTILITY: BROOKE ZBYTNIEWSKI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RON JAFFE

AFN PRODUCTIONS-TELEPICTURES “THE REAL” SEASON 6

LIGHTING DIRECTOR: EARL WOODY, LD OPERATORS: KEVIN MICHEL, NATE PAYTON, STEVE RUSSELL, CHRIS WILLIAMS STEADICAM OPERATOR: WILL DEMERITT CAMERA UTILITIES: HENRY VEREEN, SALVATORE BELLISSIMO, ANDRES VELASQUEZ, JR. JIB ARM OPERATOR: JIM CIRRITO VIDEO CONTROLLER: JEFF MESSENGER

AMOA PICTURES, INC.

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A VERY GOOD PRODUCTION, INC. & WAD PRODUCTIONS

“THE ELLEN DEGENERES SHOW” SEASON 17 LIGHTING DIRECTOR: TOM BECK PED OPERATORS: DAVID WEEKS, PAUL WILEMAN, TIM O’NEILL HANDHELD OPERATOR: CHIP FRASER JIB OPERATOR: DAVID RHEA STEADICAM OPERATOR: DONOVAN GILBUENA VIDEO CONTROLLER: JAMES MORAN HEAD UTILITY: CRAIG “ZZO” MARAZZO UTILITIES: ARLO GILBUENA, WALLY LANCASTER, DIEGO AVALOS

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“DAYS OF OUR LIVES” SEASON 54 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: VINCE STEIB OPERATORS: MARK WARSHAW, VICKIE WALKER, MICHAEL J. DENTON, STEVE CLARK CAMERA UTILITIES: STEVE BAGDADI, GARY CYPHER VIDEO CONTROLLER: ALEXIS DELLAR HANSON

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BONANZA PRODUCTIONS, INC. “SHAMELESS” SEASON 10

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BESHERT, LLC “MARRY ME”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: FLORIAN BALLHAUS, ASC OPERATORS: BUZZ MOYER, HEATHER NORTON ASSISTANTS: BOBBY MANCUSO, JOHNNY SOUSA, JUSTIN MANCUSO, MICHEAL DERARIO LOADER: TYLER MANCUSO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ABBY LEVINE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: BARRY WETCHER PUBLICIST: RACHAEL ROTH

BIG BEACH TV PRODUCTIONS

“SORRY FOR YOUR LOSS” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ADAM BRICKER OPERATORS: CHLOE WEAVER, BEN VERHULST ASSISTANTS: CHARLIE PANIAN, TIFFANY NATHANSON, MARIELA FERRER, RYAN MONELLI STEADICAM OPERATOR: BEN VERHULST

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DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANTHONY HARDWICK OPERATORS: CHRISTIAN HERRERA, CHRIS HOOD ASSISTANTS: RYO KINNO, DARBY NEWMAN, DAVID BERRYMAN, SAL ALVAREZ LOADER: MAYA MORGAN DIGITAL UTILITY: BROOKE MAGRATH STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL SARKIS

BONEYARD PICTURES “GHOST DRAFT”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LARRY FONG, ASC OPERATORS: LUKAS BIELAN, MATT PETROSKY ASSISTANTS: BILL COE, ANDY HOEHN, BOBBY MCMAHAN, PAUL WOODS STEADICAM OPERATOR: MATT PETROSKY DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ROBERT HOWIE LOADER: NASTASIA HUMPHRIES DIGITAL UTILITY: RACHEL KEENAN

CBS

“BULL” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DERICK UNDERSCHULTZ OPERATORS: BARNABY SHAPIRO, MALCOLM PURNELL ASSISTANTS: ROMAN LUKIW, SOREN NASH, MICHAEL LOBB, TREVOR WOLFSON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: THOMAS WONG LOADERS: QUINN MURPHY, NIALANEY RODRIGUEZ

“CAROL’S SECOND ACT” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRIS LA FOUNTAINE OPERATORS: BRUCE REUTLINGER, GEORGE LA FOUNTAINE, CHRIS WILCOX, KRIS CONDE ASSISTANTS: CHRIS WORKMAN, BRIAN LYNCH, JEFF ROTH, JOHN WEISS, CRAIG LA FOUNTAINE CAMERA UTILITIES: CHRIS TODD, VICKI BECK DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: SHAUN WHEELER VIDEO CONTROLLER: ANDY DICKERMAN

“ENTERTAINMENT TONIGHT” SEASON 39 LIGHTING DESIGNER: DARREN LANGER DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: KURT BRAUN OPERATORS: JAIMIE CANTRELL, JAMES B. PATRICK, ALLEN VOSS, ED SARTORI, HENRY ZINMAN, BOB CAMPI, RODNEY MCMAHON, ANTHONY SALERNO CAMERA UTILITY: TERRY AHERN VIDEO CONTROLLERS: MIKE DOYLE, PETER STENDAL

“EVIL” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: FRED MURPHY, TIM GUINNESS OPERATORS: AIKEN WEISS, KATE LAROSE ASSISTANTS: ROBERT BECCHIO, RENE CROUT, ALISA COLLEY, SANCHEEV RAVICHANDRAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DAVE SATIN LOADERS: VINCE LARAWAY, KATE NAHVI, BRIANNA MORRISON

“MAN WITH A PLAN” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GARY BAUM, ASC OPERATORS: GLENN SHIMADA, TRAVERS HILL, LANCE BILLITZER, ED FINE ASSISTANTS: ADRIAN LICCIARDI, JEFF GOLDENBERG, ALEC ELIZONDO, CLINT PALMER, JASON HERRING UTILITIES: DANNY LORENZE, SEAN ASKINS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DEREK LANTZ VIDEO CONTROLLER: JOHN O’BRIEN

“NCIS” SEASON 17 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: WILLIAM WEBB, ASC OPERATORS: GREGORY PAUL COLLIER, CHAD ERICKSON, DOUG FROEBE (VIDEO) ASSISTANTS: JAMES TROOST, HELEN TADESSE, NATHAN LOPEZ, YUSEF EDMONDS LOADER: ANNA FERRARIE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MIKE KUBEISY


“NCIS: LOS ANGELES” SEASON 11 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: VICTOR HAMMER OPERATORS: TERENCE NIGHTINGALL, TIM BEAVERS ASSISTANTS: KEITH BANKS, RICHIE HUGHES, PETER CARONIA, JACQUELINE NIVENS STEADICAM OPERATORS: TERENCE NIGHTINGALL, TIM BEAVERS STEADICAM ASSISTANTS: KEITH BANKS, RICHIE HUGHES DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOHN MILLS DIGITAL UTILITY: TREVOR BEELER
 STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RON JAFFE PUBLICIST: KATHLEEN TANJI

“STAR TREK: PICARD” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILLIP LANYON OPERATORS: KENNY BROWN, STEVE MATZINGER, MARK LABONGE ASSISTANTS: JAMIE FELZ, CASEY MULDOON, JAMES BARELA, LUIS GOMEZ, DAVE EGERSTROM, ERIC GUTHRIE, CARLOS LOPEZ-CALLEJA, NATT VINYUWONGE STEADICAM OPERATORS: KENNY BROWN, MARK LABONGE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MARC CLANCY DIGITAL LOADER: SAMAR KAUSS DIGITAL UTILITY: KYLE JACOBS B UNIT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRIS MABLY OPERATOR: MARK LABONGE

ASSISTANT: NATT VINYUWONGE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: SCOTT RESNICK DIGITAL UTILITY: STEPHEN LING

“SEAL TEAM” SEASON 3 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: J. MICHAEL MURO, ALAN JACOBY OPERATORS: DOMINIC BARTOLONE, MATT VALENTINE ASSISTANTS: TODD AVERY, ANDREW DEGNAN, ARTURO ROJAS, RYAN JACKSON STEADICAM OPERATOR: DOMINIC BARTOLONE STEADICAM ASSISTANT: TODD AVERY DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: RAUL RIVEROS LOADER: NOAH MURO

“THE NEIGHBORHOOD” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRIS LA FOUNTAINE OPERATORS: BRUCE RUETLINGER, KRIS CONDE, GEORGE LA FOUNTAINE, CHRIS WILCOX ASSISTANTS: JEFF ROTH, BRIAN LYNCH, CRAIG LA FOUNTAINE CAMERA UTILITIES: CHRIS TODD, VICKI BECK, TREVOR LA FOUNTAINE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: RYNE NINER VIDEO CONTROLLER: ANDY DICKERMAN

“THE TALK” SEASON 10 LIGHTING DIRECTOR: MARISA DAVIS PED OPERATORS: ART TAYLOR, MARK GONZALES, ED STAEBLER HANDHELD OPERATORS: RON BARNES, KEVIN MICHEL, JEFF JOHNSON JIB OPERATOR: RANDY GOMEZ HEAD UTILITY: CHARLES FERNANDEZ UTILITIES: MIKE BUSHNER, DOUG BAIN, DEAN FRIZZEL, BILL GREINER, JON ZUCCARO

VIDEO CONTROLLER: RICHARD STROCK STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RON JAFFE

“TOMMY” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CRAIG DIBONA OPERATORS: DAVID TAICHER, ERIC TRAMP ASSISTANTS: EDWIN EFFREIN, JAMES BELLETIER, DEREK DIBONA, JAMES MCEVOY STEADICAM OPERATOR: DAVID TAICHER LOADERS: CHRIS MENDEZ, TREVOR BARCUS STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: CARA HOWE, ALYSSA LONGCHAMP, JEFFREY NEIRA, MICHAEL PARMELEE

CMS PRODUCTIONS “SILENT RETREAT”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SING H. YAM OPERATOR: ALEX KORNREICH ASSISTANTS: FILIPP PENSON, ANDY HENSLER LOADER: CHRISTOPHER CHAVES STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: EMILY ARAGONES, LINDA KALLERUS

“THE HUMANS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LAURIE CRAWLEY OPERATOR: JENNIE JEDDRY ASSISTANT: YALE GROPMAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: LOIC DE LAME LOADER: ADAM DEREZENDES STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: WILSON WEBB

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STEADICAM ASSISTANT: AL COHEN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: GREG VANZYCK DIGITAL UTILITY: BRIAN FREDERICK

“MADAM SECRETARY” SEASON 6 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LEARAN KAHANOV OPERATORS: JAMIE SILVERSTEIN, LISA SENE ASSISTANTS: HEATHER NORTON, DAMON LEMAY, HILARY BENAS, EMILY DEBLASI STEADICAM OPERATOR: PETER VIETRO-HANNUM DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: KEITH PUTNAM LOADERS: KRISTINA LALLY, RAUL MARTINEZ STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: SARAH SHATZ, MARK SCHAFER C

FAWTYFIELD, INC.

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“THE 40 YEAR OLD VERSION”

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DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ERIC BRANCO OPERATORS: BRENT WEICHSEL, JULIEN ZEITOUNI ASSISTANTS: AUTUMN MORAN, TSYEN SHEN LOADER: ANJELA COVIAUX STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JEONG PARK

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FILM SIX, LLC

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“THE BINGE”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDREW HUEBSCHER OPERATORS: BRIAN OSMOND, KEVIN GRAVES ASSISTANTS: CAMILLE FREER, JELANI WILSON, JADE BRENNAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ROSS CITRIN

FLETCHER STREET, LLC “GHETTO COWBOY”

CODA PRODUCTIONS

ENDEMOL SHINE

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PAULA HUIDOBRO OPERATORS: ALEC JARNAGIN, SCOTT LEBEDA ASSISTANTS: CHRISTIAN HOLLYER, NOLAN BALL, FELIX GIUFFRIDA DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: LEONARD MAZZONE LOADER: CHRIS MALENFANT DIGITAL UTILITY: CHEYENNE CAPRI STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: SEACIA PAVAO, MARK HILL

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROB WHITAKER, JOHN IKENOUYE OPERATORS: KAKO OYARZUN, JASON FORD, JEREMIAH SMITH ASSISTANTS: DAVE KAPLAN, JUSTIN WITT, JERRY HUDGENS, BLAKE WADDELL, ELIE VERBLE JIB OPERATOR: CHRIS SCHULTZ JIB TECH: BRYCE BONN

“CODA”

COOL WATERS PRODUCTIONS, LLC

EYE PRODUCTIONS, INC.

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TODD BANHAZL OPERATORS: SCOTT SAKAMOTO, SOC, JOHN CONNOR, JUSTIN CAMERON ASSISTANTS: DAVID EDSALL, SCOTT JOHNSON, GARY BEVANS, JASON ALEGRE, NICK NIKIDES STEADICAM OPERATOR: SCOTT SAKAMOTO, SOC STEADICAM ASSISTANT: DAVID EDSALL LOADER: RACHEL WIEDERHOEFT DIGITAL UTILITY: JACQUES VINCENT STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: WARRICK PAGE

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GENE ENGELS OPERATORS: STEPHEN CONSENTINO, GEOFFREY FROST ASSISTANTS: GRAHAM BURT, JACOB STAHLMAN, MARTIN PETERSON, KENNETH MARTELL DIGITAL IMAGING TECHS: RYAN HEIDE, STEVE CALALANG LOADERS: MICHAEL FULLER, JOHN KEELER STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: CRAIG BLANKENHORN, PATRICK HARBRON

“UNTITLED SHOWTIME LAKERS PROJECT” PILOT

EDUVISION, LLC

“UNTITLED AMY HOGGART PROJECT” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: RYAN SCAFURO OPERATOR: NADINE MARTINEZ ASSISTANTS: IAN BRACONE, ANTHONY DEROSE

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“BLUE BLOODS” SEASON 10

“MACGYVER” SEASON 4 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL MARTINEZ, CHRISTOPHER DUDDY OPERATORS: IAN FORSYTH, PAUL KRUMPER, GREG BALDI ASSISTANTS: AL COHEN, TREVOR RIOS, MICHAEL TORINO, STEFAN VINO-FIGUEROA, EASTON HARPER, TYLER BASTIANSON STEADICAM OPERATOR: IAN FORSYTH

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MINKA FARTHING-KOHL OPERATOR: DREW SARACCO ASSISTANTS: ANTHONY DEFRANCESCO, MICHAEL TOLAND, ADAM RUSSELL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ROBERT STRAIT LOADER: COLLIN WELCH STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JESSICA KOURKOUNIS PUBLICIST: JACQUELINE BAZAN

FOX 21

“THE MS. PAT SHOW” PILOT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GEORGE MOORADIAN, ASC OPERATORS: VANCE BRANDON, CHUN MING HUANG, VINCE SINGLETARY, ROBERT ARNOLD, HELENA JACKSON ASSISTANTS: MICHELE MCKINLEY, TIM ROE, AL MYERS STEADICAM OPERATOR: ROBERT ARNOLD STEADICAM ASSISTANT: TIM ROE CAMERA UTILITY: KATE STEINHEBEL DIGITAL UTILITY: ERINN BELL TECHNOCRANE OPERATOR: VINCE SINGLETARY TECHNOCRANE TECH: MICHELE MCKINLEY VIDEO CONTROLLER: RICK DUNGAN

FRONT PAGE NEWS, LLC “NEWS OF THE WORLD”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DARIUSZ WOLSKI, ASC OPERATORS: MARTIN SCHAER, JAMES GOLDMAN ASSISTANTS: DAN MING, SIMON ENGLAND, DORIAN BLANCO, JASON SEIGEL STEADICAM OPERATOR: JAMES GOLDMAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: RYAN NGUYEN LOADER: HILLARY BACA STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: BRUCE TALAMON PUBLICIST: GUY ADAN


FUQUA FILMS

GRAMERCY PRODUCTIONS, LLC

HORIZON SCRIPTED TELEVISION

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BART TAU OPERATORS: MATT DOLL, ANDY FISHER, CHRISTIAN SATRAZEMIS ASSISTANTS: JUSTIN DEGUIRE, APRIL RUANE CROWLEY, JENNIFER RANKINE, TAYLOR CASE, MIKE FISHER, GRACE PRELLER CHAMBERS STEADICAM OPERATOR: MATT DOLL STEADICAM ASSISTANT: JUSTIN DEGUIRE LOADER: TREY VOLPE DIGITAL UTILITY: RYAN ST CLAIR

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRETT JUTKIEWICZ OPERATORS: STANLEY FERNANDEZ, JR., CHRISTOPHER MESSINA ASSISTANTS: JAMES SCHLITTENHART, BAYLEY SWEITZER, JORGE DEL TORO, RACHEL FEDORKOVA DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JAIME CHAPIN LOADER: ADAM SCHLARB STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: NICOLE RIVELLI

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PETER MENZIES, JR., ACS, ADAM SUSCHITZKY, BSC, CHRISTOPHER NORR, EVANS BROWN OPERATORS: GEORGE BIANCHINI, SOC, BOB SCOTT ASSISTANTS: MARY-MARGARET PORTER, OGI SAROVIC, JOHN OLIVERI, NICK GOWIN, DERRICK GUTIERREZ STEADICAM OPERATOR: GEORGE BIANCHINI, SOC DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JASON BAUER LOADER: JAIME STRIBY DIGITAL UTILITY: JAKE SCHNEIDERMAN STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: GENE PAGE PUBLICIST: ERIN FELENTZER

“THE RESIDENT” SEASON 3

2ND UNIT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDY FISHER STEADICAM OPERATOR: CHRISTIAN SATRAZEMIS

FX NETWORK

“IT’S ALWAYS SUNNY IN PHILADELPHIA” SEASON 14 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN TANZER OPERATORS: ADAM SKLENA, DAVE GASPERIK, DAVE HIRSCHMANN ASSISTANTS: GAVIN WYNN, ANGELICA GIANGREGORIO, NOAH BAGDONAS CAMERA UTILITY: JOHN GOODNER DIGITAL UTILITY: MICHAEL BAGDONAS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: PATRICK MCELHENNEY

“BOOGIE”

HOME AGAIN PRODUCTIONS, LLC

“THE RIGHT STUFF” SEASON 1

“HALLOWEEN 12 AKA HALLOWEEN KILLS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL SIMMONDS OPERATORS: PAUL DALEY, JOHN LEHMAN ASSISTANTS: JUSTIN SIMPSON, ALAN ALDRIDGE, SETH LEWIS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ANDY BADER LOADER: NICHOLAS BROWN STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RYAN GREEN

HOP SKIP AND JUMP PRODUCTIONS, INC. “GOOD TROUBLE” SEASON 2B

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MARCO FARGNOLI OPERATORS: NICK FRANCO, PATRICK ROUSSEAU ASSISTANTS: SETH KOTOK, JEFF SALDIN, DANNY GARDNER, ANDREEA CORNEL STEADICAM OPERATOR: NICK FRANCO DIGITAL UTILITY: AUBREY STEVENSON DIGITAL LOADER: RYAN POLACK

HULA POST

“LAUGH MOBB’S LAUGH TRACKS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ERIC WYCOFF OPERATOR: SAM LAW ASSISTANTS: AMBAR CAPOOR, BRIAN WINIKOFF, DARIN MILLER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: STEPHEN FOUASNON

JAY SQUARED

“BLINDSPOT” SEASON 5 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDREW PRIESTLEY OPERATORS: PYARE FORTUNATO, PETER RAMOS, JOHN ROMER ASSISTANTS: ANDREW SMITH, ALEKSANDR ALLEN, CHRISTIAN BRIGHT, BRYANT BAILEY, DEBORAH FASTUCA

NOVEMBER 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

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“BROOKLYN NINE-NINE” SEASON 7 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: RICK PAGE OPERATORS: PHIL MASTRELLA, LAUREN GADD, JOEL TALLBUT ASSISTANTS: JAY LEVY, BILL GERARDO, DUSTIN MILLER, WILLIAM SCHMIDT, CHRIS CARLSON LOADER: NICK GILBERT DIGITAL UTILITY: KURT LEVY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JOHN P. FLEENOR

“CHICAGO PD” SEASON 7 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JAMES ZUCAL OPERATORS: VICTOR MACIAS, DARRYL MILLER, SETH THOMAS ASSISTANTS: JOHN YOUNG, JAMISON ACKER, DON CARLSON, KYLE BELOUSEK, DAVID WIGHTMAN STEADICAM OPERATOR: SCOTT DROPKIN, SOC LOADER: NICK WILSON UTILITIES: MARION TUCKER, ALAN DEMBEK

“F.B.I.” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TARI SEGAL OPERATORS: AFTON GRANT, CHARLES ANDERSON ASSISTANTS: LEE VICKERY, NICALENA IOVINO, GEORGE LOOKSHIRE, SEBASTIAN IERVOLINO LOADERS: CONNOR LYNCH, NKEM UMENYI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHAEL PARMELEE

“GOOD GIRLS” SEASON 3 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JASON OLDAK OPERATORS: GARY CAMP, BRIAN OUTLAND, NICOLE LOBELL ASSISTANTS: JOHN RUIZ, JASON KNOLL, PATRICK BLANCHET, ROBYN BUCHANAN, EM GONZALES, CARTER SMITH STEADICAM OPERATOR: GARY CAMP STEADICAM ASSISTANT: JOHN RUIZ LOADER: MATT SCHOUTEN DIGITAL UTILITY: JONNIE MENTZER

SET LIGHTING

DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CHLOE WALKER LOADERS: DARNELL MCDONALD, ANDREW BOYD STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: PHIL CARUSO

“MANIFEST” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SARAH CAWLEY OPERATORS: CARLOS GUERRA, RYAN TOUSSIENG ASSISTANTS: ANDREW PECK, WESLEY HODGES, TRICIA MEARS, KAIH WONG LOADER: WILL FORTUNE

MANHUNT PRODUCTIONS, INC.

“MANHUNT: LONE WOLF” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN LINDLEY, ASC, ERIC MOYNIER OPERATORS: NICHOLAS DAVIDOFF, RICARDO SARMIENTO ASSISTANTS: BRADEN BELMONTE, ABNER MEDINA, BENEDICT BALDAUFF, JASON CIANELLA LOADER: BRIAN BRESNEHAN DIGITAL UTILITY: KIMBERLY HERMAN STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: LEWIS JACOBS

“LINCOLN” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID HENNINGS OPERATORS: MICHAEL F. O’SHEA, SOC, LISA SENE ASSISTANTS: DOUGLAS FOOTE, KYLE BLACKMAN, RODRIGO MILLAN GARCE, PATRICK J. O’SHEA STEADICAM OPERATOR: MICHAEL F. O’SHEA, SOC STEADICAM ASSISTANT: DOUGLAS FOOTE LOADER: KATHERINE RIVERA STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: BARBARA NITKE

“NEW AMSTERDAM” SEASON 2

LWOD PRODUCTIONS, INC.

“LOVE, WEDDINGS AND OTHER DISASTERS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: NICHOLAS MATTHEWS OPERATORS: JOEL SAN JUAN, TOM FITZGERALD ASSISTANTS: JAMIESON FITZPATRICK, DEAN EGAN, MATTHEW HEDGES, TALIA KROHMAL DIGITAL IMAGING TECHS: MATTHEW DORRIS, DAVE KUDROWITZ LOADER: THOMAS BELLOTTI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: SEACIA PAVAO

MAIN GATE PRODUCTIONS, LLC “GOD FRIENDED ME” SEASON 2

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JON DELGADO OPERATORS: THOMAS SCHNAIDT, DANIEL HERSEY ASSISTANTS: BLACKFORD SHELTON, III, MARCOS RODRIGUEZ QUIJANO, BEHNOOD DADFAR, ALFONSO DIAZ DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CHANDLER TUCKER LOADERS: ANGEL VASQUEZ, MIGUEL GONZALEZ STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHAEL PARMELEE

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NBC

“ALMOST FAMILY” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TIM BELLEN OPERATORS: ARTHUR AFRICANO, JONATHAN BECK, CAITLIN MACHAK ASSISTANTS: ALEX BELLEN, JOSEPH METZGER, WARIS SUPANPONG, YVES WILSON, JONATHAN MONK, RANDY SCHWARTZ LOADERS: GIANNI CARSON, IVANA BERNAL STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: LINDA KALLERUS, CARA HOWE

“BLUFF CITY LAW” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MIKE SPRAGG, BSC OPERATORS: MATTHEW PEARCE, BRENT SHREWSBURY ASSISTANTS: DAVID LEB, BETTY CHOW, MATTHEW CABINUM, JARRETT RAWLINGS STEADICAM OPERATOR: MATTHEW PEARCE LOADER: CONNOR KING DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JACOB LAGUARDIA STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: KATHERINE BOMBOY

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDREW VOEGELI OPERATORS: JULIAN DELACRUZ, SCOTT TINSLEY ASSISTANTS: PEDRO CORCEGA, JAMES MADRID, MATTHEW MONTALTO, ROBERT WRASE LOADERS: JEFFREY MAKARAUSKAS, ANABEL CAICEDO

“SUPERSTORE” SEASON 5 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JAY HUNTER OPERATORS: ADAM TASH, DANNY NICHOLS, MIGUEL PASK ASSISTANTS: JASON ZAKRZEWSKI, BRANDON MARGULIES, ERIC JENKINSON, RYAN SULLIVAN, ESTA GARCIA, RIKKI ALARIAN JONES CAMERA UTILITY: GRACE THOMAS

“WILL & GRACE” SEASON 11 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GARY BAUM, ASC OPERATORS: GLENN SHIMADA, TRAVERS HILL, LANCE BILLITZER, ED FINE ASSISTANTS: ADRIAN LICCIARDI, JEFF GOLDENBERG, ALEC ELIZONDO, CLINT PALMER, JASON HERRING UTILITIES: DANNY LORENZE, SEAN ASKINS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DEREK LANTZ VIDEO CONTROLLER: STUART WESOLIK STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CHRIS HASTON


NETFLIX PRODUCTIONS, LLC

NKZ PRODUCTIONS, INC.

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ZACK SNYDER OPERATOR: JOHN CLOTHIER ASSISTANTS: TREVOR LOOMIS, BRADEN BATSFORD, CHRIS SLOAN, BRENDAN DEVANIE STEADICAM OPERATOR: JOHN CLOTHIER DIGITAL LOADER: MIKE PRIOR STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CLAY ENOS

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DENNIS WEILER, CHAD GRIEPENTROG, ANDRE MARTINEZ OPERATORS: DOUG HENNING, MARK JUNGJOHANN, IVAN DURAN, MARTIN MOURINO, TIM STAHL, ANDREW RAKOW, EZRA EPWELL, NICK TULLY, ERICA SHUSHA, JEREMY GUY, SUZIE WEIS ASSISTANTS: YOGI NEELY, TYLER DETARSIO, DAVE OSTERBERG, THOR FRIDLEIFSSON, NICK MILLER, JAY STRAMM, JEN CHMIELEWSKI, TAYLOR GILMARTIN CAMERA UTILITIES: APPLE SCHLOSSER, MICHAEL WILLIAMSON JIB OPERATOR: RANDY GOMEZ, JR. VIDEO CONTROLLERS: RICHARD STROCK, MARC SURETTE

“ARMY OF THE DEAD”

2ND UNIT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPY: IAN SEABROOK

“HEXAGON” SEASON 1 OPERATORS: JOE CHESS, ROBERT SPAULDING ASSISTANTS: MARICELLA RAMIREZ, JEFFERSON JONES, ALVARO NAVARRO, ULRIKE LAMSTER STEADICAM OPERATOR: JOE CHESS STEADICAM ASSISTANT: MARICELLA RAMIREZ DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: RYAN DEGRAZZIO LOADER: MICHAEL RUSH STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: AARON EPSTEIN

NICKELODEON

“HENRY DANGER” SEASON 5 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MIKE SPODNIK OPERATORS: TIM HEINZEL, CORY GUNTER, SCOTT OSTERMANN, DANA ROBERT ROSS CAMERA UTILITIES: BILL SEDGWICK, JIM ELLIOTT, DOUG MINGES JIB UTILITY: RYAN ELLIOTT STEADICAM OPERATOR: DANA ROBERT ROSS VIDEO CONTROLLER: JIM AGNOR

“THE BACHELOR” SEASON 24

OPEN 4 BUSINESS PRODUCTIONS, LLC “BRING THE FUNNY” SEASON 1

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TOM SUTHERLAND HANDHELD OPERATORS: JOFRE ROSERO, GUIDO FRENZEL, STEVE THIEL PED OPERATORS: SCOTT HYLTON, SCOTT KAYE, ROB BURNETTE, MARTIN BROWN, KATHRINE LACOFANO TECHNO JIB OPERATOR: MARC HUNTER JIB OPERATOR: ALEX HERNANDEZ STEADICAM OPERATOR: MANNY BONILLA TOWER CAM OPERATOR: RANDY GOMEZ, JR. HEAD UTILITY: DUSTIN STEPHENS UTILITIES: MIKE VINYARD, SHAWN JOHNS, TIM FARMER, KEVIN FERNANDEZ, JOHN MARKESE TECHNO UTILITY: JORGE VALENZUELA JIB UTILITY: BRIAN JACQUEMIN

STEADICAM UTILITY: MANUEL BONILLA TOWER CAM UTILITY: ROB PITTMAN 2ND UNIT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MALCOLM SERRETTE OPERATORS: KYLE STRYKER, TIM MURPHY ASSISTANT: JEREMIAH THOME MOVI OPERATOR: MIKE GORCZYNSKI MOVI ASSISTANT: CHRIS METCALF ASSISTANT: SCOTT PERAGINE

PICROW STREAMING, INC. “UTOPIA” SEASON 1

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SHAWN KIM OPERATORS: BEAU CHAPUT, CHRIS REJANO ASSISTANTS: PAUL DEMARTE, DEAN M. SIMMON, ERIC ARNDT, SHANNON DEWOLFE STEADICAM OPERATOR: BEAU CHAPUT STEADICAM ASSISTANT: ERIC ARNDT LOADER: RYAN SHUCK CAMERA UTILITY: CHRIS SUMMERS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ELIZABETH MORRIS

PROXIMITY PRODUCTIONS, LLC “KATY KEENE” SEASON 1

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRENDAN UEGAMA OPERATOR: DAVID ISERN ASSISTANTS: LISA LONG, RORY HANRAHAN, NOLAN MALONEY, SUNIL DEVADANAM LOADERS: MIGUEL GONZALEZ, MARION SANNUTI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: BARBARA NITKE

NOVEMBER 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

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RANDOM PRODUCTIONS, LLC

“LOVECRAFT COUNTRY” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROBERT MCLACHLAN, MICHAEL WATSON OPERATORS: BOB GORELICK, BILL SAXELBY ASSISTANTS: STEPHEN EARLY, KEITH POKORSKI, NICHOLE CASTRO, LAUREN GENTRY LOADER: CORY BLAKE CAMERA UTILITY: KYLE FORD STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: ELI ADE, D. STEVENS

REPRISAL 1 PRODUCTIONS, LLC “REPRISAL” SEASON 1

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DEREK TINDALL, LARKIN SEIPLE, MARC LALIBERTE OPERATORS: GRANT ADAMS, MICHAEL REPETA ASSISTANTS: PATRICK BOROWIAK, SEAN YAPLE, ROY KNAUF STEADICAM OPERATOR: GRANT ADAMS DIGITAL UTILITY: JILL AUTRY LOADER: NICK COCUZZA STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: FRED NORRIS

“FOR LIFE” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: NIELS ALPERT OPERATORS: ELI ARONONFF, JAY SILVER ASSISTANTS: ERIC ROBINSON, JOHN REEVES, MARCOS HERRERA, QUINN MURPHY, SARAH SCRIVENER, WILLIAM POWELL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JEFFREY HAGERMAN LOADERS: MAX COLLINS, JOHN CONQUY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: PATRICK HARBRON

“THE BLACKLIST” SEASON 7 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL CARACCIOLO, SAADE MUSTAFA OPERATORS: DEREK WALKER, DEVIN LADD, PETER RAMOS ASSISTANTS: DANIEL CASEY, GARETH MANWARING, MIKE GUASPARI, JAMES GOURLEY, EDWIN HERRERA, EDGAR VELEZ LOADERS: JAMES PARSONS, CHARLES GRUNDER JR., ALYSSA LONGCHAMP STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: JOJO WHILDEN, WILL HART, DAVID GIESBRECHT

SHOWTIME PICTURES REUNION 2017, LLC

“THE CONNERS” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DONALD A. MORGAN, ASC OPERATORS: RANDY BAER, VITO GIAMBALVO, JOHN DECHENE, JOHN BOYD ASSISTANTS: STEVE LUND, KENNETH WILLIAMS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: VON THOMAS CAMERA UTILITIES: MARIANNE FRANCO, ERINN BELL

SAN VICENTE PRODUCTIONS, INC. “FBI: MOST WANTED” SEASON 1

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MANUEL BILLETER, LUDOVIC LITTEE OPERATORS: CHRISTOPHER MOONE, REBECCA ARNDT ASSISTANTS: JASON RIHALY, MARC HILLYGUS, DYLAN ENDYKE, CHRISTOPHER CAFARO LOADERS: RYAN HADDON, DONALD GRAHAMER, III STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MARK SCHAFER

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NOVEMBER 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

“RAY DONOVAN” SEASON 7 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: RON FORTUNATO, ASC MAURICIO RUBINSTEIN, ASC OPERATORS: ERIC SCHILLING, PATRICK QUINN ASSISTANTS: MICHAEL ENDLER, JUSTIN WHITACRE, JOSHUA WATERMAN, BRIAN GRANT, JR. DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TIM NAGASAWA LOADERS: MICHAEL WILLLIAMS, CHRISTINA CARMODY

SONY

“JEOPARDY!” SEASON 36 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF ENGEL OPERATORS: DIANE L. FARRELL, SOC, MIKE TRIBBLE, JEFF SCHUSTER, L. DAVID IRETE JIB ARM OPERATOR: MARC HUNTER HEAD UTILITY: TINO MARQUEZ CAMERA UTILITY: RAY THOMPSON VIDEO CONTROLLER: GARY TAILLON STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CAROL KAELSON

“WHEEL OF FORTUNE” SEASON 37 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF ENGEL OPERATORS: DIANE L. FARRELL, SOC, JEFF SCHUSTER, RAY GONZALES, STEVE SIMMONS, L. DAVID IRETE, MIKE CORWIN CAMERA UTILITY: RAY THOMPSON HEAD UTILITY: TINO MARQUEZ VIDEO CONTROLLER: GARY TAILLON JIB ARM OPERATOR: RANDY GOMEZ, SR. STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CAROL KAELSON

SPYMOM, LLC

“THE SLEEPOVER” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CONRAD HALL OPERATORS: KYLE RUDOLPH, TERRENCE HAYES ASSISTANTS: JIMMY JENSEN, ERIK BROWN, LOGAN HALL, SAMUEL LUSTED DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: RAFEL MONTOYA LOADER: AUDREY STEVENS DIGITAL UTILITY: CHELSEA JENNEY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CLAIRE FOLGER

STALWART FILMS, LLC

“DISPATCHES FROM ELSEWHERE” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JAKOB IHRE OPERATORS: THOMAS WILLS, CHONG PAK ASSISTANTS: MICHAEL LEONARD, LEON SANGINITI, JAMES MCCANN, SEAN GALCZYK DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: PAUL SCHILENS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JESSICA KOURKOUNIS

“THE WALKING DEAD 3 AKA MONUMENT” DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MATT GARRETT, ROSS RIEGE OPERATORS: JOSEPH ARENA, CHAD PERSONS ASSISTANTS: ELIZABETH SILVER, SEAN SUTPHIN, ERIC EATON, MAXWEL FISHER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: RANDY KAPLAN LOADER: ALEXANDRA COYLE DIGITAL UTILITY: ANDREW STORCKS STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: SARAH SHATZ, JOJO WHILDEN


SCH_FFPrimes_ICG.qxp_Layout 1 8/19/19 3:50 PM Page 1

Schneider-Kreuznach Xenon Full Frame Prime Lenses “The first thing I noticed was the creamy bokek. Shooting amongst leaves or lights and letting the background go soft produces a wonderful effect.“ Nicholas Price, Director of Photography

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STOP SAYING THE WORD, INC.

TOPANGA PRODUCTIONS

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ETHAN PALMER OPERATOR: BLAKE JOHNSON ASSISTANTS: ALAN WOLFE, MATTHEW LYNCH DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JUSTIN HARTOUGH

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CARL HERSE OPERATORS: ORLANDO DUGUAY, BARRY ELMORE ASSISTANTS: ANDREW DICKIESON, DEVON TAAFFE, RYAN GUZDZIAL, EMILY ZENK STEADICAM OPERATOR: ORLANDO DUGUAY DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CHRIS HOYLE DIGITAL UTILITY: TAI CHEADLE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: NICOLE WILDER

“AUDREY”

STU SEGALL PRODUCTIONS, INC

“THE GOOD LORD BIRD” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PETER DEMING OPERATOR: KIM MARKS ASSISTANTS: DAVID EUBANK, JENNIFER LAI, DWIGHT CAMPBELL, MARK BAIN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: KYLE HOEKSTRA DIGITAL LOADER: RINNY WILSON STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: WILLIAM GRAY

SOUNDVIEW PRODUCTONS

“BLACK MONDAY” SEASON 2

UNIVERSAL

“LAW & ORDER: SVU” SEASON 21 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL GREEN OPERATORS: JONATHAN HERRON, MICHAEL LATINO ASSISTANTS: CHRISTOPHER DEL SORDO, MATTHEW BALZARINI, JUSTIN ZVERIN, EMILY DUMBRILL LOADERS: JASON RASWANT, JASON GAINES STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHAEL PARMELEE

“13 REASONS WHY” SEASON 4 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: KEVIN THOMPSON, TOMMY LOHMANN OPERATOR: STEPHEN BUCKINGHAM ASSISTANTS: JASON GARCIA, SAM LINO, TIM GUFFIN, ANNE LEE DIGITAL LOADER: ANTHONY ROSARIO STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: DAVID MOIR

“THE SINNER” SEASON 3 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: RADIUM CHEUNG OPERATORS: DAVID KIMELMAN, JUSTIN FOSTER ASSISTANTS: GUS LIMBERIS, GLEN CHIN, JAMES DEMETRIOU, IAN CARMODY DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MALIKA FRANKLIN LOADERS: CALEN COOPER, AUSTIN RESTREPO STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: GIOVANNI RUFINO, ZACH DILGARD

VERTICAL HOLD PRODUCTIONS, LLC “PRODIGAL SON” SEASON 1

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANTHONY WOLBERG OPERATORS: PHIL MARTINEZ, CHRISTOPHER RAYMOND ASSISTANTS: ALEX WATERSTON, HAMILTON LONGYEAR, SAMANTHA SILVER, KEVIN HOWARD, KATIE WAALKES LOADERS: AMANDA URIBE, HOLLY MCCARTHY STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: PHILLIP CARUSO, DAVID GIESBRECHT, CARA HOWE, WALLY MCGRADY, BARBARA NITKE

“NEVER HAVE I EVER” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: RHET BEAR OPERATORS: PATRICK MCGINLEY, BRIAN HART ASSISTANTS: BLAIR ROGERS, PETER DEPHILIPPIS, GEOFF GOODLOE, ULRIKE LAMSTER LOADER: BRITTANY MEADOWS DIGITAL UTILITY: CARL HELDER

WARNER BROS

“ALL AMERICAN” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: NIKHIL PANIZ OPERATORS: CARLOS ARGUELLO, ERIC LAUDADIO ASSISTANTS: JON JUNG, BLAKE COLLINS, JON LINDSAY, MEL KOBRAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: URBAN OLSSON STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: KEVIN ESTRADA

NOVEMBER 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

79


“ALL RISE” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID HARP, CYBEL MARTIN OPERATORS: TIM ROARKE, STEPHEN CLANCY, SHANELE ALVAREZ ASSISTANTS: MATT GUIZA, KRISTI ARNDS, RANDY SHANOFSKY, ADAM TSANG, COLLEEN LINDL, ANTHONY HART STEADICAM OPERATOR: STEVE CLANCY STEADICAM ASSISTANT: KRISTI ARNDS DIGITAL UTILITY: MORGAN JENKINS LOADER: BENNY BAILEY

“BOB HEARTS ABISHOLA” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PATTI LEE, ASC OPERATORS: MARK DAVISON, CHRIS HINOJOSA, JON PURDY, MICHELLE CRENSHAW ASSISTANTS: JEFF JOHNSON, VITO DE PALMA, MARIANNE FRANCO, ADAN TORRES, LISA ANDERSON, ALICIA BRAUNS, LANCE MITCHELL, JORDAN HRISTOV VIDEO CONTROLLER: JOHN O’BRIEN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: T. BRETT FEENEY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHAEL YARISH PUBLICISTS: KATHLEEN TANJI, MARC KLEIN

“MOM” SEASON 7 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: STEVEN V. SILVER, ASC OPERATORS: CARY MCCRYSTAL, JAMIE HITCHCOCK, SOC, DAMIAN DELLA SANTINA, CANDY EDWARDS ASSISTANTS: MEGGINS MOORE, NIGEL STEWART, SEAN ASKINS, MARK JOHNSON, WHITNEY JONES CAMERA UTILITY: ALICIA BRAUNS, COLIN BROWN, JEANNETTE HJORTH VIDEO CONTROLLER: KEVIN FAUST DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BENJAMIN STEEPLES STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ROBERT VOETS PUBLICIST: MARC KLEIN

YOUNG SHELDON

“YOUNG SHELDON” SEASON 3 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BUZZ FEITSHANS, IV OPERATORS: NEIL TOUSSAINT, SOC, AARON SCHUH ASSISTANTS: MATTHEW DEL RUTH, GRANT YELLEN, BRAD GILSON, JR., JAMES COBB STEADICAM OPERATOR: AARON SCHUH STEADICAM ASSISTANT: GRANT YELLEN DIGITAL LOADER: BAILEY SOFTNESS DIGITAL UTILITY: IAN DOOLEY STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: ROBERT VOETS, MICHAEL DESMOND, DARREN MICHAELS

YNFS PRODUCTIONS, LLC

“LITTLE VOICE AKA STARLING” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JIM FROHNA OPERATORS: RACHAEL LEVINE, AARON MEDICK ASSISTANTS: CAI HALL, GREGORY FINKEL, PATRICK BRACEY, EMMA REES-SCANLON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JESSICA TA LOADERS: KYLE TERBOSS, DONALD GAMBLE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: GREG ENDRIES

“S.W.A.T.” SEASON 3

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: FRANCIS KENNY, ASC, CRAIG FIKSE OPERATORS: TIM DOLAN, BRIAN PITTS, MICHAEL OTIS ROPERT ASSISTANTS: RYAN PARKS, LOGAN TURNER, THANE CHARACKY, RILEY PADELFORD, JUSTNI QUACH, MIKE FAUNTLEROY CAMERA UTILITY: CARL LAMMI LOADER: TREVOR BEELER

COMMERCIALS ARTS & SCIENCES “CARL’S JR.”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PETE KONCZAL ASSISTANTS: BRETT WALTERS, JEFFREY TAYLOR DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MARIUSZ CICHON CRANE TECH: AL RODGERS CRANE TECH ASSISTANT: LANCE RIECK, JUNCTION WEN

HAYROAD PRODUCTIONS

“ENDURANCE/VAGRANTS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOE ZIZZO OPERATOR: CARLOS BERMUDEZ ASSISTANTS: MARY ANNE JANKE, MICHAEL RODRIGUEZ TORRENT

BISCUIT FILMWORKS

HUNGRY MAN

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ERIC SCHMIDT OPERATORS: CHRIS BOTTOMS, MICHAEL MERRIMAN ASSISTANTS: LILA BYALL, JOHN HOLMES, DANIEL HANYCH, KIRA HERNANDEZ, MICHAEL YAEGER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOHN SPELLMAN

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MOTT HUPFEL OPERATOR: STEVE BUCKINGHAM ASSISTANTS: DENNIS ROGERS, VANCE PIPER, KIRA BACKER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TIM ERICKSON

“NATIONWIDE”

“GOOGLE” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ERIC SCHMIDT ASSISTANTS: LILA BYALL, DANIEL HANYCH, KIRA HERNANDEZ, JOSH BENAVIDEZ DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOHN SPELLMAN

BOB INDUSTRIES “BUDWEISER”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MANEL RUIZ OPERATOR: ROHAM RAHMANIAN ASSISTANTS: HECTOR RODRIGUEZ, JUSTIN CHEFE, BRANDON SZAJNER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: KEVIN ZANIT LOADER: CLIFF THENARD

“INDIANA FARM BUREAU INSURANCE” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID ROBERT JONES ASSISTANTS: ETHAN MCDONALD, MARCUS DEL NEGRO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: FELIX ARCENEAUX

“RAKUTEN STEPH CURRY”

LONDON ALLEY “TARGET”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SHAWN KIM ASSISTANTS: LUCAS DEANS, EDGAR GONZALEZ-LEON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: LANLIN WONG

MISSING PIECES

“FB SKYSCRAPER DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LUKE MCCOUBREY OPERATOR: CHARLIE LIBIN ASSISTANTS: WALTER RODRIGUEZ, ADAM GONZALEZ, KYLE REPKA DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TYLER ISAACSON

MT. MELVIL

“JAPANESE CLOTHING CO.” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROSS RICHARDSON ASSISTANTS: NINA CHIEN, JEFF TAYLOR, JORDAN LEVIE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TYLER ISAACSON

“PELOTON” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROSS RICHARDSON ASSISTANTS: ETHAN MCDONALD, MARCUS DEL NEGRO STEADICAM OPERATOR: CHRIS CUNNINGHAM DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DAN SKINNER

“ADIDAS”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ALEX DISENHOF ASSISTANTS: DENNIS ROGERS, KIRA BACKER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TIM ERICKSON

NOVEMBER 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

CORNERSTONE PICTURES

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: COREY WALTER ASSISTANTS: ROBERT RAGOZZINE, DAN KECK DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JEFF FLOHR

CMS PRODUCTIONS

80

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ARNAU VALLS COLOMER ASSISTANTS: ETHAN MCDONALD, LILA BYALL, JASON ADLER STEADICAM OPERATOR: LIAM CLARK DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JESSE TYLER

“CON AIR, UNBOUND”

BULLITT WOODBRIDGE PRODUCTIONS

“NOVARTIS”

O POSITIVE, LLC “BEST BUY”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: STUART DRYBURGH OPERATOR: CHRIS REYNOLDS ASSISTANTS: JOHNNY SOUSA, ADAM MILLER, AUSTIN CHANG DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: KAZIM KARAISMAILOGLU CRANE TECHS: JASON CORTAZZO, ARTHUR ELLIS


PARK PICTURES “KOHL’S”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DONAVAN SELL OPERATOR: GREG BENITEZ ASSISTANTS: TRAVIS DAKING, NOAH GLAZER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: STEVE HARNELL CRANE TECH: MIKE WEST

“MCCAFE”

“FISHER PRICE”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEANNE VIENNE ASSISTANTS: MATT BLEA, TRIGG FERRARO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: KEVIN ZANIT

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRETT PAWLAK ASSISTANTS: NITO SERNA, NOAH GLAZER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ANDY BETHKE

SIBLING RIVALRY

STINK FILMS USA

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: STEPHEN MCGEHEE ASSISTANTS: RICK GIOIA, JORDAN LEVIE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TYLER ISAACSON SCORPIO HEAD TECH: MARTIN YEE

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SHAWN PETERS ASSISTANTS: JOSEPH CANON, LUCAS DEANS, EDGAR GONZALEZ STEADICAM OPERATOR: KYLER JAE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: NATE KALUSHNER

“GOOGLE NEST”

“ROLEX” DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LANCE ACORD, ASC, EMMANUEL LUBEZKI, ASC, AMC ASSISTANTS: MATEO BOURDIEU, BOBBY MANCUSO, JUSTIN MANCUSO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TED VIOLA

“NIKE”

SMUGGLER

“FIFTH THIRD BANK” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRYAN NEWMAN OPERATOR: VINCENT FOEILLET ASSISTANTS: RICK OSBORN, COREY BRINGAS, SARAH LANKFORD DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: STEVE HARNELL

PICROW, INC.

“PANERA BREAD” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: NICK TAYLOR ASSISTANT: NOAH GLAZER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: SCOTT BECKLEY

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: AUTUMN DURALD OPERATOR: JOSH MEDAK ASSISTANTS: ETHAN MCDONALD, MARCUS DEL NEGRO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: STEVE HARNELL

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF CRONENWETH ASSISTANTS: PAUL SANTONI, ROBERT SMATHERS, PAUL TOOMEY STEADICAM OPERATOR: CHRIS CUNNINGHAM DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: STEVE HARNELL

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRYCE FORTNER ASSISTANTS: SAL CONIGLIO, SUZY DIETZ DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CJ MILLER

“OLD NAVY”

“SAMSUNG”

“ONEPLUS”

“SERTA”

THE DIRECTORS BUREAU

SOMESUCH

REDACTED CONTENT

THE CORNER SHOP

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SHAWN KIM OPERATORS: DENNIS NOYES, KIRA HERNANDEZ ASSISTANTS: LILA BYALL, GAVIN GROSSI, CONRAD CASTOR, NOAH GLAZER JIB OPERATOR: DANIEL BALTON JIB TECH: BRIAN JACQUEMIN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DYLAN JOHNSON

SPARE PARTS

“CBS TOMMY NY PROMO”

RSA FILMS

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID WATERSTON ASSISTANTS: PETER MORELLO, NATE MCGARIGAL PHANTOM TECH: JEFF FLOHR

“ADVIL”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PAUL MEYERS ASSISTANTS: LUCAS DEANS, CAMERON KEIDEL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TED PHUTHANHDANH

Advertisers Index COMPANY

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NOVEMBER 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

81


STOP MOTI ON

Daniel McFadden UNIT STILL PHOTOGRAPHER HYPERDRIVE

This is my favorite photograph from this assignment. The terrain of the course [held at the former Eastman-Kodak film manufacturing facility in Rochester, NY] made this the most challenging image to capture. I was able to position myself on a small ridge overlooking the “Walk on Water” obstacle, barely staying out of the view of the many production cameras used to record the show.

82

NO VEMBER 2019


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