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ICG MAGAZINE

SUMMER

PREVIEW

ISSUE

FEATURING

Greyhound GENIUS:

ARETHA

|

BLACK

MONDAY

|

IN

FOCUS:

AC'S


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pictured: Polly Morgan, ASC, BSC


contents SUMMER PREVIEW May 2020 / Vol. 91 No. 04

DEPARTMENTS gear guide ................ 14 on the street ................ 22 master class ................ 28 exposure ................ 34 production credits ................ 88 stop motion .............. 100

SPECIAL In Focus: AC’s ........ 76

38

FEATURE 01 FROM THE BRIDGE Shelly Johnson, ASC, and cinematographerturned-director Aaron Schneider, ASC, go inside a World War II destroyer for the searing drama, Greyhound.

FEATURE 02 ALL HAIL THE QUEEN There never was (and never will be) another artist like Aretha Franklin, as National Geographic Channel’s third season of Genius makes clear.

FEATURE 03 CRASH & BURN Showtime’s Black Monday is a wild ride through Wall Street history; it’s visually daring, and as inventive as series TV gets.

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52 64


SUMMER PREVIEW

7


Publisher Teresa Muñoz Executive Editor David Geffner Art Director Wes Driver

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Tyler Bourdeau

STAFF WRITER Pauline Rogers

ACCOUNTING

Glenn Berger Dominique Ibarra

COPY EDITORS

Peter Bonilla Maureen Kingsley

CONTRIBUTORS Richard DuCree Ted Elrick Matt Hurwitz Elle Schneider

May 2020 vol. 91 no. 04

Local

600

International Cinematographers Guild

IATSE Local 600 NATIONAL PRESIDENT John Lindley, ASC VICE PRESIDENT Dejan Georgevich, ASC 1ST NATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT Christy Fiers 2ND NATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT Baird Steptoe NATIONAL SECRETARY-TREASURER Stephen Wong NATIONAL ASSISTANT SECRETARY-TREASURER Jamie Silverstein NATIONAL SERGEANT-AT-ARMS Deborah Lipman NATIONAL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Rebecca Rhine ASSOCIATE NATIONAL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Chaim Kantor

COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE

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ADVERTISING POLICY: Readers should not assume that any products or services advertised in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine are endorsed by the International Cinematographers Guild. Although the Editorial staff adheres to standard industry practices in requiring advertisers to be “truthful and forthright,” there has been no extensive screening process by either International Cinematographers Guild Magazine or the International Cinematographers Guild. EDITORIAL POLICY: The International Cinematographers Guild neither implicitly nor explicitly endorses opinions or political statements expressed in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. ICG Magazine considers unsolicited material via email only, provided all submissions are within current Contributor Guideline standards. All published material is subject to editing for length, style and content, with inclusion at the discretion of the Executive Editor and Art Director. Local 600, International Cinematographers Guild, retains all ancillary and expressed rights of content and photos published in ICG Magazine and icgmagazine.com, subject to any negotiated prior arrangement. ICG Magazine regrets that it cannot publish letters to the editor. ICG (ISSN 1527-6007) Ten issues published annually by The International Cinematographers Guild 7755 Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, CA, 90046, U.S.A. Periodical postage paid at Los Angeles, California. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ICG 7755 Sunset Boulevard Hollywood, California 90046 Copyright 2020, by Local 600, International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employes, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States and Canada. Entered as Periodical matter, September 30, 1930, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under the act of March 3, 1879. Subscriptions: $88.00 of each International Cinematographers Guild member’s annual dues is allocated for an annual subscription to International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. Non-members may purchase an annual subscription for $48.00 (U.S.), $82.00 (Foreign and Canada) surface mail and $117.00 air mail per year. Single Copy: $4.95 The International Cinematographers Guild Magazine has been published monthly since 1929. International Cinematographers Guild Magazine is a registered trademark.

www.icgmagazine.com www.icg600.com


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president's letter Voices of Hope and Unity Although this space is typically reserved for the president of our Local, I have asked your entire officer leadership team and national executive director to contribute. The current crisis has distanced us physically but brought us closer together in every other way. Our membership has never been more threatened – physically, emotionally or financially – and the Local 600 staff and elected leaders have responded by working harder and more effectively than ever to offer aid and to continue to look to a future when we return to a safe workplace. That future includes rebuilding our staff, protecting our members on jobs, and bargaining new contracts, to name only a few of the things our union does for us. I am grateful to the national executive officers, the entire national executive board, and all our staff who form the leadership team that is guiding our Local through this difficult time. We will get through this together and come through stronger than ever. The Local 600 Training Committee has been busy revamping course syllabi for online Zoom training as a viable alternative given the current coronavirus crisis. The response to the first 2ndAC pilot training held in April was a resounding success. The next training session on Zoom will be data handling – a one-day, six-hour session. The Training Committee plans to host online operator, stills, and p ublicists’ panels, which will include members sharing their respective craft knowledge and experience. Dejan Georgevich, ASC National Vice President As we prepare for Netflix and HBA negotiations, our industry faces a redefining, even existential crisis. Parental, family and sick leave and healthcare access have always been of primary concern. Now these programs, within a new coronavirus world, are simply vital to our survival. This upcoming presidential election will see demands for single-payer healthcare continue to escalate, as the threat of COVID-19 redefines healthcare as a fundamental human right. The future of healthcare for working families will be addressed at the bargaining table as well as legislatively, but it will be solved. Christy Fiers First National Vice President I am witness to the incredible hard work the officers, NEB, and staff across the country are doing. The leadership of this union will continue to work hard for the safety and well-being of

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its members, including coordinating with the safety committee for protocols that will help members remain safe when returning to work. With member support, I know we will prevail. As chair of the Shop Stewards Training Program, [I predict] we will be up and running soon. Baird Steptoe Second National Vice President We have all had to sacrifice these last few weeks. Local 600 gave a 100-percent second-quarter dues waiver to all members and increased the hardship fund to $500,000 with the potential to do it again. We are looking out for our members. We don’t know how long this pandemic will last. We don’t know when it will end, and we want to have a Local to come back to. Stay safe.

John Lindley, ASC National President International Cinematographers Guild IATSE Local 600

We are in the midst of a major election year. Many will naturally focus on the presidential race, but there are many other important races – in the U.S. Senate and Congress, and at the state and local level, that need our attention. We must also keep our eyes on legislation that contributes to labor’s collective bargaining power, such as paid family leave, sick pay, and worker safety. Our power is to organize, to get Local 600 members involved with these races, and to join with affiliates that align with the interests of working families. As a union member, it’s time to be registered and VOTE. Deborah Lipman National Sergeant-at-Arms

President Lindley has asked me to chair the Residency Working Group with the responsibility of looking at the residency requirements surrounding the position of the president of Local 600. The goal of the working group is to make sure that the residency requirements allow members of all regions to run for the office of president while ensuring that the membership and staff of Local 600 are provided with efficient and effective governance.

When you’re in the eye of a storm, it’s hard to imagine what is on the other side; and with this crisis, it isn’t even certain when the storm will pass. What we know is that when it does, we will return to our mission and priorities – contract negotiations, contract enforcement, benefits, safety, training, political and legislative action, organizing, diversity, and strengthening bonds and alliances within the IATSE, and the larger labor movement. The order in which we tackle them – safety on sets, healthcare, and paid sick leave to start, for example – may change, but our mission never will. We must continue to fight effectively for fair wages, sustainable benefits, a safe workplace, respect for craft, and retirement with dignity for our members and their families using every tool at our disposal.

Jamie Silverstein National Assistant Secretary-Treasurer

Rebecca Rhine National Executive Director

Stephen Wong National Secretary-Treasurer


CLICK HERE FOR VIDEO


Photo by Sara Terry

wide angle

I

t’s impossible to sidestep what’s going on in the world. Thinking optimistically, by the time ICG readers see our Summer Preview issue, the spread of the novel coronavirus, COVID-19, will have slowed, perhaps even ceased, and those whose health has been directly impacted will be on the road to recovery. As of this writing, the best short-term option to fight the crisis is existing anti-viral drugs that will not require an extended period of safety testing like the many potential vaccines health-care workers around the globe are frantically racing to develop. And we can only pray that relief is forthcoming. I do know that with hundreds of millions of people self-quarantined inside their homes, the importance of supposedly “non-essential” industries, such as entertainment, is plain to see. This was best expressed to me by my recent phone conversation with Laura Pursely, market development manager for digital cinema capture at Sony, and our discussion of the roles our organizations can play in this crisis. When I said ICG Magazine would continue to publish, continue to support and advance the interests of Local 600 members, Laura said: “My sister has always teased me about getting a ‘real job,’ as if films and TV are totally frivolous. What this industry creates, through the working partnerships of who knows how many dedicated people – like those in your union – is essential. Now more than ever we need the artists, the craftspeople, the storytellers to help us survive.” But don’t just take Laura’s or my word for it. In the early days of this crisis, political leaders around this nation called for federal emergency relief for displaced entertainment industry workers that included continuity of health benefits, enhanced and extended unemployment benefits, extensions and protections to disability and workers’ compensation insurance, and emergency paid leave benefits. Among those many voices were Matthew D. Loeb, international president of the IATSE, whose union suffered more than two-thirds unemployment (120,000 film, TV, stage, live-event, and theatrical workers) in the first weeks of COVID-19’s arrival in the U.S. Congress also took up our colors. Reps. Adam Schiff, Brad Sherman, Julia Brownley, and dozens

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of others wrote to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy early in the crisis, outlining the unique nature of a work-for-hire industry. That letter included this excerpt: “Many of these workers have arranged, contracted for, and planned on work on a film, television show, streaming program, commercial, theatrical or other live production that has been canceled or postponed as a result of the coronavirus emergency. However, these union workers are not adequately protected by rules designed for traditional single-employer relationships, or even consistent multiemployer work as in industries like construction.” Call it narrative destiny, but all three of our feature stories this month have a direct correlation with the pandemic that has altered human history. Ted Elrick’s cover story on Greyhound (From The Bridge, page 38) is about a movie centered on a career U.S. naval officer (played by Tom Hanks, the first prominent celebrity to announce he was infected with COVID-19 while on an Australian movie set) who must escort a convoy through waters patrolled by the deadly German U-boat Wolfpack, even though he’s never been in combat. Shot by Shelly Johnson, ASC, and directed by cinematographer-turneddirector Aaron Schneider, ASC, Greyhound posits the perfect metaphor for our times: What the hell do you do when all hell is breaking loose and your enemy is one you’ve never faced, nor can even see? ICG staff writer Pauline Rogers’ story on Showtime’s Black Monday (Crash and Burn, page 64) profiles a wildly inventive TV series, created by Seth Rogen disciples Jordan Cahan and David Caspe and shot by Carl Herse, that’s based on the worst day in Wall Street history. Unbelievably, the day (October 19, 1987) that became the basis for this fictional (and funny) show was recently eclipsed in real life by another “Black Monday,” March 16, 2020, the biggest one-day plunge in economic history, thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic. Herse and his Guild camera team are fearless in capturing this story about financial industry outsiders, calling it “alive and messy,” much like Black Monday’s take on an economic meltdown. Finally, there’s Matt Hurwitz’s story on National Geographic Channel’s Genius: Aretha (All Hail the Queen, page 52). Shot by Kevin McKnight, the limited series employs an emotional and intimate camera to reveal how events in Aretha Franklin’s life (portrayed by Cynthia Erivo) helped to form her genius. Combining shallow focus with large-sensor capture, McKnight and his frequent collaborator, director Anthony Hemingway (Exposure, page 34), manage to show Franklin’s genius from the inside out. They magnify how “essential” her music was to our history as a people, and how we can’t, especially in these challenging times, live without “the artists, the craftspeople, the storytellers.”

CONTRIBUTORS

Richard DuCree All Hail The Queen, Stop Motion As a unit photographer, working with cameras A and B, the boom operator, and actors can be a delicate dance on set; at times I have just a slither of space to work my magic. It’s my ultimate goal to capture the essence of the moment of the character without being noticed.

Ted Elrick From The Bridge To visualize Greyhound, Shelly Johnson, ASC, said director Aaron Schneider was very insistent that “AD Kim Winther and I learn about maritime target tracking, navigation, and weather. If we can give the audience situational awareness, they’ll understand everything that Captain Krause (Tom Hanks) knows.” Schneider likens it to the opening scene in Close Encounters of the Third Kind, where the flight controllers are gathered around the radar seeing the airliner’s encounter with a UFO. It doesn’t matter if you understand what they’re saying, but you’re well aware of the tension and seriousness of the situation.

ICG MAGAZINE

David Geffner

Executive Editor

Twitter: @DGeffner Email: david@icgmagazine.com

SUMMER

PREVIEW

ISSUE

FEATURING

Greyhound GENIUS:

ARETHA

|

BLACK

MONDAY

|

IN

FOCUS:

1ST

AC'S

Cover photo by Niko Tavernise


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“Recently we had blue screen car photography with a nighttime police-flashing-lights effect. I could precisely control it all within the LitraStudio without light splashing all over the blue screen – unlike with the much bigger panel lights.” GEORGE MOORADIAN, ASC Local 600 Director of Photography

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“CUBA is focused on the beauty, spirit and character of this Caribbean country and its people. One of the primary stories in the film centers around a young ballerina. I was really looking forward to using the Cookes as we knew we would be shooting on stage with challenging theatrical stage lighting, and breaking that sort of giant screen IMAX norm of not having any close-ups. That’s exactly what we did — shot some close-ups of her face, which came out beautifully. I teamed the Cooke S7/i lenses with the ARRI ALEXA LF camera, which is a phenomenal combination. It gives me a very cinematic and dreamy look — very smooth and gentle, but still crisp and sharp. Cooke lenses have always been very flattering with faces and people, so for the portrait-oriented sections of the film this pairing was magical.” Peter Chang, Director, Cinematographer “The lenses were very sharp, something extremely important at the resolutions and IMAX screens we are shooting for, while maintaining a creamy bokeh and very pleasant roll off. What I loved most about

shooting the Cooke S7/i lenses is the familiarity that they gave me. I’ve shot on Cooke lenses for years, starting with the Speed Panchro, then the S4/i lenses and most recently a lot with the new Cooke Anamorphic/i SF (Special Flair). Cooke lenses have always been a go-to for me. On CUBA I had the pleasure to shoot on the ALEXA LF in full frame for the first time, and the fact that the Cooke S7/i lenses maintained the ‘Cooke Look’ that I have grown accustomed to over the years was great — but on this new full frame camera system, it was a real treat.” Justin Henning, Cinematographer

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gear guide

Angénieux Optimo Primes

12-LENS PLATINUM SET $309,000 WWW.ANGENIEUX.COM

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“Angénieux Optimo Primes made all the difference on a recent fashion shoot. Their color rendition, especially noticeable in the beautiful skin tones we captured, was unmistakable. I’ve always loved the classic Optimo Zoom look, and now we have a full-frame Prime lens set that’s a perfect match.” EVAN PESSES Local 600 Director of Photography

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Lindsey Optics LF Optical Viewfinder

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“For Swimming with Sharks, we needed to keep a 16:9 safe area in both 6K and 4K modes. This meant we had four different frame lines. The Lindsey Optics LF Viewfinder allowed me to do that as I quickly swapped format modules when we went from the 6K mode to 4K mode.” BRIAN BURGOYNE Local 600 Director of Photography

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Modern Lens. Timeless Look. Ranging from 12 mm to 280 mm, the ARRI Signature Prime lenses offer a unique look never seen before in cinema. Warm, smooth skin; open shadows with crisp blacks; and bokeh like looking through a window in the rain.

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gear guide

Helios RGB-H700 Space Light

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“I recently used the Helios RGB-H700 on NBC’s Council of Dads, and it performed well. What I like most is the ease of use and the wide color range. Hanging the light and the skirt becomes a one-person job, as it is lightweight. I love the soft light box that I was able to create from it.” MAZI MITCHELL Local 728 Chief Lighting Technician

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ON THE STREET

05.2020

The Ultimate Full-Frame Lens Test – Online! BY ELLE SCHNEIDER PHOTOS COURTESY OF SHAREGRID/JOE ADAMS

In August of 2019, peer-to-peer rental hub ShareGrid partnered with Burbank-based rental house Old Fast Glass to undertake the Ultimate Full-Frame Lens Test, the third installment of such comparisons, which in previous years put vintage and anamorphic lens sets side by side as part of a comprehensive online resource for filmmakers. With many digital camera systems going full frame, lens manufacturers have unleashed an explosion of large-format glass on the market, often produced in a limited, exclusive quantity that makes in-house testing difficult. Old Fast Glass and ShareGrid’s comparison, which covers 20 sets of lenses – more than 80 focal lengths overall – provides that information, which is especially

helpful when prepping at a rental house isn’t an option. The concept behind the test is simple, as ShareGrid Co-founder and Local 600 Director of Photography Brent Barbano explains: “We use the same model, camera, lighting and set, and shoot each lens of each set multiple times at different apertures under the same conditions.” In each clip, the camera pans, tilts and racks from minimum focus to infinity. Each test is added to ShareGrid’s free online Quad Player, which allows a viewer to watch four videos simultaneously, giving an “apples to oranges” comparison of the differences between each set. And once the new test goes live, Barbano says users can compare

“anamorphic and full-frame, full-frame and vintage lenses” from all three lens tests, or the same lenses on both Super 35 and Full-Frame sensors. “A few of the sets were already tested in our Vintage Lens Test on a Super 35-sized sensor, and then again on the ALEXA LF’s larger sensor,” Barbano continues. “It will be helpful for those who don’t understand how sensor size affects the image captured – when using those same lenses on a full-frame sensor, there often is more vignette, more focus fall-off, more interesting bokeh characteristics, more distortion, and lens flare characteristics that were fully cropped out of a Super 35 frame.” In addition to the videos, there are also traditional focus and distortion charts (cont'd on page 22)

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ON THE STREET

available for each set of lenses, as well as personal testimonials from many Local 600 directors of photography. According to Barbano, Mark LaFleur of Old Fast Glass – whose company specializes in vintage lens rentals – was the architect behind the process, deciding which characteristics to test, including chromatic aberration, minimum focus, flares, barrel distortion, vignetting, breathing, edge-to-edge sharpness, skin tone, highlight roll-off and bokeh. “Some differences between lenses are quite subtle,” LaFleur notes. “Other differences are extreme and obvious, but if you test lenses in front of white walls with overhead fluorescent lighting, typical of most rental houses, you won’t get to see much of a lens’ character.” LaFleur, Barbano, and Local 600 Director of Photography Kyle Stryker used a 4:3 “open gate” aspect ratio on the ARRI ALEXA LF to capture the most from each lens. In front of the camera was a model in a white dress, lit in tungsten, with bluegelled backlight seeping in through windows behind, which “made for a nice background to contrast the skin tone of the subject,” LaFleur adds. Christmas lights and bare lightbulbs hang in the background to show bokeh and flare. Barbano says they tried to create a mixed-color-temperature world “that looked like it could be a shoot, but one that subtly tests everything you’d want to see in a lens.” One reason for the test, Barbano admits, was to build a better knowledge base for the ShareGrid community. Filmmakers prepping films and planning to rent through the site frequently ask for recommendations as to which lenses are best for their projects. Since ShareGrid acts as a virtual intermediary between rental houses and filmmakers who find and list gear through the platform, the tests presented a unique opportunity for objectivity, since there are no exclusive brand partnerships or any inhouse stock to move. ShareGrid is very clear the tests are not competitions, and there are no winners or losers. “This is a tool to help filmmakers choose the right lens for their project,” LaFleur insists. “We hope this library will help filmmakers forget about trends, or the brand name engraved into a lens, and choose lenses based on their individual characteristics.” “Whether you need something modern and sharp, something vintage and flare-y, or just cheap and easy to find, there are no bad lenses,” Barbano adds. “Putting them online, side by side, allows filmmakers to draw their own conclusions about what they like and why. One of the most important things about [the test] is that it provides an easier shorthand to educate and communicate with your colleagues.” Barbano says the tests have helped him overcome prejudice and assumptions about which

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MARK LAFLEUR OF OLD FAST GLASS AND TEST CO-SPONSOR

L TO R: KYLE STRYKER MODEL KORI AGEE, 1ST AC SEDA KISACIK


05.2020

LOCAL 600 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY KYLE STRYKER

SHAREGRID CO-FOUNDER AND LOCAL 600 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY BRENT BARBANO

SUMMER PREVIEW

25


ON THE STREET

05.2020

PHOTO COURTESY OF SHAREGRID/ERIC LOMBART

lenses were viable. “It’s made me realize how beautiful cheap vintage glass can be. It doesn’t have to be expensive to work for any given project.” Barbano says filmmakers often get locked into a particular style or brand when shooting. “Unless you can do side-by-side testing as we’ve done, it’s hard to distinguish the differences [between lenses] and then determine why you like them or what that look would be applicable for. I can’t speak for everyone, but for me, it has broadened my horizon.” Joint sponsorship for the Ultimate Full-

which took place over five days, also captured the attention of ASC president Kees Van Oostrum and more than a dozen ASC members who dropped in during the process. “We had some amazing cinematographers come by who were learning just as much as the students or the interns,” Barbano smiles. “No matter what your background or experience,” LaFleur adds, “most of us won’t have the opportunity to thoroughly test 20 sets of lenses over an entire working week.” LaFleur says ShareGrid and Old Fast Glass have tried to tackle evergreen problems with new

Frame Lens Test – ARRI, Zeiss, Duclos Lenses, Sigma, Aputure, Athos Insurance and On The Mark Media – helps to provide an objective seal of approval. Like ShareGrid, the lens tests were born of necessity; Barbano and LaFleur were seeing misinformation about lenses online and wanted to tackle the gaps in knowledge on internet user groups. Also, the difficulty in finding a single rental house with enough sets of vintage, anamorphic, and now fullframe lenses, in-house for comparable testing, remains very high – a fact the test’s sponsors also recognized. “[The vendors involved] want to be a part of a movement that is all about spreading good information and inspiring filmmakers,” Barbano offers. ShareGrid’s Ultimate Full-Frame Lens Test,

technology like online video. The test levels the playing field by giving both the professional and emerging filmmakers a valuable tool to learn about optics, as well as providing information for those who haven’t traditionally had access to high-end rental houses and their inventory. “My goal as a rental house owner and cinematographer was to create a library of accurate, reliable, unbiased lens tests,” LaFleur concludes, “that would be a helpful tool for filmmakers for years to come.” As Barbano describes, “Having an unbiased, third-party, free resource that you can look at in your house on a Saturday morning is the ultimate freedom of just testing things out and asking yourself questions. And, in turn, you’re inspired to do your own research and further testing.”

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The Ultimate Full-Frame Lens Test, available online this month at www.sharegrid.com, covers the following sets of lenses: Zeiss Supreme Zeiss CP.3 Zeiss CP.2 ARRI Signature Sigma FF High Speed Sigma Cine FF Classic Tokina Vista Tokina Vista One Cooke S7/i Rokinon XEEN Canon Sumire Canon CN-E Schneider Xenon TRIBE7 BLACKWING7 binaries Leitz THALIA Canon K35 - Rehoused by TLS Leica R - Rehoused by GL Optics Nikon AI-S - Rehoused by Zero Optik Canon FD - Rehoused by GL Optics Richard Gale Optics UK CLAVIUS


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M AY 13-14, 2 0 2 0

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F E AT U R E D S E S S I O N ICG Local 600 Cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto, ASC, AMC, is known for his bountiful creative palette and innovative approach to color, composition, and lighting. Martin Scorcese, Spike Lee, Ang Lee, Pedro Almodóvar, Ben Affleck, Julie Taymor, Oliver Stone, Curtis Hanson, and his earliest collaborator, Alejandro González Iñárritu, are just a few of the directors he has worked with over the past decades. Bring your questions for Prieto about the art and craft of cinematography, creative collaboration and about filmmaking, in general.

Produced in partnership with IATSE Local 600 & ICG Magazine SUMMER PREVIEW

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MASTER CLASS

How Do We Make Safer Skies?

BY PAULINE ROGERS

Chances are, these days, be it a feature film, television show, live sporting event or commercial, some of the most exciting and startling footage is captured with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), also known as a drone. In the early days of the platform, requests for drone shots were off the charts as everyone was trying to get into the game, sometimes with disastrous results. Today, as drone work has matured in the film and television industry and has become more complex, knowing what to use, when to use it, and how that device operates safely trumps all other concerns. Having an experienced Guild operator controlling that drone is vital to any project’s success, and as part of ICG’s ongoing commitment to industry safety, we polled a handful of Local 600 drone operators to find out what is essential in drone safety. (cont'd on page 26)

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PHOTO COURTESY OF BEVERLY HILLS AERIALS

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Michael and Cameron FitzMaurice Aerial Cinematographer / Drone Pilot Helinet Aviation

PHOTO COURTESY OF BEVERLY HILLS AERIALS

“Most productions determine what camera and lenses they want to carry and ask the drone provider for the drone that can carry those. A better way to start is to think about what type of shot you want to create, and then look at what type of drone can accomplish that, finally arriving at what type of camera that drone can accommodate. A lighter drone always gives creators a wider range of possibilities when planning a shot. A smaller, lighter drone is faster to set up, flies longer, and is more flexible as far as positioning goes due to its small footprint. The federal weight limit for a drone in the United States is 55 pounds. Many drone companies, in order to accommodate the demand for large cameras and high performance, are being forced to fly – illegally – over this weight limit. Drones give us the ability to create shots that are unlike anything that can be captured by previously existing equipment; they fill a gap between cranes and helicopters. To a degree, drones that are large and heavy take away these advantages.”

Michael Izquierdo Chief Pilot, Beverly Hills Aerials

“The biggest safety issue is that drones are rarely given the same attention and time that the other camera platforms are given on the set. Many productions seem to have a ‘drones fly themselves’ mentality, when we are doing everything a standard camera crew is doing – and also strapping it to a flying robot remotely operated sometimes up to a mile away (and usually given only a few takes to capture what the director needs). On a recent big studio film shoot, we choreographed a drone shot with close proximity to A-list talent and moving objects. Some important steps that ensured a safe and successful outcome included holding a safety briefing with everyone and blocking out the action on the ground, at reduced speeds, and then again in real time so everyone understood when and where they were going to be in relation to the drone. We also had the production hire more PA’s so that we could do pedestrian and vehicle lock-offs of all access points to the shooting area, so that no one walked into a hot set with a drone in the sky.”

Caleb des Cognets Chief Aerial Cinematographer, Beverly Hills Aerials

“One of the most common drone safety issues we constantly battle is the unwillingness, or forgetfulness, of other cameras or VTR vans to turn off their wireless signals, like MicroLites and Teradeks, during drone-only shots. These signals can heavily interfere with our drone and pilot radio signals, as well as our camera’s video feed, on which we heavily rely. This interference can be a small issue where it will interrupt the camera’s video feed, forcing us to land to diagnose the source of interference or change channels, or a big issue where it can actually cause the drone itself to lose sync with the pilot’s remote control, rendering the drone uncontrolled until re-link.”

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Colin Burgess Strato Aerial “A small drone such as a DJI Mavic is a great tool to have on a scout. Easily flying the drone to get an aerial view of the location or having the ability to put the drone in places a person can’t access on foot is helpful – and safe. It’s a great way to explore a new location quickly. Also, having a drone on the scout is helpful to test any potential wireless interference issues in the location’s environment, and also to test geofencing-unlock software if required in the area. Per any production, crews always need to check local drone laws for specific regions, cities, and counties. Many cities have laws that prohibit drone flights if they are outside of a designated flying field. A temporary use permit is sometimes required – like in New York.”


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Pablo Barrera Founding Partner, Xizmo Media

“Crew safety briefings are extremely important, and detailed planning with the crew involved in the shot is crucial. While filming second unit for 21 Bridges, it was imperative to know the position of other cameras and their respective moves, as well as the action of stunt drivers and stunt actors. The more comfortable everyone is with a camera flying near them, the better everyone will be able to perform. Another point to mention is that DP’s and directors must remain open-minded. Sometimes a shot the DP or director envisions is not possible due to safety concerns; the drone pilot/camera operator team who execute these shots will, can and should suggest creative alternative shots that move the story forward in the event a specific shot seems unsafe for the pilot in command.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF PABLO BARRERA

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PHOTO COURTESY OF WILD RABBIT AERIAL

Drew Roberts Founder, CEO, and Chief Pilot, Wild Rabbit Aerial

“While working on a Super Bowl commercial for the Toyota Supra, we executed one of the most difficult and dangerous shots we’ve ever done. It was a full-speed ‘chicken shot’ counter over the Supra at night while flying through a series of lighted pentagonal structures. We were flying a Freefly ALTA 8 with an ALEXA Mini and anamorphic primes. This package is about 6.5 feet wide and almost 4 feet tall. This gave us less than one foot of clearance on all sides while passing through the gates and over the Supra. We used multiple spotters – our stunt coordinator was with the pilot to ensure the car didn’t hit me after it cleared the last structure, and the second was at the end of the last structure to give a ‘clear’ call out

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over the walkie so I would know where to stop. We needed to cross over the Supra while it was passing through the second gate, giving us the lowest margin for error. We ran several passes without the car, so I could get used to flying through the structures as they sequentially lit up. Once we were comfortable, we executed the shot for several takes to adjust the timing on the lights and the vehicle, and we finally nailed a few perfect takes, all safe and sound! This shot could have gone wrong in so many different ways, but through clear communication and not being afraid to tell Production what was needed to execute the shot safely, the outcome was great.”


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Michael-Ryan Fletchall, SOC Chief Pilot, Pro-Cam Aerials

PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL-RYAN FLETCHALL

“There are several benefits to using singleoperator drones on location scouts not just for future aerial cinematography but for ground-based work as well. Capturing photos and videos from even 20 feet above ground gives a new perspective that is helpful to location managers in selling a location to cinematographers and directors. It also gives cinematographers and pilots the time and space to work out complex drone moves without the pressure of being on production. Cinematographers can save production time and money by using drones to quickly lens a future crane or dolly shot. For example, on The Little Things, John Schwartzman [ASC] wanted to see what a future Technocrane intervalometer shot would look like. Drone pilot Dana Baker used a drone to find the camera position and angle, and from that information, where the crane base would go on the shoot day.�

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EXPOSURE

Anthony Hemingway DIRECTOR - GENIUS: ARETHA BY MATT HURWITZ PHOTOS BY RICHARD DuCREE

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Anthony Hemingway truly worked his way up the directing ladder, from visiting his mom on sets as a child to becoming the youngest member to join the DGA, guided by one of his mentors, Bruce Paltrow. He worked for many years as an assistant director, until, while in that position on The Wire, he was asked by Showrunner David Simon and Executive Producer Nina Kostoff-Noble to direct. He has since helmed many critically acclaimed and hit television series, including Treme, Shameless, CSI: NY, half of the episodes of American Crime Story: O.J. Simpson, and Underground, where he worked with a frequent (and favorite) collaborator, Local 600 Director of Photography Kevin McKnight, ASC. Hemingway reteams with McKnight for the National Geographic Channel limited series Genius: Aretha (page 52), which stars Academy Award-nominee Cynthia Erivo and for which Hemingway served as producer and directed half the show’s episodes. In his own words, the producer/director is doing what he loves best: guiding the look, feel, and emotional heart of a story from start to end. ICG: You have deep roots in this industry. How did you end up directing? Anthony Hemingway: I was basically birthed on to film sets by way of my mother [production coordinator Eleanor Nichols]. From a young age I had a desire to be a doctor due to growing up around mortality. My senior year of high school I had a change of heart, leaving me confused as to what I really wanted to do. Eventually, I realized that storytelling was my purpose, that I could heal people through the art of storytelling. You became an assistant director at a young age, which many people on your Aretha camera team said helps on set. What has that experience brought to your directing? I was 19 when I joined the DGA, the youngest member to

join at that time. Bruce Paltrow, who was a family friend – my mother worked with him a lot – was a linchpin for me. Bruce was in my life at the right time – he helped me see through the clutter of questions I had about my future. After several light bulb moments, I decided that I wanted to be a creative producer like Bruce. What I didn’t realize at the time is that my steps were already ordered by God and I just needed to be open to the signs that were to direct my path. My experience as an AD has been one of the greatest assets for me as producer/director. It has afforded me the knowledge to be a master collaborator – the awareness and sensitivity needed to foster a safe and creative environment, and the ability to anticipate, navigate or troubleshoot any situation. The whole process is important and necessary,

whether it’s scheduling, budget, cast or the needs of the cast and crew. It has also given me a shorthand in communicating with my director of photography to establish and execute the look of the show. Was there a key moment or epiphany that jumpstarted the transition to directing? I was an AD for 13 years [five as a second and eight as a first]. Around six years into my long tenure as a first, I started to get the itch to be more creative. I cared about my creative contributions as an AD, and my support of the director. I wasn’t just a managing AD. Thankfully, around the time I started to get the taste for directing, my producers on The Wire – David Simon and Nina Noble – before I even got a chance to ask, called me up and said that they

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wanted me to direct in the next season, which was season four. They saw something in me, that I was ready. This was my confirmation, affirming what I was feeling. And, honestly, I don’t know if [becoming a director on a hit TV show] was a gift or a curse! The gift was cutting my teeth on such an amazing show as The Wire, but it set the bar pretty high for everything that followed. Your director of photography on Aretha, Kevin McKnight, described the two of you as having “riffing sessions” before starting a new show – going through the script page by page and creating a shared vision. We’ve worked a lot together, and the approach in prep is always about the creative intentions that illustrate the psychology of the narrative and the players. Kevin and I start with a lot of discussion about intention, which inspires thematic concepts. After some fun brainstorming, we create the blueprint that will support story themes and character arcs, which informs the tools necessary to express and capture everyone’s artistry. How did you approach telling Aretha Franklin’s story? Kevin described the series not as a musical drama or concert film, but as a deep character study. This is Nat Geo’s third season of Genius, and the series is about taking a step back and thinking about all the things that add up to a person as an exceptional being: someone with lasting effects on others. One of the beautiful things that make working with Kevin so enjoyable is that we approach the process from the same jump-off point. We delve into things from the psychological perspective, tapping into the mind and how that translates through the narrative, and then [exploring] what that means for the visual experience. This approach means truly thinking about how those things inspire every choice: every lens used, every lighting decision, every composition and how we capture each frame, and what it does to the energy of the performance, blocking, and camerawork. Aretha’s genius was earned by her lasting transformative effect on people. She was someone who brought people together. She was aware of her times and lived what she sang about. Thinking through the lens of a genius is how/what we needed to capture the essence of Aretha Franklin. Our visual treatment will hopefully show how she fits into the dynamic of the world she lived in, growing up under a somewhat celebrated father, the Reverend C.L. Franklin, and the influences that had. You make use of black and white in an interesting way. We use it cutting back and forth

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in real time, to see how her childhood affected what she’s doing now. For example, [we show her] sitting at a piano and hitting a stumbling block, and we see a flashback to how that calculated into what she produced and delivered. There’s one scene in the first episode, which we call the “Birth of Aretha” moment, where she sings her first solo at her father’s church. And there, we have what we loosely called our “Wizard of Oz” moment, where we go from black and white into color. It’s where she finally connected to that gift inside of her. For the concert and studio performance scenes, Cynthia Erivo sings live for camera to a pre-recorded backing track, to which the musicians mime. How did that come about? From the beginning, I always knew I wanted to record the music live. It was a decision that Cynthia and I keyed in on from our first sit-down together, talking about how we were going to do the music. She said, “I have to sing live,” and I was, like, “I want you to sing live.” If you take Cynthia Erivo, who is a Tony-Grammy- and Emmy-award winning actress, as well as an Oscar nominee and recording artist, and not use her gifts, you’re doing yourself a disservice. Singing live translates differently than when it’s recorded. Did she have a personal connection to the music? Cynthia, like many of us, grew up listening to Aretha. Her sound and life have been inspired by Aretha Franklin, so it’s not a big stretch for her to deliver that to the camera. She just loves singing. When we’re in scenes, she sings for reaction shots, for her other co-stars, and even for the extras. She just loves to do it. And everyone’s captivated, each and every moment we’re shooting it. Talk about filming the scene where Aretha is crowned the “Queen of Soul” at the Regal Theatre in Chicago, which you shot at Atlanta’s historic Fox Theatre. That’s a real moment in history. We start with her finding her sound, creating her early hits at the FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, and then returning to Atlantic Studios in New York and starting to record. She was growing as an artist. And we start to see how she arranged the music and got the best from all of the musicians, without technically knowing how to write a note of sheet music. But it’s not just the recording process, it’s seeing and feeling the influence of her environment on her music, alchemizing the pain she’s going through in her life into the song she was recording, in this case, “Save Me.” We transition from the studio to a moment watching a tense scene between her


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“ One of the beautiful things that make working with Kevin [McKnight] so enjoyable is that we approach the process from the same jumpoff point. We delve into things from the psychological perspective and how that translates through the narrative.” and her husband, Ted, in the dressing room, an experience she then drew on in her performance of that same song on stage, using it to find rhythmic cues. The sequence drew in its energy and scope, which we get through doing a lot of 360s with the Steadicam – and, by the way, [Steadicam Operator] Michael Alba is a beast with the camera! So cutting back and forth from an earlier time in her life to what she’s experiencing on stage at that historic performance in Chicago helps the viewer see how she drew from her experience, in the choices she made, musically, to make her sound. You directed half of the episodes of this limited series, which you’ve done before. Why is that level of involvement important? I was part of The Wire from start to finish, and I was a producing director on Treme, with David Simon for HBO. And even in my prior years as an AD, I’ve been part of many series from start to finish. As a director, there’s a different investment when you are a part of the full show [compared to] being a directorfor-hire doing one, or even multiple episodes. You’re engaged with every detail, versus coming in as a guest and trying to find your footing and see how you can contribute. The idea of being there to support, from start to finish in every aspect, is what I love to do. It’s how it connects to me as a human being. There’s also ownership there, and just as an artist, to finish what you start is beyond rewarding. With Aretha, even though I’m not directing every episode, I’m still a part of helping hold the show’s hand and see it to the end. It’s also like doing a film.

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FROM THE BRIDGE

Shelly Johnson, ASC, and cinematographer-turned-director Aaron Schneider, ASC, go inside a World War II destroyer for the searing drama, Greyhound.

BY TED ELRICK / PHOTOS BY NIKO TAVERNISE FRAMEGRABS COURTESY OF SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT

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In 1942, shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, U.S. Naval Commander Ernest Krause (Tom Hanks) is tasked with leading an escort group to 36 Allied cargo ships across the North Atlantic. Although he’s a career officer, Krause has no military combat experience, and now as the skipper of the USS Keeling, he must navigate waters patrolled by the infamous and ruthless German U-boat Wolfpack, in the Columbia Pictures and Playtone release Greyhound. The rousing adventure story is derived from the pen of C.S. Forester, creator of the Horatio Hornblower series, the Oscarwinning adventure story, The African Queen, and the non-fiction documentary Sink the Bismarck! Visualizing the script by Hanks (who adapted the story from Forester’s novel, The Good Shepherd, and served as producer/ screenwriter/actor) proved challenging for cinematographer-turned-director Aaron Schneider, ASC (Get Low) and his Director of Photography, Shelly Johnson, ASC (Captain America: The First Avenger, Jurassic Park III). Johnson, for one, says there was a deeper layer at play. “ The film is a procedural view following Captain Kraus into a dangerous unknown,” he describes. “Most captains at the  beginning of WWII had little or no battle experience. So, Kraus had to rely on gut instinct and a limited understanding of his conditions.” The film had two principal sets – an exact recreation of a destroyer’s pilot house, inside and out, on a gimbal, and the USS Kidd in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, a World War II museum ship moored in the Mississippi River. Schneider wanted to shoot almost all of the film from Krause’s POV in the pilot

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house; and he had another interesting take that came up when he interviewed Johnson for the job. “Aaron said he wanted a DP willing to learn the intricacies of how to locate a sonar contact, how they evaluate its threat level, how they map it, how they follow it and how they plan a strategy to engage,” Johnson shares. “He was very insistent that First AD Kim Winther and I learn about maritime target tracking, navigation, and weather. If we could provide the audience with the needed situational awareness, they would begin to be able to understand Krause’s decision-making and connect with this inner drama.” Schneider’s example to Johnson for the film’s tone was the opening scene in Close Encounters of the Third Kind, which features a flight controller and a lot of procedural dialog between the control tower and the pilots. “Inside the procedural world of this control tower,” Schneider offers, “the audience has no idea of how things work. Despite all the procedural dialogue, the underlying drama of the UFO is palpable. It’s an amazing opener – authentic and spellbinding. You’re thrown into the pilot house of a destroyer with this captain, and

A-CAM OPERATOR DON DEVINE, SOC (ABOVE LEFT, WITH SHELLY JOHNSON, ASC, MIDDLE AND 1ST AD KIM WINTHER, RIGHT) SAYS THAT IN ORDER TO MAINTAIN HIS BALANCE ON THE GIMBALED PILOT HOUSE SET, HE FOUND HIMSELF, “USING MANY DIFFERENT MUSCLES. I COULDN’T JUST CONCENTRATE ON FRAMING THE SHOT BECAUSE I ALSO HAD TO FIGURE OUT HOW TO STAY ON MY FEET.”


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forced to pick up on how things work as the drama plays out around him. I think it will be incredibly engaging for an audience.” In fact, Schneider was so intent on total immersion (no pun intended), he did copious research on sea conditions, and with the help of game technology leader Nvidia, guided the development of a new plug-in that simulates physically-based oceans in Maya. “Aaron’s a brilliantly mad scientist,” Johnson describes. “He’s a self-taught visual-effects expert. Using the 3D program Maya, he created the desired sea state and put a ship on these waves to observe the forces in movement, then he put a camera on a virtual chase boat. So, now, we have all the waves affecting the camera boat, while it tosses in open sea with our Destroyer. He wanted to take that dynamic motion file and translate it to camera movement. This way, we could shoot a stationary ship with the camera performing all the X/Y axis... all the ins and outs, from that motion file Aaron created in Maya.” Johnson praises Schneider’s efforts with Maya,  saying they were crucial when shooting the USS Kidd with a 75-foot Technocrane on a barge. “Thanks to Aaron’s prep,” he adds, “we knew exactly how to

move that crane. We knew what the ship would do when hit with 10 to 15-foot waves on a six-second cycle. Our grips were very good. A 75-foot Techno weighs a lot, and for them to do 30- and 40-foot rises and falls in six seconds was mind-blowing.” Johnson shot with Panavision’s Millennium DXL and Sphero 65 lenses. Aside from a few flashbacks, most of Greyhound is handheld; the DXL and Sphero 65 lenses worked well, particularly given the small set and rocking and rolling of the gimbal. Schneider wanted to shoot in the 65 format, noting destroyer pilot houses were often very small – 10 by 18 feet – and filled with as many as 16 crewmembers. “He said: ‘We’re going to be very close to these faces. Instead of shooting with a 35mm gate and wide lenses that might distort, doesn’t it make sense to shoot large spherical format, so we can get close with a big negative, longer focal length, and less distortion?’” Johnson relates. “I was in agreement and saw we needed  a lensset that would focus closely in addition to making a contribution in tone and feel.” (Dave Dodson at Panavision in Woodland

Hills located a set of Spheros just before shooting began.) “I didn’t have a lot of time to test them,” Johnson adds. “Getting to know them in a lighting environment more or less happened on the set. I dove into the shark tank, but I was delighted.” The gimbaled pilot house allowed the team to replicate the sway and surge the destroyer would encounter through a variety of sea and combat conditions. They could shoot inside and on the bridge wing outside the pilothouse. Although it had a low ceiling that Johnson didn’t want to fly out, it did have removable panels. A-Camera Operator Don Devine, SOC, says that the entire team understood the challenges of shooting in such a confined space. “We recognized that we would be facing very close quarters with the cast and that there was the potential to become very claustrophobic,” Devine describes. “I think we all knew it was going to be a handheld show, but it was never discussed in the beginning. After seeing the main set, doing it handheld made the most sense.” Devine says the ceiling was too low for an Easyrig, and not a good choice in any event with the pilot house on a gimbal. “Ultimately

B-CAMERA/STEADICAM OPERATOR GEORGE BILLINGER, SOC (WITH HANKS ON DECK OF USS KIDD) SAYS SCHNEIDER WANTED “TO GET AWAY FROM A PERFECT STEADICAM LOOK AND HAVE THE BIG SWELLS MAKE EVERYTHING ROLL AND PITCH. SO INSTEAD OF LOCKING OFF ON THE STEADICAM, WE WERE ALWAYS FLOATING.”

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JOHNSON AND GAFFER BOB BATES HAD TO CREATE AN INTERACTIVE EXPLOSIVE FIRELIGHT, AT NIGHT, ONBOARD THE USS KIDD THAT WOULD SEAMLESSLY INTERCUT WITH SCENES SHOT ON STAGE.

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we decided to shoot off the shoulder and a camera with as small a profile as possible,” he continues. “I found the Panavision DXL to be a well-balanced body, left to right, a little front heavy, although that seems to be the norm for a digital body.” Because of its size and layout, “half the size of a hotel room with nine portholes,” Johnson says, it presented the team with lighting challenges. Gaffer Bob Bates says he’s worked with Johnson before and appreciates the cinematographer’s micro attention to detail. “Shelly does lighting plots that take a lot off my shoulders because I know what he’s going for,” Bates recalls. “On Greyhound, all of the ocean-going shots would be visual effects.” Johnson says he had to think a lot about weather and what the colors were in that moment. “I needed to provide interactive light,” he states. “So, I broke it down into one long document, literally scene by scene, exactly how I wanted to track the light and experience the sea state... show the audience horizon's visibility and atmospheric effects for each scene.” Johnson opted for a white screen instead of green screen, something he’d first asked the Captain America effects team about owing to that film’s dark bomber set with surfaces that would reflect green. Because Greyhound was a similar situation, the pilot house set was surrounded with a U-shaped bleached muslin backlit with ARRI SkyPanel S-60c’s. This was augmented with Kino Flo Celebs and Freestyles, LiteGear LED cards controlled by Ratpacs and Lumen radio devices. “The muslin also played as our skylight,” Bates notes. “From where we were on the top of the bridge, you wouldn’t see the water until deep horizon.” Johnson’s visual breakdown and Schneider’s desire to shoot in chronological order allowed Bates to plot the use of the SkyPanels. “There are a few scenes where some of the other ships in the convoy are under attack, and our ship is under attack at one point,” Bates explains. “So we created interactive lighting with the SkyPanels and all the way around the U-shape. We were able to create an explosion effect and have that travel from the starboard to the bow to the port so it looks like our ship is turning away from or into the explosion. We had a great [lighting board] programmer in Dana Hunt.” Steadicam Operator George Billinger, SOC, describes a conversation between Hanks on the bridge and actor Stephen Graham playing a lieutenant colonel. “Charlie Cole was on the non-gimbaled set, the CIC or Combat Information Center, at the same time,” Billinger begins. “Don [Devine]

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was on the bridge, and I’m down in the CIC. I had been on the gimbal set, so I was able to simulate the roll of the ship on the nongimbaled CIC. “For another sequence,” Billinger continues, “I’m outside on the bridge, and Tom is walking inside the Pilot House looking in and giving battle commands, with the portholes towards the bow. The Steadicam follows him through each porthole, left to right, right to left, as he’s pacing. We realized with the Steadicam everything would look too perfect; Aaron wanted to get away from that and have the big swells making everything roll and pitch. So instead of locking off on the Steadicam, we were always floating.” Of course, being on a moving gimbaled set for eight to ten hours a day is challenging. “You’re basically at sea the whole time,” Bates laughs. “When I got home, I was having leg cramps at night realizing it was from trying

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to hold my balance all day.” First AC Michael Charbonnet says the simulated roll was surprisingly more realistic than he first imagined. “I literally fell off my apple box, and a few times from the gimbal set,” he chuckles. “I was stationary, under a black cloth, watching my focus monitor. I didn’t have any bearing of where I was. All I’m looking at is the monitor, but it looks like I’m on a rocking boat! But all that was easy compared to Don [Devine], who was on the bow of the ship with the water hitting him so hard from the fans. He is an amazing operator.” Devine says his most challenging moments were shots that started outside the pilot house with wind and sea spray blowing in his face, and then moving into the pilot house and back out the other side. “In order to maintain my balance on the gimbal,” he describes, “I found myself using many different muscles. I couldn’t just concentrate

on framing the shot because I also had to figure out how to stay on my feet.” And with so much CGI being used, Devine says imagining the shot in his head for the framing was difficult. “I had to frame the non-existent boats that would ultimately be out on the ocean in the distance, using lights or signs for reference. I really look forward to seeing those finished shots as it all comes together with the effects.” Fortunately, Visual Effects Supervisor Nathan McGuinness had previous sea experience on Peter Weir’s Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World. And with some 1,200 VFX shots in play, Greyhound’s filmmakers opted to stay with a single vendor – Double Negative. “Digital effect s producer Mike Chambers had done all the digital effects for Christopher Nolan,” McGuinness relates.


“And we both agreed because of the quality and the schedule it was best to roll the dice and go with one house.” At one point, the filmmakers were able to actually capture footage of the Kidd’s guns firing, which McGuinness said was a very useful tool. “The best way to generate digital effects is from using actual reality,” he notes. “Being able to capture real references of guns and star shells was great for us to recreate the simulation of what actually would occur from that event.” In addition to the preplanning, another key to making the CGI work, for not only the camera operators but also for the actors, was the incredible detail in the actual Forester novel. “C.S. Forester was a sailor,” Schneider describes. “We brought in a technical advisor and it turns out all the bearings in the book add up to a battle. So if you go through the

book and transcribe the bearings and the turns, you can actually draw out a map of the naval engagement! “That was quite helpful,” he continues, “when you get to the set, and the actors ask, ‘What am I reacting to? Where do you want me to look? How long do I look there? And how far away is the submarine so that I know how fast to pan my binoculars?’ And these questions were not just about one shot – this was our whole movie. It was quite a challenge and Shelly and his crew were right there beside me the whole time.” “It really captures the time and place,” Billinger concludes. “When you read about how the ships were crossing, the amount of deflection in the rudder, how far the ship is heeling, left or right, the nomenclature and seamanship, Aaron made it all so well lived.” Schneider, who was 2nd Unit Director of Photography on Titanic, says there are vast differences as to how the sea affects

ships. “The destroyers are a lot smaller than people think they are,” he reveals. “They kind of gnaw around the sea, push it out of the way and get pushed around by it, unlike the Titanic, which was this elegant lady skating across a glassy ocean. Greyhound is more about how the ocean can be as treacherous and unpredictable as the enemy.” Johnson calls the Greyhound experience a “career high point” and one that owed a lot to the Local 600 camera team who supported his efforts. “We all needed to show up with the same amount of preparation as the actors,” he concludes. “And, a primary component of this film is camera performance. Two handheld cameras, operated by two very talented operators – Don Devine, who’s been my operator for more than 30 years and George Billinger – I couldn’t be luckier. If Tom Hanks was the star, Don and George are co-stars, because their performances in the film were equally meaningful.”

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A-CAMERA OPERATOR DON DEVINE, SOC SHOOTING HANDHELD, WITH ACTORS KARL GLUSMAN AND TOM HANKS, ON THE GIMBAL PILOT HOUSE SET.

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LOCAL 600 CREW MAIN UNIT Director of Photography Shelly Johnson, ASC A-Camera Operator Don Devine, SOC A-Camera 1st AC Michael Charbonnet A-Camera 2nd AC Jonathan Robinson B-Camera Operator / Steadicam George Billinger, SOC B-Camera 1st AC Ry Kawanaka B-Camera 2nd AC Taylor Fenno Additional B-Camera 2nd AC Hai Le Loader Melanie Gates Utility Eric Van der Vynckt Still Photographer Niko Tavernise Unit Publicist Rachael Roth 2ND UNIT C-Camera Operator Joe Chess, SOC C-Camera 1st AC Maricella Ramirez C-Camera 2nd AC Harrison Reynolds D-Camera 1st AC Taylor Fenno D-Camera 2nd AC Caitlin Trost Utility Sydney Viard

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ALL

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THE There never was (and never will be) another artist like Aretha Franklin, as National Geographic Channel’s third season of Genius makes clear. BY MATT HURWITZ / PHOTOS BY RICHARD DuCREE FRAMEGRABS COURTESY OF NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CHANNEL

QUEEN


Veteran TV director Anthony Hemingway (Exposure, page 34) recalls a moment shooting inside Atlanta’s historic Fox Theatre, for National Geographic Channel’s Genius: Aretha, when Local 600 Steadicam Operator Michael Alba, SOC, was circling Cynthia Erivo (portraying Aretha Franklin) onstage. “The entire crew just stood there mesmerized, with their jaws dropped, watching and listening to her deliver,” Hemingway says. “Everyone is captivated, every moment we’re shooting with her.” Erivo – fresh off double 2019 Oscar nominations for playing another famously admired black woman, Harriet Tubman (www.icgmagazine.com/web/the-real-lifesuperhero/) – embodies all aspects of the “Queen of Soul” in this eight-part series, which debuts later this year. Shot by Kevin McKnight, ASC, who has worked extensively with Hemingway over the years, the visual approach, consistent with the past two seasons of Genius, was to capture the inner journey of the artist, both personally and professionally. As McKnight describes: “We keep the camera within close proximity of our characters so that there is no wall between them and the audience. I do a lot of close-up work. I’m not big on long lenses, poking in as a third-person perspective.” Genius: Aretha began shooting last December in Atlanta on a voluminous stage at Eagle Rock Studios. Location filming included several historic churches and theaters. “There aren’t too many older theaters around Atlanta anymore, maybe just three or four,” notes Production Designer Tim Galvin. “We found them all.” McKnight’s Guild team included A- Camera/Steadicam Operator Alba, B- Camera Operator Michael Hartzel, A-camera 1st AC Taylor Fenno, B-Camera 1st AC Ross Davis and Chief Lighting Technician Tully McCulloch, who first worked with McKnight on Killers (shot in Atlanta in 2010). McKnight says Alba possesses a “great sensibility” for telling a story with the camera. “I move the camera a whole lot with Anthony, and on day one we had big Steadicam, 360 moves, and Michael brought it,” he offers. Alba pours similar praise on his focus puller, Fenno, who apprenticed under Shelly Johnson, ASC (From The Bridge, page 38), as did McKnight. “Taylor comes from a competitive sports background, and he holds himself to a very high standard,” Alba describes. “If he’s not on focus, he’s tough on himself about it, and it’s on the very next take. He’s amazing – he’s like a machine.” As for the machine used to capture, it was ARRI’s popular ALEXA LF (large-format) system – two LF Minis used for A-Camera

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McKNIGHT SAYS HE AND DIRECTOR HEMINGWAY LIKE TO KEEP THE CAMERA WITHIN CLOSE PROXIMITY OF THEIR CHARACTERS, ELIMINATING ANY VISUAL WALLS BEFORE THE AUDIENCE. “THE BACKGROUND MELTS AWAY, AND THE EARS AND SHOULDERS FALL OFF ON A CLOSE-UP OF A FACE,” McKNIGHT EXPLAINS. “WE TELL THEM WHERE WE WANT THEM TO LOOK.”

and Steadicam capture, and a standard LF (allowing for 60-fps frame rate) used for B-Camera. “Having that large-format sensor brings so much more to the image on every setup we do,” the Atlanta-based Hartzel offers. “The capture is more immersive and dimensional than what we were getting out of Super 35 sensors.” Fenno adds that the LF is “small and lightweight, which makes it incredibly versatile. And they’ve improved the design, moving the card slot to the smart side of the camera, instead of the rear, so it’s easier to load and build-out.” Large-format capture does introduce some challenges. “You have to be delicate with the frame,” Alba explains. “When you shoot with a longer lens, you’re getting a

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wider field of view than a 35mm full-frame, so any errors, like shakes or wobbles, are amplified; and on Steadicam, your horizon is more amplified. There’s also a razor edge for focus [for the assistants], so Taylor just has to nail it, and he’s great at it.” McKnight rounded out the setup with ARRI’s Signature Prime lenses, which, he says, when tested, “have a dimensionality that other lenses just don’t have.” Fenno agrees, adding that “[the Signature Primes] have this artistic sharpness, which is different than the technical sharpness of the Zeiss Supreme Primes. There’s a rounder quality to the focus falloff that elicits a filmic look. And the way they’re engineered, due to their coatings, you don’t have a lot of bounce-back within the lens elements, or

focus breathing.” The limited depth of field of the 47- or 58mm Signature Primes, in combination with the large sensor, also allowed McKnight and Hemingway to direct the audience’s attention within the frame. “It’s something Anthony and I have been using for five years – selective focus, to always guide the audience, rather than just giving them one plane of focus,” McKnight explains. “The background melts away, and the ears and shoulders fall off on a close-up of a face. We tell them where we want them to look.” Characters walk in and out of focus, which McKnight says is like “a reveal, as opposed to just having one plane where everything’s in focus.” Cameras and lenses were provided by Keslow Camera, whom McKnight describes


The Unit Publicity Team Behind Genius: Aretha Bringing journalists onto the Atlanta set of National Geographic Channel’s Season 3 of Genius: Aretha, as well as capturing stills to define the marketing campaign for the series, were jobs handled by a pair of Guild professionals, Unit Publicist Shelly Williams and Unit Still Photographer Richard DuCree. Williams, whose credits include a variety of agency campaigns and the upcoming indie feature Charming The Hearts of Men, says one way to pave the road for successful set visits comes from advice she received when she first started in the industry: “I was told to know everybody on the crew,” Willams shares. “Even if you don’t know all their names, you should know what everyone is doing. Everyone is there for a reason, including myself. And I love learning about everyone’s craft.” That means Williams is a constant student of the filmmaking process. “By paying attention, asking questions myself and learning, I’m able to come out and say, ‘You may not have noticed this, but the Director of Photography, Kevin McKnight, just made a lighting change – and here’s why,’” she adds. “I’m able to point out, ‘This is the craft. Here’s what’s going on.’” Introducing production members to the media also helps Williams know who enjoys talking (and who doesn’t). “I’m cognizant of the schedule and what’s happening each shooting day,” she continues. “But part of a publicist’s job is also being aware of how comfortable people are with the media, and understanding their temperaments. Some people are outgoing, and some are less so. I have to gauge that to make sure everyone is comfortable with a press person on set. Even if someone’s just coming to watch, it’s important to be respectful of the work.” DuCree (who has been featured multiple times in ICG Unit Still Photographer gallery spreads over the years) is also vigilant for opportunities to represent both the crew’s experience and what the director and director of photography are trying to capture. “I’ll look on the monitors, which, on this show, have Kevin McKnight’s LUT’s applied, and try to match his color balance as best I can, as well as [A-Camera/Steadicam Operator] Michael Alba’s framing,” DuCree notes. McKnight is well aware of the value of the unit still photographer’s work, as DuCree adds. “There are times when Kevin will pull me aside and say, ‘You might want to capture this. I’ve got the atmosphere, and I’ve got the key lighting in here.’ [Genius: Aretha] is a fantastic crew to work with,” he adds with a smile. Shooting stills for the series’ concert scenes required extra-special care for DuCree, who grew up hearing Franklin’s music. “This project is a bit personal for me because of the timeframe covered, and my mother having been active in the Civil Rights Movement,” he states. Although DuCree was a photo editor at UMass Amherst, and shot concerts in college, Genius: Aretha was different. “Here, you don’t have to jockey for position. But you’re always making sure that you’re out of the eye-line of the actor, as well as making sure you’re not in the way of A-Camera or B-Camera’s positioning,” he concludes. “Cynthia [Ervio] is so focused – I try to respect her process and not overshoot. Once I get the shot, I back down. If they don’t know you’re there, you’ve done your job.” KEVIN McKNIGHT, ASC

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as “incredibly supportive. If I have some crazy idea,” he smiles, “they manufacture it for me.” Shallow focus was key to the central visual concept McKnight took with the series. “We have a lot of dramatic content where I’ll give A-camera a chance to get right in there and engage up close with Cynthia,” he states. “[Ervio] has these big, expressive eyes, and that comes through in subtle nuances. Bless her heart, we play that camera three feet away – I did that with her on The Outsider, so she’s more comfortable with the approach.” So-called “genius moments,” which bring viewers inside pivotal depths of the subject’s life, are central to the series. “I call them her ‘psychological moments,’ when we separate Aretha from the realm,” McKnight continues. “There are no ‘aha’ moments for her genius. It’s about something important emerging out of many conditions of her life,” such as watching her famous father, C.L. Franklin (Courtney B. Vance) preaching in church when she’s a child, or later, dealing with challenges from her husband, Ted White (Malcolm Barrett). “If we highlight a moment, it’s really to be more in her head, through our lensing, composition and selective focus.” Alba says McKnight creates a look “where we get so close, maybe even with a diopter, and alienate everybody out, at very minimum focus.” The shots require Fenno to be in constant communication with Alba, whom he describes as an “operator with no fear. If Michael sees something, he’s going in,” Fenno smiles. “And that means I always have to be ready. If there’s a look, a line that’s going to be spoken, be ready. There will be times where we’ll do a little bit of a push-in, and then Michael will take that next step, and get right in there, to get that look that Cynthia is showing. You can see it in her eyes.” No doubt the combination of shooting with a shallow focus and wide lenses, along with an open aperture and sensor, make Fenno’s job that much more demanding. “When we move in, we like to open it up a little bit,” the AC continues. “We’ll use 40, 47, 58mm – close to the face, and usually around 2.5 or 2.0, for these striking compositions that reveal the thought process of the character, thinking about her life, her childhood, or that moment to shine.” McKnight will also sometimes put the LF on an Aurora LT or Mo-Sys L40 two-axis remote head to capture the “genius moments.” “It’s not only a matter of not casting shadows,” Alba observes. “It removes the operator from the camera and lets the actors be in their space. There’s a lot less technical influence on them.” Alba communicates with Dolly Grip Evan Russell via HME headset, and if any correction is needed, “I can just whisper it to Evan, rather than making a disruptive hand gesture,” he adds. Fenno is similarly away from the actors,

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standing beside Alba as he controls the remote head. “It’s fun because I get to be next to my operator,” Fenno says. “He can tell me, ‘Okay, we’re pushing in here.’ And I can hear what he’s saying to his dolly grip. My second, Caitlin Trost, is also next to the camera, and she’s my eyes and ears on the set.” Alba says the shooting style impacts the way the story is told. “You don’t have three technicians right up in the face of an actress,” he notes. “There’s just a quiet camera that makes no noise, which pans and tilts a bit, and is not disruptive to performers during dramatic scenes.” Lighting for key scenes, like when Erivo is at FAME Recording Studios in Muscle Shoals, AL, and discovering important musical moments at the piano, was achieved through a combination of elements by McCulloch using a Kino Flo Celeb 850 LED with a Chimera and snap grid. “We also have a Kino Flo FreeStyle 41, which is a big light that Kevin likes to use a lot, and we let it wrap her face and fall off,” McCulloch adds. “The longer the lenses, the better the falloff – you can have out-of-focus lights in the background, and it’s just beautiful.” Lighting Erivo to take advantage of her extraordinary skin tone is almost effortless. “Her skin tones are fabulous,” he enthuses. “You could use a flashlight and she’d still look beautiful.” To distinguish various phases of Franklin’s life, McKnight and Hemingway developed three separate LUT’s to use in on-set monitoring (in the absence of a DIT). “Anthony wanted to denote our different timelines very significantly, as we had done on another show,” McKnight reflects. “The audience knows, right up front, where they are, in time and space.” Developed with Technicolor PostWorks New York senior colorist John Crowley (remotely, via T-VID, with McKnight in Atlanta), the LUT’s were created following test shooting by McKnight, rooted in a basic “ALEXA Capture LUT” he’d created and been using for years. (They were also applied by dailies colorist Nels Carlson at Mango Color in Atlanta.) The series unfolds non-linearly, with blackand-white scenes representing Franklin’s earlier life – 1942 to 1954 – intercut with current sequences, as the singer reflects on her earlier roots. “It’s a warmer, nostalgic black and white,” Crowley explains, “not modern crushed blacks and higher contrast – a smoother base.” For the “1967 LUT,” from 1954 to the early 1970s, Crowley says McKnight “had an idea for one with warmer tones. So there’s a hint of cyan in the shadows, to give it that vintage feel. And we’ve rolled off the highlights a little bit, to make it less video feeling.” The later 1970s look brings the saturation up and takes the blacks down a bit, playing more into the “jewel tones of celebrity,” McKnight adds. Genius: Aretha is no music documentary, but more, as McKnight insists, a “character study.”

LONG LENSES USED IN LARGEFORMAT CAPTURE YIELD A WIDER FIELD OF VIEW THAN A 35MM FULL-FRAME, “SO ANY ERRORS, LIKE SHAKES OR WOBBLES, ARE AMPLIFIED; AND ON STEADICAM, YOUR HORIZON IS MORE AMPLIFIED,” ALBA RELATES. “IT’S ALSO A RAZOR’S EDGE FOR FOCUS...AND 1ST AC TAYLOR [FENNO] HAS TO NAIL IT, AND HE’S GREAT AT IT.”

DI COLORIST JOHN CROWLEY (WORKING REMOTELY, VIA T-VID, WITH MCKNIGHT IN ATLANTA), DEVELOPED LUT’S FOR THE VARIOUS TIME PERIODS. THE BLACK-AND-WHITE [FROM HER CHILDHOOD] “IS A WARMER, NOSTALGIC BLACK AND WHITE,” CROWLEY EXPLAINS, “NOT MODERN CRUSHED BLACKS AND HIGHER CONTRAST – A SMOOTHER BASE.”


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ATLANTA-BASED B-CAMERA OPERATOR MICHAEL HARTZEL SAYS HAVING A LARGEFORMAT SENSOR BRINGS SO MUCH MORE TO THE IMAGE ON EVERY SETUP. “THE CAPTURE IS MORE IMMERSIVE AND DIMENSIONAL THAN WHAT WE WERE GETTING OUT OF SUPER 35 SENSORS,” HE NOTES.

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As such, the music scenes, reproducing both key concerts and recording sessions, are shot from Franklin’s emotional perspective. “They aren’t free-standing performance pieces,” McKnight offers. “They’re intercut with shots about her struggles with her relationship with her husband and from her childhood, all of which are reflected in her performance.” Scenes such as a show at Chicago’s Regal Theatre where Franklin was crowned “The Queen of Soul” (shot at the Fox Theatre as Hemingway described) contain periodaccurate lighting. When McCulloch and McKnight scouted the theater (where the chief lighting technician had filmed many times), the in-house lighting crew was installing a new show. “I went back,” McCulloch recalls, “got their scheme, and we just went through it: ‘Okay, we want to keep this, this and this, and let’s eliminate this.’ They, of course, had LED’s and moving lights, which weren’t correct for the time – and we wanted to show the lights in our shots,” replacing them with traditional PAR cans and Lekos. While the Fox’s house crew, made up of IATSE 927 stagehands, did the installation, McCulloch brought in his dimmer-board operator, Patricia Tuckwiller, who connected her board to the system, providing smooth operation for the shoot. For Erivo’s onstage performances, Alba first filmed up close with Steadicam or

handheld, before wider shots and coverage were captured by the two- or three-camera team. “I’ve done a lot of live TV, where you only get one take,” Alba describes. “For this show, there was a moment where you peak, usually by ‘take three,’ and everything comes together. Cynthia is a pro and will give it her all for as many takes as are required. But it’s hard for anyone to sing a song 25 times, from four different angles across a huge theater, and then six inches away from her face. So we try to do that, as a creative collective, to get those shots, right when everybody’s peaking, and then go back and get our coverage.” Hartzel, using a Fujinon Premista 28100mm or 80-250mm zoom lens, worked alongside his 1st AC, Ross Davis, to gather tons of great material for editorial. “Because I don’t know where I’m going – like an extra I see in the audience or reacting to a band member onstage – unless those beats are scripted,” Hartzel relates, “Ross and I are in constant communication. And I try not to get the same thing each take, to give the editor as much material as possible.” The results are staggering, delivering not just Aretha Franklin’s music, but the essence of the performer’s soul to the audience. “Those were tumultuous times,” McKnight concludes. “So much was changing. All of that configured into who Aretha became, and how she emerged from it all. She truly was the Queen.”

LOCAL 600 CREW Director of Photography Kevin McKnight, ASC A-Camera Operator / Steadicam Michael Alba, SOC A-Camera 1st AC Taylor Fenno A-Camera 2nd AC Caitlin Trost B-Camera Operator Michael Hartzel B-Camera 1st AC Ross Davis B-Camera 2nd ACs Peter Johnston Nelson Moncada Data Manager Emily Gurley Utility Samantha Gardella Still Photographer Richard DuCree Unit Publicist Shelly Williams

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CRASH & Showtime’s Black Monday is a wild ride through Wall Street history; it’s visually daring, and as inventive as series TV gets. BY PAULINE ROGERS / PHOTOS BY ERIN SIMKIN & NICOLE WILDER FRAMEGRABS COURTESY OF SHOWTIME NETWORKS

BURN


Do you remember New York City in the months leading up to October 19, 1987, the day of the largest stock-market crash since the Great Depression? It was a world fat with excess, maximalism, and Reaganomics, and (apparently unbeknownst to historians) it was set afire by a group of outsiders who challenged Wall Street’s good-old-boys’ club and made the global financial markets tank. “We wanted to develop a period look that went deeper than the wild hair, flashy costumes, and 1980s set pieces,” explains Director of Photography Carl Herse, who returns to Showtime’s outrageous comedy, Black Monday, for Season 2. “We wanted it to feel like it could have been shot in the 1980s but still have the energy of a modern series.” Created by Seth Rogen disciples Jordan Cahan and David Caspe, Black Monday chose early on (the pilot was shot by James Laxton, ASC) to shoot in anamorphic as a nod to iconic films of the period, such as Ghostbusters and Raiders of the Lost Ark. “But we needed to be able to shoot at a television pace without the usual constrictions of anamorphic – poor close-focus capabilities, deep t-stops, et cetera,” Herse adds. “These characters are callous, coked-up crazy people. We wanted to promote loose blocking and express the insanity of that time.” And, he notes, shooting handheld promoted that sense of freedom for the stellar cast, which includes Don Cheadle (also an executive producer), Andrew Rannells, and Regina Hall. Finding the camera package posed a unique challenge. Showtime required 4K resolution, “but for international distribution, they additionally mandated that a 16:9 center frame extraction be ultra-HD,” Herse shares. “Because we were shooting in such a wide aspect ratio, in reality, we had to capture above 4K so that the 16:9 extraction met their resolution requirements once they shaved so much information off the sides.” Herse and his team tested the RED Weapon and Panavision DXL, but ultimately chose the Sony VENICE, explaining that “from an on-set efficiency

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standpoint, I loved the fact that it had the entire range of ND filters built into the camera body itself. This eliminated stressful filter changes throughout daylight work.” The VENICE also allowed Herse to incorporate a tangible, textured film grain by emphasizing the noise in the on-set capture and allowing the recorded camera noise to blend-in with post-process. “I’ve always found that baking some noise into the initial image helps it all feel physical and cohesive,” he continues. “By shooting primarily at 3200 ISO, and only dropping to 2500 ISO to protect the darkest sequences, we were able to achieve a muted push-processed look that built out this grimy, greed-fueled corporate world.” For lensing, Herse chose the Panavision T Series, with its softness and a roll-off of focus as well as flaring, bokeh, vignetting, and subtle distortion – all in the lightest anamorphics needed for on-the-go handheld capture. “The T Series lenses open up to a T2.3 and feature between an 18inch and 24-inch close-focus, so it wouldn’t be a challenge to shoot in small offices, elevators, and vehicles,” Herse explains. Herse’s next step was to meet with Ricky Gausis, senior colorist at MPC, to set the look. “We wanted a nod to classic 1980s films and photography, but we weren’t ever trying to completely trick the viewer into thinking that it was shot back then,” Gausis explains. “That would be a futile venture as soon as we were introduced to the present-day cast members, so we didn’t shy away from incorporating contemporary elements.” The two explored another major challenge of the series: creating a seamless blending of the stock footage needed to set the period, often with VFX added in. Gausis, who would often not see the stock shots until just before delivery, recalls that he “would never compromise the look of an entire show to work around a handful of stock


COLORIST RICKY GAUSIS SAYS HE AND HERSE WANTED A NOD TO CLASSIC 1980S FILMS, “BUT WE WEREN’T EVER TRYING TO COMPLETELY TRICK THE VIEWER INTO THINKING THAT IT WAS SHOT BACK THEN,” GAUSIS NOTES.

SONY VENICE HAS THE ENTIRE RANGE OF ND FILTERS BUILT INTO THE CAMERA BODY, “WHICH ELIMINATED STRESSFUL FILTER CHANGES THROUGHOUT DAYLIGHT WORK,” HERSE RELATES.

SHOWTIME REQUIRED 4K RESOLUTION, AND A 16:9 CENTER FRAME EXTRACTION IN ULTRAHD FOR INTERNATIONAL. “SHOOTING IN SUCH A WIDE ASPECT RATIO,” HERSE SAYS, “WE HAD TO CAPTURE ABOVE 4K SO THE 16:9 EXTRACTION MET THEIR RESOLUTION REQUIREMENTS ONCE THEY SHAVED INFORMATION OFF THE SIDES.”

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shots, but not knowing how these looked until late in the process meant I would spend a great deal of time trying to work with their very limited range,” he explains. Knowing that any key/isolation would not be smooth enough to work without breaking up, he did a significant number of incredibly subtle contrast and color adjustments in the curves. As the look changed from Season 1 to Season 2, the art department had to pivot as well. As Production Designer Alec Contestabile describes: “Season one’s main set was dark, dirty and grimy. For season two, we wanted to lighten-up the whole place and make it more inviting. Color-wise, we changed from grays, browns and dark greens to pastel pinks, mauves, and light grays. Lighting-wise, our set decorator, Kaitlynn Wood, added a bunch of diffused sconces and soft lamps to the desks. We also installed recessed can lights into the ceiling for the 1980s feel.” Season 2 also featured new rooms on the set. While these areas were lit with natural light in the first season, Contestabile says he and Herse came up with the idea of adding a wall of glass where there were once dark file cabinets. “This gave us another half wall of daylight, which brightened up the set,” the designer adds. Herse cites various flashback scenes from Episode 108 (Season 1) as some of his favorite moments. The time is 1968, and Mo Monroe (Don Cheadle) is seen as an idealistic member of the Black Panthers doing volunteer work in South Los Angeles. “The filmmakers wanted to introduce a version of Mo that we hadn’t seen before and tell the story of his transition into self-preservation, greed, and corruption,” Herse explains. Herse researched 1950s and 1960s handheld photography, where early 16mm documentary cameras such as the ARRI ST were used on the streets to help set the tone. He also looked at newsreel coverage of the era, including that of the Vietnam War and big sporting events. “The strongest choice was to abandon the anamorphic 2.39:1 in favor of a 16:9 spherical,” he continues. “I asked our operators to manually ride the lightweight spherical zooms as if they were news cameramen from that period. Unlike the mechanical servo-operated zooms that are used by today’s ENG crews, the quality of this camera work felt authentically imperfect, as if we were trying to keep up with a story that was being captured live.” Season 2 also contains similarly out-of-the-box footage. It opens with a reenactment sequence from the Season 1 finale for a fictional 1980s television series called America’s Most Unsolved Mysteries. “In both seasons we shot news footage and security-camera footage with a retrofitted Sony DXC3000A CCD [a customized camera system developed by 1st AC Justin Watson], recording digitally in Apple ProRes 422 outputting 480i to a Blackmagic Recorder,” explains 1st AC Andrew Dickieson. “For this sequence, we chose to shoot on the ARRI AMIRA with Canon Super 16mm zoom lenses in a 4:3 aspect ratio.” The key to the sequence was the use of Dutch angles and wider focal lengths “to express the bombastic nature of these dramatizations,” Herse adds. “We rated the AMIRA at a high ISO of 1600 to

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Mo bursts in and tries to break-up the deal. After covering this scene fully, we went to a single camera to run a single pass on the full scene, swinging in almost 270 degrees. Without being in the room to see all the players, I would have only been able to react to the screen instead of proactively engaging in exactly where Orlando was swinging or walking. This gave us a couple of takes where we had the majority of the scene that could play out in one if needed. Most of the time, the edit will take over, but it is our job as focus pullers to give them takes that can play out [as designed]. When I can’t be in the room, I use a Wards Sniper MKII [infrared laser].”

incorporate digital noise. In the color suite, we added a Super 16mm film grain. On top of this degradation, VFX added an interlaced, broadcast video layer.” Herse, whose TV credits include the similarly inventive The Last Man on Earth, notes he also used an unusually strong combination of Smoque and Glimmerglass filtration to further soften the image, “as a contrast to the sharpness of the main body of our show. We also employed saturated, colorful lighting choices – purple, teal, neon orange – and harder lighting instruments to emulate the Fresnel-based lighting of the era.” “On top of the multimedia,” Dickieson notes, “we are bouncing between presentday 1980s [T-Series anamorphic] and 1970s flashbacks [Panavision Super/Ultra Speeds]. Because we did not have a DIT, we found that for a few episodes the camera bodies were not matching in either color or contrast. Mark Legaspi [B-Camera 1st AC] and I had to take a few lunches to shoot tests on each body and analyze each image at the monitor to find the best body matches. We ended up swapping out bodies a couple of times but ultimately found the right combination.” A-Camera operator Orlando Duguay, SOC, says Steadicam was used throughout the series, “particularly in scenes where Mo and his cocaine-fueled frenetic energy

aren’t present, and where the camera had to move quickly and across large distances without having the handheld feel become a distraction,” he notes. Duguay cites a shot from Episode 204 that follows Corky Harris (June Diane Raphael) as she walks down the bullpen to confront Dawn Towner (Regina Hall) in her office. “We started following her with the Trinity in extreme-low mode on Corky’s high heels, then slowly boomed up her body into a tight following shot that then swung 180 degrees to land in a medium close-up,” the operator describes. “Because it was a compound move, I gave Barry Elmore, our B-Camera operator, remote tilt control for the Trinity, so that he could adjust headroom while I ensured the camera was in the right place at the right time to land on a line of dialogue.” Dickieson says such shots are challenging because “the way we are shooting, it’s impossible for a focus puller not to be on a monitor; but at the same time, there is no real way to gauge perspective, distance, and movement when you are in the next room. “In episode 205,” he continues, “ we had a nine-page scene where Dawn and Blair [Andrew Rannells] are working out a deal with Lenny Lehman [Ken Marino], when

Season 2 ends with high excitement, much of it shot on the Warner Bros. backlot, where, observes Director Payman Benz, “it was tricky because upon first glance, the backlot looks sitcom-like and fake. We began the episode on an active walk-and-talk between Mo and Dawn through the streets of New York at night. Mo and Dawn burst out of a restaurant, with Mo trying to keep up with Dawn. They turn a corner, step into a taxi, exit the taxi almost immediately, and then continue down the street until they end up at a bus stop. Between Carl, his team, the art department, and Special Effects doing a wet-down, the final product is stunning, and you can’t even tell that it’s a backlot.” Benz says the extended scene was broken up over two nights because “shooting in one evening would not have been fair or safe for the crew.” Contestabile’s art team “dressed” the backlot location to shoot both day and night. “For the night shots, we would see everything,” he explains. “We brought in neons, chasing bistro lights, standing lamps and a multitude of window coverings, all different colors to try to break up all the backlot to make it feel as ‘lived in’ as possible while simultaneously putting out enough light to see our actors.” Local 728 Chief Lighting Technician Oliver Alling says lighting for the scene (and all of the stage work) was about “letting the actors inhabit the sets without the distraction of lighting instruments. On the New York street shoot, a lot of coordination went into choosing and placing the practical fixtures, hiding our sources, and programming cues that would create an environment free of clumsy equipment,” Alling explains. “We made liberal use of DMX’d practical fixtures that allowed Production to seamlessly move from day to night, shooting wide tracking coverage without slowing down to tweak.” As B-Camera Operator/2nd Unit Director of Photography Barry Elmore explains, Episode 210 took things a step further. “One of our main characters, Keith [Paul Scheer],

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is rollerblading through the streets trying to deliver important information. It opens with Paul rolling into the frame and beginning to weave past cars. In the background, another car crashes into Mo’s Lamborghini limousine, and to achieve all this I had to work closely with First AD Adam Martin and Stunt Coordinator John Koyama. Of course, on the day, it was downpouring, which was not part of the plan. But Paul still wanted to do the stunt, so John, Adam, Carl, and I worked out a safety plan that would keep Paul far enough away from the crash but close enough in the frame to still maximize the impact. “Riding on a Grip Trix [with driver Art Ortiz, Legaspi and dolly grip Phil Heath operating the jib arm, with Libra head tech John Bonnin], we were able to keep Paul in a medium shot,” Elmore continues, “and have the action of the car crash happen out of focus in the background. Although the shot was covered by two other cameras, it could easily be used as a oner. The rain made things more difficult, but with the expertise of everyone on the crew, the shot was pulled off in one go.” Herse praises his camera department for making such challenging shots work. “Orlando Duguay is unparalleled in his ability to move the camera and coordinate with the performers to chase, lead, and exchange coverage as actors move,” he states. “Andrew Dickieson kept it all in focus and was ninjalike in his execution of complicated long sequences that might feature the camera moving through multiple environments. [Second AC’s] Devon Taafe and Emily Zenk are incredible at tracking the sheer volume of marks and impeccably recording the chronology of actors’ positions. And Barry Elmore is great at identifying the moments we missed with the A-coverage and finding supplemental angles that are still as visually impactful, dynamic, and engaging as everything else.” Herse adds that the mantra on Black Monday is always to “avoid boring choices. We try to coordinate individual setups to cover as much of the scene as possible, taking big 180-degree swings, clocking the camera from frontal to profile positions, and swapping focus of coverage mid-scene,” he concludes. “Rather than slogging through one isolated piece of coverage after another, we use the camera to dynamically express the interconnected stories and their characters. The show feels alive and messy; I think the actors elevate their game when it’s apparent that anyone could be on camera take after take.”

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HERSE SAYS A-CAMERA OPERATOR ORLANDO DUGUAY, SOC (LINING UP A TRACKING SHOT IN SEASON 1 ABOVE) IS “UNPARALLELED” IN HIS ABILITY TO MOVE THE CAMERA AND COORDINATE WITH THE PERFORMERS.


LOCAL 600 CREW SEASON ONE Director of Photography Carl Herse A-Camera Operator / Steadicam Orlando Duguay, SOC A-Camera 1st AC Andrew Dickieson A-Camera 2nd AC Devon Taaffe B-Camera Operator Barry Elmore B-Camera 1st AC Zoe Van Brunt B-Camera 2nd AC John Roney Utility Emma Massalone DIT Chris Hoyle Still Photographer Erin Simkin SEASON TWO Director of Photography Carl Herse A-Camera Operator / Steadicam Orlando Duguay, SOC A-Camera 1st AC Andrew Dickieson A-Camera 2nd AC Devon Taaffe B-Camera Operator Barry Elmore B-Camera 1st AC Mark Legaspi B-Camera 2nd AC Emily Zenk Utility Beau “Tai” Cheadle DIT Chris Hoyle Still Photographer Nicole Wilder

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in focus:

a c 's


“I am working with the ALEXA 65 [for Darius Khondji, ASC, AFC] and a series of lenses expanded by Dan Sasaki at Panavision to cover the large sensor. Modern lenses have been detuned to match vintage glass and take the edge off the extremely crisp big chip.”

Chris Silano EASTERN REGION PHOTO BY PETER KRAMER

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E. Gunnar Mortensen WESTERN REGION PHOTO COURTESY OF E. GUNNAR MORTENSEN

“I’ve been using the new Primo 70 Series and Artiste for large format on my last four projects. Even though the mechanics are the same on each of those projects, we’re able to tune the lenses specifically for the cinematographer’s vision.”

“When working on HBO’s The Deuce, Season 1, set in the 1970s and mostly at night, Vanja Černjul, ASC, had chosen detuned Panavision PVintage primes. During check-out, I was projecting each lens and noticed that they did not resolve well past a T2.8 in 4K. With me at Panavision New York, Vanja recognized he would need to shoot closer to a T2.8, and adjusted his grip and electric package. Proper time in prep and a cinematographer with reasonable expectations, combined with confidence that their look could be achieved, are what made that possible.”

Bradley Grant EASTERN REGION PHOTO BY NIKO TAVERNISE

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John Oliveri CENTRAL REGION PHOTO BY NIKO TAVERNISE

“Coordinating the demands and logistics of the camera department these days is best compared to a game of chess – saving certain pieces for when you will need them most. I still entrust the most important of my scheduling to a Rite in the Rain hand notebook and mechanical pencil. It’s important to stay a present, active member of the set even when attempting to move a small mountain with your cell phone, hence all the handwritten notes.”

Sarah May Guenther EASTERN REGION

“My new show concerns two different social classes, and the DP has decided to use spherical lenses [Cooke S7/i’s] for one social class and anamorphic lenses [Cooke] for the other, creating different looks between them. I’m tasked to check the integrity of each camera and lens chosen for the production while maintaining that quality throughout the project. Being an AC is a very technical job, but it also allows room to put your own mark on the show.”

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“My next show is a series of love stories, and we’re using older, re-housed Primos to soften the highresolution sensor. It reminds me of the age-old question: ‘Does technology help or hinder art?’ There is no correct answer since everyone looks at art differently. At the end of the day, we are all storytellers.”

Waris Supanpong EASTERN REGION PHOTO COURTESY OF WARIS SUPANPONG

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“During rehearsals and between setups I’m always listening; I’m always within earshot of my operator and the DP. Being one step ahead is key in our job. Camera can set the pace, and I can be pulling out a lens or building equipment before the information is relayed if I’m paying attention.”

Jennifer Braddock CENTRAL REGION PHOTO BY SETH F JOHNSON

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Erik Brown WESTERN REGION PHOTO BY CHIABELLA JAMES

Sergius Nafa

“Cinematographers today are embracing what were once considered the flaws of older lenses – unpredictable flares, unique bokeh, less resolution, and odd focus falloff. Panavision’s PVintage lenses – rehoused Super Speeds and Ultra Speeds from the 1960s and 1970s – have focus marking on each side of the barrel, the same pitch gear for focus and iris, and are closer to each other in size and weight than the originals. They make for a faster on-set experience, whether it’s changing a lens quickly or balancing a Steadicam.”

WESTERN REGION PHOTO BY MATT KENNEDY, SMPSP

“Leadership is one of the most important jobs of an AC. It requires a desire and commitment to maintain and cultivate the holistic wellbeing of your department. Fear and anxiety don’t serve anyone, and confidence is contagious. Personal safety is everything; you want your team to come to you first if they feel uncomfortable about something because they know you’re going to do something about it.”

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Simon England WESTERN REGION PHOTO COURTESY OF SIMON ENGLAND

“There is no such thing as a good or bad lens, just the right lens for the story. For Godzilla Vs. Kong [2020], shot by Ben Seresin, ASC, BSC, on ALEXA 65, we used old large-format still photography lenses, which caused the background to swirl and defocus. While they provided the unique look we were after, it also brought focus pulling challenges, as the lens wasn’t meant to be used on a Technocrane crashing into minimum focus.”

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“For the final shot and end-credit crawl in Finding Forrester, director Gus Van Sant wanted to start on a manuscript title, travel through a window, and end on a high, wide shot of Jamal Wallace and his friends playing basketball 70 feet away – all in-camera. Harris Savides, ASC, shot with Panavision C-Series anamorphics on film, and the 100mm needed for the high, wide shot has a minimum focus that was not tight enough for Van Sant. Pre-digital, the first thought was oversized props à la the telephone from Hitchcock’s Dial M for Murder, or doing a soft cut as we traveled through the window. Dan Sasaki at Panavision came up with something he called a ‘variable diopter,’ which allowed me to pull focus from a plus two to zero without any breathing of the lens, and then pull to the basketball players out the window. It looked seamless, and it was Dan who let us do the impossible.”

eric swanek EASTERN REGION


Betsy Peoples CENTRAL REGION PHOTO COURTESY OF BETSY PEOPLES

“On Empire, we use the full set of Leica Summilux-C Prime Lenses [12 focal lengths ranging from 16 to 135 millimeter] chosen by our DP, Jody Williams. Not only are there more witness marks, but they’re consistent throughout the set, allowing muscle memory to form and the chance to get a ‘feel’ for the lenses as a set, as opposed to each lens independently.”

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PRODUCTION CREDITS COMPILED BY TERESA MUÑOZ – AS OF APRIL 15, 2020 The input of Local 600 members is of the utmost importance, and we rely on our membership as the prime (and often the only) source of information in compiling this section. In order for us to continue to provide this service, we ask that Guild members submitting information take note of the following requests: Please provide up-to-date and complete crew information (including that the deadline for the Production Credits is on the first of the preceding cover month (excluding weekends & holidays).

Submit your jobs online by visiting: www.icg600.com/MY600/Report-Your-Job Any questions regarding the Production Credits should be addressed to Teresa Muñoz at teresa@icgmagazine.com 88

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First Man / Photo by Daniel McFadden

Still Photographers, Publicists, Additional Units, etc.). Please note


20TH CENTURY FOX

A24/QUEENS LLC

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOAQUÍN SEDILLO, ASC OPERATORS: PHIL MILLER, SOC, DUANE MIELIWOCKI, SOC, JAMIE ALAC ASSISTANTS: KEN LITTLE, CLAUDIO BANKS, ERIC GUERIN, DAVID STELLHORN, MAX MACAT, JIHANE MRAD STEADICAM OPERATOR: PHIL MILLER, SOC STEADICAM ASSISTANT: KEN LITTLE CAMERA UTILITY: PAULINA GOMEZ DIGITAL UTILITY: JOSHUA SMITH

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN TANZER OPERATORS: DAVID HIRSCHMANN, GRETCHEN WARTHEN ASSISTANTS: YEN NGUYEN, RACHEL DUSA, KELSEY CASTELLITTO, MINMIN TSAI LOADER: FRANCESCO SAUTA

“911” SEASON 3

“FRESH OFF THE BOAT” SEASON 6 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GREG MATTHEWS OPERATORS: JOEY MORENA, ADAM KOLKMAN ASSISTANTS: RAY DIER, TOMOKA IZUMI, CHRISTIAN COBB, AJIRI AKPOLO STEADICAM OPERATOR: JOEY MORENA CAMERA UTILITY: LESLIE KOLTER

“LAST MAN STANDING” SEASON 8 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DONALD A. MORGAN, ASC OPERATORS: GARY ALLEN, RANDY BAER, DAMIAN DELLA SANTINA, JOHN BOYD ASSISTANTS: MISSY TOY-OZEAS, SEAN ASKINS, AL MYERS CAMERA UTILITIES: JOHN WEISS, STEVE MASIAS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: VON THOMAS

“MODERN FAMILY” SEASON 11 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JAMES BAGDONAS, ASC OPERATORS: TREY CLINESMITH, TOBY TUCKER ASSISTANTS: JOHN STRADLING, MICHAEL BAGDONAS, NOAH BAGDONAS, REBECCA MARTZ SPENSER CAMERA UTILITY: GAVIN WYNN DIGITAL UTILITY: SEAN KEHOE

“NEXT” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRETT PAWLAK OPERATORS: SEBASTIEN AUDINELLE, CHRISTOPHER ARATA ASSISTANTS: MATT ROZEK, NITO SERNA, MATT FEASLEY, ALAN DEMBEK STEADICAM OPERATOR: SEBASTIEN AUDINELLE STEADICAM ASSISTANT: MATT ROZEK LOADER: DEREK ASHBAUGH DIGITAL UTILITY: EMILY LAZLO

“THE ORVILLE” SEASON 3 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF MYGATT OPERATORS: BILL BRUMMOND, GARY TACHELL, MIKE SHARP ASSISTANTS: DENNIS SEAWRIGHT, DALE WHITE, STEVE MAGRATH, DUSTIN KELLER, BUTCH PIERSON, KRISTEN LAUBE STEADICAM OPERATOR: BILL BRUMMOND LOADER: BROOKE MAGRATH UTILITY: FERNANDO ZACARIAS

“THIS IS US” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: YASU TANIDA OPERATORS: JAMES TAKATA, COY AUNE ASSISTANTS: SEAN O’SHEA, RICH FLOYD, BRIAN WELLS, JEFF STEWART STEADICAM OPERATOR: JAMES TAKATA STEADICAM ASSISTANT: SEAN O’SHEA LOADER: MIKE GENTILE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RON BATZDORFF

“I’M SORRY” SEASON 3

ABC STUDIOS

“AMERICAN HOUSEWIFE” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROB KITZMANN OPERATORS: RICH DAVIS, TIM WALKER, LISA STACILAUSKAS ASSISTANTS: MAX NEAL, ROBERT GILPIN, JOE TORRES, ELIZABETH ALGIERI, KARL OWENS, JASWINDER BEDI STEADICAM OPERATOR: RICH DAVIS STEADICAM ASSISTANT: MAX NEAL DIGITAL LOADER: LESLIE PUCKETT DIGITAL UTILITY: STEVE ROMMEVAUX

“BLACK-ISH” SEASON 6 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROB SWEENEY OPERATORS: JENS PIOTROWSKI, GARRETT BENSON ASSISTANTS: ART MARTIN, NEAL MORELL, TIFFANI STEPHENSON, PABLO JARA DIGITAL LOADER: JAI CORRIA DIGITAL UTILITY: RAUL PEREZ

“GREY’S ANATOMY” SEASON 16 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: HERB DAVIS, ALICIA ROBBINS OPERATORS: FRED IANNONE, STEVE ULLMAN, LESLIE MORRIS ASSISTANTS: NICK MCLEAN, FORREST THURMAN, KIRK BLOOM, LISA BONACCORSO STEADICAM OPERATOR: STEVE ULLMAN STEADICAM ASSISTANT: FORREST THURMAN CAMERA UTILITY: MARTE POST STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: LISA ROSE

“JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE!” SEASON 18 LIGHTING DIRECTOR: CHRISTIAN HIBBARD OPERATORS: GREG GROUWINKEL, PARKER BARTLETT, GARRETT HURT, MARK GONZALES STEADICAM OPERATOR: KRIS WILSON JIB OPERATORS: MARC HUNTER, RANDY GOMEZ, JR., NICK GOMEZ CAMERA UTILITIES: CHARLES FERNANDEZ, SCOTT SPIEGEL, TRAVIS WILSON, DAVID FERNANDEZ, ADAM BARKER VIDEO CONTROLLER: GUY JONES STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: KAREN NEAL, MICHAEL DESMOND 2ND UNIT DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BERND REINBARDT, STEVE GARRETT

“STATION 19” SEASON 3 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DARYN OKADA, ASC, NANCY SCHREIBER, ASC OPERATORS: RON SCHLAEGER, MARIANA ANTUNANO, BILL BOATMAN ASSISTANTS: TONY SCHULTZ, HANNAH LEVIN, MICHAEL ALVAREZ, SUMMER MARSH, ADAM COWAN, DUSTIN FRUGE STEADICAM OPERATOR: RON SCHLAEGER STEADICAM ASSISTANT: TONY SCHULTZ DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ANDREW LEMON UTILITY: GEORGE MONTEJANO, III TECHNOCRANE OPERATOR: NAZARIY HATAK

TECHNOCRANE TECH: BRIAN LOVE REMOTE HEAD TECH/OPERATOR: JAY SHEVECK

“STUMPTOWN” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CLARK MATHIS, MAGNI AGUSTSSON OPERATORS: BUD KREMP, PHIL MASTRELLA ASSISTANTS: JUSTIN WATSON, SHANE CARLSON, GAYLE HILARY, JESSYCA MARILYN CARACCI LOADER: DYLAN NEAL CAMERA UTILITY: CHRIS SHADLEY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CAROL KAELSON

ADOBE PICTURES, INC.

“PROJECT ICE CREAM AKA MATRIX 4” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN TOLL, ASC AERIAL DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DYLAN GOSS OPERATORS: DANIELE MASSACCESI, MICK FROEHLICH, GEORGE BILLINGER ASSISTANTS: CHAD RIVETTI, MATT GAUMER, PATRICK MCARDLE, HENRY NGUYEN, TIM GUFFIN, SHANNON BRINGHAM, SYDNEY COX DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ETHAN PHILLIPS LOADER: NATHAN MIELKE DIGITAL UTILITIES: AUSTIN PEDRONI, ROBBIE JULIAN PURSUIT HEAD TECH: PETER TOMMASI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MURRAY CLOSE PUBLICIST: FRANCES FIORE

AFN PRODUCTIONS-TELEPICTURES “THE REAL” SEASON 6

LIGHTING DIRECTOR: EARL WOODY, LD OPERATORS: KEVIN MICHEL, NATE PAYTON, STEVE RUSSELL, CHRIS WILLIAMS STEADICAM OPERATOR: WILL DEMERITT CAMERA UTILITIES: HENRY VEREEN, SALVATORE BELLISSIMO, ANDRES VELASQUEZ, JR. JIB ARM OPERATOR: JIM CIRRITO VIDEO CONTROLLER: JEFF MESSENGER

A VERY GOOD PRODUCTION, INC. & WAD PRODUCTIONS

“THE ELLEN DEGENERES SHOW” SEASON 17 LIGHTING DIRECTOR: TOM BECK PED OPERATORS: DAVID WEEKS, PAUL WILEMAN, TIM O’NEILL HANDHELD OPERATOR: CHIP FRASER JIB OPERATOR: DAVID RHEA STEADICAM OPERATOR: DONOVAN GILBUENA VIDEO CONTROLLER: JAMES MORAN HEAD UTILITY: CRAIG “ZZO” MARAZZO UTILITIES: ARLO GILBUENA, WALLY LANCASTER, DIEGO AVALOS

BEACHWOOD SERVICES

“DAYS OF OUR LIVES” SEASON 54 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: VINCE STEIB OPERATORS: MARK WARSHAW, VICKIE WALKER, MICHAEL J. DENTON, STEVE CLARK CAMERA UTILITIES: STEVE BAGDADI, GARY CYPHER VIDEO CONTROLLER: ALEXIS DELLAR HANSON

“THE GOLDBERGS” SEASON 7 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JASON BLOUNT OPERATORS: SCOTT BROWNER, NATE HAVENS ASSISTANTS: TRACY DAVEY, GARY WEBSTER,

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JENNIFER BELL PRICE, MICHELLE BAKER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: KEVIN MILLS LOADER: DILSHAN HERATH STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: LISA ROSE

ASSISTANTS: TODD AVERY, ANDREW DEGNAN, ARTURO ROJAS, RYAN JACKSON STEADICAM OPERATOR: DOMINIC BARTOLONE STEADICAM ASSISTANT: TODD AVERY DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: RAUL RIVEROS LOADER: NOAH MURO STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: CAROL KAELSON, RON JAFFE

BIG INDIE BELLEVILLE, INC. “MASTER”

OPERATOR: DEVON CATUCCI ASSISTANTS: BENYOMIN SPANER, BRIANNA MORRISON LOADER: KATHERINE RIVERA STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: EMILY ARAGONES, JOJO WHILDEN

BOARDWALK PICTURES

“LAST CHANCE U-BASKETBALL” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TERRY ZUMALT OPERATORS: DEVON HOFF-WEEKES, DAVID NEWTON ASSISTANTS: DEVIN KEEBLER, ETHAN SERLING DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOSH GREYTAK

CBS

“BULL” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DERICK UNDERSCHULTZ OPERATORS: BARNABY SHAPIRO, MALCOLM PURNELL ASSISTANTS: ROMAN LUKIW, SOREN NASH, MICHAEL LOBB, TREVOR WOLFSON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: THOMAS WONG LOADERS: QUINN MURPHY, NIALANEY RODRIGUEZ

“ENTERTAINMENT TONIGHT” SEASON 39

LIGHTING

DESIGNER: DARREN LANGER DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: KURT BRAUN OPERATORS: JAMES B. PATRICK, ALLEN VOSS, ED SARTORI, HENRY ZINMAN, BOB CAMPI, RODNEY MCMAHON, ANTHONY SALERNO JIB OPERATOR: JAIMIE CANTRELL CAMERA UTILITY: TERRY AHERN VIDEO CONTROLLERS: MIKE DOYLE, PETER STENDAL

“THE GOOD FIGHT” SEASON 4 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: FRED MURPHY, ASC, PETR HLINOMAZ, TIM GUINNESS OPERATORS: ALEC JARNAGIN, PETER NOLAN ASSISTANTS: RENE CROUT, DANIEL FIORITO, ELIZABETH HEDGES, JULIA LEACH, EMILY DEBLASI STEADICAM OPERATOR: ALEC JARNAGIN LOADERS: SANCHEEV RAVICHANDRAN, BRIAN CARDENAS

“THE TALK” SEASON 10 LIGHTING DIRECTOR: MARISA DAVIS PED OPERATORS: ART TAYLOR, MARK GONZALES, ED STAEBLER HANDHELD OPERATORS: RON BARNES, KEVIN MICHEL, JEFF JOHNSON JIB OPERATOR: RANDY GOMEZ HEAD UTILITY: CHARLES FERNANDEZ UTILITIES: MIKE BUSHNER, DOUG BAIN, DEAN FRIZZEL, BILL GREINER, JON ZUCCARO VIDEO CONTROLLER: RICHARD STROCK STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RON JAFFE

CETERI, LLC

“UNTITLED KINBERG WEIL SERIES AKA RAY JAMES” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TIMOTHY IVES OPERATORS: MARK SCHMIDT, WYLDA BAYRON ASSISTANTS: ADRIANA BRUNETTO-LIPMAN, ROSSANA RIZZO, AMBER ROSALES, MIKE SWEARINGEN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: J. ERIC CAMP LOADER: BRITTANY JELINSKI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MACALL POLAY

“NCIS” SEASON 17 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: WILLIAM WEBB, ASC OPERATORS: GREGORY PAUL COLLIER, CHAD ERICKSON, DOUG FROEBE (VIDEO) ASSISTANTS: JAMES TROOST, HELEN TADESSE, NATHAN LOPEZ, YUSEF EDMONDS LOADER: ANNA FERRARIE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MIKE KUBEISY

“NCIS: LOS ANGELES” SEASON 11 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: VICTOR HAMMER OPERATORS: TERENCE NIGHTINGALL, TIM BEAVERS ASSISTANTS: KEITH BANKS, RICHIE HUGHES, PETER CARONIA, JACQUELINE NIVENS STEADICAM OPERATORS: TERENCE NIGHTINGALL, TIM BEAVERS STEADICAM ASSISTANTS: KEITH BANKS, RICHIE HUGHES DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOHN MILLS DIGITAL UTILITY: CAROLINE MILLS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RON JAFFE PUBLICIST: KATHLEEN TANJI

“SEAL TEAM” SEASON 3 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: J. MICHAEL MURO, ALAN JACOBY OPERATORS: DOMINIC BARTOLONE, MATT VALENTINE

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CINE CONDADO ENTERTAINMENT, LLC “EL PROFESOR AKA SIMONE”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SONNEL VELAZQUEZ OPERATOR: EDUARDO MARIOTA ASSISTANTS: CARLOS GARCIA, LIZZ DIAZ, ERNESTO GOMEZ LOADER: NESTOR CESTERO STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: LAURA MAGRUDER

CMS PRODUCTIONS, INC. “WEREWOLVES WITHIN”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MATTHEW WISE OPERATOR: JASON THOMPSON ASSISTANTS: JUSTIN WHITACRE, JOSHUA WATERMAN STEADICAM OPERATOR: PETE KEELING DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BRANDON KELLEY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: SABRINA LANTOS

CRANETOWN MEDIA, LLC “LEGENDARY” SEASON 1

OPERATORS: CHRISTOPHER PIAZZA, MARC BLOOMGARDEN, MICHAEL CIMINO, CLINTON CHILDERS, MARTIN HOFFMAN,

MATTHEW MURO, NATHAN LYNCH, JASON MASON, ROBERT DAVIDSON, ROBERT AUMER ASSISTANTS: ZACH SOLOMON, EDWIN SHIMKO, MARK WESTON, ERIC LICHTENSTEIN, OMAR GUINIER, JOHN HENEGHAN CAMERA UTILITIES: JAMES GOLDSMITH, KEVIN WHITE, JONATHAN SCHAMANN, EDWARD LAVIN, RYAN GOLDSMITH, SEAN BOWLES, SR., PETER GEOGHEGAN

DISNEY/FOX 21

“QUEEN OF THE SOUTH” SEASON 5 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ABE MARTINEZ OPERATORS: DOMINIC BARTOLONE, MATT VALENTINE ASSISTANTS: JASON GARCIA, DAN MCKEE, RIGNEY SACKLEY, ZANDER WHITE STEADICAM OPERATOR: DOMINIC BARTOLONE STEADICAM ASSISTANT: JASON GARCIA DIGITAL LOADER: ADAM LIPSCOMB

EYE PRODUCTIONS, INC.

“BLUE BLOODS” SEASON 10 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GENE ENGELS OPERATORS: STEPHEN CONSENTINO, GEOFFREY FROST ASSISTANTS: GRAHAM BURT, JACOB STAHLMAN, MARTIN PETERSON, KENNETH MARTELL DIGITAL IMAGING TECHS: RYAN HEIDE, STEVE CALALANG LOADERS: MICHAEL FULLER, JOHN KEELER STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: CRAIG BLANKENHORN, PATRICK HARBRON

“DYNASTY” SEASON 3 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: STAR BARRY, ROGER CHINGIRIAN OPERATORS: BRETT MAYFIELD, BROWN COOPER ASSISTANTS: COLIN DURAN, RYAN ABRAMS, ALEXA ROMERO STEADICAM OPERATOR: BRETT MAYFIELD STEADICAM ASSISTANT: COLIN DURAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ERIC HENSON DIGITAL UTILITY: JIMARI JONES

“MACGYVER” SEASON 4 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL MARTINEZ, CHRISTOPHER DUDDY OPERATORS: IAN FORSYTH, PAUL KRUMPER, GREG BALDI ASSISTANTS: AL COHEN, TREVOR RIOS, MICHAEL TORINO, STEFAN VINO-FIGUEROA, EASTON HARPER, TYLER BASTIANSON STEADICAM OPERATOR: IAN FORSYTH STEADICAM ASSISTANT: AL COHEN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: GREG VANZYCK DIGITAL UTILITY: BRIAN FREDERICK STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MARK HILL

“SWAGGER” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: RODNEY TAYLOR, ASC CLIFFORD CHARLES OPERATORS: KERWIN DEVONISH, GARY HATFIELD ASSISTANTS: CHRISTOPHER GLEATON, NICHOLAS HAHN, ZAKIYA LUCAS-MURRAY, DERRICK DAWKINS LOADERS: BRITTANY WILSON, XAVIER VENOSTA STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: PATRICK HARBRON, FRANK MCPARTLAND, ANTONY PLATT


CREW PHOTO: 9-1-1 LONE STAR BACK ROW: JOE BRODERICK (B-CAMERA OPERATOR, 2ND UNIT DP), KELLY MITCHELL (C-CAMERA 2ND AC), PETER RUSS (DIT), RON ELLIOTT (B-CAMERA 2ND AC) FRONT ROW: KAORU ISHIZUKA (A-CAMERA 2ND AC), JAMES RYDINGS (A-CAMERA 1ST AC), BRICE REID (A-CAMERA OPERATOR/STEADICAM), ANDY STRAHOM (DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY), DEAN MORIN (C-CAMERA OPERATOR), JOE PACELLA (CAMERA UTILITY), BASSEM BALAA (DIGITIAL UTILITY), CARLOS DOERR (B-CAMERA 1ST AC), AND BEAUDINE CREDLE (C-CAMERA 1ST AC) PHOTO BY: JACK L ZEMAN

FILM 8, LLC “PLAN B”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SANDRA VALDE OPERATORS: NEAL TEN EYCK, NICH MUSCO ASSISTANTS: CHERYN PARK, JUSTIN MARZELLA, JADE BRENNAN, DAVID MASLYN LOADER: JOSIAH WEINHOLD STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: BRETT ROEDEL

FOX21

“THE CHI” SEASON 3 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JESSE M. FELDMAN OPERATORS: DAVE SAMMONS, JORDAN KESLOW ASSISTANTS: KATHRYN MOSS, RACHEL DONOFRIE, BRIAN KILBORN, J’MME IHMAD LOVE STEADICAM OPERATOR: JORDAN KESLOW

LOADER: JJ LITTLEFELD DIGITAL UTILITIES: RODERICK REED, RICHIE COLMAN STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: ELIZABETH MORRIS, PARRISH LEWIS

FUQUA FILMS

“THE RESIDENT” SEASON 3 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BART TAU OPERATORS: MATT DOLL, ANDY FISHER, CHRISTIAN SATRAZEMIS ASSISTANTS: JUSTIN DEGUIRE, TAYLOR CASE, APRIL RUANE CROWLEY, MIKE FISHER, JENNIFER RANKINE, GRACE PRELLER CHAMBERS STEADICAM OPERATOR: MATT DOLL STEADICAM ASSISTANT: JUSTIN DEGUIRE LOADER: TREY VOLPE DIGITAL UTILITY: RYAN ST CLAIR STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: GUY DE’ALEMA

2ND UNIT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDY FISHER OPERATORS: CHRISTIAN SATRAZEMIS, MICHAEL GFELNER, COOPER DUNN ASSISTANTS: JACKSON MCDONALD, CLAIRE PAPEVIES, TAYLOR CASE, MATT EVANS, STERLING WIGGINS, TRISHA SOLYN STEADICAM OPERATOR: CHRISTIAN SATRAZEMIS DIGITAL UTILITY: TREY VOLPE UTILITY: ERIC GAVLINSKI

GHOST PRODUCTIONS, INC. “GHOST” SEASON 1

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRIS LA VASSEUR, AARON MEDICK OPERATORS: JON BEATTIE, NICOLA BENIZZI ASSISTANTS: MICHAEL GAROFALO,

MAY 2020 PRODUCTION CREDITS

91


CHARLIE FOERSCHNER, YALE GROPMAN, ALIVIA BORAB LOADERS: SCOTT GAROFALO, ANDREW DAILEY DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ROB MUIA STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MYLES ARONOWITZ PUBLICIST: SABRINA LAUFER

GIMME DAT MONEY, LLC

“DESUS & MERO” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRIAN CONNOLLY OPERATORS: DANIEL CARP, MANNY GUTIERREZ, SR., MARK SPARROUGH, ERIK LUNDELL ASSISTANT: MATT ALBANO CAMERA UTILITIES: JONATHAN SCHAMANN, CHARLES KEMPF STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: GREG ENDRIES

GLITTER PRODUCTIONS, LLC “G.L.O.W.” SEASON 4

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF WALDRON OPERATORS: ROSS COSCIA, SARAH LEVY ASSISTANTS: MELISSA FISHER, SARA INGRAM, JOHN RONEY, LAURA DIFIGLIO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: PETER BRUNET DIGITAL UTILITY: BROOKE ZBYTNIEWSKI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ALI GOLDSTEIN

GRACE AND FRANKIE PRODUCTIONS, LLC “GRACE AND FRANKIE” SEASON 7

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GALE TATTERSALL OPERATORS: CRAIG COCKERILL, TONY GUTIERREZ ASSISTANTS: DAN SCHROER, NAOMI VILLANUEVA, DAN URBAIN, RENEE TREYBALL STEADICAM OPERATOR: CRAIG COCKERILL STEADICAM ASSISTANT: DAN SCHROER LOADER: NICOLA CARUSO STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: SAEED ADYANI

GWAVE PRODUCTIONS, LLC

“SULPHUR SPRINGS” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: STEFAN VON BJORN OPERATORS: GREG MORRIS, ROBERT FOSTER ASSISTANTS: BROUKE FRANKLIN, RY KAWANAKA, ERIC VAN DER VYNCKT, MATT GUIDRY DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: PAUL RAHFIELD

HORIZON SCRIPTED TELEVISION, INC. “ANIMAL KINGDOM” SEASON 5

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LOREN YACONELLI OPERATORS: SCOTT DROPKIN, BROOKS ROBINSON ASSISTANTS: DAVE EGERSTROM, PATRICK BENSIMMON, ERIC GUTHRIE, CRISTY ARBOLEDA STEADICAM OPERATOR: SCOTT DROPKIN STEADICAM ASSISTANT: DAVE EGERSTROM DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JEFFERSON FUGITT DIGITAL UTILITY: GOBE HIRATA STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: EDDY CHEN

“THE FLIGHT ATTENDANT” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRIAN BURGOYNE OPERATORS: ARI ISSLER, ROD CALARCO ASSISTANTS: JEROME WILLIAMS, ALEXANDER WORSTER, CAMERON SIZEMORE, ALEX DUBOIS LOADERS: AMANDA URIBE, JAKOB FRIEMAN

92

MAY 2020 PRODUCTION CREDITS

KANAN PRODUCTIONS, INC. “RAISING KANAN”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID FRANCO OPERATORS: FRANCIS SPIELDENNER, KATE LAROSE ASSISTANTS: TONY COAN, MARK FERGUSON, BRENDAN RUSSELL, GREGORY PACE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BJORN JACKSON LOADERS: KEITH ANDERSON, JESSICA CELE-NAZARIO STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: NICOLE RIVELLI

“F.B.I.” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TARI SEGAL OPERATORS: AFTON GRANT, CHARLES ANDERSON ASSISTANTS: LEE VICKERY, NIKNAZ TAVAKOLIAN, GEORGE LOOKSHIRE, YURI INOUE STEADICAM OPERATOR: AFTON GRANT LOADERS: CONNOR LYNCH, NKEM UMENYI STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: MICHAEL PARMELEE, ELIZABETH FISHER, MARK SCHAFER

“GOOD GIRLS” SEASON 3

MAGIC WAND PRODUCTIONS, INC. “GODMOTHERED AKA FRILLS”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRISTOPHER NORR OPERATORS: ALAN PIERCE, GERARD SAVA ASSISTANTS: ETHAN BORSUK, JAMES SCHLITTENHART, JASON BRIGNOLA, M.D. EGAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: NICK PASQUARIELLO LOADER: AUDRY STEVENS DIGITAL UTILITY: ANNE ABBRUZZESE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: KC BAILEY

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JASON OLDAK OPERATORS: GARY CAMP, BRIAN OUTLAND, NICOLE LOBELL ASSISTANTS: JOHN RUIZ, JASON KNOLL, PATRICK BLANCHET, ROBYN BUCHANAN, EM GONZALES, CARTER SMITH STEADICAM OPERATOR: GARY CAMP STEADICAM ASSISTANT: JOHN RUIZ LOADER: MATT SCHOUTEN DIGITAL UTILITY: JONNIE MENTZER

“NEW AMSTERDAM” SEASON 2

MESQUITE PRODUCTIONS

“FOR ALL MANKIND” SEASON 2 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: STEPHEN MCNUTT, ROSS BERRYMAN OPERATORS: TIM SPENCER, MIKE MCEVEETY ASSISTANTS: STEPHEN PAZANTI, JORGE PALLARES, DARIN KRASK, ARTHUR ZAJAC STEADICAM OPERATOR: TIM SPENCER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MIKE DEGRAZZIO DIGITAL UTILITY: ROBERT RUELAS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JONNY COURNOYER

NBC

“BROOKLYN NINE-NINE” SEASON 7 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: RICK PAGE OPERATORS: PHIL MASTRELLA, LAUREN GADD, JOEL TALLBUT ASSISTANTS: JAY LEVY, BILL GERARDO, DUSTIN MILLER, WILLIAM SCHMIDT, CHRIS CARLSON LOADER: NICK GILBERT DIGITAL UTILITY: KURT LEVY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JOHN P. FLEENOR

“CHICAGO MED” SEASON 5 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LEX DUPONT, ASC OPERATORS: FAIRES ANDERSON SEKIYA, JOE TOLITANO, BENJAMIN SPEK ASSISTANTS: GEORGE OLSON, KEITH HUEFFMEIER, SAM KNAPP, LAURA DIFIGLIO, PATRICK DOOLEY, JOEY RICHARDSON STEADICAM OPERATOR: FAIRES ANDERSON SEKIYA LOADER: MATTHEW BROWN UTILITY: EMMANUEL BANSA STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ELIZABETH SISSON

“CHICAGO PD” SEASON 7 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JAMES ZUCAL OPERATORS: VICTOR MACIAS, DARRYL MILLER, SETH THOMAS ASSISTANTS: JOHN YOUNG, JAMISON ACKER, DON CARLSON, KYLE BELOUSEK, DAVID WIGHTMAN, NICK WILSON STEADICAM OPERATOR: VICTOR MACIAS LOADER: MARION TUCKER DIGITAL UTILITIES: CHRIS POLMANSKI, STEVE CLAY

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDREW VOEGELI OPERATORS: JULIAN DELACRUZ, SCOTT TINSLEY ASSISTANTS: PEDRO CORCEGA, JAMES MADRID, MATTHEW MONTALTO, ROBERT WRASE LOADERS: JEFFREY MAKARAUSKAS, ANABEL CAICEDO

“SUPERSTORE” SEASON 5 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JAY HUNTER OPERATORS: ADAM TASH, DANNY NICHOLS, MIGUEL PASK ASSISTANTS: JASON ZAKRZEWSKI, BRANDON MARGULIES, ERIC JENKINSON, RYAN SULLIVAN, ESTA GARCIA, RIKKI ALARIAN JONES LOADER: GRACE THOMAS

“UNTITLED TRACY OLIVER PROJECT” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MATT EDWARDS OPERATORS: MATT FLEISCHMANN, CAITLIN MACHAK ASSISTANTS: BLAKE ALCANTARA, VANESSA MORRISON, JORGE DEL TORO, DERRICK DAWKINS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: GUILLERMO TUNON LOADERS: CHRISTINASE CARMODY, DAVID DIAZ STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: SARAH SHATZ

NETFLIX PRODUCTIONS, LLC “THE BABYSITTER 2”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SCOTT HENRICKSEN OPERATOR: CHRIS MOSELEY ASSISTANTS: DENNIS LYNCH, JAY HARDIE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: LANCE HASHIDA LOADER: CHRIS HOSEY 2ND UNIT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN PINGRY ASSISTANTS: SCOTT KASSENOFF, MIKE GRATZMILLER UNDERWATER UNIT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID WILLIAM MCDONALD ASSISTANT: COREY BRINGAS

“BECOMING HALSTON” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: WILL REXER, II OPERATORS: OLIVER CARY, GREGOR TAVENNER ASSISTANTS: JOHN OLIVERI, CORY STAMBLER, MARC LOFORTE, ALEC NICKEL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ANTHONY HECHANOVA


CREW PHOTO: BLUFF CITY LAW SEASON 1 PICTURED L-R: BACK ROW- DAVID LEB, MATTHEW PEARCE, CONNER KING, MIKE SPRAGG, JARRETT RAWLINGS, MATT CABINUM, BRENT SHREWSBURY; FRONT ROW - JAKE LAGUARDIA, BETTY CHOW. STILL PHOTOGRAPHER KATHERINE BOMBOY

LOADERS: AMBER MATHES, NAIMA NOGUERA STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: JOJO WHILDEN, EMILY ARAGONES

“THE CREW” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BILL BERNER OPERATORS: ALAIN ONESTO, MARK RENAUDIN, MIGUEL ARMSTRONG, JIMMY O’DONNELL ASSISTANTS: JASON KNOBLOCH, KYLE GORJANC DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DAVE SATIN LOADER: SHAUN JOYE CAMERA UTILITIES: JAMES ABAMONT, ANTHONY BENEDETTI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ERIC LIEBOWITZ

“COUNTRY COMFORT” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GEORGE MOORADIAN, ASC OPERATORS: RON HIRSHMAN, RANDY BAER, DAVE DECHANT, ELI FRANKS, MICHELLE CRENSHAW, HELENA JACKSON JIB OPERATOR: MICHAEL JAROCKI ASSISTANT: CONNOR HECK

DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ELENA GOMEZ CAMERA UTILITY: KATE STEINHEBEL DIGITAL UTILITY: ERINN BELL TECHNOJIB OPERATOR: ELI FRANKS VIDEO CONTROLLER: RICK DUNGAN

NKZ PRODUCTIONS, INC.

OUTLAW JB, LLC

“THE OUTLAW JOHNNY BLACK” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: KEITH L. SMITH OPERATORS: CHRIS WALLING, SAM LAW ASSISTANTS: STEPHEN BRANAGAN, ISAAC DOWELL, JONATHAN MEDINA STEADICAM OPERATOR: SAM LAW

“THE BACHELOR” SEASON 24 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DENNIS WEILER, CHAD GRIEPENTROG, ANDRE MARTINEZ OPERATORS: DOUG HENNING, MARK JUNGJOHANN, IVAN DURAN, MARTIN MOURINO, TIM STAHL, ANDREW RAKOW, EZRA EPWELL, NICK TULLY, ERICA SHUSHA, JEREMY GUY, SUZIE WEIS ASSISTANTS: YOGI NEELY, TYLER DETARSIO, DAVE OSTERBERG, THOR FRIDLEIFSSON, NICK MILLER, JAY STRAMM, JEN CHMIELEWSKI, TAYLOR GILMARTIN CAMERA UTILITIES: APPLE SCHLOSSER, MICHAEL WILLIAMSON JIB OPERATOR: RANDY GOMEZ, JR. VIDEO CONTROLLERS: RICHARD STROCK, MARC SURETTE

OLIVE AVENUE PRODUCTIONS, LLC “DOOM PATROL” SEASON 2

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SCOTT WINING, SCOTT PECK OPERATORS: TIM FABRIZIO, RYAN WEISEN ASSISTANTS: JOSH HANCHER, CRISTIAN TROVA, KYLER DENNIS, MIKE FISHER STEADICAM OPERATOR: TIM FABRIZIO STEADICAM ASSISTANT: JOSH HANCHER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOE ELROM LOADER: NICK YOUNG DIGITAL UTILITY: ALESSANDRA MACI

MAY 2020 PRODUCTION CREDITS

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PACIFIC 2.1 ENTERTAINMENT GROUP, INC.

RANDOM PRODUCTIONS, LLC

SHOWTIME PICTURES

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDREI BOWDEN SCHWARTZ OPERATORS: AIKEN WEISS, AILEEN TAYLOR ASSISTANTS: DAMON LEMAY, BAYLEY SWEITZER, KRISTINA LALLY, RACHEL FEDORKOVA LOADERS: RAUL MARTINEZ, STARLENE SOLER

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BEN RICHARDSON OPERATORS: STEVEN FINESTONE, KYLE WULLSCHLEGER ASSISTANTS: KALI RILEY, ZACH RUBIN, ANDY HENSLER, ELVER HERNANDEZ LOADER: MATTHEW EWING STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHELE K. SHORT

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GIORGIO SCALI, ASC, J.B. SMITH OPERATORS: JONATHAN BECK, ERIN HENNING ASSISTANTS: CAI HALL, LEONARDO GOMEZ, II, PATRICK BRACEY, SEAN MCNAMARA LOADERS: DONALD GAMBLE, ARIEL WATSON STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JEFF NEUMAN

REDHAWK PRODUCTIONS, IV, LLC

“CITY ON A HILL” SEASON 2

“POSE” SEASON 3

“MARE OF EASTTOWN”

“THE POLITICIAN” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TIMOTHY NORMAN OPERATORS: MATTHEW PEBLER, JENNIE JEDDRY ASSISTANTS: MICHAEL BURKE, ANDREW JUHL, VINCENT TUTHS, ADAM DEREZENDES DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: LUKE TAYLOR LOADERS: MICHAEL POMORSKI, SYDNEY BALLESTEROS STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: JOHN LOPEZ, GIOVANNI RUFINO, NICOLE RIVELLI, DAVID LEE

PARAMOUNT

“FARGO” SEASON 4

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DANA GONZALES, ASC OPERATORS: MITCH DUBIN, SOC, JOHN CONNOR ASSISTANTS: CHRIS WITTENBORN, HUNTER WHALEN, ERIC ARNDT, SHANNON DEWOLFE, ERIC HINGST DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: RYAN MCGREGOR LOADER: CHRIS SUMMERS DIGITAL UTILITY: EVA JUNE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ELIZABETH MORRIS

“BOOMERANG” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID MORRISON OPERATORS: BRANDON THOMPSON, SIDARTH KANTAMNENI ASSISTANTS: AUSTIN LEWIS, ALEX HOOPER, OREN MALIK STEADICAM OPERATOR: BRANDON THOMPSON STEADICAM ASSISTANT: AUSTIN LEWIS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JAZZ PIERCE DIGITAL UTILITY: TRENT WALKER STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CURTIS BAKER

“MADE FOR LOVE” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: NATE GOODMAN OPERATORS: PETER MERCURIO, RON BALDWIN ASSISTANTS: MATTHEW KING, JOJO SUTERA, HEATHER LEA-LEROY, NINA PORTILLO DIGITAL IMGAGING TECH: MICHAEL BORENSTEIN STILL PHOTOGRAPER: JOHN JOHNSON

“STATION ELEVEN” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRISTIAN SPRENGER OPERATORS: BRIAN FREESH, BLAINE BAKER ASSISTANTS: LIAM SINNOTT, RON RUANPHAE, JASON BONNER, ELAISA VARGAS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CHRIS HOYLE DIGITAL UTILITY: LITONG ZHEN STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: PARRISH LEWIS

POPCOM, LLC/MTV STUDIOS “THREE MONTHS”

OPERATOR: BRUCE CHEUNG ASSISTANTS: JESSICA HERSHATTER, IAN CAMPBELL, KEVIN WILSON, ZAK NORTON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JONNY REVOLT STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RICHARD BAKER PUBLICIST: DEBORAH SIMMRIN

PROJECT NEXT

“TACOMA FD” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GRANT SMITH OPERATORS: RYAN HOGUE, AUSTIN TAYLOR ASSISTANTS: RYAN GUZDZIAL, KEVIN ANDERSON, JESS FAIRLESS, ANDREA GILL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BEN CRUMP DIGITAL UTILITY: JESSICA PINNS

94

MAY 2020 PRODUCTION CREDITS

ROCART, INC.

“ALL THAT” SEASON 11 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL FRANKS OPERATORS: VANCE BRANDON, JIM ORR, ROBERT MCCALL TECHNOJIB OPERATOR: ELI FRANKS ASSISTANT: MONICA SCHAD DIGIAL IMAGING TECH: DEREK LANTZ UTILITIES: JOSE GOMEZ, TAYLOR FICKLE TECHNOJIB TECH: COREY GIBBONS VIDEO CONTROLLERS: KEITH ANDERSON, BARRY LONG

“SIDE HUSTLE” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL FRANKS OPERATORS: KRIS CONDE, JOHN DECHENE, GEORGE LA FOUNTAINE, CHRIS WILCOX TECHNOJIB OPERATOR: ELI FRANKS TECHNOJIB TECH: COREY GIBBONS ASSISTANT: MEGGINS MOORE UTILITIES: JOSE GOMEZ, ERINN BELL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DEREK LANTZ VIDEO CONTROLLER: BARRY LONG

SAN VICENTE PRODUCTIONS, INC. “THE BLACKLIST” SEASON 7

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL CARACCIOLO, SAADE MUSTAFA OPERATORS: DEREK WALKER, DEVIN LADD, PETER RAMOS ASSISTANTS: DANIEL CASEY, GARETH MANWARING, MIKE GUASPARI, JAMES GOURLEY, EDWIN HERRERA, EDGAR VELEZ LOADERS: JAMES PARSONS, CHARLES GRUNDER JR., ALYSSA LONGCHAMP STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: JOJO WHILDEN, WILL HART, DAVID GIESBRECHT

SCREEN GEMS PRODUCTIONS, INC. “SHRINE”

OPERATOR: SCOTT LEBEDA ASSISTANTS: DANIEL MASON, NOLAN RUDMAN-BALL, BRIANNA MORRISON, THOMAS BELLOTTI LOADER: JOSHUA WEILBRENNER STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: DANA STARBARD

“BILLIONS” SEASON 5

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOSEPH COLLINS, MAURICIO RUBINSTEIN OPERATORS: EDGAR COLON, LAURA HUDOCK ASSISTANTS: ERIC ROBINSON, JOHN REEVES, MARC CHARBONNEAU, SARAH SCRIVENER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JEFFREY HAGERMAN LOADERS: BRITTANY JELINSKI, MAX COLLINS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: FRANCISCO ROMAN SANCHEZ

SONY

“JEOPARDY!” SEASON 36 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF ENGEL OPERATORS: DIANE L. FARRELL, SOC, MIKE TRIBBLE, JEFF SCHUSTER, L. DAVID IRETE JIB ARM OPERATOR: MARC HUNTER HEAD UTILITY: TINO MARQUEZ CAMERA UTILITY: RAY THOMPSON VIDEO CONTROLLER: GARY TAILLON STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CAROL KAELSON

“ONE DAY AT A TIME” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: WAYNE KENNAN OPERATORS: RON HIRSHMAN, DAVID DOUGHERTY, ED FINE, DAVID DECHANT ASSISTANTS: JEFF JOHNSON, VERONICA DAVIDSON CAMERA UTILITIES: DOUG MINGES, BRAD TRAVER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CHRIS RUBIN VIDEO CONTROLLER: KEITH ANDERSON

“WHEEL OF FORTUNE” SEASON 37 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF ENGEL OPERATORS: DIANE L. FARRELL, SOC, JEFF SCHUSTER, RAY GONZALES, STEVE SIMMONS, L. DAVID IRETE, MIKE CORWIN CAMERA UTILITY: RAY THOMPSON HEAD UTILITY: TINO MARQUEZ VIDEO CONTROLLER: GARY TAILLON JIB ARM OPERATOR: RANDY GOMEZ, SR. STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CAROL KAELSON

STALWART FILMS

“FEAR THE WALKING DEAD” SEASON 6 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ADAM SUSCHITZKY, BSC, JALALUDIN TRAUTMANN, BVK OPERATORS: JUAN RAMOS, KRIS HARDY ASSISTANTS: MARK BOYLE, THEDA CUNNINGHAM, SAM PEARCY, DON HOWE STEADICAM OPERATOR: JUAN RAMOS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JAMIE METZGER LOADER: BRENDA SZWEJBKA DIGITAL UTILITIES: LOUIS WATT, JASON HEAD STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RYAN GREEN PUBLICIST: SHARA STORCH


CREW PHOTO: NCIS SEASON 17 FROM LEFT TO RIGHT NATE LOPEZ - “B” 1ST A.C., GREG GAYNE - STILL PHOTOGRAPHER, DAN NASWORTHY - ADDITIONAL DOLLY GRIP, CHAD ERICKSON - “B” CAMERA OPERATOR, YUSEF G. EDMONDS - “B” 2ND AC, KURT KESSENICH - “B” DOLLY GRIP WILLIAM WEBB, ASC - DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY, JAMES TROOST - “A” 1ST A.C., ANNA FERRARIE - ADDITIONAL 2ND AC, GREG COLLIER - “A” CAMERA OPERATOR, HELEN TADESSE - “A” 2ND AC, JOHNNY O’GRADY - “A” DOLLY GRIP PHOTO CREDIT - MIKE KUBEISY

THIMBLE PEA PICTURES, LLC

“UNTITLED ANNA DELVEY ART PROJECT” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MARYSE ALBERTI OPERATORS: GEORGE BIANCHINI, JOHN PIROZZI ASSISTANTS: JAMIESON FITZPATRICK, KEITT, CORNELIA KLAPPER, EVE STRICKMAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DOUGLAS HORTON LOADER: JONATHAN PERALTA STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: NICOLE RIVELLI, LIZ FISHER, CHRIS SAUNDERS

TOT PRODUCTIONS, LLC

“THE OTHER TWO” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ZACK SCHAMBERG OPERATORS: SEBASTIAN SLAYTER, PATRICK MORGAN ASSISTANTS: STEPHEN KOZLOWSKI, CASEY JOHNSON, SOMER MOJICA, SARA BOARDMAN, TONI SHEPPARD STEADICAM OPERATOR: PATRICK MORGAN LOADER: MADDIE KING

TRISTAR PRODUCTIONS, INC.

UNIVERSAL

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN GULESERIAN OPERATORS: MICHAEL CRAVEN, RICK SCHUTTE ASSISTANTS: DEB PETERSON, AMANDA ROTZLER, BRIAN BRESNEHAN, DANIEL SOTAK, JR. DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CURTIS ABBOTT LOADER: GABRIEL MARCHETTI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ELIZABETH TERRELL PUBLICIST: RACHAEL ROTH

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL GREEN OPERATORS: JONATHAN HERRON, MICHAEL LATINO ASSISTANTS: CHRISTOPHER DEL SORDO, MATTHEW BALZARINI, JUSTIN ZVERIN, EMILY DUMBRILL LOADERS: JASON RASWANT, JASON GAINES STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHAEL PARMELEE

“HAPPIEST SEASON”

“LAW & ORDER: SVU” SEASON 21

WARNER BROS UNCLE GEORGE PRODUCTIONS, LLC “SERVANT” SEASON 2

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ISAAC BAUMAN, MARSHALL ADAMS OPERATOR: NATHAN LEVINE-HEANEY ASSISTANTS: NICHOLAS HUYNH, ANTON MIASNIKOV, JAMES MCCANN, LEON SANGINITI, JR. LOADER: SEAN GALCZYK DIGITAL UTILITY: WALKER MARKEY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JESSICA KOURKOUNIS

“ALL RISE” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID HARP, CYBEL MARTIN OPERATORS: TIM ROARKE, STEPHEN CLANCY, SHANELE ALVAREZ ASSISTANTS: MATT GUIZA, KRISTI ARNDS, RANDY SHANOFSKY, ADAM TSANG, ANTHONY HART, BENNY BAILEY STEADICAM OPERATOR: STEPHEN CLANCY STEADICAM ASSISTANT: KRISTI ARNDS DIGITAL UTILITY: MORGAN JENKINS

MAY 2020 PRODUCTION CREDITS

95


CREW PHOTO: THE LAST OG SEASON 3

TOP ROW L TO R WARIS SUPANPONG, DANIEL PATTERSON, MATT FLEISCHMANN, TRACY MORGAN, KELLON INNOCENT, JELANI WILSON, RICARDO SAMIENTO BOTTOM ROW L TO R: RICHARD PENA, BRIAN GRANT, JAMAR OLIVE PHOTO BY CARA HOWE

LOADER: JOHANNA SALO TECHNOCRANE OPERATORS: NAZARIY HATAK, BRIAN LOVE REMOTE HEAD TECH/OPERATOR: JAY SHEVECK

DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BENJAMIN STEEPLES STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ROBERT VOETS PUBLICIST: MARC KLEIN

“BOB HEARTS ABISHOLA” SEASON 1

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: HILLARY SPERA OPERATOR: BO WEBB ASSISTANTS: PATRICK BOROWIAK, DEREK SMITH, ROY KNAUF, DARWIN BRANDIS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ANDY BADER DIGITAL UTILITY: JILL AUTRY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: FRED NORRIS

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PATTI LEE, ASC OPERATORS: MARK DAVISON, CHRIS HINOJOSA, JON PURDY, MICHELLE CRENSHAW ASSISTANTS: JEFF JOHNSON, VITO DE PALMA, MARIANNE FRANCO, ADAN TORRES, LISA ANDERSON, ALICIA BRAUNS, LANCE MITCHELL, JORDAN HRISTOV VIDEO CONTROLLER: JOHN O’BRIEN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: T. BRETT FEENEY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHAEL YARISH PUBLICISTS: KATHLEEN TANJI, MARC KLEIN

“MOM” SEASON 7 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: STEVEN V. SILVER, ASC OPERATORS: CARY MCCRYSTAL, JAMIE HITCHCOCK, SOC, DAMIAN DELLA SANTINA, CANDY EDWARDS ASSISTANTS: MEGGINS MOORE, NIGEL STEWART, SEAN ASKINS, MARK JOHNSON, WHITNEY JONES CAMERA UTILITIES: ALICIA BRAUNS, COLIN BROWN, JEANNETTE HJORTH VIDEO CONTROLLER: KEVIN FAUST

96

MAY 2020 PRODUCTION CREDITS

“THE LOST BOYS” PILOT

“YOUNG SHELDON” SEASON 3 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BUZZ FEITSHANS, IV OPERATORS: NEIL TOUSSAINT, SOC, AARON SCHUH ASSISTANTS: MATTHEW DEL RUTH, GRANT YELLEN, BRAD GILSON, JR., JAMES COBB STEADICAM OPERATOR: AARON SCHUH STEADICAM ASSISTANT: GRANT YELLEN DIGITAL LOADER: BAILEY SOFTNESS DIGITAL UTILITY: IAN DOOLEY STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: ROBERT VOETS, MICHAEL DESMOND, DARREN MICHAELS, NICOLE WILDER

WOODBRIDGE PRODUCTIONS “S.W.A.T.” SEASON 3

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: FRANCIS KENNY, ASC, CRAIG FIKSE OPERATORS: TIM DOLAN, BRIAN PITTS, MICHAEL OTIS ROPERT ASSISTANTS: RYAN PARKS, LOGAN TURNER, THANE CHARACKY, RILEY PADELFORD, JUSTNI QUACH, MIKE FAUNTLEROY CAMERA UTILITY: CARL LAMMI LOADER: TREVOR BEELER


CREW PHOTO: SEAL TEAM SEASON 3

BACK ROW L-R LOADER NOAH MURO, B 2ND AC RYAN JACKSON, A 2ND AC ARTURO ROJAS, A 1ST AC TODD AVERY, DIT RAUL RIVEROS, A OP DOMINIC BARTOLONE, DP J. MICHAEL MURO, B BOTTOM ROW L-R OP MATT VALENTINE, 2ND AC ENRIQUE GARCIA, B 1ST AC ANDREW DEGNAN PHOTO CAROL KAELSON

COMMERCIALS ARTS & SCIENCES

“BUSH’S BAKED BEANS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: COREY WALTER DIGITAL IMAGING TECHS: ERICA MCKEE, DANIEL SATINOFF, SHAWN AGUILAR, TAMAS HARANGI, JACOB LAGUARDIA REMOTE DATA CAPTURE SPECIALIST: DAN SKINNER

“PROJECT BON BON” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SAM LEVY ASSISTANTS: ROBERT RAGOZZINE, KYLE REPKA, DAN KECK DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: LOIC DE LAME

BISCUIT

“LUMIFY” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TRISTAN SHERIDAN ASSISTANTS: JOHN CLEMENS, SCOTT MILLER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: KAZIM KARAISMAILOGLU

“VOLKSWAGEN DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIPPE LE SOURD ASSISTANTS: RICK GIOIA, WALTER RODRIGUEZ, JORDAN LEVIE STEADICAM OPERATOR: YOUSHENG TANG DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JEFF FLOHR

ASSISTANTS: LEO ABRAHAM, IAN CONGDON, DANIEL ASMELAS, NOAH GLAZER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: WILSON CHUNG

DIVISION7

“BK BREAKFAST”

CMS

“BANK OF AMERICA” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PATRICK RUTH ASSISTANTS: MARY ANNE JANKE, MICHAEL RODRIGUEZ TORRENT DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DAVID KUDROWITZ

“SUNDAY PICNIC” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DANIEL STEWART OPERATORS: RICK SARMIENTO ASSISTANTS: ROB LAU, PETER MORELLO, MITCH MALPICA, SCOTT MILLER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DAVID BERMAN

COMMITTEE

“KETTLE SOLUTIONS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MALIK SAYEED OPERATORS: HASSAN ABDUL-WAHID

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROBERT CHAPPELL OPERATOR: DAVID WATERSTON ASSISTANTS: NINA CHIEN, WALTER RODRIGUEZ, MITCH MALPICA DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: THOMAS WONG LOADER: JERON BLACK

“STELLA ARTOIS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROBERT CHAPPELL OPERATOR: DAVID WATERSTON ASSISTANTS: PETER MORELLO, RICK GIOIA, JEFF TAYLOR, SCOTT MILLER, JONATHAN SCHAEFER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: THOMAS WONG

“VOGUE X BURBERRY” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ARIL WRETBLAD ASSISTANTS: STEVEN TONG, PETER WESTERVELT STEADICAM OPERATOR: YOUSHENG TANG DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: PAUL SCHILENS

MAY 2020 PRODUCTION CREDITS

97


CREW PHOTO: COUNCIL OF DADS SEASON 1

STANDING LEFT TO RIGHT RON MEINHARDT (DIGITAL UTILITY), BRET LANIUS (A FIRST), BRIAN PHAN (DIGITAL UTILITY), IAN DODD (A OP), LAURA ROBINSON (B FIRST), CHAD OLIVER (DIT), LOUIS SMITH (C FIRST), ERIC DYSON (C OP) SEATED LEFT TO RIGHT TODD A. DOS REIS ASC (DP), JORDAN MCKIM (A SECOND), JENNIFER BRADDOCK (B SECOND), BEAU BELLANICH (C SECOND), DANIEL J ECKLER (B OP) PHOTO BY: SETH JOHNSON

HUNGRY MAN

ICONOCLAST

MOCEAN PICTURES, LLC

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRISTOPHE LANZENBERG ASSISTANTS: ETHAN MCDONALD, JASON ALEGRE STEADICAM OPERATOR: MANOLO ROJAS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: AARON PICOT

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DREW DAWSON ASSISTANTS: MATT SANDERSON, EZRA BASSIN HILL, COLE ELLET, COREY BRINGAS, JONATHAN DEC, MASON HARRELSON LOADERS: RENEE TREYBALL, RACHEL WIEDERHOEFT

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CHUCK OZEAS ASSISTANTS: AL RODGERS, SAM ELLIOT STEADICAM OPERATOR: TOM WILLS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MARIUSZ CICHON

“COORS”

“WALLABEE”

“JERSEY MIKE’S SUBS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ADAM BRICKER ASSISTANTS: NINA CHIEN, DANTE CORROCHER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JEFF FLOHR

“PROJECT TINA” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRYAN NEWMAN OPERATOR: MEGAN MASUR ASSISTANTS: JOHN CLEMENS, SCOTT MILLER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: KAZIM KARAISMAILOGLU

98

MAY 2020 PRODUCTION CREDITS

IMPERIAL WOODPECKER “AT&T”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ADAM RICHARDS OPERATOR: CHARLES LIBIN ASSISTANTS: WALTER RODRIGUEZ, BRETT WALTERS, KYLE REPKA, DANIEL KECK DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JEFF FLOHR

“FFP”

O POSITIVE, LLC “QUALTRICS”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BERENICE EVENO OPERATORS: DIANA MATOS, JAY FEATHER ASSISTANTS: CHEVY ANDERSON, VANESSA MORRISON, ADAM MILLER, DANIEL CARDENAS, JAN BURGESS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: PAUL SCHILENS


“TWISTED TEA” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SEBASTIAN PFAFFENBICHLER OPERATOR: JOSH MEDAK ASSISTANTS: BRADLEY ROCHLITZER, DOUG PRICE, NOAH THOMSON, MARK CONNELLY DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: STEVE HARNELL UTILITY: RYAN MURRAY

PARK PICTURES

RESET

STATION

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ADAM ARKAPAW ASSISTANTS: JOHN CLEMENS, SCOTT MILLER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JEFF FLOHR LIBRA HEAD TECH: DAN SHEATS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: GREG MCMAHON

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF VENDITTI ASSISTANTS: TIM CLARKE, AARON TICHENOR DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: STEVE HARNELL

“MONTEFIORE”

“AMERICAN EXPRESS”

SANCTUARY

“ADIDAS”

“SILK”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: IGOR MARTINOVIC ASSISTANTS: YUSUKE SATO, YVES WILSON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MARIUSZ CICHON

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF KIM ASSISTANTS: PETER MORELLO, JONATHAN SCHAEFER STEADICAM OPERATOR: YOUSHENG TANG DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOE BELACK

PULSE FILMS

SIBLING RIVALRY

“REVEAL”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: IGOR MEGLIC ASSISTANTS: ROB SAGASER, ALBERT FRIGONE, NOAH GLAZER, BRAM WEINKSELBAUM DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: KYLE HOEKSTRA

“EVIAN”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MARTIN AHLGREN ASSISTANTS: RICK GIOIA, ELIZABETH CAVANAGH DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DAVID BERMAN PHANTOM OPERATOR: STEVE ROMANO

RADICAL MEDIA, LLC

SKUNK PARTNERS, LLC

“AMERICAN UTOPIA”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ELLEN KURAS, ASC OPERATORS: DECLAN QUINN, PETER AGLIATA, CHARLIE LIBIN, KERWIN DEVONISH ASSISTANTS: RICK GIOIA, DAN CASEY, WALTER RODRIGUEZ, ADAM MILLER, JORDAN LEVIE, JEFF TAYLOR, NATE MCGARIGAL, MATT CIANFRANI STEADICAM OPERATOR: YOUSHENG TANG STEADICAM ASSISTANT: FILIPP PENSON CAMERA UTILITIES: JOE MANCUSI, ERIK CIMINELLI, ANTHONY BENEDETTI, CHRIS CONOD STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: DAVID LEE

“PRUDENTIAL”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SEBASTIAN PFAFFENBICHLER ASSISTANTS: DAVID PARSON, PETER PARSON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: STEVE HARNELL

SMUGGLER

“SPECTRUM ENTERPRISE” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TAMI REIKER, ASC ASSISTANTS: DANIEL HANYCH, JASON ADLER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: SCOTT BECKLEY

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MAY 2020 PRODUCTION CREDITS

99


STOP MOTION

Richard DuCree UNIT STILL PHOTOGRAPHER GENIUS: ARETHA

Setting up for the next shot: “It’s all about getting the light right…” says Director of Photography Kevin McKnight on the Atlanta, GA set of Genius: Aretha. Here the combination of dramatic lighting and atmosphere – created by a smoke machine – has set the mood of the 1960s at the Reverend C.L. Franklin’s house. Kevin is seated on the couch studying how the key light hits actress Challedon Saltor, while Courtney B. Vance follows up on email messages between scenes.

100

M AY 2020


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SUMMER PREVIEW

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MAGAZINE


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