ICG Magazine - January 2019 - The Film Festival Issue

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ICG MAGAZINE

THE MARVELOUS

MRS.

MAISEL NIGHT S H YA M A L A N ’ S R E F R A C T I V E THRILL R I D E

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G L A S S

PAT R I C K M U R G U I A E X P L O R E S T H E W O R L D OF NARCOS, INDIE-STYLE, IN

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M.

MISS

BA LA




FROM THE

CO-WRITER AND DIRECTOR OF THE BIG SHORT

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Christian BALE • Amy ADAMS • Steve CARELL • Sam ROCKWELL • Tyler PERRY

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION IN ALL CATEGORIES INCLUDING

BEST PICTURE BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY Greig FRASER, ASC, ACS


CONTENTS

JANUARY 2019

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64

THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL

One of the most critically touted shows in TV history steps up to the mic for Season 2.

GLASS M. Night Shyamalan’s new film, shot by Guild DP Mike Gioulakis, is a refractive thrill ride that bends visual storytelling.

SPECIALS MY SUNDANCE MOMENT / 44

DEPARTMENTS GEAR GUIDE / 14 KEY LIGHT / 22 ZOOM-IN / 26 UNION LOVE / 30 PRE-PRODUCTION / 34 EXPOSURE / 38 PRODUCTION CREDITS / 82 STOP MOTION / 96 6

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MISS BALA Sundance favorite Catherine Hardwicke and Mexican DP Patrick Murguia explore the world of narcos, indie-style.


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Photo by Scott Alan Humbert

P RESIDE N T ' S LETTER / /

LEARNING HOW TO LEARN Sometimes in life we encounter people who are so helpful that we can consider them our mentors, even if they arrive when we would least expect (or are looking for) guidance. For me, that person came along in my senior year of high school – a man who, quite literally, changed the path of my life. He didn’t just open my eyes to the importance of education (which I had seriously ignored prior to meeting him); he showed me how important education could be as it applied to areas of my life that held my interest. He was the first Ph.D. I had ever met (when I actually knew what a Ph.D. was), and an extraordinary educator who came to run our school’s audio-visual department. He helped me in so many ways, some I didn’t even recognize at the time – at that age, it’s hard to even acknowledge a guiding hand. In fact, I realized, just recently thinking back, I could not even remember his name. A quick call to Niles Township High School in the suburbs of Chicago brought it back: Ted C. Coburn, Ph.D. The first thing Ted did was to recognize my fledgling photographic talents, and mercifully get me out of my most boring classes to work on a three-screen slide show (extremely advanced for 1962) that was an orientation for new students. Since I was spending so much time in the A/V club, Ted recognized how deficient I was as a student in every other area – except for my college entrance exams! No one had ever taught me “how to learn,” and that was one crucial lesson Ted passed on to me. He knew of a special program at Southern Illinois University that would study underachievers (of which I was in a class all my own!) He managed to influence me to go to SIU, and I was agreeable because I knew they had a photography department, which was rare at that time. Few high schools had any kind of media or film program.

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After arriving at Southern Illinois, it became my beachhead for education. I was enrolled in a program called “Experimental Freshman Year,” and as time went on, I became an excellent student, even making the Dean’s List several times. My world expanded – the arts, history, literature science, etc. – all of which I never would have sought out or found on my own. The experimental program at SIU was run by the Design department and made up of followers of the Bauhaus movement. Buckminster Fuller was an artist-in-residence at our school. In that program, I was exposed to a world I never even dreamed existed while I was in high school. There have been several people throughout my life who I would consider mentors, but Ted C. Coburn truly impacted my journey in a profound way, most notably by the way he taught me how to learn. Cinematographers live by this kind of ethos every day. We are, by nature, students, who love to learn about new tools, processes, ways of storytelling, and, in turn, pass our knowledge on to those behind us. My recommendation, as this new year dawns, is to try to become that Ted Coburn in someone else’s life. He or she might not have the access or the opportunity for mentorship, but that should not matter: find someone who wants to learn and help them. It’s our duty, since the craft of cinematography first began, to carry on this great tradition of training and education.

Steven Poster, ASC National President International Cinematographers Guild IATSE Local 600



Januray 2019 vol. 90 no. 01

Publisher Teresa Muñoz Executive Editor David Geffner Art Director Wes Driver EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Tyler Bourdeau STAFF WRITER Pauline Rogers ACCOUNTING Glenn Berger Dominique Ibarra COPY EDITORS Peter Bonilla Maureen Kingsley CONTRIBUTORS Ted Elrick Jessica Kourkounis Margot Lester Elle Schneider

INTERNATIONAL CINEMATOGRAPHERS GUILD Local 600 IATSE NATIONAL PRESIDENT Steven Poster, ASC NATIONAL VICE-PRESIDENT Heather Norton 1ST NATIONAL VICE-PRESIDENT Paul Varrieur 2ND NATIONAL VICE-PRESIDENT John Lindley, ASC NATIONAL SECRETARY-TREASURER Eddie Avila NATIONAL ASSISTANT SECRETARY-TREASURER Douglas C. Hart NATIONAL SERGEANT-AT-ARMS Christy Fiers NATIONAL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Rebecca Rhine

PUBLICATIONS & PUBLICITY COMMITTEE Spooky Stevens, Chair

CIRCULATION OFFICE 7755 Sunset Boulevard Hollywood, CA 90046 Tel: (323) 876-0160 Fax: (323) 878-1180 Email: circulation@icgmagazine.com

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ADVERTISING POLICY: Readers should not assume that any products or services advertised in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine are endorsed by the International Cinematographers Guild. Although the Editorial staff adheres to standard industry practices in requiring advertisers to be “truthful and forthright,” there has been no extensive screening process by either International Cinematographers Guild Magazine or the International Cinematographers Guild. EDITORIAL POLICY: The International Cinematographers Guild neither implicitly nor explicitly endorses opinions or political statements expressed in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. ICG Magazine considers unsolicited material via email only, provided all submissions are within current Contributor Guideline standards. All published material is subject to editing for length, style and content, with inclusion at the discretion of the Executive Editor and Art Director. Local 600, International Cinematographers Guild, retains all ancillary and expressed rights of content and photos published in ICG Magazine and icgmagazine.com, subject to any negotiated prior arrangement. ICG Magazine regrets that it cannot publish letters to the editor. ICG (ISSN 1527-6007) Ten issues published annually by The International Cinematographers Guild 7755 Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, CA, 90046, U.S.A. Periodical postage paid at Los Angeles, California. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ICG 7755 Sunset Boulevard Hollywood, California 90046 Copyright 2018, by Local 600, International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employes, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States and Canada. Entered as Periodical matter, September 30, 1930, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under the act of March 3, 1879. Subscriptions: $88.00 of each International Cinematographers Guild member’s annual dues is allocated for an annual subscription to International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. Nonmembers may purchase an annual subscription for $48.00 (U.S.), $82.00 (Foreign and Canada) surface mail and $117.00 air mail per year. Single Copy: $4.95 The International Cinematographers Guild Magazine has been published monthly since 1929. International Cinematographers Guild Magazine is a registered trademark.

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W IDE A N G LE / /

Twitter: @DGeffner Email: david@icgmagazine.com

Jessica Kourkounis

(Mirror,Mirror, Stop Motion) “Thanks to the confidence of director M. Night Shyamalan, I was given the opportunity to join ICG and to work my first job as a unit stills photographer on Glass. How lucky am I to cut my teeth with such talents as Samuel L. Jackson, James McAvoy and Bruce Willis?!”

Elle Schneider (Borderline)

“It was a thrill to chat with DP Patrick Murguia about Miss Bala, the new action thriller by Catherine Hardwicke. Using nontraditional composition and practical lights, the team created a ‘new’ Mexico on screen.”

ICG MAGAZINE

THE MARVELOUS

MRS.

MAISEL M.

NIGHT S H YA M A L A N ’ S R E F R A C T I V E THRILL R I D E

PAT R I C K M U R G U I A E X P L O R E S OF NARCOS, INDIE-STYLE, IN

cover photo: Nicole Rivelli

G L A S S

THE WORLD W

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David Geffner

Executive Editor

CONTRIBUTORS

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nother year, another Sundance (eek! my eighteenth), and the cultural/social shift that I wrote about in this space last year feels like it’s come to fruition. Let’s start with the festival itself, which has, over its 25-year history, been a haven for diversity – in front of and behind the camera – but never with a woman at the top of the programming chain. Until now: our new-for-2019 department, Key Light (page 22), offers up 10 questions to Sundance’s new Head of Programming, Kim Yutani, whose résumé began as Artistic Director/Director of Programming for Outfest Los Angeles. Yutani joined Sundance as a short-film programmer in 2006, before moving on to U.S./International fiction features in 2009. More recently, she’s been responsible for creating Sundance Film Festival: Hong Kong, and guiding a partnership with Berlinale’s European Film Market. Her history with Park City goes back even further – to 1995 when Yutani attended Sundance with The Doom Generation as director Gregg Araki’s assistant. She says her team’s vision (including some new programming hires) will be to inform and impact culture. “If what we showcase determines what we value,” she described to ICG Staff Writer Pauline Rogers, “then diverse representation is key to driving cultural development.” Representing at Sundance is what production-designer-turned-director Catherine Hardwicke did spectacularly well, way back in 2003 with her debut feature, Thirteen. The innovative story (shot by Guild member Elliot Davis) won Hardwicke the Narrative Directing Award and led to a career making indie-style films within the studio system – Lords of Dogtown (written by perennial Sundance documentarian Stacy Peralta and shot by Davis), Red Riding Hood (shot by Mandy Walker, ASC, ACS), and the first installment of the Twilight franchise (also lensed by Davis). Cinematographer and Sundance regular Elle Schneider wrote about Hardwicke’s latest effort, Miss Bala (page 72). The drama was shot by Mexico City native Patrick Murguia, who brought a local eye to this reimagining of the gritty 2011 film of the same name by Gerardo Naranjo.

More examples like Yutani and Hardwicke shine through in My Sundance Moment (page 44), which checks in with eight Guild cinematographers who have experienced the magic of Park City. For some, like Ashley Connor and Hilary Spera, their first visit was just in the last few years; for others, like Laela Kilbourn and Shana Hagan, it was two decades plus. Kilbourn first attended in 2004 with the feature documentary Word Wars; Hagan’s festival legacy dates back to 1996 and the nonfiction feature Breathing Lessons, which went on to win the Oscar for Best Documentary Short. (Spoiler Alert: Hagan says her favorite Sundance moment was seeing Jackie Chan do a backward handspring at a Q &A for Chan’s Rumble in the Bronx at the Egyptian Theater!) Proud and strong union women are seen throughout this Festival issue, starting with one of our most influential cinematographers (irrespective of gender), Nancy Schreiber, ASC. In Pre-Production, another new-for-2019 department, she recounts her early trailblazing days as a New York City gaffer, and how, after designing the lighting for a big commercial for the Broadway hit Pippin (and not being invited to dailies), was urged to become a DP by DP/ Director Mark Obenhaus and Gaffer Bobby Vercruse. Many years later, Schreiber says the joy of shooting film again (on the upcoming Samuel Goldwyn feature Mapplethorpe), “with no video village and an SD tap on the monitor,” meant the project’s look was truly in her hands again. “What a concept,” she laughs. Other voices this month – First AC’s Mary Margaret Porter in Zoom-In (page 26), Alaina McManus in Union Love (page 30), and Costume Designer Donna Zakowska in Exposure (page 38), all reinforce a new narrowing of the Hollywood gender gap. Look no further than our cover story on The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel (page 52), whose writer-creator Amy Sherman-Palladino, and main character Miriam “Midge” Maisel (Rachel Brosnahan), led to eight Emmy Awards in its first season. Shot by M. David Mullen, ASC, and Eric Moynier, with a proud New York City-based crew, Maisel is a handcrafted production that would feel right at home at Sundance – or anywhere offbeat, high-quality stories are given a true platform.

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Kim Yutani got her start as a film critic and freelance journalist, focusing on independent film. She then moved into the festival world, first as Artistic Director/Director of Programming for Outfest Los Angeles. She joined Sundance in 2006, programming short films. By 2009, she became a featurefilm programmer, focusing on U.S. and International Fiction Films, overseeing short-film programming, and working on the festival’s Offscreen series of panels and conversations. Yutani was instrumental

in the creation of Sundance Film Festival: Hong Kong, which she also programs. She represents Sundance internationally, serving on juries, speaking on panels, and working to cultivate relationships with film commissions, industry, and artists around the world. For the past five years, Yutani has also overseen a new collaboration with the Berlinale’s European Film Market – housed within the Sundance Film Festival – that provides exposure and sales opportunities for Sundance films immediately after their

Park City premiere. Yutani was recently named an A100 Honoree on Gold House’s list of the most influential Asian Americans in culture. What excites you about this job? It demands an understanding of the full spectrum of independent film, in terms of its international points-of-view and showcasing different types of filmmakers. It’s a diverse and passionate group of people that are looking for different stories, political stories, (cont'd on page 24)

KIM YUTANI 10 QUESTIONS WITH SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL’S NEW HEAD OF PROGRAMMING BY PAULINE ROGERS PHOTO COURTESY OF AGNIESZKA WOJTU/GREEN CARROT

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personal stories, stories that are not told in the mainstream culture. This is a great opportunity to guide and foster more of that work. Figuring out what the job is has been a challenge, but challenges are things that make someone great at what they do because it means you are constantly gaining knowledge as you tackle them. What was your first big Festival moment? Attending Sundance in 1995 with Gregg Araki and his film The Doom Generation. I was his assistant at the time!

mainstream. The opportunities we have to showcase diverse voices are numerous and really exciting. It is always our goal to have a diverse program, and it’s really heartening to have a robust field to select from. Part of it has to do with the climate we are living in right now: filmmakers are always heavily influenced by their environments and are making movies based on that, and the volume of the work seems to be increasing. If what we showcase determines what we value, then diverse representation is key to driving cultural development.

Do you have a favorite Sundance film? I love the films that may not be the most obviously loveable. Since I focus so much on international cinema – that was how I fell in love with film to begin with – I have championed films like the Danish Holiday, which was highly controversial. It had such a strong directorial voice and was beautifully made. It was something we had to include in the program.

How would you define indie film in 2019? It’s a singular commitment to vision, craft, and voice. When you see a great independent film there’s nothing like it; it’s unconventional; it’s a voice that’s unexpected. It carries a point of view that has never been heard before, and that is what I get to experience every day. We are trying to share stories that otherwise wouldn’t reach audiences.

Why is there no mandated award for Cinematography anymore? We keep our awards responsive and flexible – and we always appreciate it when our juries single out specific achievements, as they did last year, when (among many other special jury awards) they recognized cinematographers Maxim Arbugaev and Peter Indergand with a Special Jury Award for Cinematography for their work on Genesis 2.0.

Will you have a vision as new head of programming? If so, what will it be? Absolutely. We have an amazing team of programmers, and I have made a few new hires this year, who have added to the mix. I think that, in terms of the job we have ahead of ourselves, our vision, as a team, is to inform and impact culture. And with each year, we get to see some of the most exciting work, not only from the U.S. but also around the world – a huge undertaking but also an honor that we don’t take lightly. I am looking forward to continually elevating our team’s work to create a diverse lineup of exciting and beautifully told stories that inspire audiences.

How has Sundance become a bellwether for gender and racial-diversity change in Hollywood? Sundance was created as a space for the voices not heard in the

What is your favorite Sundance film for cinematography? I thought the work of Hélène Louvart in Eliza Hittman’s Beach Rats was incredible and showed a director and DP completely in sync. Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, who shot Call Me by Your Name and has worked with Apichatpong Weerasethakul on many films, is one of my favorites. I recently saw Suspiria and can’t get some of those shots out of my head. Shabier Kirchner brought so much atmospheric beauty to last year’s Skate Kitchen. Will the new digital technology (VR, AR, et cetera) alter narrative filmmaking and impact the choices you make in programming in years ahead? Of course, digital technology advances and innovations have lowered the bar for entry into filmmaking, and I love anything that supports that kind of field-building. VR, AR and other work that lives at the intersection of technology and creativity has been the life-blood of the Festival’s New Frontier section since its inception – but we aim to always keep our programming categories responsive to the state of the art and the state of the culture. Do filmmakers still see Sundance as a platform, versus going elsewhere, like SXSW, or just direct delivery online? I think that Sundance occupies a specific space for creators; we’ll always be a discovery festival for voices from outside the mainstream. Different paths are right for different films, and success looks different depending on the specific work. Frankly, I celebrate any platform that allows for more choices, options and access.

“I think that Sundance occupies a specific space for creators; we’ll always be a discovery festival for voices from outside the mainstream.”

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MARY-MARGARET PORTER

On location for Nancy Drew and the Hidden Staircase / Photo by Jace Downs

She played football at Smithfield, North Carolina’s middle school. She had heart surgery at 13 years old, and two years later she was the captain and All-State goalie of her high school soccer team. She also grew up watching the Academy Awards, mesmerized by the making of beautiful moving pictures. That was it – she wanted to be a cinematographer. But life got in the way for Mary-Margaret Porter, and that dream was put on hold, until, at age 32, she took a leap of faith and pursued what she loved – working with a camera. Her first real taste of what it is like to work on a movie was as Evans Brown’s assistant on the Cinemax series Outcast. “I would take

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notes and pictures for Evans during director scouts and production meetings,” Porter explains. “I’d give his notes on equipment, crew, and location needs to Production and the appropriate departments. I would create a template for a scene or shot, break down and send it to the camera department for each episode. “All this helped me understand the importance of pre-production and prepping an episode from scouting, scene and shot breakdowns. Having that time to learn firsthand about everything that goes into a production on set and behind the scenes I believe has made me a better camera assistant

and crew member.” In 2015, Porter joined Local 600 and, since then has worked on AMC’s Halt and Catch Fire (she started as digital utility) and 1st AC on the episodic series Brockmire, Halt and Catch Fire and features like The Bellmen, Nancy Drew and the Hidden Staircase, Only and Trial by Fire. Each posed a different challenge. On the feature film Trial by Fire, Porter was the B-camera 1st AC and recalls one particularly stressful day. “It was a courtroom scene,” she recalls, “and I had to rack between the two leads while director Edward Zwick was tapping me on the shoulder when he wanted me to rack focus.” (cont'd on page 28)

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On Nancy Drew, she was the B-camera 1st AC with Aaron King as her operator. “We had a skaterscope lens on and had to figure out a way to fit it behind an AC unit and make it so he could fit back there, too, and operate the camera,” Porter remembers. “I did some finagling with the quick-release plate and gave him the option to tilt the camera while keeping the frame.” Only was Porter’s first A-camera 1st AC job, and it was challenging, working with DP/ operator Sean Stiegemeier as a single-camera low-budget location feature. They worked with two ARRI ALEXA Minis: one on the MōVi and the other on the EasyRig or in Studio mode. “With the WCU-4 handset in place,” Porter explains, “the only thing that I had to swap [when changing camera bodies] was the transmitter and change the WCU-4 channel.” Porter believes the most stressful thing that can happen as a 1st AC is an equipment

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malfunction. “It takes years to see what to do when something does go wrong, so that you know how to troubleshoot or what’s the fastest solution to get back up and running so Production isn’t waiting on you for technical reasons,” she says. Times, they are a-changing, of course, but perhaps not at the speed many perceive when it comes to gender equality. “There are only five women classified as 1st AC’s in Atlanta out of 75 total,” Porter reflects. “And there are only four women [in Atlanta] classified as operators out of 118 total. I see more women as utilities, loaders and 2nd AC’s. I do feel that women operators and DP’s have it much harder with being accepted in their position and being taken seriously. I have heard producers say, ‘I hired a woman operator once, and it didn’t work out.’ I’m not sure if all of the male operators they hired worked out, either, but I highly doubt it. However, for some

reason, the ‘woman’ operator sticks out in their minds versus them being anonymous.” Still, those kinds of examples have hardly slowed down Porter’s enthusiasm for her craft and the industry. “I love pulling focus and building cameras,” she says excitedly. “Whether it’s a big-budget feature, a tier project, or an episodic series. I adore any day that I can grab the knob and tell a story with a simple pull. I practice my pulls before a shot and work hand in hand with my operator to achieve the desired shot. It’s a fun dance that you play to make a beautiful sharp picture that tells a story with a simple twist of the wrist. This is the reason that I wanted to join the camera department – to tell a visual story that can set the mood, through lighting or atmosphere, or even the simple movement of a camera and its focal length. It can leave an audience wanting more and just thinking, ‘Damn – that is stunning.’”

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OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN CINEMATOGRAPHY THEATRICAL RELEASE ALFONSO CUARÓN

“THE BEST PICTURE OF THE YEAR.

The film, shot in lustrous, haunting black-and-white, folds in hundreds of small visual details that evoke a specific time and place and state of being. A reflection of a vanished era that’s like a portrait of a loved one painted from memory.” STEPHANIE ZACHAREK, TIME

WINNER BEST FILM VENICE FILM FESTIVAL GOLDEN LION


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First AC Alaina McManus learned about the labor movement during her studies at the North Carolina School of the Arts filmmaking program. “My professor, Bill McCord, taught a class on organized labor, where I learned all the things that unions have won us over the years, and the importance of being an industry union member,” she explains. When McManus moved to L.A. to be in the center of the business, she met Jamie Felz, who taught her many things about the union – like that a contract is worthless if you don’t know what’s in it. Felz encouraged her to attend National Executive Board (NEB) meetings, and as a result, McManus is now a full NEB Board member, co-founder of the Young Workers Group and co-chair of the Committee of the Future.

What was the first issue you became passionate about? Raising awareness of the many different contracts that we have. I got the most questions from members about the low-budget contract and found it really hard to navigate. That’s when I decided to make an easy-toread “quick guide” for the low-budget contract.

Photo by Robb Rosenfeld

ALAINA McMANUS

When did you first get involved in Union issues? I didn’t really dive deep into union involvement until I did some pickups on a Tier 1 project. I knew my rate wasn’t great, but when the DP told me we were making pretty much the same amount of money, I found out that new/younger DP’s can be offered $1 over key rate, take it or leave it. To be undervalued like that? Under the basic agreement, hourly DP rate is often double the AC rate or 75 to 80 percent higher. I brought it up at a Regional Council meeting.

What additional issues are you involved in? I am also passionate about solidarity across the locals. On set I take time to learn about the various intricacies of not just the other locals, but also the other unions we work with every day: SAG/AFTRA, DGA and WGA. The more we understand each other, the easier it is to band together. For a couple of our Young Workers meetings, I’ve brought in someone from another local to talk about their experience as a union member and their relationship with the camera department. How can members get involved? The best thing that a member can do for him- or herself is to be involved. Even if it’s only going to the website once a month to poke around, or reading the newsletter. If there is an aspect that you don’t like, investigate what can be done to change it. You might not always like the answer, and it’s rarely going to be easy, but change and momentum have to start somewhere. (cont'd on page 32)

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What is it like to be on set today – as an AC but also as a woman? You still have to work twice as hard, and when you fail, your whole gender fails. But more women are joining the workforce every day, and that’s refreshing. I’m not super fond of being a walking piece of PR, but lamentably, it feels like that’s part of my appeal these days. My holding a camera makes for a great photo op for some company or director or DP to put on their Instagram in order to show the world how progressive they are. I hope that one day my being a woman will be inconsequential because it’s about the work. How has the new technology impacted the work? It’s changed since I started. When I began working, film was still king, and no one was sure where digital was going, if anywhere. I suppose the biggest change I’ve noticed is the domino effect that began when directors and producers didn’t have a finite amount of time they could shoot based on the budget. Now

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you can wipe cards and start over, but you can’t run film back through the gate. Because of that, a lot of the structure I was trained under has fallen by the wayside. How has digital impacted your job? There are more moving parts than there used to be. I often work in tandem with the DP to discuss pros and cons of various new pieces of equipment, and with so many new cameras on the market every day, DP’s know they can count on me to keep up with all the intricacies of each. What would you like to see change in the digital world? I would like to see the culture shift to include the Key 1st AC as a recognized department head. Along with the key grip and the gaffer, we need to be included in production meetings and scouts. The DP should be able to take shots and visualize with the director, but someone still needs to think about cart placement, staffing, and power for video village.

What do you want to see happen unionwise in the future? A Local 600 app with quick access to contracts and rates and the directory. We also need more staff to meet with our rapidly growing membership and address needs. A better path for people who want to join the department to learn the craft and get their days. What’s the best advice you can give someone who is joining the Union? Know your rights! Learn the contracts, or at least how to access them. But also make sure you know your state labor rights. When you are first starting out, people will use your excitement and ignorance of the law to take advantage of you. Knowledge is power. Knowing the difference between a 1099 and a W-2 is just as important as lens sets or wireless systems. Know you are a valued worker – and you deserve to get paid and treated with dignity and respect.

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Editor’s Note: In this new department for 2019, we explore the early days of Local 600 members, who are now well established, and, in many cases (like this month’s debut subject, Nancy Schreiber, ASC), serving as valued mentors to those union craftspeople entering the industry. Nancy Schreiber was the first woman gaffer to join New York’s NABET Local 15 and one of the first women to become a member of the American Society of Cinematographers. In her long and stellar career, she’s received a Primetime Emmy nomination for Outstanding Individual Achievement for

The Celluloid Closet, a Camerimage Golden Frog nomination for Dead Beat, and an Independent Spirit Award for Chain of Desire. Schreiber was the first woman to win an ASC President’s Award, an Athena Award, a Kodak Cinematography Mentor of the Year from Emerging Cinematographers, a Dramatic Cinematography Award from the Sundance Film Festival and a Vision Award from Women in Film Crystal Awards. She chuckles at the name of her recent award: Susan B. Anthony Failure Is Impossible Award from High Falls Film Festival. Schreiber is a stirring role model for female cinematographers and

a mentor to many, but it wasn’t always that way. How did she get there? Who were her mentors? And what were those key moments when she first started out? Her path really began studying Art History and Psychology at the University of Michigan, and running a movie theater after graduation (along with film editor Jay Cassidy, ACE), which, she says, was her own private film school. As she remembers: “Five nights a week we programmed foreign films – the Nouvelle Vague, Vittorio De Sica, Ingmar Bergman, Andrzej Wajda, Luis Buñuel and American (cont'd on page 36)

NANCY SCHREIBER, ASC Photo on location from The Fat Film courtesy of Nancy Schreiber

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independents like Morley Markson.” Schreiber also devoured movies (like Lawrence of Arabia) as a child, growing up on the works of David Lean, CBE, and Freddie Young, OBE, BSC, ASC. She studied Bertolucci and Storaro’s collaboration on The Conformist – the beautiful blending of photographic styles and colors, production design, wardrobe, and cinematography still influences her today. When shooting music videos, it was Blade Runner and later Vilmos Zsigmond, ASC’s American Beauty for a quieter style. “Point Blank from John Boorman [CBE] and Philip Lathrop’s [ASC] breathtaking images are still in my mind and vision as are the Nouvelle Vague’s looser style – and the gutsy work in Seven,” she adds. After college, she moved to New York City and answered an ad in the Village Voice for a production assistant on an independent dark comedy, which, quite literally, started her on the road to the ASC. She laughingly says the key to getting the job was that she’d promised she could come up with a van she’d borrowed from her roommates. It was a tiny crew on Werewolf of Washington, learning everything she could from DP Bob Baldwin and Gaffer Marty Andrews. That experience led her into the electric department, working for gaffer Bobby “Vee” Vercruse and Jack Reidel (father of producer Guy Reidel and his sister Gaye Reidel, who also became an electrician). Before too long, Schreiber was getting calls as a gaffer for commercials and independent films. She went to China with Shirley MacLaine and director Claudia Weil for the Academy Award-nominated The Other Half of the Sky: A China Memoir, and was mentored by Polish cinematographer Andrzej Bartkowiak, ASC. “In those days, in New York, we did not use generators but tied into the main power,” she reflects. “So I must have been fearless,” and

very careful. She recalls one day on a Burger King commercial, shot in a restaurant in Queens, during which “I was tying in, and all of a sudden the power went off in the whole restaurant. Imagine my horror when I went outside to witness the whole street dark. Could I have caused that? Thankfully, it was a large Con Edison generator malfunctioning and a total coincidence!” Things changed when DP/director Mark Obenhaus was hired to shoot a commercial for Bob Fosse’s play Pippin. He brought Schreiber in to design the lighting for a large musical number. Although she created so much of the look, she wasn’t invited to dailies. “That’s when Mark urged me to start shooting – and offered me [and Arthur Albert] an Éclair NPR. Bobby Vee loaned me lights and grip equipment from his company, FilmTrucks. I shot some Columbia University shorts and was encouraged by Mark, Arthur and Bobby to make the move up.” Unfortunately, there were precious few opportunities for women DP’s in narrative filmmaking at that time, so Schreiber decided to build her reel with documentaries. She raised money to direct and shoot a cinéma vérité doc (Possum Living) to demonstrate her handheld skills (something she is still known for today). It made the festival circuit and was included in the prestigious New Directors New Films at MOMA. “Unlike today, the industry did not embrace doing more than one job, except in commercials,” she explains. “So, after shooting and directing two other films, I concentrated on making it as a DP.” Her first real break was on Chain of Desire, for Argentinian director Temístocles López. “It was a great collaboration between Temi, production designer Scott Chambliss and me,” she recalls. “I took artistic and technical risks.” And it paid off with an Independent Spirit Award nomination.

Schreiber says digital capture is the main ask these days, although she has started shooting film again. “On Mapplethorpe (to be released by Samuel Goldwyn in 2019), we shot Super 16. It was so efficient in terms of moving fast, never looking at a monitor except when Sandy Hays came in to do Steadicam. And there was no focus on monitors at video village, as there is nowadays, in the digital world. The tap was standard def, and people had to trust me about the final look. What a concept! “Conversely, on the movie last spring, Miss Virginia, starring Uzo Aduba,” she continues. “I had such an enormous cast that I was happy to employ two full camera crews, with Ric Griffith [SOC] as A-camera operator/ Steadicam and Cybel Martin and Janice Min as our B-camera operators.” These days Schreiber is also a valued lecturer, notably on how to get started in the industry. “Take what comes your way for the experience, unless you feel it is an exploitative or degrading situation,” she tells her students. “Be grateful for every offer you receive. And never take any work for granted. There are literally thousands of folks out there who long for the opportunities you have been offered. “And be nice to everyone,” she adds. “That PA getting you coffee might be your boss someday or in a position to hire you. Long ago, I was on a film and apparently nice to one of the PA’s. He remembered that and recently tracked me down to shoot his upcoming feature. It’s all about being open to adventure. Being creative. Being grateful for the hardworking crew. Being of service to those that hire you. Staying on time and budget. And, for heaven’s sake, having a lot of fun at the same time! “This is the best job ever. How lucky we are!”

“Take what comes your way for the experience, unless you feel it is an exploitative or degrading situation. Be grateful for every offer you receive. And never take any work for granted.”

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“ V I S UAL LY, T H E MOV I E I S A F E A S T. CI NE MATOGRAP H E R RO B B I E RYA N ,

S H O O T I N G O N 3 5 M M, S H I F T S F RO M F O R M A L F RA M I N G T O O F F - K I LT E R P E RS P E C T I V E S AND DISORIENTING WIDE-ANGLE VIEWS.” D

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DONNA BY MARGOT CARMICHAEL LESTER

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ZAKOWSKA PHOTOS BY NICOLE RIVELLI

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It was painting that first captured Donna Zakowska’s heart as a kid growing up in Brooklyn. Then she got into dance, so a career in the arts was almost a certainty. But ending up as an Emmy-winning costume designer wasn’t on the table – at least not then. After immersing herself in painting and dance in college and graduate school, she combined her love of color and movement to constructing costumes, and a career path emerged. “It was a quick, but natural, transition,” she laughs. The range of Zakowska’s work is staggering. She’s designed for Mick Jagger on tour and logged nine seasons with the Big Apple Circus. She did commercials and stage (including opera) and screen work with Eve Ensler, William H. Macy, Woody Allen, and John Turturro, among others. In 2006, she garnered her first nomination from the Costume Designers Guild (CDG) for HBO’s Empire Falls (lensed by Ian Baker). Two years later, she won a CDG Award and a Primetime Emmy (Outstanding Costumes for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special) for another HBO project, John Adams (shot by Tak Fujimoto, ASC, and Danny Cohen). In 2014, a commercial featuring her costume work earned another CDG nomination. And this year, of course, she was part of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel nomination tidal wave, earning nods from CDG and Emmy nominators for the episode “The Disappointment Of The Dionne Quintuplets” (shot by David Mullen, ASC). “Being from New York and having done so many things outside of New York, my agent knew I would love the idea of working on this show,” Zakowska recalls. “So I went to meet Amy [Sherman-Palladino] and we had instant chemistry. We are both intellectually curious and have dance in common, but we also like to translate movement into a visual. Amy, Dan [Palladino] and I get excited talking about what’s possible. When you combine all that – the intellectual, visual and artistic – that’s where you create your best work.” ICG regular Margot Carmichael Lester

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talked to Zakowska about her creative journey and how she styles one of the most popular series around. You didn’t start in fabric design or fashion, yet you’ve earned four Costume Designer's Guild Awards and Primetime Emmy nominations. How did you get here? My background is as a painter. I studied painting – and dance – at Columbia University and the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. After Beaux-Arts, I studied at Yale School of Drama’s theater program. I had studied color from a painter’s perspective, so I understood it. It was a transitional period where I was dealing with color abstractly as a painter and then threedimensionally as I designed for people on stage. In either case, you have to create what doesn’t exist. I liked that. What was your path into the industry? I left school and worked my way into being a costume assistant on Woody Allen movies. My first projects were working with Sven Nykvist [1989’s Crimes & Misdemeanors and New York Stories], Carlo Di Palma [1992’s Shadows & Fog] and other incredible DP’s. They taught me so much about how the camera sees

clothing and its movement. I realized that it’s about the camera’s eye – not just mine. They even brought me into the editing room. It was like a course for three years on camera and clothing. Do you still paint or dance? I have been very influenced by my fine art background. My renderings and research boards are still very painterly. I work with fabric the way I would work with paint. In addition to pursuing the search for very specific colors in fabric, I also do a great deal of dyeing and shifting of color. My costumes are, for me, really like painting with fabric. You’ve had some incredible assignments – designing costumes for the circus and for rock icon Mick Jagger. What was that like? The great part of costuming a circus is the intensity of creating costumes that enable a performer to execute a trick that can often be very difficult and dangerous. There are also often animals involved! I particularly loved one equestrian costume that involved a performer dressed in Eighteenth-Century Venetian garb who had to land on a horse, stand on its back – and was pregnant on top of it. (cont'd on page 42)

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“A SUPREMELY WELL-MADE FILM. PÅL ULVIK ROKSETH’S WORK IS SUBTLY TEXTURED.” “★★★★★ SEARING. A BRAVE AND MASTERLY FILM.”


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Costuming rock stars – particularly someone like Mick Jagger – is also very exciting and special. It feels a bit surreal and very different than working with actors. Somehow their iconic status can feel monumental; the music and stature of their impact on the culture seem to heighten all of one’s choices. The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel had a huge first year, garnering a slew of nominations for everything from editing and costumes to writing and acting. Why do you think it’s been such an immediate success critically and with fans? You never know. [Laughs.] It does resonate, though. It must mean something. I do think women are still looking for ways to express themselves. We’re still in a bit of a rough period here with the Kavanaugh hearing, et cetera. We’re all geared up to assert ourselves. I’m glad if the show gives women a vehicle. It seems to be the right moment for women’s empowerment, for [lead character] Midge and for the whole series. So much else on TV is based on a woman being killed or something bad happening to her. There is so much darkness. People need something with a mixture of a little darkness and something lighter. That’s what our show is all about. Where did you get your inspiration for the Mrs. Maisel wardrobe? For any period show, I do a lot of research in terms of art, magazines, and photography and combine all that to create the look. For this show, I spent a lot of time looking at period French Vogue and especially [the work of ] photographer Saul Leiter. This gave me a feel for how the photographers and designers were playing with color. The clothes literally popped out of the background, and you’ll see that in in the show. I also looked at what was happening in the West Village scene for the emerging looks of the Beat Generation. I should add that Amy and Dan are both very bright people, and they do a lot of their own research. They really pay attention to the minutiae. It’s amazing what people don’t bother to find out about when doing a period

show. On Maisel, we work hard to capture those details. Is it more or less difficult to recreate such a well-documented period like the 1950s? You know, our expectations of that period are actually very limited, and that makes it easy for me. Most of the shows set in the ’50s are unsatisfying. They are caught in the syndrome of the Midwestern America of that period, where all the girls have ponytails and wear big skirts. The challenge, then, was to make it believable that a New York woman of certain means could have these things. That she didn’t have to be rich. Was that time period important from a fashion perspective? It was actually a very important couture period when designers like Dior and Balenciaga were dominant and tailoring was entering women’s clothing in a unique way. Couture from 1953 to 1959 was really about sculpture, and we were starting to see that with both masculine and feminine angles showing up in women’s fashion. When you look at French Vogue from that era, it’s so much more exciting than what we were seeing elsewhere. That meant that it was very easy not to deal with the wardrobe clichés the audience might expect. There are so many people in this show, from the main roles to all those extras. How much of the wardrobe is bought and how much is made specifically for the cast? All the extras’ clothes are rentals from Los Angeles and various other places, but practically ninety percent of the principal wardrobe is designed and built specifically for each character. That means in every season there are a few hundred pieces of clothing, but we have to do it because all the actors have very particular bodies. Let’s talk about those coats and hats, which are fantastic. How do you come up with them and why are they such

important statement pieces? There’s something about the drama of a coat. I have a dance background, so the movement of clothing is big to me, and there’s nothing like a coat to establish some gravitas and fill up space in the room. It was a very good period for the hat – the hat of that period was sort of sculptural. You also get some leeway with comedy so you can be dramatically assertive in your clothing choices. Midge definitely rocks the outerwear, but her nightgown in the pilot has such an outsized and important role in establishing her character. That’s the iconic one. That first nightgown was crucial because of what had to happen in it. It had to be able to look normal dry, then look great in the rain and then do the reveal – go down and come back up. This is going to be the image you’re leaving with everyone. On Instagram, on Halloween, I couldn’t believe the amount of people in nightgowns and pink coats. It was a little strange. Do you have a favorite character to dress? Be honest! Obviously, Midge is pretty big for me, but I honestly do love dressing them all. With her, I’ve gone down the path of color in such a big way. Midge has really allowed me to create a landscape of color for her and for the show. But it’s not the standard saturated bright palette that we usually see in comedy. I’m very excited by color – the way it appears and the rhythm to it. That’s what’s great about working with Amy. Her work is a little bit musical and she often uses dancers as extras, so people move in a certain way. I think of the show as a minor operatic thing in my brain – I have the idea of Midge saying that certain thing in a certain way and that informs what I design for her. Amy’s language helps a lot. The dialog is so great. It’s really the words. If the words aren’t there, the costumes don’t matter. We need to have those scripts, then the wardrobe enhances the way the story is being told.

“There’s something about the drama of a coat. I have a dance background so the movement of clothing is big to me.”

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Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography Theatrical Release

Bruno Delbonnel, AFC, ASC “ BRUNO

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ICG MEMBERS HAVE A SPECIAL RELATIONSHIP WITH PARK CITY; HERE ARE A FEW OF THEIR MEMORIES. PHOTOS BY SARA TERRY UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED 44


MOMENT Local 600 camera team members have been a part of Sundance since the festival’s inception. But it’s mostly in the last decade that their numbers have snowballed (sorry!) to the point where last year (2018), Guild DP’s, AC’s, operators and DIT’s worked on close to 45 percent of all the films screened at Sundance, including shorts, documentaries, and streaming TV series and pilots. Given the maturation of ICG’s presence at Sundance, we thought it was an appropriate time for some reflection – 15-year-plus veterans to those newbies who just made the trek in the last few years were kind enough to share their special moments. When, where, and how did they know that the world’s most unique film festival had welcomed them into the Park City family? 45


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LAELA KILBOURN Word Wars (2004)

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The first feature documentary I ever shot, Word Wars, followed four elite Competitive Scrabble players. I hadn’t known that there was such a thing as elite Competitive Scrabble – and I didn’t know if it would be engrossing to watch as a film. This was back in 2001 and documentaries were neither ubiquitous nor in high demand. But the film’s firsttime directors, Julian Petrillo and Eric Chaikin, were convinced that the strategy and stakes of gameplay, and more importantly, the eccentric characters who played at this elite level, would reveal a story. So we set out to find it and to figure out how to cover Scrabble game after Scrabble game in compelling ways that also delved into the nature of the people playing. There was a steep learning curve – our first dailies were almost unwatchable, but instructive on what to do going forward. We shot over the course of a year, and then I waited while they edited for another year. In November 2003, Eric called to say a rough cut had been accepted to Sundance! It was a last-minute scramble to get it all done – they locked picture at Christmas, and I flew to L.A. to colorcorrect over New Year’s Eve. And then suddenly we were all in Park City, bunking on couches and foldout beds in a little condo, awaiting our premiere and not knowing if people would even come. When we discovered all our screenings were sold out and the film was the buzz of the festival, the stakes suddenly were high: would it live up to the hype? Would the passion and intensity of our subjects and the intricacies of the game come through? On premiere night, I distinctly remember when the lights went down and the first images came up. I was shaking, but with a huge smile – terrified but thrilled. In what seemed a blink came the end credits and the audience in a standing ovation. The film had reached them. It was spectacular.

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QUENELL JONES, SOC We The Animals (2018)

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Having films screened at the Sundance Film Festival is a wonderful experience, and I’ve been fortunate to have worked on four projects, as an operator, that have debuted in Park City including We The Animals and Get Out. But what I remember most about the festival is the large gathering of filmmakers, professionals, and creatives – this one-of-a-kind unique community driven to showcase their work, and supported by vendors eager to demonstrate new technologies and provide informative lectures. Places like The Filmmaker Lodge, The Black House or ICG’s Snowdance party create opportunities to sit one-on-one with other filmmakers from across the country and the world. Being able to have a lengthy discussion with a Japanese producer about her industry, or meeting fellow Guild members to discuss cinematography, have been highlights, but so has attending vendor sessions displaying new cameras. More than anything, my Sundance experience has been about a very special filmmaking community willing to share.

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I believe my Sundance moment happened before I set foot in Park City when I learned that the film I had shot was accepted into Dramatic Competition – the proud realization that out of the hundreds of films submitted to Sundance, ours would be shown to the world. I had been to Sundance in years past as a film fan and for an opportunity to search out the formula for telling a story without financial resources – it was the starting line for that rugged race to bring a story to the big screen. My reward became Walking Out, a beautiful but brutal story set in the rugged terrain of Montana in the winter. Whatever your personal motivations might be, I believe attending Sundance provides the senses with fresh air, celebrity sightings, social movements, industry buzz and unique Park City rights of passage, like standing in lines and slipping on the icy sidewalk! Whether you have been in the business for years or are igniting your career, Sundance can provide motivation and inspiration for all levels of filmmakers. 47


Photo courtesy of Shana Hagan

My first visit to Sundance was in 1996 with director Jessica Yu’s documentary short Breathing Lessons. I was so excited between our screenings that I would just wander up and down Main Street, soaking in Sundance’s creative energy. I remember one day Jessica and I rushed to see the U.S. Premiere of Jackie Chan’s Rumble in the Bronx, at the Egyptian Theatre, which I still remember as one of the best theatrical viewing experiences of my life. The enthusiastic audience hooted and hollered during every incredible action sequence, and it was topped off with a lively Q&A with Jackie Chan, who did a back handspring on the stage! Even though it was snowing heavily after the screening, Jessica and I took advantage of the crowd exiting the theater to hand out postcards for Breathing Lessons. It was then I first met filmmaker Doug Pray, who was at Sundance that same year with his feature documentary, Hype! Doug had just arrived in Park City and the airline had lost his luggage. He was wearing L.A. street clothes and was really cold! So, I gave him my gloves and Jessica gave

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SHANA HAGAN Breathing Lessons (1996)

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him her scarf, and he promised to come to see a Breathing Lessons screening – and we promised to see Hype! After the Festival, Doug and I remained friends and over the past 20-plus years have worked together on various projects; we even have taught documentary filmmaking together. After Sundance, Breathing Lessons went on to win an Oscar for Best Documentary Short (1997), and Jessica Yu and I continue to shoot documentaries and commercials together. Sundance really is a magical place for anyone who loves cinema. My advice to newbies: Be prepared with handouts to get the word out about your screening times. And pack some extra gloves, just in case!

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r MARKUS MENTZER s Clara’s Ghost (2018)

2018 was my very first Sundance, and it felt overwhelming to walk into such a big festival with all of the hype. Leading up to it, my expectations were that I would meet a whole new group of filmmakers with whom I hoped to work down the road. What came as a surprise was randomly running into old friends on the street, getting dinner or a drink, and actually having fun! Fortunately, the cast and crew from our movie, Clara’s Ghost, ended up being very close, and my favorite Sundance memories came from when we all just hung out together at the end of the night. Collectively, the Clara’s Ghost team was going through similar experiences – for many it was their first Sundance, so it was fun to lean on each other again, as we did during the shoot.

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ZAK MULLIGAN Obselidia (2010)

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My first Sundance, in 2010, was with the film Obselidia, which went on to win Best Cinematography that year. But our first screening was to a sold-out audience at the Eccles Theater, which seats 2,500 people, and it was terrifying! We had no idea how people would react. I remember sitting nervously in the back row with the lead actor, Michael Piccirilli, watching to see the audience’s engagement. They were silent where they should be, laughing when they should be, and we got a standing ovation, which made the whole thing so magical. That first year I saw as many films as I could and then spent the rest of the time partying! My second Sundance I didn’t see a single film, I just partied. [Laughs.] Since then, I’ve struck a better balance, because what’s really invaluable about Sundance are the people you meet and the relationships made. Whether it’s colleagues or future collaborators, there’s nowhere else on the planet that brings everyone together like Sundance.

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Photo courtesy of Ashley Connor

When I think of Sundance, two words come to mind: oppressive snow. [Laughs.] My first visit was in 2017 (Person to Person) and then again last year with two films (The Miseducation of Cameron Post, and Madeline’s Madeline), and both times there were snowstorms. [The weather] is the great equalizer because everyone is freezing, covered in snow, and trying to find somewhere, anywhere to get warm – and maybe some free snacks. It’s usually some random little bar or restaurant, where you end up having conversations with people you might never otherwise meet. Sundance is also a place where you experience the film community in all its glory – and horror. [Laughs.] Main Street becomes this egregious display of capitalism, where [to get out of the snow] you find yourself in the Chase Sapphire Lounge or the Orville Redenbacher Popcorn Tent, being showered with excess. So you’re thrown together with all these indie filmmakers, most of whom cannot afford the lifestyle these companies promote. But it always comes back to the snow – running anywhere to hide out and kind of being stranded with the most amazing people.

r ASHLEY CONNOR s Photo by Sarah Shatz

Person to Person (2017)

r

HILLARY FYFE SPERA After Tiller (2013)

s

My best Sundance moment is always the premiere. No matter how many times I am lucky enough to have a film at the festival, it never loses one shred of the excitement. The lights dim, the opening frame appears, and your stomach drops witnessing the energy of the audience, in a place with so much collective film history. Two premieres that stand out were After Tiller (2013) and Band Aid (2017). The first (directed by Lana Wilson and Martha Shane) was a documentary with four late-term-abortion doctors, which was so

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charged and sensitive there had to be security at the door! We worked on it for three years and the emotional Q&A after, and resulting discussion, seemed uniquely at home in the mixed audience of Sundance. Band Aid (directed by Zoe Lister-Jones) was a much different film, but the Sundance premiere experience felt similar. We made the movie with an all-female crew, many who were in the audience watching. Like After Tiller, it was a once-in-a-lifetime project, made with love, blood, sweat, tears, and

extremely hard work. I was so proud to stand on the stage, shoulder-to-shoulder with all those badass women. It felt like we were on the crest of a wave that was the beginning of a major change in both our industry and culture. For me the reward of making a film is in the experience and rarely what comes after; but to be at Sundance, watching the movie start its next chapter, is undeniably thrilling. Sitting out in that audience makes me squirm to get out there and immediately make another one.


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AND A WHOLE BUNCH OF EMMYS TOO! THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL BEGINS SEASON 2 AS ONE OF THE MOST CRITICALLY TOUTED SHOWS IN TV HISTORY, THANKS TO A TIGHT CREATIVE TEAM THAT VALUES UNION LABOR. BY

PHOTOS BY

MA RG OT C A RMICHA EL LEST ER

NICOLE RIVELLI

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R

Regardless of whether you watch on your phone, tablet or large-screen LED display, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel feels big: like a major cinematic work. Or, as co-DP David Mullen, ASC, who shot the pilot and half of the inaugural season describes: “With some people watching in 4K HDR on 60-inch monitors and others watching on a smartphone, you can’t choose a shot size or composition based on the unknown dimensions of the display.” “So,” adds Maisel co-DP Eric Moynier, “we look at shooting this series as home cinema. We don’t think about the size of the screen, we think about how the shot will help tell the story and achieve the look that David and Amy created for the pilot.”

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“Amy,” of course, is Amy Sherman-Palladino, who, along with husband Dan Palladino, forms Maisel’s show-running team. Both are Emmy-winning producers, with show creator Amy ShermanPalladino also winning for directing and writing, the latter aided by whip-smart dialog that helps to establish the pace and energy of the camera coverage. And as 2nd AC Cornelia Klapper observes: “Unlike other comedy shows, the camera plays a very active role. Movements are choreographed and precise, supporting and emphasizing the energy of the actors. Often the camera move becomes an active participant in the scene.” Now entering its second season, after a spectacular Amazon streaming debut that included eight Emmy awards and two Golden Globes, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel centers on a 1950s New York City housewife playing along with her husband’s hobby: stand-up comedy. The relationship unexpectedly goes south, and Miriam “Midge” Maisel (the marvelous one), reeling from betrayal and a little bit drunk, heads off to the club and inadvertently finds herself in the spotlight. In comedy

parlance, she kills. Season 1, which followed Midge through the ups and downs of being a young divorcée and a rising female comic (when there weren’t any others), has departed from the comedic playbook in ways beyond just camera movement; i.e., it’s primarily a single-camera production. As Moynier asserts: “We’ll never compromise the look of the show with a second camera. If lighting is right, we may use two cameras for cross coverage, but that’s it. And we’re not lensing close-ups with 50 or 75mm – we will use a 30mm. If we’re doing a single on Midge [played by Rachel Brosnahan] or Susie [Myerson, played by Alex Borstein], it will be clean with

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“ I’M PROUD WHEN I MANAGE TO LIGHT A SCENE WITH SOME MOOD THAT LOOKS NATURAL AND IS STILL FLATTERING FOR THE CAST, YET STILL ALLOWS UNRESTRICTED CAMERA MOVEMENT.” David Mullen, ASC

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a tight eyeline.” In fact, Mullen and Moynier never shoot close-ups and rarely shoot insert shots. “Once or twice,” Mullen recalls, “when we had a shot with some text on a notecard or small sign that had to be read by the viewer, we’ve had to sharpen and add some contrast to the lettering in post to make it more legible, rather than shoot it tight.” The DP’s also try to separate characters from the background at key moments with careful lighting and depth of field. “Sometimes if I find the background too busy behind the actors’ heads in an intimate dialogue scene, I’ll open up the lens iris from our usual f/2.8 to an f/2.0 to soften the background at that moment,” Mullen adds. Stylistic continuity has been seamless. “Eric and I match each other’s lighting and the look created from the start, and we have [A- Camera/Steadicam Operator] Jim McConkey [SOC] on every episode to keep the moving camera and framing style consistent,” Mullen continues. “The main time when we really have to coordinate with each other is when a new set is built, and the permanent lighting installed has to work for both of us and the potential needs of the scripts down the road.” “The biggest challenge in season one,” describes Gaffer John Oates, “was coordinating the lighting cues with the camera. My dimmer board operator, Scott Maher, was very proactive to head off potential problems.” Close collaboration with Production Designer Bill Groom and his art department ensures that practical lighting does a lot of the work illuminating the actors, particularly, Mullen says, “since we often do elaborate camera moves, sometimes 360s, which make it hard to add any movie lighting. I’m proud when I manage to light a scene with some mood that looks natural and is still flattering for the cast, yet still allows unrestricted camera movement. It’s what most cinematographers hope to achieve!” McConkey says he gets an assist from the Artemis Prime video viewfinder, which he sets to the scene’s lens and camera package. He then puts the lens on the iPad and choreographs shots with Sherman-Palladino. “After rehearsal, but before we bring in the rest of the crew, Amy stands behind me and I use the finder to see what she’s seeing,” McConkey shares. “Then she literally pushes me around to track the shot. I know when she’s got a wild idea because she gets a mischievous look. She’ll say, ‘Can you spin around?’ and then David or Eric and I will try to figure out a way to make that happen. That’s how we discover the emotional center she wants for the shot.” They make temporary marks, and by the time rehearsals for official marks roll around, McConkey has

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“ YOU CAN CREATE GREAT COSTUMES, BUT THEY HAVE TO WORK WITH THE CINEMATOGRAPHY, WHETHER IT’S DIGITAL OR FILM.” Costume Designer Donna Zakowska

the moves figured out and recorded on his iPad. After a couple of run-throughs, he can show the DP’s where they are able to place lights. “It’s instantaneous,” he says. “That’s why we can do complicated scenes in a way that’s creatively and emotionally quicker than traditional situations.”

One such example was a flashback montage Mullen shot for Episode 4. It starts at a nighttime New Year’s Eve party and moves from the dining room into the living room, rotates around Midge, and then transitions in halfway through a second 360 to a daytime interior of the same living room now empty except for Midge, and then moves back to the dining room into a wide shot. “Amy wanted the transition as seamless as possible rather than using a traditional dissolve,” Mullen recalls. “Knowing that our visual effects supervisor, Lesley Robson-Foster, would have to do some morphing to hide the transition, we had to make sure the background behind Midge would be the same in both versions and that her hair and wardrobe wouldn’t be too different. We didn’t want a collar or a sleeve to disappear or appear on her during the transition. I had to light [Brosnahan] with an overhead source that stayed on during both versions, though in the transition to daytime the soft ambient window light naturally floods onto her as an additional source.” Mullen shot the scene on a 21mm lens (instead of the show’s typical 24mm), so Robson-Foster had some flexibility to zoom into the frame and reposition elements to make the two passes line up exactly. “In the end,” Mullen reports, “Lesley still had to combine elements from both passes to get everything to line up at the moment of transition.” Traditionally this sequence would be produced with a motion-control rig, but the semi-spiral movement couldn’t be done on a track. Jim McConkey practiced the “figure 9” move by having playback feed an overlay of the party sequence on his Steadicam monitor, enabling him to match distance and lens height as closely as possible. He used Betz-Tools Wave1 to stabilize the horizon so he could focus on framing and choreography without worrying about being off level. Another complex and iconic oner in the inaugural season was a fourminute sequence in the Copacabana club, shot at a carefully redesigned Masonic Temple in Brooklyn. It begins close on a drummer on stage, flies through the band and pulls further back to reveal people dancing, and sitting

at tables. Then it lowers to crowd level, following a waiter through the room and into the kitchen, where there are about two minutes of dialog between Midge and Susie, captured in a 360. They knew the shot would require a crane, a MōVI and some kind of electromagnetic release system to continue action into the kitchen. “That’s when I called [older brother] Larry,” Jim McConkey remembers. The elder McConkey, part mad scientist, part master mechanic (and co-inventor of the SkyCam), had already used a mechanical quick-release system for a Luc Besson film but decided the shot needed something “slicker” and designed a system specifically for this shot. After a few days of tinkering, he had the solution: a new rig using an electromagnet with a 20-pound weight that would free the camera from the 50-foot Technocrane and “mount” it on the operator. “Charlie [Sherron, Key Grip] had to figure out how to take the safety off so the camera didn’t fall by mistake, and the grips contracted the arm as Larry, wearing the Armor Man, walked in,” Jim McConkey recalls. “They had to pull down on the crane while he was pushing up to take out the ‘drop’ and hide the transition while I was on the wheels. We think that was the first time this technique has been done.” First AC Anthony Cappello describes the controlled chaos: “We had literally everyone from the AD department choreographing background, the grip department on crane, the lighting department coordinating cues to avoid camera shadows, dancers avoiding bumping into the camera, and our operators – Jimmy on the wheels, Larry carrying the MōVi – coordinating all the difficult moves, while I had the multiple focusing challenges. “Everyone had to be on point, or you would have a collision or make a mistake that would require us to start all over. I believe it took 21 takes total. It’s an impressive shot – a big movie shot – pulled off on a weekly series. We’re all very proud of it.” Adding to the visual magic is an authentic late 1950s look and feel created by Bill Groom’s detailed production design and Donna Zakowska’s equally scrupulous and creative costume design (which earned an Emmy nomination). Groom and set designer Ellen Christiansen know how to deliver shootable sets that were almost 360, so as not to restrain Sherman-Palladino’s love of long takes, or Mullen and Moynier’s ability to deliver that vision. “The details and the palette are everywhere I point the camera,” Moynier says. Adds Mullen: “What Eric and I do is try to find opportunities to naturally bring in some colored lighting now and then, perhaps some red neon lighting in a bar scene.” Sequences shot outside in modern-day New York require some thought, given the 180- and 360-degree shots that have become part of the

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LOCAL 600 CREW Directors of Photography M. David Mullen, ASC Eric Moynier A-Camera Operator/Steadicam Jim McConkey, SOC A-Camera 1st AC A. Anthony Cappello A-Camera 2nd AC Kellon Innocent B-Camera Operator Greg Principato B-Camera 1st AC Rossana Rizzo B-Camera 2nd AC Andrea Bias 2nd AC Cornelia Klapper DIT Charlie Anderson Loader James Dean Drummond Still Photographer Nicole Rivelli

series’ visual language. Sometimes the solution to staying “on period” is low-tech, like blocking reflections in car or building windows or hiding modern elements behind period delivery trucks or busses. Other times, a little assist from post is required. The wardrobe – and how it appears on screen – revels in the late-1950s era in which the story unfolds. As Mullen describes: “In the movies of that period you often see the lead actress walk into a grey or brown room wearing a dress or coat in a striking color that pops from the background.” He calls this color aesthetic “aggressively pastel” because it features a strong color accent framed against neutral tones. “David and I both enjoy working with color and make a lot of references to Kodacolor when we’re searching for a hue, like that certain red or certain green,” Zakowska shares. “He’s very supportive of my use of color in what he can photograph. You can create great costumes, but they have to work with the cinematography, whether it’s digital or film.” Keeping all that color palette consistent is DIT Charlie Anderson, who says Mullen and Moynier both make on-set color management a priority. “I’m primarily doing color matching between cameras,” Anderson relates. “My main goal is to match the wide or the first shot in the series, whichever comes first, pulling iris when needed.” David Mullen does as much color and lighting work in-camera as possible, “so I’m mainly matching color. He does his own stop

pulls, also, unless there’s a need for both cameras to do one.” Anderson checks in with dailies colorist Aaron Burns and Light Iron Supervising Colorist Steven Bodner almost daily about the prior and current day’s work, as well as what’s coming up. “This gives Steven as much info as possible when going into a DI, as he’s working on a time crunch,” Anderson adds. “The more Steven is able to prep and be aware of, the more time he’s able to anticipate certain situations that arise in the final color, especially since we’re doing an HDR master as well.” “What’s very important about this show is the dedication and commitment. Everyone cares,” Cappello says. “I believe this stems from Amy and Dan, who are there and committed every day, and from our producers Dhana Gilbert, Nick Thomason, and Meghan Wicker. They make us feel welcome and a real part of the process. Being committed is easy because it’s a true collaboration.” The results in a single season speak for themselves: 16 Emmy nominations, including Comedy Series and Outstanding Cinematography for a Single-Camera Series (One Hour), and eight statuettes. “I’ve never been asked by so many other New York AC’s if I could get them on this show just to work for a day,” laughs Andrea Bias, B-Camera 2nd AC on the just-wrapped Season 2. “Maisel is shot like a feature film. I feel very proud to be a part of such a meticulously crafted piece of work.” For Mullen and Moynier, the success of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is derived from true creative cohesion. “Amy and Dan’s writing and the performances from our cast really drive this show,” Mullen concludes. “There’s also an aesthetic pleasure from watching the image that the viewer feels, though I think that is mostly due to Donna’s costumes and Bill’s production design, and the whole time-capsule aspect.” “The ensemble camera team is amazing at logistics, getting things ready and pulling off some challenging shots,” Moynier adds. In fact, Sherman-Palladino made specific mention of the union crew in one of her Emmy acceptance speeches. “They have a great attitude, they’re top-shelf and they bring their A-games,” Moynier concludes. “We wouldn’t be able to achieve any of this without them.”

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M. NIGHT SHYAMALAN’S NEW FILM, GLASS , SHOT BY GUILD DP MIKE GIOULAKIS, IS A REFRACTIVE THRILL RIDE THAT BENDS VISUAL STORYTELLING. BY

T ED EL RICK

PHOTOS BY

JES S IC A KOURKOUN I S

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M. Night Shyamalan’s 2016 thriller Split, about three girls kidnapped by a disturbed man (James McAvoy) with 24 distinct personalities, including “The Beast,” offered a stunning reveal at the end that referenced an earlier Shyamalan film, 2000’s Unbreakable. The shocker was the reappearance of David Dunn (Bruce Willis), the sole survivor of a train wreck who came to believe he was invincible.

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S Shyamalan called his Split crew back months after what they thought was the film’s wrap to shoot the sequence with Willis. “I didn’t have [the Dunn reveal] in the script for Split,” Shyamalan explains, “because of all the legal stuff – Unbreakable was made by a different studio – and I didn’t know if it was going to work out. When we did the pick-up, we did it with a very small crew and flew Bruce in quietly. He came for like two hours. Even the studio didn’t know I had shot it and saw it first at a preview,” Shyamalan laughs. “They were like, ‘What?! We can’t have that. That’s the character from another studio’s [Disney] movie.’ I said, ‘That’s all been taken care of.’ I like to surprise people, even the people I work with. It’s really fun.” Also in the dark was Guild cinematographer Mike Gioulakis, who shot Split, and the third part of the surprise trilogy, Glass, due out from Universal Pictures this month. Glass also brings back Unbreakable’s Samuel L. Jackson as Elijah Price/Mr. Glass, a man so brittle he’s suffered 94 broken bones. Add in Dr. Ellie Staple (Sarah Paulson), a psychiatrist who specializes in treating people who have delusions that they are real-life superheroes and villains, and you have the makings of a very unique (and typically surprising) M. Night movie. Shyamalan says he first knew he

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wanted Gioulakis to shoot Split when he saw the 2014 horror film It Follows. “I thought I was seeing a very like-minded filmmaker,” the director recalls. “I watched it at my house with my daughter, who is actually a film student now, and I turned to her and said, ‘That was amazing.’ I talked to [It Follows director] David Robert Mitchell, and I interviewed Mike while I was writing Split. He said Unbreakable was very influential to [It Follows], and I said, ‘Oh, that’s interesting.’ I didn’t say we’re making the sequel.” In fact, the use of long shots in It Follows, including a lot of 360s, was, as Shyamalan describes, “very ballsy. One of that film’s best assets was its atmosphere.” Still, Gioulakis cites a large difference in approach between Split and Glass. “Split was a very confined film,” he explains. “You don’t know that it’s part of the Unbreakable universe until the very end. With Glass, we immediately begin the film knowing we’re in the comic-book world. And since all three characters are now together [Dunn, The Horde, and Price], we were able to expand our color palette. On Unbreakable, Night [cinematographer] Eduardo Serra [ASC], and [production] designer Larry Fulton used purple for Elijah, and green for David Dunn, and we brought over yellow for Kevin Crumb’s multiple personalities from Split.” According to Shyamalan, the purple for Elijah/Mr. Glass was

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to symbolize the royalty he believes himself to be, the ochre for McAvoy’s The Beast is a reference to religion because he thinks of himself as a prophet, and green is the lifesaving and -giving nature of David Dunn. “Unbreakable was monochromatic,” Shyamalan adds. “We used the colors to symbolize their awareness of the comicbook world they inhabit. In Split we couldn’t do anything with the colors until the diner scene, where we had reds and it was very pungent and strong primary comic-book colors that began creeping in at the end. In Glass, the whole conversation is about comic books, so we had the freedom to use colors. For example, the room where they are being interrogated is bubble-gum pink. They are being talked out of their belief that they are comic book characters, and the colors are fading back to more neutral colors.” Not surprisingly, Gioulakis points to that scene as one of Glass’s most challenging. “It’s a long dialogue scene – ten pages, I believe,”


the DP describes. “All four characters are in the room, and Sarah Paulson’s character is trying to convince them that they’re not really super heroes and villains, but people suffering from delusions of grandeur. “Night storyboards everything,” Gioulakis adds. And he has worked with the storyboard artist Brick Mason since Wide Awake. “It was extremely valuable having that early prep time with Night and Brick, as it gave me plenty of insight into Night’s process,” he adds. “Night is very much about the emotional POV of the camera and how it supports the characters in the story. Sometimes the POV can be quite literal, but most often it’s trying to evoke a subconscious feeling from the audience. Of course the practical logistics of sets, and blocking from the actors, can all inspire changes, but I found having storyboards helps to see the visual essence of each scene beforehand.” First AC Scott Johnson said the production shot 3.4K ARRI RAW with two ALEXA SXT’s

and one ALEXA Mini with ARRI Master Primes and Fujinon Premier Zooms. “I tend to prefer lower angles,” Gioulakis offers. “I feel the lines in a room converge with slightly more drama, and seeing a ceiling in frame grounds the space in reality. So I carry a low-angle prism with me, which is essentially a mirror-like contraption that enables me to set the lens at a lower vantage point, without having to dig holes in the ground or build actors up on platforms.” Also brought over from Unbreakable is a memorable scene with Dunn on the train right before it jumps the tracks. The moment was revisited to tie up some of the disparate plot points Shyamalan first envisioned way back in 2000. For Unbreakable, the scene was shot using a train set built on a gimbal. Eighteen years later, an actual train car was used and dressed by Production Designer Chris Trujillo (Stranger Things). “Amtrak was very helpful in letting us peruse their trains and gave us some options of what we could and couldn’t get our hands on,” Trujillo outlines. “We picked the train most similar for the bones, and then we completely recovered all their seats, added little head-rest bits and lighting to the ceiling. It’s seamless from the built train to our train. For lighting and camera, it was a

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“ I TEND TO PREFER LOWER ANGLES. I FEEL THE LINES IN A ROOM CONVERGE WITH SLIGHTLY MORE DRAMA, AND SEEING A CEILING IN FRAME GROUNDS THE SPACE IN REALITY.” Mike Gioulakis

challenge to get outside the windows animated. It’s a relatively quick scene, but it is crucial to Glass’s plot because it’s the only one with a direct tie-in to Unbreakable.” Trujillo adds that because the original scene was straightforward, it made tying in this new material easier than if it had been a complicated camera move. “It’s the opening sequence, where the camera was on a crane,” Johnson explains. “We did this MōVi shot for Glass, where we’re tracking down the aisle, with a woman in a blue sweater. Then the camera slides right, and there’s a hidden match cut into the scene from Unbreakable, so it looks like a single shot, where we jump back 20 years in time to a young Bruce Willis in the same row.” As MōVi operator Nick Timmons adds: “We watched that clip over and over again to get the cadence so we could match the original shot. We couldn’t remove anything from the real train car. Then we replicated the shot with an ALEXA Mini on the MōVi Pro. There was no room for anything else that would have been stabilized in any way.” “Mike works a lot with a remote head mounted on a jib on a dolly. We were often designing compound moves by laying 20 or 30 feet of track,” Johnson states. “It can complicate things because you have three people operating the machine, but it gives you complete freedom to put the camera where you want, which makes for some very cool camera work in this movie.” The production also found unique solutions to solve story elements. Gaffer Ryan Lynch used Digital Sputnik lights for when the McAvoy/Beast character is imprisoned. “There’s a flashing device that controls the Beast,” Lynch describes. “We looked at several different options, and Chris [Trujillo] and Night liked what the Sputnik lights looked like.” Lynch, who has known Gioulakis since they were film students at Florida State and who also lit Split, said that Shyamalan likes to shoot at Philadelphia’s 30th Street Train Station, which can be difficult to light. “There’s a lot of logistical elements you have to puzzle over because you can’t shut down a working train station,” Lynch relays. “We also shot at an old armory for an extended action sequence where the characters fall out of a window into night exterior, and we’re introduced to another character. We had tents outside the windows so we could shoot day for night. We used T12s and 20Ks and a lot of Fresnels to do the bounces outside the windows and had a certain amount of rigged practicals, with Kino Flos on the inside.

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We had LED pushes as needed. A few nights later we shot outside with both special effects and real rain. One of those nights where you can’t catch a break,” Lynch laughs. Second AC Leon Sanginiti, who has worked with Shyamalan since Wide Awake, says all the director’s movies are about families and their relationships. “Bruce Willis’s character and his son, Elijah’s and his mother. It’s their knowing how they are dealing with who they are and how they are treated and mistreated in this asylum that’s run by Sarah Paulson. Night always goes for something deeper than good versus bad. He always goes to the relationship end of it.” The Asylum sequences were shot in a former psychiatric ward, the Allentown State Hospital. The structure, opened in 1913, is now being demolished, with Glass preserving the imposing interior and exterior. The story also features two sequences involving water. One involves a flashback to boys hazing another at a swimming pool, which was shot by Underwater DP Ian Takahashi [ICG June/ July 2018, Interview Section]. “We start out with the youngster under the water, then tilt up with him as he’s pulled out of the water,” Takahashi describes. “You have to tilt up even farther than you think because of the way the light is refracted by the water. Instead of being at a 45-degree angle to see them giving him CPR, I was pointed at an almost 80-degree angle. The light never goes in at a straight line. Once it hits that water’s surface, it bends at different angles depending on the angle your camera is looking.” Takahashi was in four feet of water, getting the camera up and out of the water following the action and doing a slow


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push-in. The ARRI was housed in a Hydroflex RemoteAquaCam Mk5 underwater housing. The second underwater sequence involved a fight between Dunn and The Beast in an 11-foot exterior deep tank. The DP for that sequence was Ian Seabrook. “Night wanted, for as long as possible, to see McAvoy pushing Willis down to try and drown him,” Seabrook recounts. “McAvoy was well-suited underwater and could hold his breath long enough to get the shots. We only needed Bruce for some sequences seeing his face. He was very good in the water, but not so enthused in it because he had a bad experience, I believe, on Striking Distance. Once we made it comfortable for him, he was fantastic. “We used an ALEXA Mini in a Nauticam housing, and the lens was an Angénieux 1540,” Seabrook continues. “The set piece was a white translucent tank, so we blacked it out, wrapping the entire exterior with Duvetyne to allow for more contrast. I put black on the floor of the tank and had a LitePanel underwater fixture for a little bit of highlight for both McAvoy and Willis. As the sequence was daylight exterior, an 18K was rigged over top of the tank to augment the sun, which was overcast during the time we shot.” Underwater First AC David McDonald [icgmagazine.com, Waterman, March 2015, ICG Magazine, July 2016, Walk This Way], who is currently transitioning to being

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an Underwater Operator/DP, notes that although Glass had a good stunt team, “McAvoy and Bruce are pretty tough,” he smiles. “We told them, if you need a breath, take a breath, and we’ll shoot around it. It was cold and the only thing I got wet was my hands, as I was sitting up on the scaffolding out of the tank. I was using a WCU-4 setup, with cables attached to the camera housing to provide camera control and surface video. I was excited to provide topside technical support so Ian could focus all attention on the creative under the water.” Shyamalan observes that while “everybody wanted to fund this movie, I wanted to keep [the budget] small by choice so there was no corruption of the process. How Mike and I use our limited resources is how we’re going to use them. What we think is important is important. Nobody sees the North Star as well as we do, so we just keep on going and we’re very disciplined. What comes with that is limited resources. You can’t bring the Technocrane back on another day, so you find another way to do it. We’re constantly problem solving, and that’s the beauty of it. Just because you have ten more million doesn’t make for a better movie.” Gioulakis says he’d love to see a print of Unbreakable re-released in theaters. “It’s an absolutely beautiful film and one of my favorites of Night’s,” he concludes. “I’m grateful to have had a part in the trilogy.”

LOCAL 600 CREW Director of Photography Mike Gioulakis A-Camera 1st AC Scott Johnson A-Camera 2nd AC Leon Sanginiti B-Camera Operator/Steadicam Kyle Rudolph B-Camera 1st AC Michael Leonard B-Camera 2nd AC James McCann MōVi Operator Nick Timmons Loader Sean Galczyk Still Photographer Jessica Kourkounis underwater UNIT Director of Photography Ian Takahashi, SOC Operator Ian Seabrook ACs Peter Lee David William McDonald


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SUNDANCE FAVORITE CATHERINE HARDWICKE AND MEXICAN DP PATRICK MURGUIA EXPLORE THE WORLD OF NARCOS, INDIESTYLE, IN THE COLUMBIA PICTURES ACTIONER, MISS BALA . BY

EL L E S CHN EIDER

PHOTOS BY

GREGORY SMI TH

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Top: Director Catherine Hardwicke celebrates a scene wrap Bottom: DP Patrick Murguia on location in his native Mexico

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As an artist who grew up in South Texas, filmmaker Catherine Hardwicke has always had a special love for Mexico. So, when she put together the lookbook for her latest feature, Miss Bala, an action thriller set in Tijuana, her mandate was simple: shoot in Mexico, and avoid the visual clichés Hollywood films have often relied on when depicting California’s borderlands.

K

Key to this plan was Guild cinematographer Patrick Murguia, who has lived in Los Angeles for the last decade shooting projects like Brooklyn’s Finest and Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan series, but was born and raised in Mexico City. The pair became kindred creative spirits on the AMC series Low Winter Sun back in 2013. As Hardwicke describes: “Many of the best cinematographers are coming from Mexico these days, and Patrick is in that group. He was really the linchpin [for Miss Bala], because having a cinematographer that you love and can work with, and with whom you have a shorthand, makes a big difference in making movies, especially on an abbreviated prep. The entire camera, lighting, grip, and electric team are all going to [come through] the DP.” With only eight weeks from greenlight until start date, Hardwicke and Murguia worked hard to devise the visual language for Miss Bala, an update of the 2011 Mexican film of the same name, written and directed by Gerardo Naranjo. Hardwicke’s version stars Gina Rodriguez as a U.S.-based makeup artist who gets caught up in gang violence during a trip to Tijuana, eventually becoming an informant and pawn in a deadly game between drug cartels and the U.S. government. “Patrick and I spent a lot of time scouting,” Hardwicke notes, “and you really got a sense of what summer is like there – this arid landscape out in the Valle de Guadalupe.” As prep went on, the story started to feel like a traditional western, especially the epic climax, “with a shootout with the good guys and the bad guys and this big sky,” which influenced their composition. The physical space of Gloria’s story plays a big part in Miss Bala, which is visually divided into three acts – two more traditional

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“ WE WERE USING A LOT OF PRACTICALS AS A SOURCE OF LIGHT OFF-SCREEN TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE PARTICULAR TEXTURES THEY CREATE.” Gaffer Leonardo Julian

segments bookending a frenetic middle. “In the beginning, Gloria’s life is much more stable,” Hardwicke explains, “and she’s in a normal world, so we shot it in more of a studio mode, where you feel comfortable and relaxed and shots were composed more traditionally.” Then it all goes to pieces, as Gloria, who lives in Southern California, crosses the border to help an old friend win a beauty contest in Tijuana. She witnesses a club shooting, which sends her world spiraling out of control, and “from then on,” Hardwicke continues, “the camera becomes much more subjective – it’s personal and handheld, right next to her, feeling what she’s feeling. It’s also more frenetic during the action and shootout scenes.” “Instead of being a camera that just observes,” Murguia adds, “now it’s a camera that really participates.” Hardwicke’s take is more action-oriented (and less grim) than Naranjo’s original film, which also adopted a “you are there” style but more low-end, not unlike a drug cartel’s Internet feed! The new script by Gareth DunnetAlcocer reimagines Gloria as a survivor, rather than just a victim of circumstance. “Ours being an action thriller,” Hardwicke explains, “the cinematography puts you right into the mind of the heroine in an intimate and often terrifying way. What we really tried to do was get inside her head as the external circumstances start ramping up.” Murguia contemplated using anamorphic lenses because the aspect ratio would allow the

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audience to always see Gloria’s surroundings, “so we never forget where she is,” he says. He found inspiration in the photo book Chaos, by Josef Koudelka, who captures wide, evocative images of “things that look beautiful. But what happened behind that image is terrifying.” Although shot in the 2.39:1 aspect ratio, Murguia ultimately chose spherical lenses because “with anamorphic, there comes a point where you can’t come [physically] closer; you have to use a diopter or a longer lens,” he describes. “A close-up with a long lens or a close-up with a wide-angle lens, like a 25 millimeter or 35 millimeter, have two very different feelings.” And using wide-angle lenses close to the actors allowed Murguia to keep the camera aimed at higher and lower angles and still capture the hectic world around Gloria. “When she’s wondering what is going to happen with her,” he adds, “we want to move super close to figure out what she’s thinking next. That’s what the spherical lenses allow for.” Even with the odd angles and lens choices, Rodriguez was fully invested in the role. “She was like: ‘I don’t care if I look good or not,’” Murguia recalls, “‘let’s make it happen because this is good for the story.’” In fact, Rodriguez came up with ideas for blocking and was a true creative partner. “Gina was the first one mussing her hair and making it look sweaty, and that was very helpful,” the DP adds, “because if you have to start to be careful [about how the actors look in a particular moment], then it’s like: are we telling this story or just trying to make these people look good?” Murguia opted for vintage Canon K35s and

Zeiss Mark III Super Speed lenses. The K35s were used for moments of clarity, because, as he describes: “They have a beautiful fall off, but whatever is in focus, even wide open, is still sharp. Not as sharp as new lenses, of course, which would have been too much for our purposes, but [the K35s] still have great clarity.” The Super Speeds were used wide open in moments of confusion since “they are generally very soft, and because of the way they’re constructed they have a lot of bouncing light inside,” Murguia notes, which creates a milky veil over the image and creates interesting flares. “It really helps in an emotional way, and that’s a big part of our job as cinematographers. “Film used to be the way we could affect the look through different ISO’s, textures, grain, contrast, color saturation, and through different techniques in the processing,” he continues. “But with digital capture, you have one fixed look, which is the camera sensor. Using vintage lenses has become an important part of the personality of the movie.” Hardwicke, a former production designer, had strong ideas about Miss Bala’s texture and color. She was eager to avoid the overly used amber-tinted glow from Traffic (2000), now often deployed in Hollywood films set in Mexico. “We had a very controlled color palette in the design of the clothes, the locations, but we didn’t go in there and purposely do a major desaturation and tinting,” she explains. “We wanted to show how modern Tijuana is right now, and all the contrast in the city – contemporary buildings,

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radical new art, music, and food. We wanted to show a new version of Mexico.” “In pre-production,” Murguia adds, “we were talking not just about Tijuana’s lower-class world, but all the different worlds that exist in Mexico, which is a country of huge contrast. You have a huge, sad inequality, around 80 million poor people, and at the same time you have one of the richest men in the world.” Contrast and contradiction are at the core of Miss Bala. For example, in a scene after Gloria’s been taken hostage, a cartel member shows her how to shoot a gun. “It’s a horrible situation,” Hardwicke describes, “because she’s been kidnapped, and doesn’t know if this guy is going to kill her, as she’s completely disposable. Eating a sandwich or killing her is the same thing.” Murguia and Hardwicke decided to shoot the scene at magic hour; it became an almost romantic moment that was in direct juxtaposition with the real situation, that made sense for the tone of the middle act of the film. Relying on magic hour was one of a few triedand-true tricks used on a film shot mostly using practicals, including warm house lights and even CFL’s. “I would never put [a CFL] in my house because it feels like a hospital. It is a horrible light,” Murguia shares. “But for that particular moment [the CFL] was working perfectly and was our only source of light. It has a particular texture; if you tried to put a gel into an HMI to try and match the color, the texture would be completely different. It wouldn’t match at all.

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Murguia, who hadn’t shot a movie in Mexico for almost ten years, says “going back was pretty fun.” He’s collaborated with his Mexican gaffer, Leonardo Julian, for eighteen years – the last nine exclusively on commercials. “I look at him, and he already knows what I’m asking and how I want things.” Julian adds that “we were using a lot of practicals as a source of light off-screen, to take advantage of the particular textures they create, which would not be possible with movie lights. One such example that comes to my mind, was at the interior of the party at the villas, where there’s shooting and a big action scene. Due to the small space and the very low ceilings, we had to find out how to hide some of the practicals and how to utilize or take advantage of the ones that were playing in the framing.” In describing Miss Bala’s intense middle act, Murguia says he was trying to avoid using movie lights completely. “The beautiful thing about the ALEXA sensor is that you can shoot in very low light situations. I could be more creative with the practicals.” Having a quick shorthand with crew members like Julian was key to shooting in Mexico, which, as the gaffer describes, has challenges. “I have had the fortune to work in many different projects and budgets,” he says, “and compared to U.S. studio projects, Mexican movies, which are mostly independent, have limited resources, so we just have to be creative and make it work, and tell the story with what we have. Miss Bala was no different in terms of equipment, as this was part of the idea to give the movie that tone.” Shooting began with a challenging action sequence, done over four days near the border. As Murguia recounts: “One day it was sunny, another cloudy, the same day it started foggy. It was super hard. At the end you can’t just sit down there and wait, you have to keep on going.” “The border wall goes right into the ocean and this old bull ring – which is called the Bullring by the Sea – is built right next to it,” Hardwicke remembers. “We staged this whole shootout with multiple cars and multiple sniper positions – some on the top of the bullring, one from an


abandoned building.” Julian notes that the bullring location was a real test for Murguia, “as we were shooting 360 degrees and there was no way to put lights. We were working with available light, and here is where the experience and knowledge of the DP has to come into play, managing when and what to shoot depending on the light conditions.” The location’s vastness did allow Murguia and Hardwicke to choose a wide array of unique angles and provided options to fight the changing light so that the scene plays as if it takes place over twenty minutes. “The fact that it’s right next to this big wall, which is a central topic for our country right now, is a quiet reminder,” Hardwicke observes. “There’s not an exact scene about the wall, but it’s there, we see it.” The border wall is not the only socially current aspect of Miss Bala. With Gloria, Hardwicke has supplied a fierce, complex female lead, an anomaly of diversity and girl power for a Hollywood action film, for which Hardwicke gives kudos to Sony. “A female director, shooting in Mexico with a Mexican cast, and having Gina as the lead is pretty awesome,” she says. To add to that, Miss Bala’s editor, Terilyn Shropshire, is a woman of color, and sound mixer Isabel Muñoz won last year’s Ariel – Mexico’s version of the Oscar. As Murguia notes about a story set in his home country, featuring a female hero: “This woman is in the wrong place at the wrong time. But by thinking things through, being smart and clever, she overcomes being a victim and finds her way out.” Murguia says it’s so important to be grabbed by the humanity in a script, as he was with Miss Bala. “If you’re reading something that doesn’t echo with you,” he concludes, “you have to think about why you’re making it in the first place. You don’t just want to shoot something because it can look beautiful or is cool.”

LOCAL 600 CREW Director of Photography Patrick Murguia A-Camera 1st AC Paul Santoni A-Camera 2nd AC Greg Kurtz Still Photographer Gregory Smith

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PRODUCTION CREDITS

COMPILED BY TERESA MUÑOZ – AS OF DECEMBER 1, 2018 The input of Local 600 members is of the utmost importance, and we rely on our membership as the prime (and often the only) source of information. In order for us to continue to provide this service, we ask that Guild members submitting information take note of the following requests: Please provide up-to-date and complete crew information (including Still Photographers, Publicists, Additional Units, etc.). Please note that the deadline for the Production Credits is on the first of the preceding cover month (excluding weekends & holidays).

Submit your jobs online by visiting: www.icg600.com/MY600/Report-Your-Job Any questions regarding the Production Credits should be addressed to Teresa Muñoz at teresa@icgmagazine.com

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20th CENTURY FOX “911” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Joaquín Sedillo, ASC Operators: Brice Reid, Duane Mieliwocki, SOC, Phil Miller, SOC Assistants: Ken Little, Noah Thomson, Eric Guerin, Seth Gallager, Naomi Villanueva, Jihane Mrad Steadicam Operator: Brice Reid Steadicam Assistant: Ken Little Camera Utility: Paulina Gomez Digital Utility: Joshua Smith “COOL KIDS” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Chris La Fountaine, ASC Operators: Bruce Reutlinger, George La Fountaine, Chris Wilcox, Kris Conde Assistants: Brian Lynch, Jeff Roth, Craig La Fountaine Digital Imaging Tech: Shaun Wheeler Camera Utilities: Chris Todd, Vicki Beck Video Controller: Andy Dickerman “EMPIRE” SEASON 5 Director of Photography: Joe “Jody” Williams Operators: Kirk Gardner, Spencer Gillis Assistants: Andy Borham, Betsy Peoples, Uriah Kalahiki, Shannon DeWolfe Loader: Amanda Kopec Digital Utility: Mark Irion Still Photographer: Chuck Hodes “FRESH OFF THE BOAT” SEASON 5 Director of Photography: Greg Matthews Operators: Brian Morena, Brooks Robinson Assistants: Ray Dier, Tomoka Maronn Izumi, Chris Cobb, Steve Whitcomb Camera Utility: Adam Kolkman “LAST MAN STANDING” SEASON 7 Director of Photography: Donald A. Morgan, ASC Operators: Gary Allen, Randy Baer, Larry Gaudette, John Boyd Assistants: Missy Toy-Ozeas, Damian Della Santina, Al Myers Camera Utilities: John Weiss, Steve Masias Digital Imaging Tech: Von Thomas “REL” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: George Mooradian, ASC Operators: Jack Chisholm, Ron Hirschman, Bruce Pasternack, John Boyd Assistants: Jeff Lorenz, Michele McKinley, Hunt Hibler, Kevin Menteer Camera Utility: Kate Steinhebel Digital Utility: Selvyn Price Jib Arm Operator: Jack Chisolm Jib Arm Assistant: Hunt Hibler Video Controller: Keith Anderson “SPEECHLESS” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Rhet Bear Operators: Patrick McGinley, Hiro Fukuda, Brad Richard Assistants: Blair Rogers, Peter DePhilippis, Geoff Goodloe, Ulli Lamster, David Erickson, James Jermyn Camera Utility: Brittany Meadows “STAR” SEASON 3 Directors of Photography: Jesse M. Feldman, Jim “Gooch” Gucciardo Operators: Aiken Weiss, SOC,

Christian Satrazemis Assistants: Maurizio “Nino” Dotto, Chad Brock, April Ruane Crowley, Grace Preller Chambers Steadicam Operator: Aiken Weiss, SOC Loader: Trent Walker Camera Utility: Anna-Marie Aloia “THE GIFTED” SEASON 2 Directors of Photography: Bart Tau, Peter Kowalski Operators: Matt Doll, Andrew Fisher, Christian Satrazemis Assistants: Justin DeGuire, Cristian Trova, Joe Waistell, Taylor Case, Lauren Gentry, Justin Cooley Steadicam Operator: Matt Doll Steadicam Assistant: Justin Deguire Digital Imaging Tech: Joe Dare Loader: Peter Johnston Digital Utility: Becca Bennett Still Photographers: Eliza Morse, Guy D’Alema “THIS IS US” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Yasu Tanida Operators: James Takata, Tim Roarke Assistants: Sean O’Shea, Rich Floyd, Brian Wells, Jeff Stewart Steadicam Operator: James Takata Steadicam Assistant: Sean O’Shea Loader: Mike Gentile Still Photographer: Ron Batzdorff ABC STUDIOS “AGENTS OF S.H.I.E.L.D.” SEASON 6 Directors of Photography: Allan Westbrook, Kyle Jewell Operators: Bill Brummond, Josh Larsen Assistants: Coby Garfield, Tim Cobb, Derek Hackett, Josh Novak Steadicam Operator: Bill Brummond Digital Imaging Tech: Ryan Degrazzio Digital Utility: Andrew Oliver “BLACK-ISH” SEASON 5 Director of Photography: Rob Sweeney Operators: Jens Piotrowski, Troy Smith Assistants: Art Martin, Dan Squires, Tony Muller Digital Utilities: Pablo Jara, Eliza Wimberly

“HOW TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER” SEASON 5 Directors of Photography: Michael Price, Jeff Jur Operators: Scott Boettle, John Hankammer, Andrea Rossotto Assistants: Heather Lea-LeRoy, Vanessa Morehouse, Darrell Herrington, Drew Han, Mark Sasabuchi, Michael Stampler Digital Imaging Tech: Andrew Osborne “JESSICA JONES” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Manuel Billeter Operators: Michael F. O’Shea, Kate Larose Assistants: Marc Hillygus, Jason Rihaly, Vincent Tuths, Ryan Toussieng Loaders: Kelsey Middleton, Jonathan Peralta “JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE!” SEASON 17 Lighting Director: Christian Hibbard Operators: Greg Grouwinkel, Parker Bartlett, Garrett Hurt, Mark Gonzales Steadicam Operator: Kris Wilson Jib Operators: Marc Hunter, Randy Gomez, Jr., Nick Gomez Camera Utilities: Charles Fernandez, Scott Spiegel, Travis Wilson, David Fernandez, Adam Barker Video Controller: Guy Jones Still Photographers: Karen Neal, Michael Desmond 2ND UNIT Directors of Photography: Bernd Reinbardt, Steve Garrett “STATION 19” SEASON 2 Directors of Photography: Oliver Bokelberg, ASC, Daryn Okada, ASC Operators: Ron Baldwin, Mariana Antunano Assistants: Tony Schultz, Chris Garcia, Diana Ulzheimer, Tim Tillman Steadicam Operator: Ron Baldwin Steadicam Assistant: Tony Schultz Digital Imaging Tech: Andrew Lemon Digital Utility: George Montejano, III

“GODFATHER OF HARLEM” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Guillermo Navarro, ASC Operators: David Knox, Christopher Moone Assistants: Jerome Williams, Cory Stambler, Cameron Sizemore, Benedict Baldauff Still Photographer: David Lee

“THE CONNERS” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Donald A. Morgan, ASC Operators: Jon Purdy, Vito Giambalvo, John Dechene, Richard Price Assistants: Jeff Johnson, Steve Lund, Marianne Franco, John Weiss, Kenneth Williams Camera Utilities: Val Sklar, Robert Deane Digital Imaging Tech/Video Controller: Von Thomas

“GRAND HOTEL” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Alison Kelly Operators: David Ayers, Steve Matzinger, Matt Blute Assistants: Mark Legaspi, Gretchen Hatz, Emily Zenk, Robin Bursey Digital Imaging Tech: Stephen Fouasnon Loader: Alex Gadberry Digital Uitlity: Trigg Ferrano

“THE FIX” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Robert Humphreys, ACS Operators: Damian Church, Dale Myrand Assistants: Nick Infield, Richard Kent, Tommy Klines, Michael Yaeger Loader: Nico Rich

“GROWN-ISH” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Mark Doering-Powell Operators: Paul Sanchez, Robert Arnold Assistants: Robert Schierer, Michael Kleiman, Yen Nguyen, Dan Taylor Camera Utility: Andrew Oliver Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe

AFN PRODUCTIONS-TELEPICTURES “THE REAL” SEASON 5 Lighting Director: Earl Woody, LD Operators: Kevin Michel, David Kanehann, Steve Russell, Bob Berkowitz Steadicam Operator: Will Demeritt Camera Utilities: James Magdalin, Henry Vereen, John Markese Jib Arm Operator: Jim Cirrito

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“ENTERTAINMENT TONIGHT” SEASON 39 Lighting Designer: Darren Langer Director of Photography: Kurt Braun Operators: Jaimie Cantrell, James B. Patrick, Allen Voss, Ed Sartori, Henry Zinman, Bob Campi, Rodney McMahon, Anthony Salerno Camera Utility: Terry Ahern Video Controllers: Mike Doyle, Peter Stendal “INSTINCT” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Joseph Collins Operators: Edgar Colon, Laura Hudock Assistants: Eric Robinson, John Reeves, Marc Charbonneau, Sarah Scrivener Digital Imaging Tech: Jeffrey Hagerman Loaders: Quinn Murphy, Brittany Jelinski Still Photographers: John Lopez, Jeff Neumann, Mark Schafer “MAN WITH A PLAN” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Gary Baum, ASC Operators: Glenn Shimada, Travers Hill, Lance Billitzer, Ed Fine Assistants: Adrian Licciardi, Jeff Goldenberg, Alec Elizondo, Clint Palmer, Jason Herring Utilities: Danny Lorenze, Sean Askins Digital Imaging Tech: Derek Lantz Video Controller: John O’Brien “NCIS” SEASON 16 Director of Photography: William Webb, ASC Operators: Gregory Paul Collier, Chad Erickson, Doug Froebe (Video) Assistants: James Troost, Helen Tadesse Nathan Lopez, Yusef Edmonds Loader: Anna Ferrarie Still Photographers: Ron Jaffe, Mike Kubeisy

Video Controller: Jeff Messenger

Publicist: Amy Johnson

A VERY GOOD PRODUCTION, INC. & WAD PRODUCTIONS “THE ELLEN DEGENERES SHOW” SEASON 16 Lighting Director: Tom Beck Ped Operators: David Weeks, Paul Wileman, Tim O’Neill Hand Held Operator: Chip Fraser Jib Operator: David Rhea Steadicam Operator: Donovan Gilbuena Video Controller: James Moran Head Utility: Craig “Zzo” Marazzo Utilities: Arlo Gilbuena, Wally Lancaster, Diego Avalos

BENEFACTOR PRODUCTIONS “CHAMBERS” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Dana Gonzales, Eliot Rockett, Joe Gallagher, Paul Elliott Operators: Brian Bernstein, Mark LaBonge, George Stephenson Assistants: Nick Shuster, Kinglea Bueltel, Ryan Bushman, Jason Seigel Digital Imaging Tech: Rafel Montoya, Sam Petrov (2nd Unit) Digital Loader: Jannis Schelenz Digital Utility: Oscar Montez Still Photographers: Ursula Coyote, John Britt

BEACHWOOD SERVICES “DAYS OF OUR LIVES” SEASON 53 Directors of Photography: Mark Levin, Ted Polmanski Operators: John Sizemore, Mark Warshaw, Vickie Walker, Michael J. Denton, Steve Clark Utilities: Steve Bagdadi, Gary Cypher Video Controller: Alexis Dellar Hanson

CBS “BULL” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Derick Underschultz Operators: Barnaby Shapiro, Doug Pellegrino Assistants: Roman Lukiw, Soren Nash, Mike Lobb, Trevor Wolfson Digital Imaging Tech: Gabe Kolodny Loaders: Wyatt Maker, Nialaney Rodriguez

BENEDICT WHITE, LLC “KNIVES OUT” Director of Photography: Steve Yedlin Operators: Dale Myrand, Terrence Hayes Assistants: Dan Schroer, Dan Mason, Felix Giuffrida Loader: Toshadeva Palani Still Photographer: Claire Folger

“CRAZY EX-GIRLFRIEND” SEASON 4 Director of Photography: Ian Dodd Operators: Shasta Spahn, Bonnie Blake, Taj Teffaha Assistants: Eric Dyson, Eric Wheeler, Freddy Rosado, Blake Hooks Digital Imaging Tech: Sam McConville Utility: James Dunham

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“NCIS: LOS ANGELES” SEASON 10 Director of Photography: Victor Hammer Operators: Terence Nightingall, Tim Beavers Assistants: Keith Banks, Richie Hughes, Peter Caronia, Jacqueline Nivens Steadicam Operators: Terence Nightingall, Tim Beavers Steadicam Assistants: Keith Banks, Richie Hughes Digital Imaging Tech: John Mills Digital Utility: Trevor Beeler
 Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe Publicist: Kathleen Tanji “NCIS: NEW ORLEANS” SEASON 5 Director of Photography: Gordon Lonsdale, ASC Operators: Jerry Jacob, Vincent Bearden, Tony Politis Assistants: Brouke Franklin, Peter Roome, Jeff Taylor, Dave Edwards, Toni Weick, Stephen Vicari Steadicam Operator: Vincent Bearden Digital Loader: Levi Wells Digital Utility: Kolby Heid “THE CODE” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Jimmy Lindsey Operators: Lawrence McConkey, Chris Scarafile Assistants: Scott Koenigsberg, Joseph Metzger, Dean Martinez, Jonathan Monk Digital Imaging Tech: Matthew Selkirk Loaders: James Abamont, Alyssa Longchamp Still Photographer: Mark Schafer


“THE GOOD FIGHT” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Fred Murphy Operators: Alec Jarnagin, Diana Matos Assistants: Rene Crout, Daniel Fiorito, Elizabeth Casinelli, Milly Itzhak Loaders: Vincent Laraway, Sancheev Ravichandran Still Photographer: Patrick Harbron “THE NEIGHBORHOOD” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Chris La Fountaine, ASC Operators: Bruce Reutlinger, George La Fountaine, Chris Wilcox, Kris Conde Assistants: Brian Lynch, Jeff Roth, Craig La Fountaine Digital Imaging Tech: Shaun Wheeler Camera Utility: Vicki Beck Video Controller: Andy Dickerman Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe “THE TALK” SEASON 9 Lighting Director: Marisa Davis Ped Operators: Art Taylor, Mark Gonzales, Ed Staebler Hand Held Operators: Ron Barnes, Kevin Michel, Jeff Johnson Jib Operator: Randy Gomez Head Utility: Charlie Fernandez Utilities: Mike Bushner, Doug Bain, Dean Frizzel, Bill Greiner, Jon Zuccaro Video Controller: Richard Strock Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe CMS PRODUCTIONS “RAMY” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Adrian Correia Operators: Claudio Rietti, Shannon Madden Assistants: Jon Cooper, Erik Kandefer, Grace Hendricks, Mabel Santos-Haugen Loader: Brandon Kelley Still Photographer: Barbara Nitke COLUMBIA “TOSH.0” SEASON 10 STAGE CREW Operator: Jason Cochard Camera Utilities: Benjamin Steeples, Kyle Kimbriel, Roger Cohen FIELD CREW Director of Photography: Andrew Huebscher Operator: Jason Cochard Assistants: Benjamin Steeples, Kyle Kimbriel, Roger Cohen, Delfina Garfias COLUMBIA “LITTLE WOMEN” Director of Photography: Yorick LeSaux Operator: Colin Hudson Assistants: Gregory Wimer, Jamieson Fizpatrick, Talia Krohmal, Autumn Moran Loader: Joshuah Weillbrenner Still Photographer: Wilson Webb CONACO “CONAN” SEASON 9 Operators: Ted Ashton, Nick Kober, Kosta Krstic, James Palczewski, Bart Ping, Seth Saint Vincent Head Utility: Chris Savage Utilities: Baron Johnson, Josh Gwilt

COOLER WATER PRODUCTIONS, LLC “EUPHORIA” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Marcell Rev, Drew Daniels Operator: Kristen Correll Assistants: Norris Fox, Jonathan Clark, Tulio Duenas, Gavin Grossi Digital Imaging Tech: Justin Steptoe Loader: Baird Steptoe, Jr. Utility: DeWayne Williams, Jr. CRANETOWN MEDIA, LLC “DICKINSON” Director of Photography: Tim Orr Operators: Jeffrey Dutemple, Arthur Africano Assistants: Gregory Finkel, Bradley Grant, Emma Rees-Scanlon, Suren Karapetyan Loader: Patrick McKeown Still Photographer: Michael Parmelee “LOST GIRLS” Director of Photography: Igor Martinovic Operators: Ari Issler, Chris Reynolds Assistants: Zach Rubin, Pedro Corcega, Gregory Pace, Matthew Montalto Digital Imaging Tech: Robert Cauble Loader: Jessica Cele-Nazario Still Photographer: Jessica Kourkounis “THE RANCH” SEASON 4 Director of Photography: Donald A. Morgan, ASC Operators: Brian Armstrong, Randy Baer, Chris Hinojosa, Michelle Crenshaw Assistants: Don Davis, Missy Toy, Vito De Palma, Adan Torres, Al Myers Digital Imaging Tech/Video Controller: Rick Dungan Camera Utilities: Erinn Bell, Steve Masias DC COMICS “DOOM PATROL” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Chris Manley, Noah Greenberg Operators: Tim Fabrizio, Ross Sebek Assistants: Ryan Weisen, Paul Saunders, Jackson McDonald, Sagar Desai Digital Imaging Tech: Jonny Revolt Digital Utility: Torey Lenart Loader: Caroline Oelkers DEADNOUGHT HT, LC “HONEST THIEF” Director of Photography: Shelly Johnson Operator: Jeff Muhlstock Assistants: Nolan Ball, Scott Lebeda, Samuel Lusted, Matthew Dorris Still Photographer: Dana Starbard DELTA FILMS, LLC “HARRIET” Director of Photography: John Toll, ASC Operator: Kim Marks Assistants: Christopher Toll, Dwight Campbell, Terry Wolcott, Eric Eaton Digital Imaging Tech: Maninder Saini Loader: Rinny Wilson Still Photographer: Glen Wilson DIVA GAMES, LLC “GAMES DIVAS PLAY” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Frank Perl Operators: Hilton Goring, Tony Gutierrez Assistants: Alaina McManus, Cristina Arboleda, Mark Reilly, Aldo Porras

Digital Imaging Tech: Oliver Mancebo Digital Utility: Missy Burgess Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe ECHO LAKE ENTERTAINMENT “ALL THE BRIGHT PLACES” Director of Photography: Rob Givens Operator: Brian Freesh Assistants: Nicolas Martin, Chris Jones, Alan Certeza, Joseph Bou Digital Imaging Tech: CJ Miller UNDERWATER UNIT Operator: David William McDonald ENJOY IT, INC. “BROCKMIRE” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Adam Bricker Operators: Parker Tolifson, Ben Verhulst Assistants: Dan Turek, Nick Montalvo, Mary-Margaret Porter, Kyle Simmons, Violet Jackson Steadicam Operator: Ben Verhulst Camera Utility: Marshall Johnson Digital Utility: Sam Chun EYE PRODUCTIONS, INC. “BLUE BLOODS” SEASON 9 Director of Photography: Gene Engels Operators: Stephen Consentino, Geoff Frost Assistants: Graham Burt, Jacob Stahlman, Chris Seehase, Kenny Martell Digital Imaging Tech: Ryan Heide Loaders: Neicy McFadden, Caleb Keeler “ELEMENTARY” SEASON 7 Director of Photography: Thomas Houghton, ASC Operators: Carlos Guerra, Jeremy Weishaar Assistants: Jason Cleary, Charlie Foerschner, Kyle Blackman, Patrick O’Shea Loaders: Dylan Endyke, Ryan Haddon Still Photographer: Elizabeth Fisher “HAWAII FIVE-0” SEASON 9 Directors of Photography: Kurt Jones, Newton TerMeer Operators: Greg Lundsgaard, Jim Jost Assistants: Jeff Pelton, Kanoa Dahlin, Ulysses Domalaon, Brandon Ho, Mike Prioste, Will Wacha Digital Imaging Tech: David Crans Loader: Ryan Charlton-Halweg Digital Utility: Geraldo Morales “MADAM SECRETARY” SEASON 5 Director of Photography: Learan Kahanov Operators: Jamie Silverstein, Peter Vietro-Hannum Assistants: Heather Norton, Jamie Fitzpatrick, Amanda Rotzler, Damon LeMay Digital Imaging Tech: Keith Putnam Loaders: Christopher Patrikis, Kristina Lally Still Photographer: Mark Schafer “MACGYVER” SEASON 3 Directors of Photography: Mike Martinez, James L. Carter, ASC Operators: Ian Forsyth, Allen D. Easton, Paul Krumper Assistants: Al Cohen, Stefan Vino-Figueroa, Trevor Rios, Easton Harper, Mike Torino, Danny Vanzura Steadicam Operator: Ian Forsyth

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Digital Imaging Tech: Greg VanZyck Utility: Tyler Bastianson “MAGNUM P.I.” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Krishna Rao, Rodney Charters, ASC Operators: Keith Jordan, Jay Herron, Scott Mason Assistants: Tony Nagy, Rylan Akama, Brian Mastumura, Zeke Hanohano, Tommy Lewis, Sal Alvarez Digital Imaging Tech: Caleb Lucero Loader: Kilani Villiaros Digital Utility: Blane Eguchi FOX 21 “THE CHI” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Abraham Martinez Operators: Garret Benson, Richard Crow Assistants: Paul DeMarte, Rachel Donofrie, Michael Fierros, J’mme Love Loader: Brian Kilborn Utility: Josh Smith Still Photographer: Parrish Lewis HBO “DEADWOOD” Director of Photography: David Klein, ASC Operators: John Johyce, Dean Morin, Joel Perkal Assistants: Dominik Mainl, Stephen Taylor-Wehr, Joshua Greer, John Carreon, Otis Sherman, Chris Burket Steadicam Operator: John Joyce Steadicam Assistant: Dominik Mainl Loader: Nicola Caruso Digital Utility: Stephen Ling Still Photographer: Warrick Page “VEEP” SEASON 7 Director of Photography: David Miller Operators: Bo Webb, Josh Williamson, Johnny Martin, April Kelley Assistants: Mark Figueroa, Greg Kurtz, Aaron Bowen, Will Evans, Tony Martin, Chris Garland, Maryan Zurek, Tyler Ernst Digital Loader: Rachel Mangum Digital Utility: Luigi Ventura Still Photographer: Colleen E. Hayes

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HOLD FAST PRODUCTIONS “BOSCH” SEASON 5 Directors of Photography: Michael McDonough, Theo Van de Sande, ASC Operators: Nicholas Davidoff, Dan Coscina Assistants: Danny Brown, Mike Thomas, Tim Hennessy, Kokoro Lee Steadicam Operator: Nicholas Davidoff Loader: Bob Campi Utility: Jake Schultz Still Photographers: Aaron Epstein, Ron Jaffe HORIZON SCRIPTED TELEVISION, INC. “ANDI MACK” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Matthew Williams Operator: Scott Hoffman Assistants: John Williams, David Rhineer, Kurtis Burr, Nick Nebeker Steadicam Operator: Scott Hoffman Digital Imaging Tech: Sean McAllister “DAVID MAKES MAN” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Todd A. Dos Reis, ASC Operators: Robert Scott, Grayson Austin Assistants: Kevin Smith, Steven Latham, Julianna Junker, Ognjen Sarovic Steadicam Operator: Grayson Austin Steadicam Assistant: Steven Latham Digital Utility: Jaime Striby HUCKLEBERRY INDUSTRIES “HUCKLEBERRY” Directors of Photography: Greig Fraser, ASC, ACS, Baz Idoine Operators: Craig Cockerill, Karina Silva Assistants: Paul Metcalf, Amanda Levy, Niranjan Martin, Jeremy Cannon Digital Imaging Tech: Eduardo Eguia Digital Utility: Robby Marino 2ND UNIT Director of Photography: Ryley Brown IT’S A LAUGH PRODUCTIONS “SYDNEY TO THE MAX” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: George Mooradian, ASC, Tom Eckelberry Operators: Ken Herft, Cory Gunter, Tom Conkright, Jack Chisholm,

Vince Singletary Camera Utilities: Terry Gunter, Kate Steinhebel Digital Utilities: Mike Pusatere, Monica Schad Video Controllers: Keith Anderson, Brian Dodds Still Photographer: Ron Tom JAY SQUARED PRODUCTIONS, LLC “BLINDSPOT” SEASON 4 Directors of Photography: Andrew Priestley, Jon Delgado Operators: Pyare Fortunato, Peter Ramos, John Romer Assistants: Andrew Smith, Aleksandr Allen, Kyle Clark, Christian Bright, Bryant Bailey, Deborah Fastuca, Kjerstin Rossi, Darnell McDonald Steadicam Operator: Pyare Fortunato Digital Imaging Tech: Chloe Walker Still Photographer: Phil Caruso “MANIFEST” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Timothy Norman, Brad Smith Operator: Jeff Muhlstock Assistants: Robert Mancuso, Adriana Brunetto-Lipman, Michael DeRario, Amber Rosales Loaders: Matthew Richards, Cory Maffucci Still Photographers: Giovanni Rufino, Christopher Saunders, Phillip Caruso LADY PRISON PRODUCTIONS, INC. “ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK” SEASON 7 Director of Photography: Ludovic Littee Operators: Scott Tinsley, Rebecca Arndt Assistants: Beka Venezia, James Daly, Justin Mancuso, Maxwell Sloan Digital Imaging Tech: Andrew Nelson Loader: Joshua Waterman Still Photographer: JoJo Whilden LATE SEVENTIES “MINDHUNTER” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Eric Messerschmidt Operators: Brian Osmond, William Dearborn Assistants: Alex Scott, David Edsall, Gary Bevans Loader: Liam Doyle Still Photographer: Merrick Morton


LIMITED PARTNERS, LLC “LIMITED PARTNERS” Director of Photography: Jas Shelton Operators: William O’Drobinak, Stewart Smith Assistants: Freddy Thomas, Max Junquera, Rodrigue Gomes, Hugh Braselton Steadicam Operator: Stewart Smith Steadicam Assistant: Max Junquera Digital Imaging Tech: Stuart Huggins Loader: Najee Rawlins Still Photographer: Eli Ade LWY PRODUCTIONS, LLC “LIVING WITH YOURSELF” Director of Photography: Yaron Orbach Operators: Jim McConkey, Charles Beyer Assistants: Basil Smith, Steven Search, Marvin Lee, Justin LeBlanc Loaders: Matthew Martin, David Gallagher Still Photographer: Eric Liebowitz MAIN GATE PRODUCTIONS, LLC “GOD FRIENDED ME” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Stefan Czapsky, ASC Operators: Thomas Schnaidt, Daniel Hersey Assistants: Blackford Shelton, Marcos Rodriguez-Quijano, Behnood Dadfar, Alfonso Diaz Digital Imaging Tech: Chandler Tucker Loaders: Miguel Gonzalez, Angel Vasquez Still Photographers: David Giesbrecht, Sarah Shatz MESQUITE PRODUCTIONS “FOR ALL MANKIND” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Stephen McNutt, ASC, Ross Berryman Operators: Tim Spencer, Mike McEveety Assistants: Stephen Pazanti, Haydn Pazanti, Jorge Pallares, Arthur Zajac Steadicam Operator: Tim Spencer Steadicam Assistant: Stephen Pazanti Digital Imaging Tech: Mike DeGrazzio Digital Utility: Robert Ruelas Still Photographer: Justin Lubin 2ND UNIT Director of Photography: Stephen McNutt, ASC Operators: Mike McEveety, Ron Schlaeger Assistants: Jorge Pallares, Arthur Zajac, Dave Erickson, Suzy Dietz Steadicam Operator: Mike McEveety Digital Imaging Tech: Steve Harnell “LA’S FINEST” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Robert Gantz Operators: Ian Fox, Jody Miller, Pete Romano Assistants: Jamie Felz, Casey Muldoon, James Barela, Luis Gomez, Mark Connelly Digital Imaging Tech: Kevin Britton Digital Loader: Kyle Jacobs Digital Utility: Claudio Banks Still Photographer: Nicole Wilder “SNEAKY P3TE” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Arthur Albert Operators: Nick Albert, Jordan Keslow Assistants: Ron Peterson, Casey Nearing, Greg Williams, Tamara Arroba Steadicam Operator: Jordan Keslow Loader: Sam Petrov Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe NY UNIT Assitants: Aileen Taylor, Joshua Waterman, Carlos Barbot

SET LIGHTING

MINIM PRODUCTIONS, INC. “DEVS” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Rob Hardy Operator: Grant Adams, SOC Assistants: Patrick McArdle, Ray Milazzo, Seth Gallagher, Blake Collins Steadicam Operator: Grant Adams, SOC Steadicam Assistant: Ray Milazzo Digital Imaging Tech: Natalie Carr Loader: Mike Prior Digital Utility: Zach Madden

“CHICAGO MED” SEASON 4 Director of Photography: Lex duPont, ASC Operators: Faires Anderson Sekiya, Chris Hood, Joe Tolitano Assistants: George Olson, Laura DeFiglio, Keith Hueffmeier, Patrick Dooley, Sam Knapp, Joey Richardson Steadicam Operator: Faires Anderson Sekiya Loader: Matt Brown Utility: Emmanuel Bansa Still Photographer: Liz Sisson

MAKE HAY, LLC “FIRST COW” Director of Photography: Christopher Blauvelt Assistants: Cameron Carey, Brian Tasker Steadicam Operator: Sam Naiman Digital Imaging Tech: Sean Goller Loader: Laura Roe Still Photographer: Allyson Riggs

“CHICAGO PD” SEASON 6 Director of Photography: James Zucal Operators: Scott Dropkin, SOC, Darryl Miller, Seth Thomas Assistants: John Young, Don Carlson, David “YT” Wightman, Jamison Acker, Phillip Walter, Kyle Belousek Steadicam Operator: Scott Dropkin, SOC Loader: Nick Wilson Utilities: Marion Tucker, Alan Dembek Still Photographer: Sandy Morris

NBC “CHICAGO FIRE” SEASON 7 Director of Photography: Lisa Wiegand, ASC Operators: Will Eichler, Vanessa Joy Smith Assistants: Luis Fowler, Zach Gannaway, Brian Romano, Gary Malouf Steadicam Operator: Will Eichler Digital Loader: Derek Ashbaugh Digital Utility: Amy Tomlinson Still Photographer: Elizabeth Morris

2ND UNIT Director of Photography: Darryl Miller “F.B.I.” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Tari Segal Operators: Afton Grant, Phil Oetiker Assistants: Lee Vickery, George Lookshire, Niknaz Tavakolian, Jorge Del Toro Steadicam Operator: Afton Grant

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Loaders: Amber Mathes, Nkem Umenyi Still Photographers: Michael Parmelee, Christopher Saunders “NEW AMSTERDAM” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Andrew Voegeli Operators: Julian Delacruz, Fabio Iadeluca Assistants: Alexander Worster, James Madrid, Samantha Silver, Stephen McBride Digital Imaging Tech: Luke Taylor Loaders: Jye-en Jeng, Lorenzo Zanini Still Photographers: Christopher Saunders, Will Hart “SUPERSTORE” SEASON 4 Director of Photography: Jay Hunter Operators: Adam Tash, Hassan Abdul-Wahid, Danny Nichols Assistants: Jason Zakrzewski, Brandon Margulies, Eric Jenkinson, Ryan Sullivan, Esta Garcia, Rikki Alarian Jones Loader: Grace Thomas “THE ENEMY WITHIN” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Frank Prinzi, ASC Operators: Todd Armitage, Jay Silver Assistants: Rory Hanrahan, Keitt, Sean Souza, Sebastian Iervolino Digital Imaging Tech: Lewis Rothenberg Loader: Brenton Ayers Still Photographer: Will Hart “THE VILLAGE” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: William Rexer Operators: Alan Mehlbrech, Matthew Pebler Assistants: Michael Burke, Michael Guthrie, Stephen McBride, Rachael Doughty Loadres: Anabel Caicedo, Brittany Jeliski “WILL & GRACE” SEASON 10 Director of Photography: Gary Baum, ASC Operators: Glenn Shimada, Travers Hill, Lance Billitzer, Ed Fine Assistants: Adrian Licciardi, Jeff Goldenberg, Alec Elizondo, Clint Palmer, Jason Herring Utilities: Danny Lorenze, Sean Askins Digital Imaging Tech: Derek Lantz Video Controller: Stuart Wesolik Still Photographer: Chris Haston NETFLIX “TRINKETS” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Jason Oldak Operators: Gary Camp, Shawn Sundby Assistants: Nicolas Wachter, Eric Macey, Devin Greenman, Rodrigo Melgarejo Steadicam Operator: Gary Camp Digital Imaging Tech: John Spellman Still Photographer: Allyson Riggs “UNTITLED HENRY JOOST/ARIEL SCHULMAN SCI-FI PROJECT” Director of Photography: Michael Simmonds Operators: Paul Daley, Chad Chamberlain Assistants: Justin Simpson, Cody Gautreau, Chris Flurry, Bryce Marshall Steadicam Operator: Chad Chamberlain Digital Loader: Zander White Camera Utility: Eric Van der Vynckt Still Photographer: Skip Bolden Publicist: Diane Slattery OBB PICTURES “HISTORICAL ROASTS” SEASON 1

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Operators: John Paul Meyer, Alejandro Lalinde, Dave Plakos Hand Held Operators: Danny Webb, Edward Wright Jib Operator: Ryan Elliott BTS: Brian Pratt Assistant: Liam Miller Digital Imaging Tech: Stuart Hammond Still Photographer: Lara Solanki OPEN 4 BUSINESS “SUITS SPIN-OFF” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Cort Fey Operators: Bud Kremp, Paige Thomas Assistants: Michael D. Alvarez, Doug Price, Summer Marsh, Rocio Meda Loader: Lindsey Gross Digital Utility: Hunter Jensen ORANGE CONE PRODUCTIONS “LEGACIES” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Michael Karasick, John Smith Operators: Reid Russell, Brian Davis Assistants: Rick Crumrine, Geran Daniels, Kelly Poor, Kyler Dennis Steadicam Operator: Reid Russell Digital Imaging Tech: Billy Mueller Digital Utility: Jesse Eagle PACIFIC 2.1 “FOSSE” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Timothy Ives Operators: Mark Schmidt, Wylda Bayron Assistants: Adriana Brunetto-Lipman, Rossana Rizzo, Amber Rosales, Mike Swearingen Loader: Julia Leach “THE POLITICIAN” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Nelson Cragg, ASC, Simon Dennis, BSC Operators: Andrew Mitchell, SOC, Wally Sweeterman, Nicole Lobell Assistants: Penny Sprague, Matt Brewer David Leb, Ben Perry, Jared Wilson, Nate Lewis, Shannon Van Metre, Spencer “Shweta” Shwetz Steadicam Operator: Andrew Mitchell Steadicam Assistant: Penny Sprague Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe PALLADIN PRODUCTIONS, LLC “RED LINE” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Kira Kelly Operators: Scott Thiele, Blaine Baker Assistants: Jason Bonner, Nina Pilar Portillo, Matt Rozek, Matthew Feasley Digital Imaging Tech: John Waterman Loader: Drew Fulton Digital Utility: Litong Zhen “SWAMP THING” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Pedro Luque Operators: Matthew Doll, Michael Repeta Assistants: Patrick Borowiak, Sean Yaple, Roy Knauf, Darwin Brandis Digital Imaging Tech: Andy Bader PARAMOUNT PICTURES “ISLAND PLAZA” Director of Photography: Claudio Miranda, ASC Operators: Chris Haarhoff, John Connor Assistants: Dan Ming, Bob Smathers, Mateo Bourdieu, Max DeLeo, Natasha Mullan,

Nathan Stern Steadicam Operator: Chris Haarhoff Digital Imaging Tech: Rohan Chitrakar Loader: Farisai Kambarami, Kalli Kouf Still Photographer: Scott Garfield Publicist: Michael Singer PICROW STREAMING, INC. “MODERN LOVE” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Yaron Orbach Operators: Philip Martinez, Lucas Owen Assistants: Waris Supanpong, Becki Heller, Randy Schwartz, Nathalie Rodriguez Loaders: Mateo Gonzalez, Brian Lynch Still Photographer: Christopher Saunders POSSIBLE PRODUCTIONS “BILLIONS” SEASON 4 Directors of Photography: Giorgio Scali, Alexander Dynan Operators: Peter Agliata, Mark Schmidt Assistants: Edwin Effrein, Cai Hall, Leonardo Gomez, Andrew Hamilton Digital Imaging Tech: Joe Belack Loaders: Kansas Ballesteros, Christopher Charmel “THE AFFAIR” SEASON 5 Directors of Photography: Steven Fierberg, ASC, Jim Denault, ASC Operators: Eric Schilling, Nicole Lobell Assistants: Michael Endler, Don Burghardt, Rudy Pahoyo, Robyn Buchanan Steadicam Operator: Eric Schilling Steadicam Assistant: Michael Endler Digital Imaging Tech: Kevn Celi Loader: Emily Goodwin Digital Utility: Glen Landry Still Photographer: Paul Sarkis PP21 PRODUCTIONS, LLC “BLACK LIGHTNING” SEASON 2 Directors of Photography: Scott Peck, Michael Watson Operators: Glen Brown, Fernando Reyes Assistants: Anthony Zibelli, Alan Newcomb, Alfredo Santiago, Rodell Francis Steadicam Operator: Glen Brown Steadicam Assistant: Anthony Zibelli Digital Imaging Tech: Justin Warren Digital Utility: Chandra Sudtelgte PRESENCE PICTURES, LLC “THE PLEASURE OF YOUR PRESENCE” Directors of Photography: Charles Libin Operator: Blake Johnson Assistant: Peter Westervelt SALT SRING MEDIA “ARE YOU SLEEPING” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Colin Watkinson (Pilot), Nicole Whitaker, Russ Alsobrook, ASC Operators: Josh Medak, Justin Browne Assistants: Niranjan Martin, Darin Necessary, Jeremy Cannon, Claudio Banks Steadicam Operator: Justin Browne Steadicam Assistant: Darin Necessary Digital Imaging Tech: Pat Paolo Digital Utility: Nicola Caruso SONY “JEOPARDY!” SEASON 35 Director of Photography: Jeff Engel Operators: Diane L. Farrell, SOC, Mike Tribble, Jeff Schuster,


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L. David Irete Jib Arm Operator: Marc Hunter Head Utility: Tino Marquez Camera Utility: Ray Thompson Video Controller: Gary Taillon Still Photographer: Carol Kaelson “SCHOOLED” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Steve Gainer Operators: Brian Shanley, Jonathan Goldfisher Assistants: Shereen Saleh, Kymm Swank, Joseph Cheung, Colleen Haley Digital Imaging Tech: Mike Bosman Digital Loader: Mimi Phan “THE GOLDBERGS” SEASON 6 Director of Photography: Jason Blount Operators: Scott Browner, Kris Denton Assistants: Tracy Davey, Nate Havens, Gary Webster, Jen Bell-Price Digital Imaging Tech: Kevin Mills Digital Utility: Dilshan Herath Still Photographers: Nicole Wilder, Adam Taylor “WHEEL OF FORTUNE” SEASON 36 Director of Photography: Jeff Engel Operators: Diane L. Farrell, SOC, Jeff Schuster, Ray Gonzales, Steve Simmons, L. David Irete, Mike Corwin Camera Utility: Ray Thompson Head Utility: Tino Marquez Video Controller: Gary Taillon Jib Arm Operator: Randy Gomez, Sr. Still Photographer: Carol Kaelson STALWART FILMS, LLC “NOS4A2” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Martin Ahlgren Operators: Alec Jarnagin, Edwin Rubio Assistants: Liz Silver, Robert Bullard, Richelle Topping, Chris Boylston Still Photographer: Dana Starbard STARS POWER, LLC “POWER” SEASON 6 Director of Photography: Mauricio Rubinstein Operators: Scott Maguire, Alan Mehlbrech Assistants: Michael Garofalo, Hamilton Longyear, Rodrigo Millan Garce, Alivia Borab Digital Imaging Tech: Douglas Horton Loader: Anjela Coviaux Still Photographer: Myles Aronowitz STARZ SWEETBITTER PRODUCTIONS, LLC “SWEETBITTER” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Radium Cheung, HKSC Operators: Justin Foster, David Kimelman Assistants: Gus Limberis, Glen Chin, Nicholas Koda, Ian Carmody Digital Imaging Tech: Malika Franklin Loaders: Calen Cooper, James Demetriou SUNDANCE NOW/AMC “THIS CLOSE” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Bruce Thierry Cheung Operator: David William McDonald Assistants: Cameron Owen, Kate Santore, Rose Licavoli, Robyn LoVecchio Still Photographer: Michael Moriatis THE CW NETWORK “JANE THE VIRGIN” SEASON 5 Directors of Photography: Lowell Peterson, ASC, Joe Gallo

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Operators: Rory Robert Knepp, SOC, Paul Plannette Assistants: John C. Flinn, IV, John Pouncey, Jai Corria, Don Burton Steadicam Operator: Rory Robert Knepp, SOC Stedicam Assitant: John C. Flinn, IV Camera Utility: Morgan Jenkins THE SECRET MOVIE, LLC “THE SECRET” Director of Photography: Andrew Dunn, BSC Operator: Michael Stumpf, Christopher Fisher Assistants: Rigney Sackley, Ry Kawanaka, Jonathan Robinson Steadicam Opertor: Michael Stumpf Steadicam Assistant: Ry Kawanaka Digital Utility: Mitch Orcino Still Photographer: Alfonso Bresciani TOPANGA PRODUCTIONS, INC. “SWAT” SEASON 2 Directors of Photography: Francis Kenny, ASC, Craig Fikse Operators: Tim Dolan, Brian Pitts, Michael Otis Ropert Assistants: Ryan Parks, Logan Turner, Thane Characky, Riley Padelford, Esther Woodworth, Mike Fauntleroy Camera Utility: Carl Lammi Loader: Jonathan Taylor Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe UNIVERSAL “GOOD GIRLS” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Tim Bellen Operators: Dave Hirshmann, Chris Haifley, Ana Amortegui Assistants: Steve Bellen, Jessica Ramos, Erik Emerson, Jennifer Stuart, Jim Nygren, Kristina Lechuga Digital Loader: Bryce Marraro Digital Utility: Sooz Edie Still Photographer: Justin Lubin “LAW & ORDER: SVU” SEASON 20 Director of Photography: Michael Green Operators: Brant Fagan, SOC, Mike Latino Assistants: Chris Del Sordo, Matt Balzarini, Emily Dumbrill, Justin Zverin Loader: Jason Raswant Still Photographer: Michael Parmelee “THE ACT” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Zachary Galler Operator: Danny Eckler Assistants: Josh Hancher, Saul McSween, Warren Brace, Aaron Willis Steadicam Operator: Danny Eckler Loader: Jennifer Braddock Digital Utility: Matt Nelson Still Photographer: Brownie Harris WARNER BROS. “ALL AMERICAN” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Nikhil Paniz Operators: Carlos Arguello, Eric Laudadio Assistants: Jon Jung, Jeff Lam, Jon Lindsay “BIG BANG THEORY” SEASON 12 Director of Photography: Steven V. Silver, ASC Operators: John Dechene, Richard Price, SOC, Jamie Hitchcock, Brian Armstrong Assistants: Nigel Stewart, Chris Hinojosa, Steve Lund, Meggins Moore, Whitney Jones Camera Utilities: Colin Brown, Jeannette Hjorth

Video Controller: John O’Brien Digital Imaging Tech: Benjamin Steeples Still Photographer: Michael Yarish Publicist: Marc Klein “JOKER AKA ROMEO” NY UNIT Director of Photography: Lawrence Sher Operator: Geoffrey Haley Assistants: Craig Pressgrove, Joseph Metzger, Tony Coan, Sarah Guenther Digital Imaging Tech: Nicholas Kay Loader: Carolyn Wills Digital Utility: Keith Anderson Still Photographers: Glen Wilson, Nico Tavernise “LETHAL WEAPON” SEASON 3 Directors of Photography: Andy Strahorn, William Wages, ASC Operators: Victor Macias, Joseph Broderick Assistants: James Rydings, Kaoru “Q” Ishizuka, Troy Blischok, Kelsey Castellitto Digital Imaging Tech: Peter Russ Digital Utility: Spencer Shwetz Still Photographers: Ron Jaffe, John P. Fleenor 2ND UNIT Director of Photography: Brian Pearson, ASC Operator: Stefan von Bjorn Assistants: Carlos Doerr, Phil Shanahan, Ron Elliot Digital Imaging Tech: Scott Resnick Camera Utility: Nicholas Martin UNDERWATER UNIT Operator: David William McDonald Assistant: Corey Bringas “MOM” SEASON 6 Director of Photography: Steven V. Silver, ASC Operators: Cary McCrystal, Jamie Hitchcock, Larry Gaudette, Candy Edwards Assistants: Meggins Moore, R. Nigel Stewart, Damian Della Santina, Mark Johnson, Whitney Jones Camera Utilities: Alicia Brauns, Andrew Pauling Video Controller: Kevin Faust Digital Imaging Tech: Benjamin Steeples Still Photographer: Darren Michaels Publicist: Marc Klein “THE PERFECTIONISTS” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Larry Reibman Operators: Matt Moriarty, Phil Anderson Assistants: Kyril Cvetkov, Jerry Turner, Mike Crockett, Patrick LaValley Steadicam Operator: Matt Moriarty Steadicam Assistant: Kyril Cvetkov Digital Imaging Tech: Sean Rawls Loader: Jasmine Karcey Still Photographer: Allyson Riggs “YOUNG SHELDON” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Buzz Feitshans, IV Operators: Neil Toussaint, SOC, Aaron Schuh Assistants: Matthew Del Ruth, Grant Yellen, Brad Gilson, Jr., Megan Boundy Steadicam Operator: Aaron Schuh Digital Loader: James Cobb Utilities: Rudy Pahoyo, Joe Sutera, Holden Lorenz Still Photographers: Robert Voets, Michael Desmond, Darren Michaels



“WHAT/IF” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Jeffrey C. Mygatt Operators: Benjamin Spek, Joel Schwartz Assistants: Dennis Seawright, Dale White, Steven Magrath, Dustin Keller Steadicam Operator: Benjamin Spek Loader: Leslie Kolter Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe DOUBLE UP UNIT Dir. of Photography: Joel Schwartz WOODBRIDGE PRODUCTIONS “THE BLACKLIST” SEASON 6 Directors of Photography: Michael Caracciolo, Saade Mustafa Operators: Derek Walker, Devin Ladd, Jack Donnelly, Peter Reniers Assistants: Daniel Casey, James Gourley, Gareth Manwaring, Edwin Herrera Mike Guaspari, Edgar Velez Loaders: Katheryn Iuele, James Parsons Still Photographers: Christopher Saunders, Will Hart, Virginia Sherwood YALE “SEPERATION” Director of Photography: Karl Walter Lindenlaub, ASC Operators: Leland Krane, Axel Ebermann Assistants: Bryan Heffernan, Rob Agulo Steadicam Operator: Axel Ebermann Digital Imaging Tech: Hunter Fairstone

COMMERCIALS ALCHEMY “VISTAPRINT” Operator: Joe Lavalle Digital Imaging Tech: Ian Buchanan ARTS & SCIENCES “ARBY’S” Director of Photography: Peter Donahue Operators: Chris Haarhoff, Ian Clampett Assistants: Conrad Castor, Joseph Canon, Adam Newell Digital Imaging Tech: Adrian Jebef BISCUIT FILMWORKS “FOOT LOCKER” Director of Photography: Isaac Bauman Operator: Ian Mosely Duffy Assistants: Jim Mayfield, Tim Kane, Andy Hensler Digital Imaging Tech: Mariusz Cichon CAVIAR “H&R BLOCK” Director of Photography: Tim Hudson Assistants: Erik Stapelfeldt, Daisy Smith Digital Imaging Tech: Eric Yu

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CENTRAL FILMS “TOYOTA” Director of Photography: Eric Schmidt Operators: Ian Clampett, Gilbert Salas, Chris Bottoms Assistants: Dennis Lynch, Luis Suarez, Nicole Martinez, Delfina Garfias, Victor Chon Digital Imaging Tech: Calvin Reibman Remote Head Tech/Operator: Peter Tommasi CMS “MACNEIL AUTOMOTIVE PRODUCTS LIMITED ELEVATOR” Director of Photography: Rob Hauer Assistants: Dave June, Jai Mansson Steadicam Operator: Beau Chaput Drone Operator: Michael Monar Drone Assistant: Charlie Anderson Digital Imaging Tech: Eric Almond “OAKLEY PRIZM” Director of Photography: Michael Lawrence Movi Operator: Neil Maciejewski Assistants: Lucas Deans, Dennis Rogers, Aaron Kirby “TOM FORD” Director of Photography: David Devlin Assistants: Ethan McDonald, Marcus Del Negro Digital Imaging Tech: Daniel Satinoff Phantom Tech: Matt Drake “VIZIO” Director of Photography: Mihai Malaimare Operator (Underwater): Ian Takahashi Assistants: Ethan McDonald, Peter Lee (Water Tech), Marcus Del Negro Digital Imaging Tech: Adrian Jebef Utility: Mike Kowalczyk COMPANY “INDIANA FARM BUREAU INSURANCE” Director of Photography: Giles Dunning Assistants: Nito Serna, Noah Glazer Digital Imaging Tech: Scott Beckley GIFTED YOUTH “JETBLUE” Director of Photography: Jeff Powers Assistants: Tom Arsenault, Logan Hall Digital Imaging Tech: Tim Gaer HOUND CONTENT “ASPEN DENTAL YES-TIMONIALS” Director of Photography: Zak Mulligan Assistants: Salvador Vega, Nicholas Martin, Scott Whitbread Steadicam Operators: Jeff Nolde, Liam Clark Loaders: Natalie Abraham, Michelle Baker ICONOCLAST “GOOGLE PHOTOS” Director of Photography: Rachel Morrison, ASC Assistants: Matt Stenerson, Dawn Nakamura Digital Imaging Techs: Francesco Sauta, Steve Harnell O POSITIVE “WELLNOW URGENT CARE” Director of Photography: Larry Fong, ASC Operator: Ian Clampett Assistants: Ray Milazzo, Dennis Lynch, Blake Collins Digital Imaging Tech: Steve Harnell

PECUBU PRODUCTIONS “NIKE” Director of Photography: Roman Vas’Yanov Assistants: Leo Abraham, Mariela Ferrer Digital Imaging Tech: Steve Harnell PRETTYBIRD “OIKOS” Directors of Photography: Brian Burgoyne, Joe Maxwell (Table Top) Operator: Timothy Gillis Assistants: Shaun Mayor, Jule Fontana, George Hesse (Table Top) Digital Imaging Tech: Francesco Sauta PULSE “AMERIPRISE” Director of Photography: Ross McLennan Drone Operator: Marcel Melanson Assistants: Conrad Castor, John Parson Digital Imaging Tech: Steve Harnell RADICAL MEDIA “GET OUT INITIATIVE” Director of Photography: Ben Kutchins Assistant: Gabe Napolitano Digital Imaging Tech: Daniel Vignal RESET “LINCOLN MOTOR COMPANY CAR WASH” Director of Photography: Martin Ahlgren Assistants: David Erickson, Suzy Dietz, Bryan Haigh Digital Imaging Tech: Steve Harnell Phantom Tech: Brannon Brown SPARE PARTS “MDM PROMO” Director of Photography: Anghel Decca Assistants: John Scivoletto, Liam Miller, Ben Brady Utility: Mike McGee STATION FILM “CHARTER” Director of Photography: Kip Bogdahn Operator: Jon Hokanson Assistants: John Clemens, Thomas Greco, Scott Miller Digital Imaging Tech: George Robert Morse SUPERLOUNGE “VALLEY TOYOTA” Director of Photography: Mike Svitak Assistants: Brad Rochlitzer, Jordan Martin Digital Imaging Tech: Bret Suding TOOL “PAPA MURPHY’S” Director of Photography: Andy Lilien Operator: Ian Clampett Assistants: Nate Cummings, Baird Steptoe, Kyle Sauer Digital Imaging Tech: Jamie Metzger “COX HOMELIFE” Director of Photography: Autumn Durald Assistant: Garret Curtis, Lawrence Lim Digital Imaging Tech: Mike Kowalczyk UNTITLED, INC. “CIGNA” Director of Photography: Phedon Papamichael, ASC Operator: Ken Fisher


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Assistants: Chris Slany, Bram Weinkselbaum, Ivan Acero, Steve Mattson Steadicam Operator: Luke Rocheleau Digital Imaging Techs: Matthew Love, Steve Harnell “MAZDA” Director of Photography: Greg Daniels Assistants: Kristi Arnds, Liam Miller Digital Imaging Tech: Kyle Hollar WONDROS “XCEL ENERGY” Director of Photography: Maz Makhani Assistants: George Hesse, Joe Solari Digital Imaging Tech: Daniel Applegate WORLD WAR SEVEN “SPRINT” Director of Photography: Giles Dunning Operators: John Veleta, Vincent Foeillet Assistants: Nito Serna, Jason Alegre, Noah Glazer, Kevin Miles Digital Imaging Tech: Scott Beckley

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STO P M OTIO N / /

JESSICA KOURKOUNIS IT’S HARD TO PUT INTO WORDS HOW AMAZING IT WAS TO WORK ON GLASS. IT WAS MY FIRST GIG AS A UNIT PHOTOGRAPHER AFTER NEARLY 20 YEARS AS A PHOTOJOURNALIST. MY PREVIOUS WORK EXPERIENCE WAS ALL ABOUT BEING TRUSTED FIRST AND THEN BEING INVISIBLE, AND IT MADE THE TRANSITION TO BEING ON SET REALLY SMOOTH. WORKING WITH SAMUEL L. JACKSON WAS TRULY SPECIAL. HE WAS VERY GENEROUS WITH HIS TIME, LETTING ME CAPTURE EVERY MOMENT I NEEDED.

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