ICG Magazine - December 2018 - The Indie Issue

Page 1

ICG MAGAZINE B VICE

U |

M THE

OTHER

B SIDE

L OF

E THE

B WIND

|

E G E N E RAT I O N

E NEXT




CINE GEAR EXPO 4

LOS ANGELES 2019 FILM COMPETITION MAY 30 EXHIBITS MAY 31 - JUNE 1 MASTER CLASSES JUNE 2 LOS ANGELES CONVENTION CENTER | LA LIVE EXHIBITS | SEMINARS | DEMONSTRATIONS NETWORKING | SPECIAL EVENTS FOR FULL DETAILS GO TO WWW.CINEGEAREXPO.COM


“LINUS SANDGREN’S

GORGEOUS CINEMATOGR APHY

LEAVES YOU OFTEN FORGETTING TO TAKE A BREATH.” AWARDS CIRCUIT

F O R

YO U R

C O N S I D E R AT I O N

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

LINUS SANDGREN FSF

universalpicturesawards.com

© 2018 UNIVERSAL STUDIOS


10 ISSUES ONLY $32* SUBSCRIBE ONLINE @ICGMAGAZINE.COM *US RESIDENTS ONLY USE PROMO CODE PROICG06


F O R

Y O U R

C O N S I D E R A T I O N

I N

A L L

C A T E G O R I E S

S CR EENPL AY BY ER IC RO T H A ND BR A DL E Y C OOPER & W IL L F E T T ER S DIR EC T ED BY BR A DL E Y C OOPER


C

O

N

T

E

N

T

S

DECEMBER 2 0 1 8

48

58 THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND Orson Welles’ final opus, The Other Side of the Wind, finally makes it to theaters – as complex, messy, and stunning as its creator’s life.

BUMBLEBEE

Enrique Chediak, ASC buzzes the Transformers franchise in a new direction with this girl-meets-bot friendship story.

68

SPECIALS GENERATION NEXT / 78

Diversity of experience and passion of heart define this year’s group of up-and-coming Guild members.

DEPARTMENTS GEAR GUIDE / 18 FIRST LOOK / 28 ZOOM-IN / 32 DEPTH OF FIELD / 36 EXPOSURE / 42 PRODUCTION CREDITS / 100 STOP MOTION / 116 8

VICE Dick Cheney was at the heart of American government for more than three decades; a new film by Oscar-winner Adam McKay brings the power broker out of the shadows.


F O R

Y O U R

C O N S I D E R A T I O N

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN CINEMATOGRAPHY THEATRICAL RELEASE

ALFONSO CUARÓN

“★★★★★

A COMPLETE TRIUMPH. EVERY SCENE, EVERY CHARACTER AND EVERY SHOT

HAS BEEN NURTURED WITH LOVING CARE. AT TIMES INTIMATE, AT OTHER TIMES RESOUNDINGLY EPIC.” PETER BRADSHAW, THE GUARDIAN

9


Photo by Scott Alan Humbert

P R E S I D E N T ’ S L E T T E R

NOT SO FIXED IN POST It’s all starting to pile up again at the end of the year. The merry-go-round ride began with the wonderful celebration of ICG’s Emerging Cinematographers at Camerimage, the premiere film festival for our craft, held November 10-17 in Poland. Opening Night this year showcased the work of two talented Guild cinematographers, with Julian Schnabel’s new feature about Vincent Van Gogh, At Eternity’s Gate, shot by Benoît Delhomme, and David Lowery’s The Old Man & the Gun, shot by Joe Anderson (who is profiled on page 22 of this issue). Concurrent with Camerimage, an ocean away in Hollywood, are the HPA Awards, honoring our industry’s post-production community, which then quickly gives way to the frenzy of Awards Season events – the ASC (the oldest professional organization in the motion picture business and celebrating it’s 100th anniversary in 2019), SOC, Publicist’s Awards (this 56th edition will move forward for the first time without its beloved chairman and five-time Publicists Guild president Henri Bollinger, who passed away last summer) and the Oscars – all of which carry a great impact for our community. Although each of these events (save for the Publicists Awards) tends to honor individuals on specific projects, the honors are an affirmation and validation of the many crew people who help support the craft of visual storytelling, always striving to create results that are beautiful and simple in their purity and effect, on whatever platform they will be consumed – large screen, home display, mobile phone, laptop, etc. And on this point – the final product that is put before an audience – I need to speak out. We as cinematographers typically get to supervise, and are intimately involved in, the final color grading of a premiere release. But I’ve noticed an unfortunate trend that is at best problematic and, at worst, disastrous for the preservation of creative intent. In subsequent mastering and remastering, for various formats, we cinematographers are often not brought into the picture. (No pun intended.) Most often we are not even considered to be part of the process. I offer

10

two personal experiences as evidence of this trend – one done right, the other horrendously wrong. I recently showed two of my past features in a class, both of which were released on Blu-ray, and both of whose initial print releases I was able to have supervised. I hadn’t seen either of the films in years. I was pleasantly surprised when I put the first Bluray in the player and it looked quite good, presented on a large digital display at the school. When it came time to see the second film, one I was extremely proud of, I was appalled at what spit out before my eyes. My first thought was: “Whoever remastered this film must have been blind!” To take a dark, mob-infested story and make it look like an old-fashioned TV comedy seemed criminal. I would understand if the original artist were no longer alive; but I’m clearly still here (and quite upset)! It makes no sense for a company that spends money finding the original film elements, re-masters the project, and markets a home release to the public, to not want to potentially maximize every aspect of its effort. I don’t know a single cinematographer who wouldn’t jump at the opportunity to recreate and enhance the work he or she spent so much time and effort creating. It only says to me that the producers and companies involved in this part of our industry have no idea of the value of the work that we do. Any project that is re-released or remastered for different markets represents the work of every single union crewmember, not just Local 600, of course; and the visual quality of that product is directly proportional to our careers and earning potential in many ways. Technology is developing to help with these kinds of situations – the use of color-management systems like ACES and the ASC-CDL system, and advanced HDR displays on set, may well be game-changers in our quest to preserve creative intent. But whatever new technology comes down the road, it all begins with the respect and affirmation of the value of the work of Local 600 members, indeed every union crew person, and their essential contribution. What’s good and right for one cinematographer’s work is good for all.

Steven Poster, ASC National President International Cinematographers Guild IATSE Local 600


M4-AXIS ATGIMBAL RIX


December 2018 vol. 89 no. 10

Publisher Teresa Muñoz Executive Editor David Geffner Art Director Wes Driver EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Tyler Bourdeau STAFF WRITER Pauline Rogers ACCOUNTING Glenn Berger Dominique Ibarra COPY EDITORS Peter Bonilla Maureen Kingsley CONTRIBUTORS Ted Elrick Matt Kennedy Margot Lester Kevin Martin

INTERNATIONAL CINEMATOGRAPHERS GUILD Local 600 IATSE NATIONAL PRESIDENT Steven Poster, ASC NATIONAL VICE-PRESIDENT Heather Norton 1ST NATIONAL VICE-PRESIDENT Paul Varrieur 2ND NATIONAL VICE-PRESIDENT John Lindley, ASC NATIONAL SECRETARY-TREASURER Eddie Avila NATIONAL ASSISTANT SECRETARY-TREASURER Douglas C. Hart NATIONAL SERGEANT-AT-ARMS Christy Fiers NATIONAL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Rebecca Rhine

PUBLICATIONS & PUBLICITY COMMITTEE Spooky Stevens, Chair

CIRCULATION OFFICE 7755 Sunset Boulevard Hollywood, CA 90046 Tel: (323) 876-0160 Fax: (323) 878-1180 Email: circulation@icgmagazine.com

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES WEST COAST & CANADA Rombeau, Inc. Sharon Rombeau Tel: (818) 762 – 6020 Fax: (818) 760 – 0860 Email: sharonrombeau@gmail.com EAST COAST, EUROPE, & ASIA Alan Braden, Inc. Alan Braden Tel: (714) 846 – 7147 Fax: (714) 846 – 8271 Email: alanbradenmedia@gmail.com

ADVERTISING POLICY: Readers should not assume that any products or services advertised in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine are endorsed by the International Cinematographers Guild. Although the Editorial staff adheres to standard industry practices in requiring advertisers to be “truthful and forthright,” there has been no extensive screening process by either International Cinematographers Guild Magazine or the International Cinematographers Guild. EDITORIAL POLICY: The International Cinematographers Guild neither implicitly nor explicitly endorses opinions or political statements expressed in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. ICG Magazine considers unsolicited material via email only, provided all submissions are within current Contributor Guideline standards. All published material is subject to editing for length, style and content, with inclusion at the discretion of the Executive Editor and Art Director. Local 600, International Cinematographers Guild, retains all ancillary and expressed rights of content and photos published in ICG Magazine and icgmagazine.com, subject to any negotiated prior arrangement. ICG Magazine regrets that it cannot publish letters to the editor. ICG (ISSN 1527-6007) Ten issues published annually by The International Cinematographers Guild 7755 Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, CA, 90046, U.S.A. Periodical postage paid at Los Angeles, California. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ICG 7755 Sunset Boulevard Hollywood, California 90046 Copyright 2018, by Local 600, International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employes, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States and Canada. Entered as Periodical matter, September 30, 1930, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under the act of March 3, 1879. Subscriptions: $88.00 of each International Cinematographers Guild member’s annual dues is allocated for an annual subscription to International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. Non-members may purchase an annual subscription for $48.00 (U.S.), $82.00 (Foreign and Canada) surface mail and $117.00 air mail per year. Single Copy: $4.95 The International Cinematographers Guild Magazine has been published monthly since 1929. International Cinematographers Guild Magazine is a registered trademark.

www.icgmagazine.com www.icg600.com


HYDRASCOPE

THE

LAND AIR WATER

15’, 20’, 32’, 43’,

ACADEMY SCI TECH AWARD WINNER

2018

51’ & 73’

CREATING M O M E N T S THROUGH MOVEMENT

www.chapman-leonard.com | @chapman_leonard HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA (888) 883-6559 | UNITED KINGDOM & EUROPE +44 1 727 838424 LOUISIANA, NEW MEXICO, TEXAS, & GEORGIA (888) 758-4826 | FLORIDA (888) 337-8243


W A

I N

F

D G

L

E E

or our December issue, themed around independent cinema, I can’t think of a filmmaker who better fits the definition of that term than the late, great Orson Welles. The original “triple threat” (back when that meant movies, theater, and radio) was fearless when it came to pushing the boundaries of narrative filmmaking. And he was helped along, most notably in his smashing debut feature, Citizen Kane, by one of the industry’s most revered cinematographers, Gregg Toland, ASC, as well as a host of other directors of photography in the few other movies he finished under a studio banner ­– The Magnificent Ambersons, The Stranger, The Lady From Shanghai – shot respectively by Stanley Cortez, ASC; Russell Metty, ASC, and Charles Lawton, Jr., ASC; and Joseph Walker, ASC. All those films chafed at a 1940’s Hollywood system yet to acknowledge the director as a prime creative author. Having run his own theater company, Welles was loath to cede control to studio executives; by default, he pioneered an indie-film model that would not become popular for another twentyplus years, using a small team of artists and craftspeople from one project to another. Once Welles broke free of Hollywood, choosing to self-finance under seriously egregious terms, his filmmaking went full-on rogue. What came forth was often experimental work like Othello, The Trial, Touch of Evil, and my personal favorite, Chimes at Midnight, whose Falstaff seems, in hindsight, the closest character to the great man himself. All of these films had terrific DP’s, but there may have been no cinematographer more committed to Welles’ genius than the late Gary Graver, who shot The Other Side of the Wind, a film Welles began in 1970 and worked on until his death in 1985. The Other Side of the Wind, which Netflix recently released in theaters and on its streaming platform, was held in legal limbo for decades, even as Graver (and Welles’ longtime creative muse, Oja Kodar) tried to bring it to fruition. Having seen The Other Side of the Wind pre-release at Netflix’s buzzing Hollywood tech hive (unfortunately in HD on a 55-in.

monitor and not projected), I can confidently say Graver (who later had success as an adult-film director!) was all in. The faux documentary style, which Welles played with his whole career dating back to Kane, freely switches color, tone, framing, and lensing, like a reality show on steroids. The dialogueless film-within-a-film, framed for 1.85 with stunning day exteriors in L.A. desert locations and nighttime scenes in Hollywood, was probably Welles’ send-up of European art cinema influencing directors of that era. Either way, Graver (and operator Billy Weaver) had their hands filled trying to capture Welles’ brilliance on a budget so fragile, one investor later embezzled most of it. When Graver passed away in 2006, Welles lost an advocate for his final opus. And yet, as revealed in Kevin Martin’s feature (page 52), more heroes emerged to take his place, chief among them producers Frank Marshall and Filip Jan Rymsza, who hired editor Bob Murawski (a longtime creative partner of Sam Raimi). While the original 16mm and 35mm footage was being digitized to 4K, Murawski played detective, researching Wind’s history at the Welles Library at the University of Michigan. Other industry heroes – ILM’s John Knoll, Supervising sound editor Daniel Saxlid, dialog editor Anna MacKenzie and [re-recording] mixer Scott Millan – helped flesh out Welles’ creative intent. Director Peter Bogdanovich, who plays the young heir apparent to John Huston’s aging auteur in the movie, never ceased agitating for Wind’s completion. Audiences will form their own opinions about The Other Side of the Wind, which considered in its own timeframe may be as prescient and daring as Kane, Touch of Evil and other groundbreaking Welles’ films, if not as narratively compelling. Perhaps the biggest lesson to be learned from the totality of Welles’ work is how essential the art of failure (or the lack of fear to try) remains in our industry. As Apple’s famous “Think Different” campaign intoned 20 years before Wind was finally released, “…the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.”

CONTRIBUTORS

Matt Kennedy

(The Darkest Knight, Stop Motion) “Alfred Stieglitz once said, ‘Wherever there is light, one can photograph.’ We, as filmmakers, are constantly adapting to our environment and its surroundings. Being able to think fast and adjust to any variable has always been a fun challenge for me as a unit photographer. Just keep following the light.”

Margot Lester (Generation NEXT)

“This is my eighth year writing about the talented members who make up the Guild’s younger cohort, and it never gets old. As technologies change – and, boy, have they! – the core traits of success do not: commitment, calm, and creativity, which these young Guild filmmakers all possess.”

CORRECTION In our Crossing The Line article, in the November issue, page 54, the frame grabs were incorrectly attributed to Warner Bros. The movie was released by Sony Pictures.

ICG MAGAZINE

David Geffner

Executive Editor

B VICE

U |

M THE

OTHER

B SIDE

L OF

E THE

B WIND

|

E G E N E RAT I O N

E NEXT

Twitter: @DGeffner Email: david@icgmagazine.com

cover photo: Jaimie Trueblood, SMPSP

14


INQUIRE TODAY

HOLLYWOOD, CA - LOUISIANA - NEW MEXICO - TEXAS - GEORGIA - FLORIDA (818) 764-6726 UNITED KINGDOM & EUROPE +44 1 727 838424

SPACECAM.COM | @spacecamsystemsinc


10 ISSUES ONLY $32* SUBSCRIBE ONLINE @ICGMAGAZINE.COM *US RESIDENTS ONLY USE PROMO CODE PROICG06


F O R

Y O U R I N

A L L

C O N S I D E R A T I O N C A T E G O R I E S

I N C L U D I N G

BEST CI N EMATOGRAPHY VA NJ A C E R NJ U L ,

AS C

“HOLLYWOOD, THIS IS WHAT YOU’VE BEEN MISSING.” JAKE COYLE,


G E A R

G U I D E

ARRI STELLAR

$10 PER MONTH OR $100 PER YEAR WWW.ARRI.COM/STELLAR

•INTELLIGENT LIGHTING CONTROL APP FOR ARRI LIGHT FIXTURES •AUTOMATIC DISCOVERY AND ADJUSTMENT OF DMX SETTINGS •INTUITIVE DESIGN PAIRED WITH BEAUTIFUL INTERFACES •CREATE AND STORE LIGHTING SETUPS AND FAVORITE COLORS •GO COMPLETELY WIRELESS VIA SKYLINK USING WI-FI AND CRMX

“I CAN THINK OF THOUSANDS OF TIMES WHERE I WOULD HAVE LIKED TO MAKE FINE ADJUSTMENTS IN COLOR TEMP OR LIGHT LEVEL BUT WAS UNABLE TO DO SO BECAUSE IT WAS TOO INTRUSIVE WITHOUT DISTURBING THE ACTORS OR DIRECTOR. WITH ARRI STELLAR, I COULD MAKE THOSE ADJUSTMENTS FROM THE COMFORT OF MY APPLE BOX.” MO FLAM, CHIEF LIGHTING TECHNICIAN

18


The Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 4.6K is the first digital film camera with easy to use features and the controls of a broadcast camera! The URSA Mini Pro is a true digital film camera with a 4.6K image sensor, 15 stops of dynamic range and a wide color gamut that delivers amazingly rich skin tones, natural color response and incredible detail. You also get built in ND filters, dual C-Fast and SD card recorders, an interchangeable lens mount and more! URSA Mini Pro works in both film and video modes, so it’s perfect for digital film or broadcast use all while delivering better image quality!

Includes DaVinci Resolve 15 Studio for editing and color correction.

www.blackmagicdesign.com Viewfinder, lens and accessories shown can be purchased separately.

Blackmagic RAW ...................... Free Upgrade Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro ................... $5,995 Learn More!


G

E

A

R

G

U

I

D

E

ANTIGRAVITYCAM

$16,500 (BASIC MODEL) $19,450 (JIB/GIMBAL LEVELING HEAD) WWW.CINEMADEVICES.COM

•SUPPORTS CAMERAS AND GIMBAL BUILDS UP TO 50 POUNDS •COMPLETE FREEDOM OF VERTICAL MOVEMENT, WITH EVEN LIFT TENSION THROUGHOUT THE RANGE •FULLY ISO-ELASTIC, REMOVING ALL OPERATOR FOOTSTEPS AND BODY MOVEMENT •NO COUNTERWEIGHTS, WEAR FOR HOURS WITHOUT FATIGUE •FULLY TELESCOPING, ALLOWING FOR PASSAGE THROUGH LOW CEILINGS AND NARROW PASSAGEWAYS

THE ANTIGRAVITYCAM HAS EXPANDED MY CAPABILITIES AS AN OPERATOR AND HAS SOLVED SHOTS THAT COULDN’T BE DONE IN TRADITIONAL WAYS. ON A STAR IS BORN , WE USED THE RIG TO SHOOT THE PIVOTAL MOMENT OF JACKSON MAINE’S (BRADLEY COOPER’S) DEATH.” CHRIS HERR, OPERATOR

20


Stellar Ready for more. The intelligent lighting control app from ARRI. ARRI is proud to introduce Stellar - the new intelligent app for professional lighting control available on iOS and Android phones and tablets. Stellar reimagines lighting control by automatically managing complex DMX settings and by featuring control interfaces with stunning graphic design. After using Stellar, it will be difficult to go back to controlling lights in any other way.

Download the app today: www.arri.com/stellar SkyPanelÂŽ and L-SeriesÂŽ is a registered trademark of Arnold & Richter Cine Technik GmbH & Co. Betriebs KG.


G

E

A

R

G

U

I

D

E

TERADEK BOLT DSMC2

•ZERO-DELAY WIRELESS VIDEO TRANSMITTER •UP TO 500-, 1000- AND 3000-FOOT OPTIONS •SECURES TO THE BACK OF RED DSMC2 CAMERAS •VIDEO- AND POWER-CABLE FREE •COMPATIBLE WITH BOLT XT, LT, 500, 1000 AND 3000 RECEIVERS

“WE’RE USING STEADICAMS, HANDHELDS, AND GIMBALS ON SET, SO IT’S CRITICAL THAT WE HAVE A COMPACT CAMERA SETUP. THE BOLT DSMC2 ELIMINATES THE NEED FOR POWER AND VIDEO CABLES, ALLOWING US TO MOVE MORE FREELY WHILE GIVING US THE ROBUST WIRELESS VIDEO WE NEED.” MARKUS FÖRDERER, BVK, DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY

22

STARTS AT $1,690 WWW.TERADEK.COM


F O R

YO U R

C O N S I D E R AT I O N

I N

A L L

C AT E G O R I E S

– MIKE REYES, CINEMABLEND

– MATT GOLDBERG, COLLIDER

INCLUDING

BEST BEST

ERIC

PICTURE

C I N E M ATO G RA P H Y

S T E E L B E R G, BEST

HUGH

ACTOR

JACKMAN

ASC


G

E

A

R

G

U

I

D

E

WESTCOTT FLEX RGBW LED MAT

•THE ONLY FLEXIBLE RGBW MATS IN THE INDUSTRY •IMPROVED MATS FEATURE MAGNETIC CORNERS, IP64 RATING, AND GROMMETS FOR MOUNTING •WIRED AND WIRELESS DMX BUILT INTO THE DIMMER, NO ADAPTERS REQUIRED •THE LARGEST VARIETY OF LIGHT MODIFIERS FOR A FLEXIBLE LED SYSTEM •V-MOUNT BUILT INTO THE DIMMER UNIT (26V REQUIRED TO OPERATOR RGBW FLEX MATS)

“AS INDIE FILMMAKERS WHO TRAVEL ALL OVER THE WORLD, WE NEED EQUIPMENT THAT IS LIGHT, MOBILE AND EASY TO PACK. WITH THE NEW V-LOCK BATTERIES FOR POWER ON THE GO AND THE WIDE VARIETY OF GELS PROGRAMMED INTO THE NEW DIMMER, OUR GO-TO LIGHTS ARE THE FLEX CINE SERIES.” DREW LAYMAN, NADUS FILMS

24

STARTS AT $469 WWW.FJWESTCOTT.COM


“A SUPREMELY WELL-MADE FILM. PÅL ULVIK ROKSETH’S WORK IS SUBTLY TEXTURED.” “★★★★★ SEARING. A BRAVE AND MASTERLY FILM.”


10 ISSUES ONLY $32* SUBSCRIBE ONLINE @ICGMAGAZINE.COM *US RESIDENTS ONLY USE PROMO CODE PROICG06


R I C H A RD ROEP ER,

“YOU NEED TO SEE THIS ONE ON THE BIGGEST SCREEN POSSIBLE, AND LET IT WASH OVER YOU AS IF YOU HAD STEPPED INSIDE THE MOST INCREDIBLE VIDEO GAME EXPERIENCE EVER CREATED.” F O R YO U R C O N S I D E R AT I O N

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY JANUSZ KAMINSKI


F I R S T

L O O K

J O E ANDERSON BY PAULINE ROGERS | PHOTO BY ERIC ZACHANOWICH

Joe Anderson has always liked projects that are offbeat and challenging and require different creative tools. Take his latest – director David Lowery’s indie feature The Old Man and the Gun, starring Robert Redford and shot on Super 16mm, something Anderson is intimately familiar with from his documentary days. “It’s a period piece, and Super 16mm is a better time machine than any other format,” he explains. This kind of throwback challenge fits

Anderson (and Lowery’s) sensibilities. The pair first got together on Ain’t Them Bodies Saints, shot by Bradford Young, ASC. “I’d actually retired from AC work and was DPing at the Sundance Directors Labs [2012] when Bradford called me,” Anderson recalls. “A chance conversation with fellow Lab participant Marielle Heller changed my mind. And my future.” During the shoot, in the sweltering Louisiana heat, the opportunity to move from

AC (he joined Local 600 in that capacity in 2011, thanks to Jody Lee Lipes) came along, and Lowery moved Anderson into the secondunit DP spot, cementing their relationship. “I admit, I was hesitant at first,” Anderson recalls. “It’s very difficult to switch your brain from one discipline to another midway through a project. It affects the whole crew. But I’m glad we worked through the challenge. I got to shoot several shots that helped expand the world of the movie.” (cont'd on page 24)

28


FOR

YOUR

CONSIDER ATION

Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography Theatrical Release

Bruno Delbonnel, AFC, ASC “ BRUNO

DELBONNEL’S CINEMATOGRAPHY IS

DAZZLING TIME

” .

★★★★” THE GUARDIAN

29


F

I

R

S

T

L

O

O

K

“We think alike – and we complement each other,” Anderson continues, of his relationship with Lowery and the move from second unit to first on Old Man. “So, the idea of going for Super 16mm was a natural. Our main goal was to make the cinematography fun [planning for a big screen release]. We kept the camera light, letting it pan and zoom and move around without taking itself too seriously.” A great deal of testing went into the decision to shoot on a slower film stock – Kodak 200T. “It gave us the right balance of sharpness and soft veneer that fit our story,” Anderson adds, “as we wanted to avoid the ‘Christmas morning home-movie look.’” Offbeat features aren’t Anderson’s only passion. He also loves documentaries. “There is an immediate cinema that you can’t replicate when doing non-fiction,” he explains. “I shot a unique documentary called

30

Fishtail. It was one of the first movies that Netflix ever acquired the rights to exhibit.” The shoot involved Anderson’s following a rancher for several days during the calving season, shooting on what he calls “the classic documentary format” of Super 16mm. “Our hope was to document every aspect of the rancher’s day and ideally capture the birth of a calf,” Anderson adds. “On the second day of shooting, we got word that a mother cow was showing signs of going into labor. We set up the camera with a 12-by-one zoom on bales of hay about 100 feet away, so as not to disturb her. And then we waited for what seemed like the entire day. In these situations, as each hour passes, you collectively decide to stick it out.” What Anderson captured, according to the young DP, was amazing. “Just as the baby was almost out, the mother cow stood up and started spinning

in circles, using centripetal force to help with the birth,” he recounts. “In the middle of this spinning, of course, we ran out of film and had to reload as fast as humanly possible. But we got the shot and have the birth of a baby cow [and its first steps] forever recorded on film!” And, just where is Anderson headed now? “I just returned from England where I was shooting the new Top Boy series,” he says. “It was exciting to be responsible for a beloved franchise for Netflix.” “Working with the new ‘over the top’ studios feels a bit like a gold rush,” he concludes. “It feels like there is so much more content being produced now than ever before. I am curious to see what my generation does with these new opportunities and how we distinguish and express ourselves. That’s the most important part of our art form.”


“ V I S UAL LY, T H E MOV I E I S A F E A S T.

S H O O T I N G O N 3 5 M M, CI NE MATOGRAP H E R RO B B I E RYA N S H I F T S F RO M F O R M A L F RA M I N G T O O F F - K I L T E R P E R S P E C T I V E S, S U P P L E M OV E M E N T A N D DI SOR I EN T I NG WI DE-ANGLE V I EWS.” D

A

F O R

V

I

D

R

Y O U R

O

O

N

C O N S I

E

Y

,

D E R A T

I O N

B E ST C I N E MATO GRAP H Y R O B B I E

R Y A N ,

FOXSEARCHLIGHT.COM/FYC

B S C

31


Z

O

O

M

-

I

N

REBECCA BAEHLER PHOTO BY ALI GOLDSTEIN

It’s a typical L.A. story. Your mother was a model and did a lot of commercials, your stepdad was an editor, and your grandmother ran the tour at Universal Studios. So often, “one on one” time for young Rebecca Baehler was on a commercial shoot, in an editing bay, or romping around the Universal lot, an insider on tour. “If that wasn’t enough to make me feel getting into the industry was natural, hanging out with my godfather, who was a producer at Amblin Entertainment, kind of sealed the deal,” the cinematographer shares about her early years. “I started working as a PA in junior

high and liked it so much, at 17, I dropped out of high school and started hands-on learning at Amblin.” While being a PA was an education, camera was Baehler’s focus and she got her first chance as a loader on Arachnophobia. “Everything just felt right, but I was very nervous,” she remembers. “The first thing you were responsible for was the film. The whole movie was in your hands – literally.” Baehler naturally clicked with the camera department and with operator Ian Fox, SOC, who brought her onto The Addams Family. Meeting Owen Roizman, ASC, led her to Grand

Canyon. “It was fascinating, working with these mentors,” Baehler relates. “I was strong physically and mentally, so I was able to carry my own. You had to pay attention and really be on your game – this was film. I remember that the best piece of advice that I’ve gotten was to be honest and follow your heart. Don’t be afraid to follow your instinct.” Gradually, Baehler worked her way through the system, moving up to cinematographer on major commercials, and counting another mentor in director Mark Coppos. “I think one spot that really typifies the Apple work we did was replicating a shot (cont'd on page 28)

32



Z

O

O

M

-

I

N

from the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey,” she recalls. “Lighting, production design, and movement had to match. It was super fun and challenging. But it was a very simple-looking spot and it worked so well. Got the message across.” Then things took an interesting turn. She got a call from her agent, Steve Jacob, at WPA, who also represented Russell Carpenter, ASC. Carpenter was looking for someone with macro experience for a new Marvel feature, Ant-Man (2015). Didn’t all the commercial work she’d done count? You bet. She met with Carpenter and VFX Supervisor Jake Morrison – and her career took another direction. “Macro photography is very immersive,” Baehler describes. “It’s very much like being right in something. You have to have knowledge of different kinds of lensing and lights. And, you have to know how to light a full wide shot – to something on the head of a pin.” Anytime Ant-Man (Paul Rudd) was small, it was Baehler’s unit that did the

The New Standard • 410 watts • 12” x 24” x 4.5” • Tunable white light • Full-gamut RGB color • Simple controls • DMX, RDM, CRMX built-in • Fanless • Integrated power supply • 8/16 bit operation • HSI/RGB modes

Technology Brought to Light www.cineolighting.com

34

motion control. “It helped with precision and stability,” she recounts, “because you are so close to things, you need that. Also, the ability to do multiple passes for focus and elements is very helpful. They wanted the environment to look otherworldly – because it wasn’t a natural place that people see.” For Ant-Man’s bathroom sequence, she needed to cut the bathtub in about five different ways to get the lens where she needed it. “We also used the Frazier lens system, for its great depth-of-field and macro possibilities. It’s also easy to get into places.” The film’s gun battle was really the biggest challenge. “We needed to work very closely with the Special Effects team to make sure the explosions were the right size for the scene,” Baehler continues. “Too big and the whole thing would blow up, and too small, it would not be dynamic enough. We also needed to run very high speed to catch all the action. So, we used the Phantom camera and a highspeed motion-control arm called The Bolt.” Baehler says seven models were made to

shoot the scene. “Everything fit into the overall image of the movie because we used the existing sets from the main unit,” Baehler adds. “Nothing was over-sized – it was all shot 1 to 1. First unit would finish shooting a set, break it down, and then move the pieces I needed to my stage.” Why does macro work fascinate Baehler? “It’s the precision, the specialization, the trust to be on your own, yet to work with the main unit,” she describes. “But macro work in film is limited because I think most productions want it in CG. Also, I don’t believe it looks as realistic if you don’t shoot it for real. I think that is why there is more of it in the commercial world. With Ant-Man, I loved the macro work. I loved the perspective. Getting into places that people rarely see.” Although she admits macro isn’t a “fulltime” job – she hopes “to do more films in whatever direction they may take me – I just love to shoot!”


FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN CINEMATOGRAPHY THEATRICAL RELEASE

GARY GRAVER

A NETFLIX FILM


D E P T H

O F

F I E L D

A F I C I N E M AT O G RA P H Y INTRODUCTORY INTENSIVE FOR WOMEN BY PAULINE ROGERS | PHOTO COURTESY OF AFI

“Less than four percent of film and television programs have a female cinematographer,” Stephen Lighthill, ASC, AFI Conservatory Cinematography Discipline Head and former ASC president said recently. “Even in an industry rife with gender discrimination, the lack of parity is striking.” Although Lighthill acknowledges that The AFI Conservatory Cinematography program has been a leader in the field (propelling female cinematographers like Rachel Morrison, ASC, the first woman ever nominated for an Academy Award for Best Cinematography for Mudbound; Ava

Berkofsky for Insecure; Uta Briesewitz, ASC, director of Stranger Things; Polly Morgan ASC, BSC, shooting Legion; Cynthia Pusheck, ASC, Sacred Lies; and many others), he was adamant AFI could do more. So Lighthill, partnering with Tessa Blake, Director of Nancy Malone Inclusion Initiatives at AFI and supported by 21st Century Fox, set out to make that vision real. The result is a pilot program (they hope to make annual) designed to support female cinematographers interested in stretching their creativity – and exploring more options in their field. Early August of this year,

Cinematography Introductory Intensive for Women (CIIW), a four-day workshop lead by AFI’s top-of-the-line faculty and masterlevel guest speakers, worked with a selected group of women passionate about the industry, offering everything from production workshops, discussions, screenings of the work of pioneering women and more. Just what were the guest speakers and teachers looking to accomplish? “It’s important for the upcoming cinematographers to have access to their role models and to be able to discuss not only the art of cinematography but also other aspects (cont'd on page 32)

36


FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

O U T S TA N D I N G AC H I E V E M E N T I N C I N E M AT O G R A P H Y IN REGUL AR SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION

DAV I D M . D U N L A P


D

E

P

T

H

O

F

F

I

E

L

D

Michelle Clementine (L) working with Jenise Whitehead (R)

Asia Heredia Caldera

like the politics of the industry and how to navigate them as a woman and more,” said cinematographer Natasha Braier (Neon Demon, Honey Boy). Of course, technique was also an important issue to discuss. That’s why cinematographer Ava Berkofsky decided to use her time to show an episode of Insecure and “discuss the artistic and formal side of shooting TV and films,” she explains. “I also wanted to open myself up to questions about how and why I became a DP,” she added. “I think it’s important to be transparent about what it takes. I wanted them to come away with a concrete and realistic sense of ‘I can do this.’ Not just a romantic notion of what being a cinematographer and an artist is like,” Berkofsky noted. Another reason Berkofsky

joined the pilot program was mentorship. She says she’s been lucky to have help from other women DP’s and knows how invaluable that help has been. For cinematographer Polly Morgan, an AFI alumna, it was a conversation with Lighthill that narrowed her focus on the technical side. “We thought it would be important to teach them about shooting with multiple cameras and how to make the best of them without compromising the image,” Morgan reflected. “In television, producers/directors often want to put more than one camera in a scene, so I talked about how to use them creatively without either doing ‘butterfly’ coverage or shooting wide and long lenses at the same time.” Morgan says she was also intrigued by

the conversation’s development. “We started off purely technical, but as time passed, the women really opened up and wanted to know about how to handle themselves on set and to take care of themselves emotionally.” How did the participants react? Local 600 Camera Operator Michelle Clementine (co-founding member of ICG’s Mentorship Working Group and an assistant on Spotlight, She’s Gotta Have It, and If Beale Street Could Talk) said the program was “a confirmation that I know more than I’ve given myself credit for. That’s something that I really needed. Often, as a woman of color, I do feel unwelcome – it’s sometimes a mental block I’ve created myself. “One of the things that I most appreciated (outside the invaluable technical information (cont'd on page 34)

38



D

E

P

T

H

O

F

F

I

E

L

D

on Insecure) was how Ava shared how she took the risk to have a whole career change,” Clementine added. It’s something that has helped Clementine shed the traditional role she found herself in and explore more for her own career. Navigating the politics was also a subject that captured Local 600 member Jenise Whitehead, a graduate of San Francisco State and La Universidad Complutense de Madrid, and co-director of Gideon’s Cross in Outfest Los Angeles’ OutSet program. “I want to tell stories that reflect being Black, female and gay – and to humanize an experience that has yet to be fully explored in cinema,” Whitehead explained. “To do this, I need to understand both the creative

and emotional. [Our] instructors advised us on how to navigate the politics from the hiring process through production, without compromising creativity, which I will definitely take with me on future projects,” she added. “On the technical side, Ava’s experience in creating a visual that incorporates a city as a character and Polly’s breakdown for prep, camera placement, coverage with two cameras, lighting, et cetera will also help me approach projects differently from now on.” For Local 600 member Asia Heredia Caldera, who studied at Columbia College of Hollywood, the program renewed her confidence in something that she began to think was unattainable – the move from 1st AC to DP. “I’m recently married and starting

a family,” Caldera said. “For awhile, I thought becoming a DP was something I would have to leave behind. Listening to these women demistify so many of the things that I was worried about gave me the confidence to actively start shooting again. “Working in production is a hard life; we sacrifice a lot in our personal lives to make art together,” she continued. “But this program brought back all the reasons why we do it. Stephen Lighthill truly cares about the future of cinematography and I’m so grateful to have been a part of the program that he put so much effort into making happen. I hope that this is something AFI and Fox can continue to offer to inspire future generations of women.” And, so does everyone else!

FreeStyle

Kino Flo 2840 North Hollywood Way, Burbank, CA USA

40

www.kinoolo.com


F O R

Y O U R

C O N S I D E R A T I O N

O U T S TA N D I N G A C H I E V E M E N T I N C I N E M AT O G R A P H Y IN REGULAR SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION

BEN KUTCHINS, ARMANDO SALAS


E

42

X

P

O

S

U

R

E


TRAVIS KNIGHT BY KEVIN H. MARTIN PHOTO BY JAIMIE TRUEBLOOD

43


E

X

P

O

S

U

R

E

Bumblebee director Travis Knight’s past achievements range from an early stint as the recording artist/rapper “Chilly Tee” to learning the painstaking art of dimensional animation. The Oregon native (and son of Nike founder Phil Knight) got his start at Will Vinton Studios, where he learned stop-motion on various TV commercial spots plus The PJs and the Gary & Mike series. He later created the Oregon-based Laika Studios – named for the canine best remembered as the first creature sent by man into Earth’s orbit – from the remnants of the Vinton organization, serving on their board of directors and as their vice president of animation.

Knight continued to work on both the creative and administrative sides of the business, serving as producer and lead animator on the company’s features Coraline, ParaNorman and The Boxtrolls [see online at icgmagazine. com], with the latter earning a Best Animated Feature nomination. After Coraline’s success, Knight took on additional duties as both Laika’s president and CEO. In 2016, he made his directorial debut with the acclaimed 3D stop-motion fantasy Kubo and the Two Strings, which collected Oscar nominations for Animated Feature and VFX while winning a BAFTA. After taking the helm on the live-action Bumblebee, Knight is slated to produce Laika’s Missing Link. ICG: Did Kubo serve as your calling card for directing Bumblebee, or was it a combination of factors that led to your being selected? Travis Knight: You should ask Paramount that! Honestly, I think they became intrigued

by the work I’d done at Laika over the past twenty years, and more specifically Kubo. Perhaps they saw something that jibed with the direction they intended to take the franchise. We had an initial meeting to discuss the project about a year and a half ago, and it went really well. I talked about the kind of film I’d want to make if they were interested in working with me, and it just took off from there. As a kid, I grew up with these characters, loving them as I watched the cartoons, read the comic books and played with the toys. So they were already a part of me, and the opportunity to breathe a new kind of life into them again was just very appealing to me on every level. Your previous directing was in the realm of stop-motion animation. Did you find it challenging to move out of non-realtime work when dealing with actors and all the vagaries of an epic-sized live-action production shoot? The pace of the work, when working in stop-

motion and CG animation, is positively glacial, whereas live-action is anything but. Fortunately, there have been many analogs between what I’ve done in the past and the requirements of this film. As an artist, one must embrace opportunities for new experiences, to learn something new while always moving forward. Going from animation to a film like this was kind of like diving into the deep end, so it was terrifying, but the artistic challenge was tremendously exciting. Then again, there was some safety and familiarity since one of our lead characters and several supporting robot parts were all realized through effects, so a huge aspect of Bumblebee relates directly to animation. You did not use your own facility, Laika, for Bumblebee – the effects were created by Industrial Light & Magic. That was perhaps the scariest aspect for me initially, knowing that going in, my key collaborators were all artists with whom (cont'd on page 40)

44


F

O

R

Y

O

U

R

C

O

N

S

I

D

E

R

A

T

I

O

N

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN CINEMATOGRAPHY I N T E L E V I S I ON M O V I E , M I N I S E R I E S O R P I L O T

DARREN LEW

“IT

ASCENDS TO TAKE ITS PLACE AMONG THE VERY BEST TV OF THE YEAR.”

“MESMERIZING.” THE WASHINGTON POST

VARIETY

“BEAUTIFULLY CRAFTED.” USA TODAY


E

X

P

O

S

U

R

E

“There’s that old saw about the three movies you make – the one you write, the one you shoot and the one you edit – and that was certainly the case here.”

I’d never previously worked. Filmmaking is such a collaborative process, and you must have great trust in those in the trenches with you. Since I’ve done stop-motion work with my own hands for years, I was able to communicate on a peer-to-peer basis with the animators, which I think really facilitated my efforts to make these characters seem to live on screen with the same vivid presence as a real breathing human, with a mind and a heart and soul. Because we did speak the same language, how the animators rose to my challenge for them to bring Bumblebee to life is my proudest achievement on this film. It’s a tribute to their creative skillsets as well as how well we could exploit the technological advances.

advance through storyboarding, trying to understand what the characters were thinking, and developing a choreography that would reveal this in a series of specific shots.

ILM has created a Transformers brain-trust over the various films in that franchise – it’s interesting they were willing to rely more on practical Transformer pieces on set rather than a fully CG approach. I wanted to capture as much in camera as possible, so building this robot fit right into that approach, to capture the interplay of light and shadow. In addition to building on our desired aesthetic, it also tied into the era in which the movie was set. In the 1980s, you’d have been trying to do more practically since the digital tools now available didn’t yet exist. So approaching it with a period mindset – doing a cutting-edge VFX movie in, say, 1987 – seemed appropriate. Even if it was not going to be part of a final, but just for visual reference and to be replaced by a digital build, it was still useful to know what the object looked like in the actual environment.

And how did the collaboration develop with your other department heads? I was fortunate to work with kindred spirits throughout, none more so than my director of photography, Enrique Chediak [ASC]. We had been talking early on, and I told him how, through all the years of stop-motion and VFX work, I could imagine seeing these robots that weren’t actually on the set. And he admitted he couldn’t do that, but then, by the end of the film, he walked over to me and whispered in my ear to me, “Travis? I see the robots.” [Laughs.] It was kind of awesome.

Was there a particular aspect of your background that proved beneficial when shooting live-action? In animation, you have to become incredibly disciplined with your approach, because there isn’t any possibility of shooting coverage – it’s just too expensive, and so you shoot only what is going into the movie. I approached all these scenes with multiple robots as a problem to be worked out in

46

So this all informed how the actors would respond appropriately? On set, when the actors are reacting to essentially vapor, they still knew how to respond because we had the tools on hand to demonstrate to them and to the whole crew exactly what was going on. We used many different tools and approaches. Bringing out sticks and tennis balls in order to get proper eyelines is still a part of the job; these things are really tall when they’re stood up!

During editorial, did you wind up reshaping things somewhat, or had the film emerged largely as expected? Again, it was the difference between liveaction and animation. Editorial in live-action on some level is reductive; you have a huge amount of material that needs to be whittled down, whereas in animation you’re building up from nothing, using boards to form the template for what the story becomes. So a really great boon for me was having this wealth of material with which to shape – and then to reshape – the film. There’s that old saw about the three movies you make – the one you write, the one you shoot and the one you edit – and that was certainly the case here, though in this instance we always had an emotional core to cling to that remained unchanged throughout. We knew

that anything we did in that regard would only be done to improve and enhance that emotional connection between our leads. That is what the audience will most respond to – the relationship between Bumblebee and Charlie [Hailee Steinfeld] – and that was locked in always as the beating heart at the center of things. Do you see this turn to live-action as just another step in your creative career, or does it indicate a different path? After starting Laika, I’ve worn many hats over the years: producer, animator, and director. Having a foot in all those different places helps expand your thoughts on what the whole place can become. I honestly think work as an artist has made me a better businessman, and the reverse is also true because art doesn’t happen in a vacuum. An artist can get caught up in the granularity of things and miss the big picture, but when you run a big company, you can’t ever lose sight of the overall. A lot of what makes me a storyteller is being influenced by other powerful films and how they were told, so wanting to be able to shoot a live-action feature is just an extension of what I’ve done, but one that feels like a worthy challenge. Plus I think one of the greatest things about art is how it binds or brings people together, letting many travel through a new world and see that world through eyes different from one’s own. This creates empathy, and that’s at the heart of storytelling, which is my goal, and that’s whether the movies are animated or live-action. Do you find new tech possibilities for storytelling, such as VR, of interest? I think if you look at Laika’s output, you’ll see each of the films is unique, not just the type of story, but also tonally and aesthetically. I’m very excited about exploring the possibilities inherent with new tools. But that’s mostly dependent on the stories themselves rather than the tools. The new media continue to evolve, and those will impact how we choose to tell these stories. I’m excited about getting hands-on with them when they’re appropriate.


E M POW ERI NG S TORYTELLI NG. E V ERY ST EP O F TH E WAY TECHNICOLOR.COM/CREATE

@TECHNICOLORPOST

@TECHNICOLORPOST

@TECHNICOLORCREA


T H E BY

KE VIN H. M A RT IN

PHOTOS BY

JA IMIE T RUEBLOOD , SMPSP

FRAMEGRABS COURTESY OF

PA RA MOUN T PICT URES

B E E ENRIQUE CHEDIAK, ASC IN A NEW DIRECTION

BUZZES THE TRANSFORMERS WITH THIS GIRL-MEETS-BOT

MOVIE 48

FRANCHISE FRIENDSHIP STORY


49


The Transformers universe was a multi-media bonanza long before the first live-action feature hit theaters in 2007. Hasbro launched a toy line featuring the Cybertronians in 1984, with animated adventures and comic books soon following. The marketable conceit behind these sentient robot forms was their ability to alter massive metal physiques from roughly humanoid to vehicular shapes. Director Michael Bay and Paramount took on the challenge of transforming “Autobots” and “Decepticons” – good and evil denizens from a faraway world who have taken their battle to Earth – into a franchise that has delivered mega boxoffice returns for five consecutive entries.

50


B

But with Bumblebee [named for a beloved good-guy Transformer], Paramount has veered off from the bigger-is-better mandate. The film is a prequel of sorts, revealing Bumblebee in a smaller form – as a VW Bug instead of a Chevy Camaro – as he existed in 1987, when Bee is scavenged from a junkyard by a young girl named Charlie [Hailee Steinfeld]. Together they must fend off investigations from pesky humans, as well as another block of evil Decepticons. Laika animation studio founder Travis Knight [see Exposure, page 36], who recently made his animated directing debut with Kubo and the Two Strings, was recruited to helm his first live-action feature. Guild cinematographer Enrique Chediak, ASC was approached by Bumblebee’s producers; the Ecuadorian-born cinematographer, who studied film at NYU before winning at Sundance for shooting Hurricane Streets, also lensed Turistas (which utilized the services of underwater shooter Pete Zuccarini, who reteamed with him on Deepwater Horizon and Bumblebee) and 28 Weeks Later, then shared a BAFTA nomination with Anthony Dod Mantle, DFF, ASC, BSC, for 127 Hours. “I had worked with [Transformers producer] Lorenzo di Bonaventura, and when he asked me to consider this, I wasn’t sure about doing a fullblown CGI robot movie,” Chediak admits. “But then my agent said Travis was going to direct. I had seen Kubo with my daughter, so that got me interested enough to read the script, which I liked for all its humanity; even with all the big action sequences, the main thrust was the relationship between the girl and the robot.”

51


For Knight’s first live-action film, he wanted to benefit from having Chediak get involved early, and the DP had a generous fourteen weeks of prep. “I wound up looking at locations with Travis and production designer Sean Haworth [Deadpool, Ender’s Game], who was devising looks for robots that worked for the film while also pleasing Hasbro,” Chediak continues. “Initially my idea was using ALEXA 65, but I couldn’t find appropriate lenses [to fully cover the sensor]. Then I tested Panavision lenses with Dan Sasaki and came across these Super Speeds from the 1970’s. They were much softer than modern glass, with aberrations and imperfections that gave a beautiful period feel.” (Digital acquisition was via the ALEXA Studio XT.) Reprising his VFX supervisor role from Transformers: The Last Knight was Jason Smith, with Industrial Light & Magic (ILM). “ILM has so many veterans who have worked on this franchise,” Smith recounts. “But this was less about creating spectacle and destruction, as in past films, and more about enhancing the relationship between Bumblebee and Charlie. If we’re successful, the audience will stop thinking about the visual effects and just relate to the characters.” In a departure from previous Transformers films, Knight and Chediak wanted a naturalistic approach to lighting. “That meant we would be seeing front-lit Transformers,” Smith describes, “instead of going to town on them with CG versions of that ‘movie light’ feel, where we have a ton of rim lights to bring up visual interest like you would on a car commercial.” Towards this end, a practical version of Bumblebee was built for use on stage and location. “It had a head, chest and upper arms that we could position, with all the chrome, detailing and weathering,” Smith adds. “There’s an efficiency and beauty you get from having something real in frame, and that is especially true when it comes to the caustic lighting created by his chrome. His eyes could light up, which gave Hailee a really good reference she could emote with. We find that if the eyeline isn’t exactly right, it breaks the connection in a major way.” While Chediak says moving the mockup around set was difficult (owing to its weight),

52

he found it useful for composition and illumination. “[The mock-up] let me establish how I wanted Bee lit, so ILM had a solid reference to match,” Chediak says. “Sometimes we only used part of the torso, but that still gave them enough to be able to replicate in CG. The robot’s yellow coloration would sometimes let me capture a bit of color reflecting on the faces of the actors, so those little touches helped, as did the practical blue eyes on the robot, which we could use with the torso or separately. We still had the old ‘ball on a stick,’ so after doing a reference pass with the torso, a performance pass with that in place would follow to ensure proper eyelines.” For other scenes in which Bumblebee moved around on set, a unique approach was devised. “We brought in a stilt performer who worked on five- and six-foot yellow-painted extensions,” Smith reveals. “This let us shoot extended dialog scenes of girl and robot in conversation while maintaining that crucial eyeline connection.” Except for one project that required a month-long digital intermediate, Chediak’s preference has been to avoid using elaborate LUT’s and rely on rec.709. “I like to let the lenses do their magic, then use a bit of color control by altering the temperature in the camera as needed to get our desired effects,” he shares. “There were the occasional fixes in the DI, but working this way made it very straightforward in post.”


“I LIKE TO LET THE LENSES DO THEIR MAGIC, THEN USE A BIT OF COLOR CONTROL BY ALTERING THE TEMPERATURE IN THE CAMERA AS NEEDED TO GET OUR DESIRED EFFECTS.” Enrique Chediak, ASC

53


“ FOR DAILIES WE HAD POSTPRODUCTION CREATE STILLS THAT COULD BE VIEWED ON MY COLOR-CORRECTED MONITORS, ENSURING ENRIQUE COULD SEE WHETHER IT MATCHED TO WHAT WE DID ON-SET.” DIT Daniel Hernandez

Digital Imaging Technician Daniel Hernandez says the image was run through LiveGrade, save for scenes with cars. “Sometimes we did light color correction with CDL’s, but mostly it was rec.709,” Hernandez reports. “We downloaded on set, backing up to RAID drives. The studio required special safety/security measures, so RAID’s would go to them, but we separated the drives from the chassis; even if the drives ever disappeared, the data couldn’t be accessed.” EC3 handled dailies, but with a non-standard approach. “Instead of looking at Pix,” Hernandez adds, “we had postproduction create stills that could be viewed on my color-corrected monitors, ensuring [Chediak] could see whether it matched to what we did on-set. It’s an easier and faster way to work when you haven’t got any facilities near set while guaranteeing you get to see the real color.” Shooting began with three weeks on stage, followed by location work in California. Chediak says he decided to interpret the 1980s rather than slavishly duplicate them with period-correct tools. “I felt using lots of digital lights was the right call because they give you so much more control,” he relates. “On dimmers, you don’t have the tungsten problem with units warming in color when dimmed. And the enormous time spent gelling older lights is time I’d prefer to spend shooting the movie. For fill and general lighting, I relied on LED, but when we were bringing directional light through windows, I went with HMI’s and Maxi-Brutes with very narrow beams.” The garage in which Charlie and Bumblebee hide out and bond together was mostly handled on stage, though entries and exits utilized a house built by Production on an empty lot near Santa Cruz. “On the stage interiors, I used a lot of fluorescents with a blue hue,” Chediak continues. “I mixed those with tungsten light, thinking that bluish felt kind of spacey while the warmer light seemed to ground things – this was a place that was home to a robot from another world as well as to the girl. I’m very happy with how those scenes look and play.” Smith took great pains to duplicate Chediak’s lighting scheme and palette for ILM’s CG work. “We used the same digital lighting tools as usual, but with the conscious goal to faithfully match the established lighting reference. Occasionally we saw ways to enhance what was there but always in collaboration with Enrique. If I thought that darkening the top of Bee’s head against a dark ceiling might help in post, I’d discuss that plan with Enrique on set – our collaboration was one that carried through all the way from set through post.”

54

As with filming many a flesh-and-blood film star, shooting Bumblebee worked best with a particular lens. “We had a dedicated 20mm lens for the robot,” says A-camera/Steadicam operator Bela Trutz. “It was even used on close-ups because that was wide enough to see him at all times. Enrique is not one of those cinematographers who are afraid of ditching the camera,” he shares. “And it wasn’t usually done just to address height difference between [the principals], but more often to create more dynamic shots.” For a number of elaborate moving shots that required both practical and digital effects, a Technodolly was deployed. “It is almost like a nextgeneration approach to motion control,” marvels Trutz, “and was great when a lot was taking place as a robot moved through the scene. Instead of putting in numbers and exact positions, I could just take the camera through its paces, moving up and down on the dolly, for whatever move needed to follow the actors or get to a particular part of the set. If that shot was approved, then the very same move could be played back on subsequent passes, repeating precisely as we captured other elements needing to be shot separately – sometimes seven or eight for a single shot.” Trutz says the workflow required enormous coordination, “since the visual-effects guys would be cueing the special-effects guys for separate physical events that had to happen at specific moments each time we repeated the move,” he describes. “It was quite the dance to witness, especially when you might have a car present during the first half of the original camera pass, but then be shooting a giant robot during the second part!” Chediak says he relied on the Scorpio crane with Oculus head to work at great speed and with enormous freedom of movement. “The Oculus was the only tool that could work on a regular dolly without track while still letting us go wherever we wanted,” the DP states. “In the forest, we could bring the Scorpio on a four-wheel-drive cart that acts as a dolly; again, you don’t need to lay track. And with the robot’s face thirteen feet from the ground, it also let us move up or down from there to the girl’s face quickly and smoothly.” Production moved north to Mare Island in Vallejo for a sequence involving both multiple explosions and multiple cameras. “This had been a World War II submarine pen, and there was action taking place down in a pit and on a level above,” Chediak describes. “In order to make our day and week, it was necessary to put the second unit down below with a Libra and crane while we remained above, with each unit running two cameras.” Hernandez says the team relied on longrange wireless systems to tie in with second unit’s cameras while on the island, “plus there was a special team for the aerial unit, so we could receive signals from the helicopter being flown overhead.” The other key development for the Mare Island shoot was a huge custom light source


55


built from LED’s in a construction frame. “We didn’t want that classic backlight night look, and instead wanted a source that gave a more organic look that extended across this huge expanse,” Chediak continues. “With this rig hung from a crane, it completely illuminated this space, and then we augmented by using specific lights to emphasize key architectural parts of the frame. We could change light levels with dimmers while still being able to expose for both the top level and those 2nd-unit guys working down below. It took a week just to transport the crane to location and days of pre-lighting to get it ready, but that light saved a tremendous amount of time on this very expensive location.” One key sequence has Bumblebee, damaged during battle, plunging into the dry dock, with Charlie going in after him. Underwater Director of Photography Pete Zuccarini, who shot the scene at Universal’s Falls Lake, worked out the choreography in advance with a stunt performer. “It helped determine issues like how wardrobe will affect movement and how much can be done with any given shot,” he explains. “It was impressive that [Hailee Steinfeld] was able to do almost as much as the professional swimmer while delivering what looked to be a very tender moment when interacting with the robot.” Zuccarini captured Charlie as she finds Bumblebee via a sweeping reveal. “I began the shot trailing behind, then overtook her while panning around to face her while descending beneath, winding up looking into her eyes, which would have taken an elaborate rig up on land but was possible for me owing to the buoyancy of water.” Zuccarini also worked with Second Unit Director of Photography Peter Collister, ASC, to capture wider views of the action, shooting wide-open with the ALEXA MINI. “We created an industrial feel in the lighting from above that put some highlights into the water, but wanted to keep things low-key, since this was a descent into inky blackness that was meant to feel spooky,” he adds. “To get that mood, we used four HMI’s to light different areas of particulate matter in the water, giving Charlie a visible phenomenon to swim against rather than trying to light things up. This creates a greater feeling of depth underwater if you snoot the light off effectively, so the character seems to pass through a level of murk then back into darkness.” The dramatic underwater “oner” owed a lot to Best Boy Rigging Grip Jason Blaise Cunningham, who built a rig that let the camera descend on a track alongside Charlie at speed while keeping the lens right on her face all the way down. Bumblebee’s bot-on-bot action often utilized previsualization and postvisualization from Proof and ILM, but that was augmented during shooting. “I’d talk with [special-effects supervisor] Scott Fisher to get an idea about how the blasts were going to develop,” Smith relates, “figuring

56

out whether they would be fireballs or smoke hits and how big they needed to be, along with the kinds of debris that would be flying out. Once those conversations were done, we’d line up a couple of other cameras to give us options. Sometimes the alternate angles wound up superseding the previs. Also, for much of the Bumblebee pyro, we went much wider than in past Transformers, where we were usually right in there, close up with the robots, so you don’t see the entire effect.” Some visual effects were handled via an in-house team of compositors that worked in camera linear space, but most work was done at ILM, and their partners, with their custom pipeline. While ILM finished their shots at 2K, Smith doesn’t rule out another kind of release. “[Deluxe Company 3 Senior Colorist] Stephen Nakamura is doing the color finish, and he has lots of experience with HDRI mastering, so it’ll be interesting to see how that works out.” Nakamura is conducting DI efforts with Blackmagic Design’s DaVinci Resolve. Chediak’s takeaway is that Bumblebee will succeed in capturing for audiences the soul of the titular machine. “I was really happy all through the experience of shooting this picture for Travis and feel this took the series in a direction that will turn out to be popular and emotionally engaging for the audiences. The bond between robot and girl calls back in a good way to some fantasy films of the 1980’s, but we were able to use modern techniques to deliver the machine characters with greater sophistication than could have even been imagined back then.”

LOCAL 600 CREW MAIN UNIT

2nd unit

Director of Photography Enrique Chediak, ASC

Director of Photography Peter L. Collister, ASC

A-Camera Operator Steadicam Bela Trutz

A-Camera Operator Peter Mercurio

A-Camera 1st AC Glenn Kaplan A-Camera 2nd AC Brent Egan B-Camera Operator Don Devine, SOC B-Camera 1st AC Peter Geraghty B-Camera 2nd AC Dennis Geraghty C-Camera 1st AC Max Macat C-Camera 2nd AC Jihane Mrad DIT Daniel A. Hernandez Loader Andreas Macat Digital Utility LaTerrian Officer-McIntosh Still Photographer Jaimie Trueblood, SMPSP Unit Publicist Gabriela Gutentag

A-Camera 1st AC Darrin DeLoach A-Camera 2nd AC Robin Bursey B-Camera 1st AC Rafiel Chait B-Camera 2nd AC Larissa Supplitt C-Camera Operator Brooks Guyer C-Camera 1st AC Ray Milazzo C-Camera 2nd AC Blake Collins DIT Jamie Metzger Loader Roberto Ruelas Digital Utility Matt Schouten


ORIGINAL TECHNOLOGY CAN NEVER BE CLONED Buy Amimon Original!

Teradek a VITEC Group company is using AMIMON ORIGINAL technology in its BOLT products

Find out more on Amimon Original products at www.Amimon.com

57


M

A

D N

ORSON WELLES’ FINAL OPUS, FINALLY

58

MAKES

IT

TO

THEATERS

AS

COMPLEX,

MESSY,

AND

STUNNING

THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND , AS

ITS

CREATOR’S

LIFE.


E

S A

S T BY

KE VIN H. M A RT IN

PHOTOS COURTESY OF

JOSÉ M A RÍ A CA ST ELLVÍ /N E T FLIX

FRAMEGRABS COURTESY OF

N E T FLIX

MIDNIGHT 59


M

Many of Orson Welles’ movies have fascinating legacies, but none may be so tortured and long-lived as The Other Side of the Wind. The story, which covers the last day in the life of Hemingwayesque filmmaker Jake Hannaford (John Huston), is told through a kaleidoscopic POV, ranging from one group of documentarians seeking insights from the old master to other vérité shooters intent on capturing the maestro’s heir apparent, director Brooks Otterlake (Peter Bogdanovich). Glimpses of Hannaford’s final feature, entitled The Other Side of the Wind for reasons not entirely clear (and starring Welles’ muse and coscreenwriter Oja Kodar), are interspersed throughout. Welles’ film-within-a-film takes an intentionally self-consciously arty approach that might be Hannaford’s desperate attempt to cater to current trends; the work of a mad, misunderstood genius; or a sly satire by the master on the state of cinema, circa 1970. Shooting began on The Other Side of the Wind with cinematographer Gary Graver and a legion of enthusiastic newcomers (many seen in the film) that included future producer Frank Marshall and continued sporadically for many years after. By then the project and the actual film footage – deliberately shot on a hodgepodge of formats and stocks, with Hannaford’s art film framed for 1.85 – became ensnared in legal difficulties, limiting Welles’ access and further impeding his attempts to complete it, which continued up to his death in 1985.

60


“EVEN THOUGH ORSON FIRED ME – AND THE REST OF THE CREW – SEVERAL TIMES OVER, BEING EXPOSED TO HIS SPONTANEOUS GENIUS WAS SOMETHING I’LL NEVER FORGET.” Producer Frank Marshall

Graver and Kodar championed the project for decades after, and Showtime attempted to rescue the film from limbo and from the Paris vault in which it languished. Finally, years after Graver’s death, Netflix stepped into the picture, working with producers Marshall and Filip Jan Rymsza to settle the outstanding issues and commence a massive effort to complete the film. Marshall, who likens his early involvement on set with Welles to a unique kind of film school, recalls “even though Orson fired me – and the rest of the crew – several times over, being exposed to his spontaneous genius was something I’ll never forget. He would shoot scenes in which actors for only half the scene were available, but do so in a way that let him pick up reverse shots years later, sometimes in a different country! And for the film-within-a-film segments, he employed ingenious old-school tricks like forcedperspective [foreground] miniatures, which, while very low-tech, were impressive, and that was just as true when we examined the footage in 2017.” Marshall and Rymsza asked editor Bob Murawski, a longtime Sam Raimi collaborator, to help spearhead the effort. “Frank and I learned that [Murawski] had dealt with a huge amount of documentary-style footage on The Hurt Locker, which suggested he could deal with this project,” Rymsza recounts. “Plus, having been friends with Gary Graver, he already knew some of the history, and had dealt previously with film reconstruction/restoration.” While waiting for the 16mm and 35mm footage to be digitized at 4K, Murawski played detective, researching the film’s history at the Academy Library and the Orson Welles Library at the University of Michigan Ann Arbor. “I also called his editors,” he remembers. “There were Yves Deschamps, Steve Ecclesine and Jonathon Braun, who worked for Orson till his death. Braun dispelled the popular notion that the film was all in his head; every time Orson worked a scene, he would have a new thought, and they’d pull it all apart and try something else.” The rethinking had gone on throughout the original shoot as well. As Rymsza notes: “You’d see the same line delivered by different actors over the years. Orson himself was playing Hannaford

61


62


off-camera at first because he shot around Huston for the first few years! He was endlessly adaptable and spontaneous. The bathroom scene [where Kodar enters a stark white restroom inside a psychedelic music club] reminded me, stylistically, of The Trial, and that was nine hours of material cut down to two minutes. For all of the film-within-the-film, I think he was really enjoying himself, having shot and shot and shot.” Welles’ enormous flexibility informed Murawski’s treatment of the raw materials. “Peter and Frank had been there with him on the shoot and confirmed this about him, which also helped me with being tough on the material,” the editor continues. “It didn’t have to all be precious; even the material he had fine-cut as a kind of sizzle reel, since that was intended as a promotional piece to secure funding. Once incorporated into our cut, the material had to be adjusted to what came before and after, rather than exist as its own thing.” That freedom to experiment was a necessity. While one might have hoped Welles left something akin to the brilliant 58page memo he authored to Universal about Touch of Evil – which served as the basis for the Walter Murch recut – this was not the case. “You wouldn’t expect to find that,” Murawski acknowledges, “because there was no need for such a manifesto – Orson knew his own intentions and made them clear as needed to his collaborators.” Working in Welles’ style was never a cut-and-dried affair. “Jake’s arrival at the party and much of the film-within-a-

“ THE 4K SCANS WERE JUST FOR PICTURE, SO I WAS CUTTING WITHOUT SOUND AND HAVING TO READ LIPS WHILE CHECKING AGAINST THE SCRIPTS.” Editor Bob Murawski

film stuff was super-cutty and designed to sustain a really frenetic energy,” Murawski describes. “But we changed that section to a more conventional pace for the later Huston/Bogdanovich scenes, which we think reflected his intent, based on how he blocked and covered the scene.” Murawski considered the hundreds of boxes of work picture the most wonderful among the film’s assets. “We ordered racks and set up a four-plate KEM [flatbed editing machine] to look at it all,” he reports, “and wound up using a full bench with synchronizer and split-reels, spring clamps and splicing tape! Before all that was acquired from Christy’s Editorial, I actually was using my old film stuff that I keep in the garage.” In fact, the detective work continued throughout the editorial process. “We’d come across slates with very simple and vague descriptions instead of the more comprehensive ones we’re used to,” Murawski adds. “In one case, there was a scene identified as ‘wagon master’ that we couldn’t figure out for the longest time, till somebody noticed there was a poster on the wall for the John Ford picture Wagon Master!” Welles’ innovative use of sound was clear in his landmark first feature, Citizen Kane, with its overlapping dialogue taken right from his own radio adaptations. But during Welles’ indie film period, he experienced enormous problems with sound, often having to dub many of his characters himself because of original-sound issues and actor availability. “While for the most part, we had a pristine picture – Gary did a great job shooting, especially given that so much was shot on reversal stock, which is so unforgiving when it comes to exposure – the sound was a disaster,” Murawski admits. “The 4K scans were just for picture, so I was cutting without sound and having to read lips while checking against the scripts.” Part of the problem was that the original quarter-inch Nagra tapes were lost, so for the bulk of shooting, there was no audio except for the work track, plus a Beta SP tape from Gary Graver’s assembly of the film, created during the 1990s. “Supervising sound editor Daniel Saxlid, dialog editor Anna MacKenzie and [re-recording] mixer Scott Millan performed miracles,” Murawski relates. “For one scene, they started with only that borderline unusable Beta SP sound but worked with filters and digital cleanup tools until it went from unintelligible to very solid and clear. Orson had chopped up all the audio tracks, so we were forever trying to reconstitute trims. The tracks had never been coded, either. So things got pieced together almost a syllable at a time in some cases.” Murawski brought on Paul Hart to augment the editorial effort before employing Post Haste to get the audio digitized. “Sometimes I’d use an alternate audio take and try to fit that in,” he

63


notes. “For some cases, I trimmed or doubled up frames, to make the cadence of the mouth match the sound. It sounds weirdly counterintuitive, but it worked. Since most of the cast had passed away, and even those still alive like Peter [Bogdanovich] didn’t sound the way they did then, we also worked with sound-alikes, though that approach was employed as judiciously as possible, sometimes only a word or a part of a word at any one time.” The “whatever-works feel” in so many of Welles’ later films also informed the post effort. Murawski says he rescued a speaker from an old drive-in theater and put the film-within-a-film’s sound through that, “which made it unique and tinny. It sounded just like what you’d get when putting [a drive-in speaker] on your car window. So in addition to all the cutting-edge digital tools, we saw places where old analog techniques also worked.” “Negative cutter Mo Henry had probably [conformed] a thousand movies, but some of the things Orson did escaped even her at first,” Rymsza adds. “There were pieces of film with string through the perforations, and that continued to stump us all until Bob figured out those were the in and out points for 16 to 35mm blowups!” Once Welles embarked on his self-funding period, he learned how to be creative without deep-pocket resources, an approach which served him well on Wind. “With Kane, he didn’t yet know the rules or what was practical for film, and came up with impossible ideas,” Murawski explains. “Nobody told him, ‘You can’t do a shot with people at these different parts of the frame both in sharp focus.’ But he had Gregg Toland [ASC] and [optical effects guru] Linwood Dunn to transform these notions into workable imagery. Even though it was all on a much smaller scale, Graver worked the same way for Orson, staging action to take advantage of reflections during the party. At Welles’ direction, [art

64

director] Polly Platt created fantastic miniature pinnacles through which Hannaford’s actors move in the film-within-a-film, which again shows how [Welles] knew to utilize techniques that were both startling and convincing.” Ultimately, Welles’ in-camera visual magic would require a measure of modern digital augmentation. When Rymsza approached Industrial Light & Magic, “it was with the idea of doing a dozen or so shots, but they wound up doing about a hundred. We knew that the [small people] at the party had to be put into some shots, because Orson had spoken of wanting to pick those shots up in Spain, so they wound up being shot by ILM, along with the Roman candles.” While much publicity about ILM focuses on their epic 2000-shot shows, VFX supervisor John Knoll says the company has ongoing relationships with many filmmakers and often works on smaller, indie projects. With Wind, it evolved considerably from when [ILM general manager] Lynwen Brennan first spoke with Frank Marshall, who says, “ILM saw other points where visual effects could help address story points and create coverage that wasn’t in the original shoot. Probably half of the shots required them to manufacture new elements.” Those included close views as Hannaford fires a shotgun at mannequins representing his leading


THE ONCE AND FUTURE MAVERICK

They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead documentary looks beyond all the lost Rosebuds at Orson Welles, the filmmaker by Kevin H. Martin

Walt Whitman’s Song of Myself, which includes the words: “Do I contradict myself? Very well then I contradict myself. (I am large, I contain multitudes.),” was written decades before Orson Welles was born, yet they seem to encapsulate the acclaimed filmmaker. A more current roadmap to Welles’ unique genius can also be found in Morgan Neville’s new feature documentary, They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead, which centers on Welles’ efforts to complete what would be his last opus, The Other Side of the Wind, a film filled with such multitudes. Though Neville has long been a follower of Welles, he never seriously considered a documentary on the great man. “There have already been documentaries, plus so many books written about him, that I didn’t see a fresh way in,” he admits. That changed when he read Josh Karp’s book Orson Welles’s Last Movie, which provided an exhaustive history on Wind. “I felt that if I could get my hands on the raw footage, it would make for a genuinely amazing documentary. There’s a popular notion that at the end of his life, Orson was reduced to doing wine commercials, but he was always making films – they just weren’t getting released. The exception was F for Fake, which is one of the most important films of my life, and instrumental in my pursuing documentaries as a career.” Neville met with producers Frank Marshall and Filip Rymsza, who were squaring away the legal issues to finish Wind, and made a deal. “If they could get the footage, I would make a documentary while they finished the feature,” Neville recounts. “This was well before Netflix

was even involved, so there was no thought of coordinating the releases of the projects; they were very much separate entities. Later, Netflix said, ‘We want everything!’” Neville labored to deliver visuals from Welles’ other unrealized projects that hadn’t been heavily seen, in one instance a clip of the unfinished The Merchant of Venice that was unearthed from a German archive. “Orson worked all over Europe, and there were bits of film and reels left everywhere as he moved around the world,” Neville describes. When the nearly 100 hours of dailies were made available, the documentarian reviewed everything. “What struck me initially was Orson’s decision to do a picture about a filmmaker nearing the end of his life who cannot finish his film,” he notes. “The resonances with his own life were evident, and when he altered his approach to the film during those years of shooting, I think those reflected changes in his own life. “Of course in choosing to document this,” he adds, “I became another reflection of Welles and his films. It’s like one of those Russian nesting dolls where there is always another smaller one inside, but Welles was nothing if not complex. He was kaleidoscopic!” This is borne out by the various interviews conducted by Neville, many of which contradict each other. “I thought I could get by with just a few primary interview sources, but everybody seemed to have something of value, so we wound up with over 40 separate interviewees,” he laughs. “‘Was [Welles] a person who created bad luck or was victimized by bad luck?’ I think there’s truth in both of those statements. For

many of the interviewees, Wind was their first professional film experience, so it is indelible in their minds for that as well as working with Orson Welles. It became a chorus of voices that took us through the story.” [Neville elected to shoot the interviews in natural light and to avoid focusing on or identifying the speaker, which could distract attention away from the material being related.] Those voices relate anecdotes citing both Welles’ eccentricities and his genius, but also speak to his outlook on life. “His feature film work is very serious, but everybody associated with him talked of this playful, mischievous streak, which is another aspect that most people never heard much about,” Neville concludes. “True to Shakespeare, there’s a linkage running through his whole life between comedy and tragedy. Like his very personal film, Chimes at Midnight, Orson was very Falstaffian.”

LOCAL 600 CREW Narrative Director of Photography Danny Grunes Interview Directors of Photography Nicola Marsh Shana Hagan Graham Willoughby Catherine Goldschmidt 1st ACs Ben Fredman Dagan Reinhardt

65


man (who went AWOL shooting the filmwithin-the-film and was a constant source of speculation and conversation among the partygoers). The pyrotechnic dummy work was never filmed, so ILM rigged breakaway figures with bullet hits, which were shot at the facility’s former Marin facility, now occupied by 32Ten Studios. [Other environmental VFX work was handled nearby at Whiskytree.] The rest of their contributions involved working atop existing plates. “There are scenes in the film with audiences watching Jake’s movie,” Knoll elaborates, “but there wasn’t anything that showed the view looking from behind the audience that included what they saw up on screen. This included the drive-in [which utilized a period-specific piece of stock footage for a since-defunct theater] and a scene early on when the film is being screened for an executive. We created overthe-shoulder views for the drive-in and the party screening, looking past the audience from the projection booth.”

66

Murawski encountered some hard facts about the state of print projection at the end of post. “While finishing our answer print at FotoKem, I asked about getting the film into shipping reels and Goldberg cases. I was told they now put them on cores in a cardboard box. I couldn’t believe that film shipping cases weren’t still being manufactured!” Ultimately some rusty old cans were uncovered. “So The Other Side of the Wind is a movie shot in the 70s, going out to theaters in cans that are just as old as the movie itself.” Marshall, Rymsza, and Murawski all expressed admiration for how ahead-of-thecurve Welles was with the found-footage feel of Wind. “People talk about The Blair Witch Project as a landmark indie film, but I think [the 1980 Italian horror movie] Cannibal Holocaust was way ahead of that with how it mixed formats and presented its story,” Murawski declares. “And Orson was ahead of even that by eight years. Nowadays people would shoot a party, like the center part of this film, with their

iPhones, so this is a precursor to that as well; plus there’s the whole reality-show feel to the proceedings. In all these ways, Orson was ahead of his time with his storytelling and visual choices; and that was always the case. You can listen to his ‘War of the Worlds’ broadcast and realize he was playing with the faux-documentary approach in 1938, while Citizen Kane (1941) has the ‘News on the March’ newsreel.” The producers say early responses to The Other Side of the Wind reflect how Welles forever defied expectations. “During a screening for filmmakers earlier this year,” recalls Rymsza, “many viewers said they had to just let go and experience it for what it is – a densely layered, increasingly self-referential and personal drama. Also, the story is clearly ‘meta’ right from the get-go; Bogdanovich’s Otterlake character cites a tricky reflection scene as another ‘Hannaford shot,’ speaking of that director’s style, but then the reflection you actually see at that point is none other than Wind DP Gary Graver.”


67


THE D

68

A


R K E S T

-

BY

TED ELRICK

PHOTOS BY

M AT T KEN N EDY

K N I G H T DICK CHENEY WAS AT THE HEART OF AMERICAN GOVERNMENT FOR A

NEW

FILM

BY

OSCAR-WINNER

ADAM

MCKAY

MORE BRINGS

THAN THE

POWER

THREE BROKER

OUT

OF

DECADES; THE

SHADOWS.

69


70


In a scene from writer/director Adam McKay’s new film, George W. Bush (Sam Rockwell) talks with Dick Cheney (Christian Bale) and says, “I want you to be my V.P. I want you. You’re my Vice.” After some negotiation over chicken drumsticks, Cheney, then Halliburton Chairman and CEO, agrees, and through his behind the scenes strategies, soon becomes (arguably) the most powerful vice president in American history. Vice, from Annapurna, Gar y Sanchez and Plan B explores Dick Cheney over a forty-year period and features a strong cast that includes Amy Adams (Lynn Cheney), Steve Carell (Donald Rumsfeld), Tyler Perry (Colin Powell) and LisaGay Hamilton (Condoleezza Rice).

F

Fans of the Oscar-winning subprime-mortgage feature, The Big Short (2015), know that McKay enjoys making complex subjects work as both cinema and entertainment. The director, whose background is mostly in comedy, observes that The Big Short made use of complex language to separate reality from people. “The idea with Vice was that Dick Cheney is one of the most brilliant bureaucratic insiders in U.S. history. But because he did it in such a boring, monotone way, I don’t think that people really understood or cared. When you’re lucky enough to have collaborators like [Director of Photography] Greig Fraser and Christian Bale, you’re able to bring this sort of paper-shuffling story to life in a way you can’t with other mediums.” Vice producers Dede Gardner and Jeremy Kleiner, both Oscar winners and co-presidents of Brad Pitt’s Plan B Entertainment (12 Years a Slave, Moonlight, Selma and The Big Short), who co-produced with Gary Sanchez Productions and Annapurna, say Greig Fraser, ASC, ACS, the cinematographer McKay selected, was a perfect fit. “We had worked with Greig before on Killing Them Softly (2012),” Gardner reflects, “and his technical talents go unrivaled. He’s interested in filming the most dimensional characters possible. Kleiner adds that Fraser also has an “extremely positive energy that is infectious. He’s like a force of nature, and for a film that is epic, sprawling and travels across five decades, and involves the complexity of make-up and prosthetics, looks and different time periods, it was a great match.” Vice is not adapted from any one source. It came about when McKay caught the flu following The Big Short’s awards run and was on the couch for a few weeks. “Somebody had given me a book on Cheney a year before and I just randomly plucked it off the shelf,” he recalls. “I said, ‘Holy God, I didn’t know that, I didn’t know that.’ I started reading articles, ordered more books, and before I knew it, I thought, ‘There’s a movie here.’” “Our goal was to show the whole scope and breadth and how [Cheney] was a visionary in some ways and an opportunist in others, as he surfed this radical change happening in America from the late 70s to where we are now,” continues McKay, who says the company

71


hired a journalist to conduct interviews, with all the information supplied thoroughly vetted. “[Cheney] had some incredibly deft maneuvers politically throughout his life,” Fraser adds. “When you’re in that many administrations, winning and losing, you very quickly learn how to play the system. For someone to be able to see through those layers of bureaucracy and to understand how to manipulate those layers to his own end, that’s genius. “For me, as an Australian, and an outsider,” he continues, “to see how this guy was able to get his voice heard in every section of government was remarkable. The subject is complex, and if the visuals were equally complicated, it would make it hard to understand. Adam and his editor, Hank Corwin, who did The Big Short, love different formats and ways of shooting, and I was into that as well. But we made quite sure we kept the imagery fairly simple.” Simplicity in photography, of course, does not necessarily mean an easy shoot. McKay and Fraser shot on film using a combination of Kodak 5213 and 5218, processing by FotoKem. “Adam and I both have a preference for film,” Fraser describes. “But it’s not right for every project. For this, we were shooting in L.A., with a very strong cast, so we didn’t feel we’d be shooting a ton of stock every day. We tested digital, but we ended up with film because it felt like a much better fit.” To give a subjective nod to each time period, the production incorporated a wide variety of cameras and lenses. Of the approach, Gardner

72

“WE WENT FROM THE 1970S RCA TUBE CAMERAS TO THE SONY CAMERAS IN THE 1980S, THEN DIGITAL BETACAM AND BETA SP.” A-camera 1st AC Bill Coe


notes, “you want to trigger, in viewers, the way their memory is of that time. You want to expand the space with which [viewers] will receive the imagery because it will be recalling something they understand without articulating it. The visual tone of this film strikes all these chords in ascending order of the way I took in news, not only in its content but how it looked. It’s an incredibly subtle yet generous delivery system because it honors people’s experience over time.” A-camera First Assistant Bill Coe says it was fun to move freely among many different formats. “We went from the 1970s RCA tube cameras to the Sony cameras in the 1980s, then Digital Betacam and Beta SP,” he explains. “There was a helpful gentleman named Steve Irwin, with a company called Playback Technologies, who does 24-frame playback. But [Irwin] can also find these rare video gems; [McKay and Fraser] wanted to use the images in the film as is, not show them on monitors. “For me, pulling focus, we tried to get some HD video taps for the film cameras, but they were all out on Westworld, so we were stuck with old NTSC taps. And that was going backward in time!” Coe laughs. “We also had some special mounted diopters that fit right on front of the lenses – instead of using them in a matte box you just screwed them on the front. We did quite a bit of hand-held stuff with them. I’d hook up my monitor and try to see what was going on, but it wasn’t perfect. Of course, they were never looking for the shot that is perfect all the way through. Sometimes Greig would just grab the barrel and do the follow focus himself.” B-camera First AC Paul Metcalf says 35mm

Cooke Anamorphic, 35mm Elite Spherical, as well as 16mm, 8mm and multiple video formats were all employed. “We also had these Todd-AO anamorphics from Keslow,” Coe continues. “They had big personalities and little idiosyncrasies, like our favorite, a Todd 50, which had a big tilt so half of it was sort-of out of focus and the other half was in focus, like a swing and shift lens; it had a mechanical problem. We looked at it in prep, and Greig said just leave it. The left-hand side was soft, but he would frame it up, and we got some really interesting shots and it became our favorite lens.” “We had to be ready at any time to jump from anamorphic to spherical, 16mm, 8mm or one of our video cameras,” adds Metcalf. “We had eight film cameras on our truck with a two-camera crew, and at any moment any camera could be working.” Among the cameras used on the film were the ARRI ST, ARRI LT, ARRI 235, ARRI 435, ARRI 416, ARRI 3C, 8mm (supplied by Pro8mm), and video cameras that included Ikegami, Betacam, Panasonic WV, Palmcorder, JVC TK and a Canon ES400V. “The awesome folks at Keslow Camera, VP Brad Wilson, Marketing Rep Nick Lanata, and Service Technician Mitch Rutherford – kept those cameras running without a hitch,” Coe says. “For as much older gear as we had, it was a pretty bugfree shoot.” Cheney’s life and McKay’s script afforded many varied scenarios. “We shot a Vietnam sequence that was following a troop of Marines out of a helicopter, running into a rice paddy and

73


everyone getting mowed down,” relates Barry Idoine, who was Additional Photography Camera Operator. “There were sequences in the hills for when Cheney was a cowhand in Wyoming and then inserts of his heart attack. They had models of hearts in various states of healthiness so we’d shoot them. We spent some time in D.C. trying to get various scenes between snow showers. “I operated nearly every camera they brought in,” Idoine adds. “I would shoot in 35 and then the same scene in Super 8 or 16mm. However, 16 is so good now, it’s hard to see the loss in quality. The drop from 35 to Super 8 was more visceral, but it didn’t make it feel like the Zapruder [home movie film of the JFK assassination]. There was just a sense of historical time travel for the audience.” Key Grip Ray Garcia reports some interesting sequences that challenged his grip team, such as the motion-control gantry camera required to skirt over a large 10×10 Monopoly-like game board, which had all the roads and rivers of Washington, D.C. and buildings that Cheney had influence over. “We made it ourselves,” Garcia says. “We used an Oculus head with a snorkel lens so we could have the camera floating above the game board and moving from one location to the next. Instead of going out and getting a Doggie Cam and Bolt motion-control system, we created our own freestanding gantry that was controlled

74

by our own computer, a poor man’s motion control. It was very effective.” Idoine says McKay asked him and Fraser to assist in the post lab work because even with all the period cameras for capture, the original period footage did not make for seamless edits. The degrading of imagery in post included tape transfer dubbing to get generational loss, FotoKem taking the 35mm negative and doing an optical reduction to 16mm and then blowing that back up to 35mm. “They did that a couple of times and sometimes where they pushed the IP to introduce grain,” Idoine recounts. “Mark Van Horne at FotoKem did a great job of going through our dailies work and applying extreme photochemical stretching. Even the hallway method was applied for one shot where he took the roll of negative, un-scrolled it, threw it down the hallway, dragged it back, reprinted and transferred for the DI.” DIT Dane Brehm came on any time actors were shot against a green screen and/or when the RED Helium was used for visual effects. “There was one sequence where Christian as Cheney is walking with the real George Bush, Sr.,” Brehm recalls. “My role was mostly with actor replacement, such as Sam Rockwell as George W. making the speech on an aircraft carrier. I worked the entire show, but not every day. I’d get pulled in once or twice a week for the green screen work and interface with the video engineer who handled the hard drives.” Much of Vice was shot on Sony’s Stage 30, a large space that helped create more efficient ways to light certain sets, like the Oval Office. Because of the heavy prosthetics involved for many of the actors, Gaffer Michael Bauman looked to use as many LEDs as possible to keep the heat down. Fraser also searched for ways to reduce power consumption on the set. “We had to light large areas so actors could walk through the White House and have ambient day or night lighting outside,” Baumann explains.


“WE DISCOVERED THAT 400 WATTS OF LED WAS EQUIVALENT TO A 6K SPACE LIGHT, A SIGNIFICANT REDUCTION IN POWER, CABLING, AND MANPOWER.” Gaffer Michael Bauman

photos above are courtesy of Gaffer Michael Bauman

75


“To get that with conventional incandescents would have required 120 to 150 Space Lights. We discovered that 400 watts of LED was equivalent to a 6K Space light, a significant reduction in power, cabling, and manpower.” “We talked to Lite Gear in Burbank and they suggested taking the LEDs we wanted and applying them to this 10-by-10 fireproof tarp material,” Bauman adds. “So we tried it and discovered that 1600 watts of LED were like five or six Space Lights. For daylight, you have to gel up, and for Space Lights you have bulb changes, but we didn’t have to worry about any of that.” McKay says that he hardly ever went over five takes, mostly because of the quality of the cast and familiarity with his approach. (Bale and Carell also starred in The Big Short.) “I was pretty dialed into how every actor works,” the director observes. “Occasionally I would lean on Greig a little bit more. ‘Boy Greig, that looked awfully beautiful; what do you think?’ And he might say, ‘I can get it a little bit better.’ That’s the spoils of working with people this good – Greig dials in it pretty quickly. He goes after it like a shark. It’s pretty amazing to watch.” For his part, Fraser says his main challenges on Vice were similar to those with Steve Carell in Foxcatcher (ICG November 2014) and the use of prosthetics on the actors. “I am very fussy about making sure we get it all in camera,” Fraser concludes. “We don’t want a whole series of pickup shots to do later or visual effects fixes due to the make-up. I think I found great partners with our make-up artist, Greg Cannom, and also Christian and Adam, who were so particular about the prosthetics. Christian changed his physique as well. He bulked up by eating too many pies, he’ll tell you. And the prosthetics added to that full look that Cheney had in office. As a crew and a group we all worked really hard, and I’m proud of that.”

76

LOCAL 600 CREW Director of Photography Greig Fraser, ASC A-Camera Operator Barry Idoine A-Camera 1st AC Bill Coe A-Camera 2nd AC Ryan Creasy B-Camera 1st AC Paul Metcalf B-Camera 2nd AC Amanda Levy Loaders Colleen Mleziva Renee Treyball Still Photographer Matt Kennedy Unit Publicist Spooky Stevens



GENERAT I O N DIVERSITY OF EXPERIENCE AND YEAR’S GROUP OF

PASSION OF HEART DEFINE THIS UP-AND-COMING GUILD MEMBERS

BY

MA RG OT CA RMICHA EL LEST ER

PHOTOS BY

KC B A ILE Y HILLARY BRON WYN GAYLE , SMPSP NICOL A GOODE , SMPSP C A RA HOWE KYLE KA PLA N KELSEY MCN E A L J OYCE RUD OLPH SA RA H SHAT Z

NEXT 78


Greta Zozula on location for What Breaks the Ice / Photo Courtesy of Brandon Kelley

Every Local 600 member works toward one thing: capturing the best story. From DP’s to publicists, our colleagues endeavor to connect with the audience via strong story telling. Regardless of role, Guild members exhibit the same crucial characteristics: commitment and calm and creative problem solving. Of course, exceptional filmmaking and extraordinary skill have always been the hallmarks of this union. What’s different today is clearly diversity: more women and more people of color are joining the Guild’s ranks, improving the ability for filmmakers to create and tell stories with deeper perspective and different points of view. For this year’s look at the next generation, we’re doing a wide shot and focusing on every classification within the Guild. Margot Carmichael Lester introduces us to a handful of up-and-comers making an industry name through talent, passion, dedication and skill.

79


“ The astute filmmaker preserves the quality of the craft while evolving new ideas. ”

ROBERT E. ARNOLD, SOC

STE ADIC AM /OPERAT OR YEARS IN GUILD: 7 LOCATION: LOS ANGELES HOMETOWN: CHICAGO, IL

It was a high school film/broadcast production class and a visit to set that motivated Robert E. Arnold, SOC, to give up his plans to be a veterinarian. “My mother gave me a Polaroid camera for my 10th birthday, then a Hi-8 camera when I was a junior in high school and taking a film/broadcast class. That first high school film ignited my passion for filmmaking,” the 34-year-old remembers. Arnold’s interest was further flamed when his dad connected him to a Teamsters friend working on Roll Bounce. “I was introduced to multiple departments, including electric, which was looking to replace its intern because of a family emergency,” Arnold adds. “The Best Boy Electrician told me that if I wanted to be a successful cinematographer, I should understand the fundamentals of lighting and he offered me the intern position.” Arnold went on to Columbia College, in Chicago, to study cinematography. During that time, he worked in the electric department on the TV series Prison Break. In 2006, IATSE Local 476 studio mechanics invited Arnold to its six-

80

day workshop to become a journeyman – he was a Union member even before earning his BFA in 2008. Arnold later earned an MFA from AFI in 2011, the same year he logged his first operating job on The Walking Dead, Season 2, lensed by Rohn Schmidt. More recently, Arnold operated A-camera and Steadicam on the multiple-Emmy-awardwinning Big Little Lies, and is now operating B-camera and Steadicam on ABC’s Grownish for Mark Doering-Powell, ASC. “Robert will shoot everything he can – he never passes on opportunities that come up in his path,” describes Todd A. Dos Reis, ASC [ICG September 2018], who worked with Arnold on Necessary Roughness. “He was always ready to jump in and find a shot to make a scene shine,” Dos Reis adds. “He always asked questions as if he were a DP. The next generation could learn from Robert that as an up-and-coming DP, you should be a sponge and always be willing to learn and soak up knowledge from the DP’s and crew around you.” The drive to achieve, Arnold says, is fueled by the fact that “Black Americans are under-represented in cinematography. In my undergraduate camera seminar class, I recall seeing the Kodak board that honored a select group of cinematographers and only included Ernest Dickerson, ASC, Joseph W. Calloway, ASC, and later, AFI professor Bill Dill, ASC. It astonishes me that these men were so outnumbered. Though trailblazers in their own right, many of those listed had yet to DP a blockbuster movie. It was at that moment I decided to dedicate my life’s work to becoming a role-model ASC cinematographer. “Being artistically safe gets you nowhere,” he continues. “Study the craft and take risks. The astute filmmaker preserves the quality of the craft while evolving new ideas. The innovative filmmaker is the successful filmmaker.” Johnny Simmons, ASC, who helped Arnold land his second operator job with Bruce Finn, cinematographer of The Game, Season 5, says Arnold has “the enthusiasm and passion of an artist and the intellect of a technician; those qualities melt into each other on the set. He comes to work, absorbs everything, and gets the job done.”


81

KELSEY MCNEAL


CAROLINA COSTA

DIRECT OR OF PHOT OGR A PHY

82

NICOLA GOODE, SMPSP

YEARS IN GUILD: 1.5 LOCATIONS: LOS ANGELES & MEXICO CITY HOMETOWN: RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL


Carolina Costa knew she wanted a career behind the camera. “I started with photojournalism because I wanted to travel the world and report on issues affecting people’s lives,” the 33-year-old says. “But I felt like it was hard to change people’s perspectives journalistically, so I got into films because I could change the environment creatively. I’ve left photojournalism behind, but it definitely still influences my work.” Another influence: Mexico, home of legendary DP’s like Chivo, Navarro and Prieto. “Of course I am influenced by the cinematography in Mexico, but not just that,” she notes. “When I see my work I see a lot of the naturalism from Mexican cinema. I’m influenced by their muralists, painters, music, food, and how they dress. That is the amazing thing about Mexico – it has culture in every corner.” Costa trained with the British Guild of Camera Technicians, and worked around Europe on narrative and documentary films. She moved to Los Angeles for an MFA in cinematography at AFI. Her thesis project, Way In Rye, was short-listed for the Student Academy Awards and accepted at Camerimage in 2014. Her short film Contrapelo premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival and was shortlisted for the Oscars in 2015. She lensed Las Elegidas (The Chosen Ones), directed by David Pablos, which premiered at Cannes, competed for Un Certain Regard in 2015, and received 13 Ariel Award nominations. (She took the trophy for Best Cinematography.) Studying film and working all over the world makes Costa fluent in the language of world cinema. Neil Solberg was her gaffer on Icebox. “We had conversations on set about obscure cinematography from strange old movies and about lighting concepts of the Baroque art period,” he recalls. “She’s a walking encyclopedia, and this comes from a passionate love for lighting and storytelling.” That knowledge was critical to Director Minhal Baig, who selected Costa for HALA. The film follows a Muslim teenager

reconciling a sexual awakening with faith and family. “A lot of my references are from foreign films,” Baig explains. “We exchanged lists of top 25 movies, and I hadn’t seen a lot of hers. I thought, ‘Here’s a cinematographer who has a deep understanding of a cinema I haven’t been exposed to.’ I was so excited to bring our references together to make this movie.” Costa was mentored by Sue Gibson, BSC – one of the few women in that British association and its first female president. “When I was a camera assistant, there were no women or people of color on the camera team. I didn’t know it was possible till I met her,” Costa remembers. “It’s important to open the industry to Latina and Black women, so there are more chances for new stories and experiences to be told. That’s why I mentor Latina girls.” She advises her protégées about communications and working effectively with people from different cultures and experiences. “You have to know how to keep your integrity while meeting producers and directors and financiers’ expectations, and managing the camera team, grip and electric team,” she concludes. “As cinematographers, we love the technique and technology – and that’s critically important – but we need to be a manager and psychologist, too.”

“ When I see my work I see a lot of the naturalism from Mexican cinema. I’m influenced by their muralists, painters, music, food, and how they dress.”

83


JOSE M. DE LOS ANGELES 2 ND AC

YEARS IN GUILD: 4 LOCATION: BURBANK HOMETOWN: PATERSON, NJ

84


“ Jose’s like a safety net – if something goes wrong, he always has an idea for how to fix it.” Tommy Maddox-Upshaw

NICOLA GOODE, SMPSP

Jose M. De Los Angeles can’t leave his house without a camera. “It’s about just having it with me in case I see something I want to capture,” he explains. “In my backpack, I carry both a film and a digital camera to have an option based on mood and tastes. Like many of my peers, I want to become a cinematographer. Photography is practice for the future, allowing me to develop my knowledge of lighting, color and framing one frame at a time. I also develop and scan my own film. I’ll always do this – it’s something I can’t live without.” Originally pursuing a career as an auto technician, De Los Angeles’ interest in photography was born from a high-school assignment to tell a story visually. “I decided to make video that included tons of Ken Burns-style editing with music playing in the background, which I thought was the best thing in the class,” he laughs. Based on that experience, he decided to study editing at Full Sail University, in Florida. There, he switched to cinematography and was the focus puller on Flo Rida’s music video “Zoosk Girl.” After earning a Bachelor of Science in film studies in 2010, he interned at Revolution Cinema Rentals in L.A., which allowed him to build the knowledge and contacts necessary to advance his career and sustain himself as a 2nd AC. His mechanical chops came in handy during his

first gig as a 2nd AC on The Malibu Tapes. “The DP was running backwards in the dark on rough terrain, which led to his taking a spill with the camera,” De Los Angeles recalls. “Nothing major occurred, but some debris entered the fan housing. I managed to convince the 1st AC to allow me to disassemble an ALEXA without prior knowledge of how to do it. I took a gamble that led to success.” De Los Angeles’ blend of photographic and mechanical jobs make him indispensable to DP’s. “Jose’s like a safety net – if something goes wrong, he always has an idea for how to fix it,” says Tommy Maddox-Upshaw, who’s worked with De Los Angeles on several projects, including Straight Outta Compton [ICG August 2015]. “He’s all about it from the tech side and the creative side. He’s always turning me onto gear and doing modifications. That’s a great asset.” So, apparently, is De Los Angeles’ love of coffee, which he grinds, brews and shares with crew and cast. “These are things people remember him for,” Maddox-Upshaw notes. “Jose understands that you have to make yourself memorable so people request you. He knows how to be an asset to production, so people want him around.” De Los Angeles remains humble. “The first time I saw my name scroll on the Straight Outta Compton credits was huge. It was was my ‘Momma, I made it!’ moment. My family and friends would send me pictures after they watched it because they were so proud. Some even told me that they yelled in the theater when they saw my name. I thought it was a little ridiculous but, hey, it felt good. That was a huge tipping point for me, and those little moments are what keep me going.”

85


86

NICOLA GOODE, SMPSP


HILARY BRONWYN GAYLE, SMPSP UNI T ST ILL PHOT OGRAPHER YEARS IN GUILD: 9 LOCATION: LOS ANGELES HOMETOWN: LAKE CHARLES, LA

“Starting out, I expected to be viewed as an individual entity or even an outsider, but I have always felt like a welcome and integral part of the crew, rather than just a stranger sharing space on the truck,” says 36-year-old unit photographer Hilary Bronwyn Gayle. “Then there are the photo editors, unit publicists, with whom we work closely and support. It goes beyond our connection to cameras or publicity. As still photographers, we rely on and serve all the departments.” Gayle embraces the photojournalism aspects of BTS and EPK photography, and goes beyond the de rigueur to get more robust images. “Hilary integrates herself with the whole crew and is interwoven with each department, camera, art et cetera,” describes Michelle Graham, head of development and production at Everyman Pictures. “She works with the film and its crew, not for it, making herself an invaluable part of the creative process.” Several recent assignments of Gayle’s featured complex and choreographed dolly moves and crane shots. “I worked very closely with the grips to ensure I was able to ‘dance’ with them and get the coverage I needed,” she explains. Graham also values her grace and sincerity. “Hilary has a talent for making everyone she comes into contact with feel at ease, which is paramount for a person in her position, so close to the actors,” Graham explains. “Secondarily, but still impressively, there is no location that can stymie her; she can get into almost any spot to get the best shot, earning herself our nickname for her on set — ‘the Ninja.’” Some of Gayle’s favorite assignments have been to recreate historic photographs for the Art Department, on features like Trumbo, All the Way and Highwaymen. “I

“Hilary can get into almost any spot to get the best shot, earning herself our nickname for her on set — ‘the Ninja.’” Michelle Graham Everyman Pictures

feel really inspired working on period pieces regardless of era, and particularly historical and biographical works,” she states. It’s how Gayle got the attention of Jim Denault, ASC, who met her on Trumbo while shooting footage to evaluate the actor’s costumes, hair and make-up. “She was off to one side making stills of them for the set decorator … to replace the faces of the actual Dalton and Cleo Trumbo with Bryan Cranston’s and Diane Lane’s in some archival still photos,” Denault recalls. “When we saw the final results of her shoot on set, I thought the composites were impressively seamless.” Gayle got into the business while studying at Savannah College of Art and Design. After earning a BFA in 2006, she completed the Still Photographer on Set course at the Maine Media Workshops, taught by Kerry Hayes. “An independent filmmaker invited me to take stills on a low-budget feature,” she recalls. “I had never considered a career in film and hadn’t even known there was a still photographer on movie sets. But after that first experience, I knew that this was what I wanted to do.” It’s been a busy year for Gayle, who was accepted into the Society of Motion Picture Still Photographers and currently serves on its board as secretary. She recently wrapped an untitled feature with director Noah Hawley and cinematographer Polly Morgan for Fox Searchlight, and is working on a still-unnamed feature with director Jay Roach and cinematographer Barry Ackroyd for Annapurna. “What sustains my love for this career,” Gayle concludes, “is that every job is a new experience presenting unique challenges, lessons, and opportunities.”

87


ERIKA HAGGERTY 2ND AC

YEARS IN GUILD: 4 LOCATION: ATLANTA HOMETOWN: PITTSBURGH, PA

“ A very wise 1st AC once told me, ‘Just stop and think,’ which is obvious, but not always easy. It’s important when things inevitably get crazy.” Erika Haggerty took an unusual path into the business. “I found editing while studying for my education degree – I was going to be a second-grade teacher,” she laughs. “I took an elective film-studies class where you got to know the camera and tried to see what you could create.” Haggerty, a varsity lacrosse player, took to it immediately. “When I realized I was skipping practice to work on it, I knew I loved it.” (Fun fact: she still stashes her lacrosse sticks in the car when she goes to work.) After leaving St. Vincent College in 2009, Haggerty was accepted to Point Park University’s Conservatory of Performing, studying editing and cinematography. After graduating in 2011, she moved to Los Angeles and worked as an assistant editor in television. She loved the work, but felt the set’s pull and decided to exit the editing suite for the camera department. Her first gig was as a camera PA on Abduction in 2009 with 1st AC Anthony Cappello, who says that the most important thing to understand about Erika is that once she commits she is all in. “Many people move up the ladder too quickly without properly learning the job they are currently in,” Cappello notes. “They seem to be sort of not realizing the importance of a good work ethic and genuine care for the job. Erika committed and then gave her best at every level.” Haggerty moved up to 2nd AC in 2014, working on the second season of the Cinemax series Banshee. She moved

88

to Atlanta in 2016, where her reputation has grown from consistent day player to company second. “I prefer features, but I love working on TV series as well,” she shares. “TV shows tend to be longer runs, and it’s nice getting so close and in tune with a crew versus day-playing or runand-gun documentaries.” Regardless of the genre or scope, the ability to stay calm and focused on set and on location is crucial to being a successful 2nd. “A very wise 1st AC once told me, ‘Just stop and think,’ which is obvious, but not always easy. It’s important when things inevitably get crazy,” she reflects. “Since then, I’ve learned how to act, not react.” People also like working with Haggerty because of her positive attitude and eagerness to learn. “I knew when I decided to use Erika as a 2nd AC that she didn’t have tons of experience in the position, but her attitude and hunger more than made up for that. I can teach her the rest of the job,” says Louis Smith, 1st AC on Fox’s The Passage. That’s something he wishes other upand-comers understood. “Attitude really makes all the difference in this business.” So what’s Haggerty’s advice for aspiring camera department members? “Don’t give up. Don’t quit halfway up the hill,” she counsels. “It is difficult. People don’t know you until they know you. And sometimes you have to take positions – like being a utility or something – that you don’t really want. But take whatever you can. Meet people. Observe and always be aware that there’s always something you can learn both in your department and others. And be genuine. People will remember that.”


89

KYLE KAPLAN


SPENCER HUTCHINS, SOC OPER AT OR

KYLE KAPLAN

YEARS IN GUILD: 8 LOCATION: ATLANTA HOMETOWN: TYLER, TX

90


Looking for a blend of art and science, Spencer Hutchins initially thought he’d become an architect. That changed after he started shooting videos with his friends and at his church, and discovered that cinematography also blended those two disciplines. “The fact that we also get to tell stories gives me everything I could dream of out of a job,” the 30-year-old operator notes. He attended Full Sail University, graduating in 2009 and moving to Los Angeles to begin a career as a camera assistant. “I did so many little features and music videos when I first started out, I’m not sure I could even say what my first job was in the industry,” he laughs. “My first big opportunity as a camera operator was on a television series called Scream Queens. I ended up doing both seasons.” Hutchins later lensed the short film Walker, which earned an ECA in 2016, and most recently has been operating and sometimes serving as DP on YoutubeRED’s TV series Step Up: High Water. He has since relocated to Atlanta, where he was working as a distant hire when Georgia’s industry was burgeoning. “I quickly tired of being away from my wife and two little girls,” he admits. With so much production in the ATL, the move made sense. “I haven’t stopped working, and we couldn’t be happier with our quality of life.” “Spencer’s a good man with good morals and a very strong work ethic,” says Joaquín Sedillo, ASC, DGA, who met Hutchins years ago and made him part of his permanent crew. “I don’t hire people I don’t trust as human beings first and foremost. I don’t care how talented you are, if you’re not a good person, I’m not interested in working with you. Spencer is [also] a wonderfully talented operator and DP. He makes quick decisions as to how to achieve the shot I’ve described to him and how to improve upon my vision – not to simply make a cool or fun shot, but to make a great shot that forwards the story, impacts the viewer and guides the story through the eyes of myself and the director.” Hutchins’ ability to leverage art and science is key to his success, according to writer/director Alan Rudolph, who first worked with Hutchins on Ray Meets Helen. “He understands the elusive magic of filmmaking, which is the key,” the director explains. “Spencer has instinctive talent and technical savvy. He understands the creative film process for the human endeavor it is, while maintaining thorough tech knowledge of the craft.

“ Spencer understands the creative film process for the human endeavor it is, while maintaining thorough tech knowledge of the craft.” writer/director Alan Rudolph

Spencer [has] the qualities of very talented cinematographers I have worked with at the beginning of their long arc. He has that steady confidence and command once a shot is worked out, mixed with the ability to be flexible at any turn.” The technology’s crucial, of course, but at some point, Hutchins says, you’ve got to go with what you know. “Whenever I have a tough shot or there’s pressure involved, I remind myself of the notes, positions, timing, etc.,” he says. “Then I take a breath and forget it all, letting instinct take over. If I can let those nerves go and just do, I’ve learned I have a better shot at it.”

91


“It has always been camera for me, since I was a small child,” says Operator Selene Richholt. Her mom and aunt were photographers, “so I was always watching them capturing the ephemeral and making it permanent. And my dad was a writer, so I was always around storytelling.” Richholt double majored in Film and English at Boston University, graduating magna cum laude in 2004. After earning her degree, she moved to New York City and landed a gig doing high-end event cinematography, shooting on film. “I was the entire camera department in one person – shooting, editing, ACing, directing, choosing film stock, et cetera,” she recalls. “I learned how to tell a story

in a situation that only happens once – no retakes.” It was great training for unscripted television, where capturing the action on fast-paced reality and live-event shows requires more than good camera work. “It’s different than other genres because audio is a huge part,” the 36-year-old explains. “We have to listen to what people are saying. I can’t tell the story if I can’t hear them. If I’m not listening, I’m just shooting b-roll.” It’s also a director’s medium. “We don’t have a DP a lot of times,” she notes. “The camera team is chosen by the director, so strong relationships with them are really important.” A major opportunity grew out of a

SELENE RICHHOLT, SOC OPERATOR

YEARS IN GUILD: 5 LOCATION: BROOKLYN HOMETOWN: SANTA FE, NM

fill-in role on Food Network’s Chopped, working with Michael Pearlman, DGA, who also helms Lifetime’s Project Runway All Stars. He brought her on full-time and they have since logged hundreds of days on set for a variety of projects. “I admire many things about Selene,” Pearlman says. “She’s a natural storyteller. She listens to people and instinctually knows what shots will best convey a story point. I direct a lot of multi-cam competition shows and there is a balance for an operator of following direction and then going rogue to find a new shot or capture something that would otherwise be missed. It takes confidence and also understanding of when you can pull off these kinds of moments. Selene excels at this and makes each show I do with her look better than it would without her. She tolerates the usual insanity of things that go wrong on set without losing her focus on what has to be done for the job. Selene’s operating is thoughtful, creative and solid at any millimeter on the lens. She’s a rock star!” The proof is in the pudding. In 2016, Richholt was part of the crew nominated for a James Beard Foundation Broadcast Media Award for visual and technical excellence for Food for Thought, Food for Life, directed by Susan Rockefeller. When not behind the camera, Richholt is committed to leading change within the Guild. “Unscripted is a wonderful place to be a woman in camera,” she says. “Still, I’d like to see more women’s representation in camera, specifically, and across Local 600 generally. When I joined in 2014, I was number 99 of female operators – now there are 129 of us. And there’s a lot of opportunity for our Union to gain a greater market share in unscripted. I want to be a part of making that happen.”

“ Selene’s operating is thoughtful, creative and solid at any millimeter on the lens. She’s a rockstar!” Michael Pearlman, DGA

92


93

SARAH SHATZ


94

KC BAILEY


“ I feel proud to be a part of the change that is happening in a Hollywood that’s embracing the power of women and diversity.”

RACHAEL ROTH UNI T PUBL ICI S T YEARS IN GUILD: 4 LOCATION: ATLANTA HOMETOWN: DALLAS, TX

“I’m extremely introverted. I don’t love crowds. That’s funny for someone who’s in public relations, I know,” admits Rachael Roth, 28. But Roth’s natural curiosity and enthusiasm has made the publicist position a good fit. “I get to hop from one project to the other,” she adds. “One day I’m learning about NASA and the basic optimal trajectory for a launch vehicle, the next I’m trying to learn the dance steps to a Pitch Perfect routine with super fans. Even after working with choreography legends like Aakomon Jones, I’m still outrageously uncoordinated.” In fact, Roth didn’t plan a career as a publicist or even in the entertainment industry. “I dabbled with the idea of being a vet or even a photographer for National Geographic. So I decided to go to school to study economics and art history!” she laughs. After graduating from Loyola University of New Orleans in economics and Tulane with a minor in art history, she landed a gig with a Crescent City ad agency. An impending transfer to the Houston office prompted her to find a reason to stay in New Orleans. “I met a unit publicist, Claire Raskind, who opened her arms to me and told me everything she knew about unit publicity.” Roth’s first gig was on the Sony Classics tier film The Final Girls. “I am a huge horror fan – especially 80s slasher films – so to get to work on Todd Strauss-Schulson’s spoof on an 1980s slasher was a dream,” she reports. “Since then, I’ve had the opportunity to work with some amazing

female filmmakers, including Trish Sie, the director of Pitch Perfect 3, and Jennifer Yu Nelson, the director of The Darkest Minds [ICG August 2018]. I feel proud to be a part of the change that is happening in a Hollywood that’s embracing the power of women and diversity. We have a long way to go, but I definitely felt a sense of pride turning in press kits for films like The Darkest Minds, which stars actor, musician and activist Amandla Stenberg as the heroine. Amandla, who is biracial, is not only a leading voice for her generation but also kind and emotionally intelligent. She’s paving the way for the next wave of young actors, as Jennifer and Trish are for filmmakers.” Roth says her philosophy on set is simple: balance priorities with patience. “I know it’s cliché, but making the movie always comes first – the publicity and marketing needs fit in there where they can,” she reflects. “Your co-workers on set need to trust that you’re organized and will get what you need whether it’s an actor for a photo shoot or an interview in the realistic amount of time you’ve prepped everyone for. Once that trust is instilled, it’s about knowing when to push to make it happen and when to sit back and wait.” The approach wins fans, even among some tough customers. “I despise publicists,” laughs Executive Producer John Starke (The Darkest Minds). “But Rachael is an exception. She’s great. In a job that’s all over the place, where you’re dealing with press and cast and all kinds of people, she is great in all facets of her job and pleasant to be around. Rachael maintains a certain focus – the good of the film – that’s very apparent and very appreciated.”

95


96

JOYCE RUDOLPH


ALISA TYRRILL DIRECT OR OF PHOT OGRAPHY YEARS IN GUILD: 6 LOCATION: SEATTLE HOMETOWN: MERCER ISLAND, WASH.

“ Problem-solving for me is often letting go of how I thought the scene should look, and deciding the best course of action with the parameters I have right now.”

Seattle, once the jumping off point for the Alaskan Gold Rush, is now a busy hub of film and TV production; ICG cinematographer Alisa Tyrrill says that one thing she loves about working in Seattle is the community feel of the film industry. “We all work together frequently, which really promotes close relationships. “ Tyrrill, 30, describes. “There’s also a lot of natural beauty here in the landscapes of the forest, water, mountains, and even desert if you head east a bit. This is great for filming, and also just for living, so there are a lot of people dedicated to creating as robust an industry as possible here.” Growing up in the Great Pacific Northwest, Tyrrill always wanted to be a filmmaker. “I didn’t know the specifics or logistics at the time, but I knew I was profoundly affected by movies and I wanted to be a part of making them,” she remembers. “I can feel connected with someone I’ve never met or with a fictional character. I can learn lessons from events I didn’t go through. Watching some scenes can feel meditative and even transcendent. I wanted to be a part of that.” After graduating from the University of Washington in 2010, she responded to a Craigslist ad for an office intern on Grassroots. From there, she AC’d on features, shorts, commercials, and music videos. Last summer, she lensed Language Arts, directed by Cornelia Duryée, based on the Stephanie Kallos novel about a family with an autistic son. “Being

able to help convey that story visually was a real gift,” she adds. “It’s very motivating when it feels like an important story to tell.” Tyrrill is known for her collegial and collaborative style. “Film is intrinsically collaborative with a lot of moving pieces. Any small thing can go awry at any given time necessitating immediate changes,” explains director Sudeshna Sen, who’s worked on five projects with Tyrrill, including Mehndi, which screened at the Seattle International Film Festival, among others. “Alisa’s ability to envision a scene and capture the highlights makes her an ideal DP. I love how prepared she is, with not only one plan but two or three backup scenarios in case something goes wrong!” Preparation and problem solving are two sides of the same coin for Tyrrill. She likes being able to find a shot that she loves and “feels right” before setting the wheels in motion for the rest of the crew. “But the sun can change, blocking can change, and even the nature of the scene can change once the actors and director work it out together,” she adds. “So problem-solving for me is often letting go of how I thought the scene should look, and deciding the best course of action with the parameters I have right now – being a part of the change instead of letting your own preconceived ideas be a barrier.” Sen also admires Tyrrill’s ability to communicate. “Alisa is clear and direct in leading the camera department, and very receptive to the ideas of cast and crewmembers. Her positive energy and instinct foster trust among her team and collaborators. These are valuable skills that every aspiring director of photography can learn from.”

97


“ It’s been a slow and steady road, and I am finally doing exactly what I want to do. It’s an incredible feeling.”

GRETA ZOZULA “Even though at the age of nine I had no real idea what it meant, I knew I wanted to make movies,” says cinematographer Greta Zozula, 30. “My sister and I would write scripts, and take out our VHS or Hi8 camcorder and take turns acting out our stories. I thought for sure I wanted to be an editor because at the age of 12 it was really accessible; but once I went to college and discovered all that went into it, I knew that I had to be on set. Camera came very naturally, and I knew it was what I was meant to do.” “I love collaborative storytelling,” she adds. “The idea that you can bring a bunch of people together who may or may not know each other and tell a story that can change peoples lives and viewpoints is amazing to me.” Zozula studied cinematography at The School of Visual Arts, earning her BFA in 2010. She worked her way through the camera department on shorts and features. In 2014, she shot Immaculate Reception, which went to Sundance and also won an ECA. Her first narrative feature, Never Goin’ Back, also premiered at Sundance (in 2017), was bought by A24, and had its theatrical release in August 2018. A presence at festivals like Sundance has helped get her name out there. “DPs rely on reputation and word of mouth for a lot of work, especially in the beginning stages of their careers,” Zozula shares. “I can say that Sundance has been the most influential for me personally. The films that I have premiered there have been the biggest propellers of my career. I got my agent through Sundance, and a lot of new work. I’ve made invaluable

98

DIRECT OR OF PHOT OGRAPHY YEARS IN GUILD: 6 LOCATION: BROOKLYN HOMETOWN: ACME, PA

connections that I still have to this day. People respect film festivals, and when you can put that on your résumé, it means something.” Augustine Frizzell, writer, director and editor of Never Goin’ Back, appreciates Zozula’s commitment. “If Greta’s going to put her time and effort into making a film, she’s going to make sure it looks great,” Frizzell states. “She’s imaginative and resourceful and doesn’t let practical issues become excuses for less than stellar work. I love the idea that young up-and-coming filmmakers can watch someone like Greta take limited resources and turn out a gorgeous product.” Zozula’s patience and persistence stand out for DP Joe Anderson, whom she met when Anderson was 2nd Unit DP and Zozula was a loader on Martha Marcy May Marlene, another Sundance hit. “I think young DP’s feel a lot of pressure to try to be rock stars right out of film school,” Anderson explains. “So, I appreciate that Greta worked her way up through the camera department. She has taken the time to learn all aspects of the trade [and] inherently understands how a camera sees the world.” Leaving the security of being an in-demand operator and moving to DP was challenging and rewarding for Zozula, who just wrapped the feature Light from Light with director Paul Harrill and is in production on What Breaks the Ice. “It was hard at first, but I am so happy I did it the way that I did,” she says. “It’s been a slow and steady road, and I am finally doing exactly what I want to do. It’s an incredible feeling.”


99

CARA HOWE


100


The Cooke Look

®

One Look. All Speeds

MINI

S4I

T2.8 Primes

"Small Town Crime was larger in scope than almost anything I had previously done. To tackle this, we doubled up coverage using the A and B cameras side-by-side, shooting both at all times. We carefully chose our A-Cam lens based on our existing storyboards, then worked the ‘B’ camera frame to something that would cut well with the A-Cam in post. With the miniS4/i primes having such a large range of lenses, our two-camera coverage was extremely useful, especially during our larger action sequences. I had read a lot about Cooke lenses but this was the first time I’d used them on a feature. There was something about those images — something that always stuck with me and drew me in.

The Sony F55 has a very sharp sensor, and it was important to me to take the edge off. The miniS4/i lenses helped me do that but without making the image look soft. The bar scenes are where the warmth of these lenses really came through. We wanted warmth in a place that people typically think might be harsh or cold. There’s an underlying noir feel. It’s sort of a Western, where the cars are the horses, a big street duel, and throughout it all the images looked gorgeous, with nice contrast. They really hit the sweet spot. I love the look.” Johnny Derango, DP, Small Town Crime , Netflix Original Movie

British Optical Innovation and Quality Since 1893.

cookeoptics.com

T: +44 (0)116 264 0700 Canada, South America, USA: T: +1-973-335-4460


PRODUCTION CREDITS

COMPILED BY TERESA MUÑOZ – AS OF NOVEMBER 1, 2018 The input of Local 600 members is of the utmost importance, and we rely on our membership as the prime (and often the only) source of information. In order for us to continue to provide this service, we ask that Guild members submitting information take note of the following requests: Please provide up-to-date and complete crew information (including Still Photographers, Publicists, Additional Units, etc.). Please note that the deadline for the Production Credits is on the first of the preceding cover month (excluding weekends & holidays).

Submit your jobs online by visiting: www.icg600.com/MY600/Report-Your-Job Any questions regarding the Production Credits should be addressed to Teresa Muñoz at teresa@icgmagazine.com

102


20th CENTURY FOX “911” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Joaquín Sedillo, ASC Operators: Brice Reid, Duane Mieliwocki, SOC, Phil Miller, SOC Assistants: Ken Little, Noah Thomson, Eric Guerin, Seth Gallager, Naomi Villanueva, Jihane Mrad Steadicam Operator: Brice Reid Steadicam Assistant: Ken Little Camera Utility: Paulina Gomez Digital Utility: Joshua Smith

Steadicam Operator: Neal Bryant Steadicam Assistant: Sharla Cipicchio Loader: Nathan Saks

“AMERICAN HORROR STORY” SEASON 8 Director of Photography: Gavin Kelly Operators: BJ McDonnell, Nathan Levine-Heaney Assistants: Mike Vejar, Gary Johnson, Beaudine Credle, Dawn Nakamura Camera Utility: Zac Prange Digital Utility: Gabriela Hirata

“STAR” SEASON 3 Directors of Photography: Jesse M. Feldman, Jim Gucciardo Operators: Aiken Weiss, SOC, Christian Satrazemis Assistants: Maurizio Dotto, Chad Brock, April Ruane Crowley, Grace Preller Chambers Steadicam Operators: Aiken Weiss, SOC, Christian Satrazemis Loader: Trent Walker Utility: Anna-Marie Aloia

“CALL OF THE WILD” Director of Photography: Janusz Kaminski Operators: Mitch Dubin, SOC, George Billinger, SOC Assistants: Mark Spath, Jeff Porter, David O’Brien, Larissa Supplitt Steadicam Operator: George Billinger, SOC Digital Imaging Tech: Josh Gollish Loader: Tim Balcomb Camera Utility: Brandon Gutierrez Remote Head Tech/Operator: Jon Philion Still Photographer: Merie Weismiller Wallace “COOL KIDS” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Chris La Fountaine, ASC Operators: Bruce Reutlinger, George La Fountaine, Chris Wilcox, Kris Conde Assistants: Brian Lynch, Jeff Roth, Craig La Fountaine Digital Imaging Tech: Shaun Wheeler Camera Utilities: Chris Todd, Vicki Beck Video Controller: Andy Dickerman “FRESH OFF THE BOAT” SEASON 5 Director of Photography: Greg Matthews Operators: Brian Morena, Brooks Robinson Assistants: Ray Dier, Tomoka Maronn Izumi, Chris Cobb, Steve Whitcomb Camera Utility: Adam Kolkman “LAST MAN STANDING” SEASON 7 Director of Photography: Donald A. Morgan, ASC Operators: Gary Allen, Randy Baer, Larry Gaudette, John Boyd Assistants: Missy Toy-Ozeas, Damian Della Santina, Al Myers Camera Utilities: John Weiss, Steve Masias Digital Imaging Tech: Von Thomas “REL” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: George Mooradian, ASC Operators: Jack Chisholm, Ron Hirschman, Bruce Pasternack, John Boyd Assistants: Jeff Lorenz, Michele McKinley, Hunt Hibler, Kevin Menteer Camera Utility: Kate Steinhebel Digital Utility: Selvyn Price Jib Arm Operator: Jack Chisolm Jib Arm Assistant: Hunt Hibler Video Controller: Keith Anderson “SINGLE PARENTS” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Tim Gillis Operators: Neal Bryant, Ilan Levin Assistants: Sharla Cipicchio, Ian Barbella, Hannah Levin, Andy Kennedy-Derkay

“SPEECHLESS” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Rhet Bear Operators: Patrick McGinley, Hiro Fukuda, Brad Richard Assistants: Blair Rogers, Peter DePhilippis, Geoff Goodloe, Ulli Lamster, David Erickson, James Jermyn Camera Utility: Brittany Meadows

“THE GIFTED” SEASON 2 Directors of Photography: Bart Tau, Peter Kowalski Operators: Matt Doll, Andrew Fisher, Christian Satrazemis Assistants: Justin DeGuire, Cristian Trova, Joe Waistell, Taylor Case, Lauren Gentry, Justin Cooley Steadicam Operator: Matt Doll Steadicam Assistant: Justin Deguire Digital Imaging Tech: Joe Dare Loader: Peter Johnston Digital Utility: Becca Bennett Still Photographers: Eliza Morse, Guy D’Alema “THIS IS US” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Yasu Tanida Operators: James Takata, Tim Roarke Assistants: Sean O’Shea, Rich Floyd, Brian Wells, Jeff Stewart Steadicam Operator: James Takata Steadicam Assistant: Sean O’Shea Loaders: Mike Gentile Still Photographer: Ron Batzdorff ABC STUDIOS “AGENTS OF S.H.I.E.L.D.” SEASON 6 Directors of Photography: Allan Westbrook, Kyle Jewell Operators: Bill Brummond, Josh Larsen Assistants: Coby Garfield, Tim Cobb, Derek Hackett, Josh Novak Steadicam Operator: Bill Brummond Digital Imaging Tech: Ryan Degrazzio Digital Utility: Andrew Oliver “BLACK-ISH” SEASON 5 Director of Photography: Rob Sweeney Operators: Jens Piotrowski, Troy Smith Assistants: Art Martin, Dan Squires, Tony Muller Digital Utilities: Pablo Jara, Eliza Wimberly “GODFATHER OF HARLEM” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Guillermo Navarro, ASC Operators: David Knox, Christopher Moone Assistants: Jerome Williams, Cory Stambler, Cameron Sizemore, Benedict Baldauff Still Photographer: David Lee “GROWN-ISH” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Mark Doering-Powell Operators: Paul Sanchez, Robert Arnold Assistants: Robert Schierer, Michael Kleiman, Yen Nguyen, Dan Taylor

Camera Utility: Andrew Oliver Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe “HOW TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER” SEASON 5 Directors of Photography: Michael Price, Jeff Jur Operators: Scott Boettle, John Hankammer, Andrea Rossotto Assistants: Heather Lea-LeRoy, Vanessa Morehouse, Darrell Herrington, Drew Han, Mark Sasabuchi, Michael Stampler Digital Imaging Tech: Andrew Osborne “JESSICA JONES” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Manuel Billeter Operators: Michael F. O’Shea, Kate Larose Assistants: Marc Hillygus, Jason Rihaly, Vincent Tuths, Ryan Toussieng Loaders: Kelsey Middleton, Jonathan Peralta “JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE!” SEASON 16 Lighting Director: Christian Hibbard Operators: Greg Grouwinkel, Parker Bartlett, Garrett Hurt, Mark Gonzales Steadicam Operator: Kris Wilson Jib Operators: Marc Hunter, Randy Gomez, Jr., Nick Gomez Camera Utilities: Charles Fernandez, Scott Spiegel, Travis Wilson, David Fernandez, Adam Barker Video Controller: Guy Jones Still Photographers: Karen Neal, Michael Desmond 2ND UNIT Directors of Photography: Bernd Reinbardt, Steve Garrett “STATION 19” SEASON 2 Directors of Photography: Oliver Bokelberg, ASC, Daryn Okada, ASC Operators: Ron Baldwin, Mariana Antunano Assistants: Tony Schultz, Chris Garcia, Diana Ulzheimer, Tim Tillman Steadicam Operator: Ron Baldwin Steadicam Assistant: Tony Schultz Digital Imaging Tech: Andrew Lemon Digital Utility: George Montejano, III “THE CONNERS” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Donald A. Morgan, ASC Operators: Jon Purdy, Vito Giambalvo, John Dechene, Richard Price Assistants: Jeff Johnson, Steve Lund, Marianne Franco, John Weiss, Kenneth Williams Camera Utilities: Val Sklar, Robert Deane Digital Imaging Tech/Video Controller: Von Thomas AFN PRODUCTIONS-TELEPICTURES “THE REAL” SEASON 5 Lighting Director: Earl Woody, LD Operators: Kevin Michel, David Kanehann, Steve Russell, Bob Berkowitz Steadicam Operator: Will Demeritt Camera Utilities: James Magdalin, Henry Vereen, John Markese Jib Arm Operator: Jim Cirrito Video Controller: Jeff Messenger A VERY GOOD PRODUCTION, INC. & WAD PRODUCTIONS “THE ELLEN DEGENERES SHOW” SEASON 16 Lighting Director: Tom Beck Ped Operators: David Weeks, Paul Wileman, Tim O’Neill Hand Held Operator: Chip Fraser Jib Operator: David Rhea

103


“ENTERTAINMENT TONIGHT” SEASON 39 Lighting Designer: Darren Langer Director of Photography: Kurt Braun Operators: Jaimie Cantrell, James B. Patrick, Allen Voss, Ed Sartori, Henry Zinman, Bob Campi, Rodney McMahon, Anthony Salerno Camera Utility: Terry Ahern Video Controllers: Mike Doyle, Peter Stendal “INSTINCT” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Joseph Collins Operators: Edgar Colon, Laura Hudock Assistants: Eric Robinson, John Reeves, Marc Charbonneau, Sarah Scrivener Digital Imaging Tech: Jeffrey Hagerman Loaders: Quinn Murphy, Brittany Jelinski Still Photographers: John Lopez, Jeff Neumann, Mark Schafer “MAN WITH A PLAN” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Gary Baum, ASC Operators: Glenn Shimada, Travers Hill, Lance Billitzer, Ed Fine Assistants: Adrian Licciardi, Jeff Goldenberg, Alec Elizondo, Clint Palmer, Jason Herring Utilities: Danny Lorenze, Sean Askins Digital Imaging Tech: Derek Lantz Video Controller: John O’Brien “MURPHY BROWN” SEASON 11 Director of Photography: John Inwood Operators: Donna Quante, Greg Saccaro, Mark Schneider, Carol Wetovich Assistants: Alexander Worster, James Madrid, Samantha Silver, Stephen McBride Digital Imaging Tech: Luke Taylor Loaders: Jye-en Jeng, Lorenzo Zanini Still Photographers: Christopher Saunders, Will Hart

SET LIGHTING

Steadicam Operator: Donovan Gilbuena Video Controller: James Moran Head Utility: Craig “Zzo” Marazzo Utilities: Arlo Gilbuena, Wally Lancaster, Diego Avalos BEACHWOOD SERVICES “DAYS OF OUR LIVES” SEASON 53 Directors of Photography: Mark Levin, Ted Polmanski Operators: John Sizemore, Mark Warshaw, Vickie Walker, Michael J. Denton, Steve Clark Utilities: Steve Bagdadi, Gary Cypher Video Controller: Alexis Dellar Hanson BENEDICT WHITE, LLC “KNIVES OUT” Director of Photography: Steve Yedlin Operators: Dale Myrand, Terrence Hayes Assistants: Dan Schroer, Dan Mason, Felix Giuffrida Loader: Toshadeva Palani Still Photographer: Claire Folger Publicist: Amy Johnson BENEFACTOR PRODUCTIONS “CHAMBERS” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Dana Gonzales, Eliot Rockett, Joe Gallagher, Paul Elliott Operators: Brian Bernstein, Mark LaBonge, George Stephenson Assistants: Nick Shuster, Kinglea Bueltel, Ryan Bushman, Jason Seigel Digital Imaging Tech: Rafel Montoya, Sam Petrov (2nd Unit)

104

Digital Loader: Jannis Schelenz Digital Utility: Oscar Montez Still Photographers: Ursula Coyote, John Britt BLUE BLUES “BIG LITTLE LIES” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Jim Frohna Operators: Shelly Gurzi, DJ Harder Assistants: Faith Brewer, Laura Goldberg, Daisy Smith, Eric Matos, Michael Ashe Loader: Dagmara Krecioch Camera Utility: Amanda Hamaday Still Photographer: Jennifer Clasen UNDERWATER UNIT Operators: Robert Settlemire, Sean Gilbert, David William McDonald Assistants: Drew Dumas, Michael Luntzel CBS “BULL” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Derick Underschultz Operators: Barnaby Shapiro, Doug Pellegrino Assistants: Roman Lukiw, Soren Nash, Mike Lobb, Trevor Wolfson Digital Imaging Tech: Gabe Kolodny Loaders: Wyatt Maker, Nialaney Rodriguez “CRAZY EX-GIRLFRIEND” SEASON 4 Director of Photography: Ian Dodd Operators: Shasta Spahn, Bonnie Blake, Taj Teffaha Assistants: Eric Dyson, Eric Wheeler, Freddy Rosado, Blake Hooks Digital Imaging Tech: Sam McConville Utility: James Dunham

“NCIS” SEASON 16 Director of Photography: William Webb, ASC Operators: Gregory Paul Collier, Chad Erickson, Doug Froebe (Video) Assistants: James Troost, Helen Tadesse Nathan Lopez, Yusef Edmonds Loader: Anna Ferrarie Still Photographers: Ron Jaffe, Mike Kubeisy “NCIS: LOS ANGELES” SEASON 10 Director of Photography: Victor Hammer Operators: Terence Nightingall, Tim Beavers Assistants: Keith Banks, Richie Hughes, Peter Caronia, Jacqueline Nivens Steadicam Operators: Terence Nightingall, Tim Beavers Steadicam Assistants: Keith Banks, Richie Hughes Digital Imaging Tech: John Mills Digital Utility: Trevor Beeler
 Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe Publicist: Kathleen Tanji “NCIS: NEW ORLEANS” SEASON 5 Director of Photography: Gordon Lonsdale, ASC Operators: Jerry Jacob, Vincent Bearden, Tony Politis Assistants: Brouke Franklin, Peter Roome, Jeff Taylor, Dave Edwards, Toni Weick, Stephen Vicari Steadicam Operator: Vincent Bearden Digital Loader: Levi Wells Digital Utility: Kolby Heid “THE TALK” SEASON 9 Lighting Director: Marisa Davis Ped Operators: Art Taylor, Mark Gonzales, Ed Staebler Hand Held Operators: Ron Barnes,


The new NBCUniversal Edge

E D G E 160 2 ’

E D G E 320 2 ’

EDGE 160 2’

EDGE 160 4’

EDGE 320 2’

EDGE 320 4’

· FIX TURE SIZE:

· FIX TURE SIZE:

· FIX TURE SIZE:

· FIX TURE SIZE:

24” W, 7” H, 3.4” D

48” W, 7” H, 3.4” D

· W E I G H T:

24” W, 12.5” H, 4.7” D

· W E I G H T:

6.8 lb

· W E I G H T:

11.4 lb

· INPUT POWER:

· OUTPUT (LUMENS): 10,000

· W E I G H T:

9.6 lb

· INPUT POWER:

100 - 240 VAC | 160W

48” W, 12.5” H, 4.7” D

16 lb

· INPUT POWER:

100 - 240 VAC | 160W

· INPUT POWER:

100 - 240 VAC | 320W

· OUTPUT (LUMENS): 10,000

· OUTPUT (LUMENS): 20,000

100 - 240 VAC | 320W

· OUTPUT (LUMENS): 20,000

FC @10’: 45

FC @10’: 45

FC @10’: 90

FC @10’: 90

LUX @3m: 377

LUX @3m: 377

LUX @3m: 970

LUX @3m: 970

· M O U N T I N G : 3/8 - 16 Thread, OmniMount

· D M X I N T E R F A C E : 5-Pin XLR In/Thru

Balanced Color Spectrum · DMX/RDM Zonal Control · Intuitive Interface F O R R E N TA L , D E M O & S A L E S I N Q U I R I E S

818.777.1281 | info@lightbladeled.com lightbladeled.com

@universalslg

@unistudioslot

105


Come visit our showroom or call for our latest Magliner product c catalog

We are the largest retailer specializing in Magliner customized c products oducts and accessories for the Film and Television Industry in the world

)6

92

-2

7

www.backst age we b.c om

(800

87

See us at BSC Expo 2019 • Battersea Evolution • London, England • February 1 - 2, 2019 Backstage Equipment, Inc. • 8052 Lankershim Bl. • North Hollywood, CA 91605 916 • Toll Free (800)) 692-2787 • (818) 504-6026 • Fax (818) 504-6180 • info@backstageweb.com info@backstageweb • www.backstageweb.com

Kevin Michel, Jeff Johnson Jib Operator: Randy Gomez Head Utility: Charlie Fernandez Utilities: Mike Bushner, Doug Bain, Dean Frizzel, Bill Greiner, Jon Zuccaro Video Controller: Richard Strock Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe CMS PRODUCTIONS “UNCUT GEMS AKA KMH” Director of Photography: Darius Khondji, ASC Operators: Maceo Bishop, Ramulas Burgess Assistants: A. Christopher Silano, Olga Abramson, Troy Sola, Bayley Sweitzer Digital Imaging Tech: Abby Levine Loader: Billy Holman COLUMBIA “TOSH.0” SEASON 10 STAGE CREW Operator: Jason Cochard Camera Utilities: Benjamin Steeples, Kyle Kimbriel, Roger Cohen FIELD CREW Director of Photography: Andrew Huebscher Operator: Jason Cochard Assistants: Benjamin Steeples, Kyle Kimbriel, Roger Cohen, Delfina Garfias CONACO “CONAN” SEASON 9 Operators: Ted Ashton, Nick Kober, Kosta Krstic, James Palczewski, Bart Ping, Seth Saint Vincent Head Utility: Chris Savage Utilities: Baron Johnson, Josh Gwilt “SPIDER-MAN: FAR FROM HOME” NY UNIT Director of Photography: Matthew Lloyd Operators: James McMillan, Jon Beattie Assistants: Keitt, Robert Becchio, Matthew Montalto, Jorge Del Toro Digital Imaging Techs: Thomas Wong, Francesco Giardiello Loaders: Toni Sheppard, Peter Perlman, Jeffrey Makarauskas Still Photographer: JoJo Whilden

106

CRANETOWN MEDIA, LLC “DICKINSON” Director of Photography: Tim Orr Operators: Jeffrey Dutemple, Arthur Africano Assistants: Gregory Finkel, Bradley Grant, Emma Rees-Scanlon, Suren Karapetyan Loader: Patrick McKeown Still Photographer: Michael Parmelee

EYE PRODUCTIONS, INC. “BLUE BLOODS” SEASON 9 Director of Photography: Gene Engels Operators: Stephen Consentino, Geoff Frost Assistants: Graham Burt, Jacob Stahlman, Chris Seehase, Kenny Martell Digital Imaging Tech: Ryan Heide Loaders: Neicy McFadden, Caleb Keeler

CRANETOWN MEDIA, LLC “THE RANCH” SEASON 4 Director of Photography: Donald A. Morgan, ASC Operators: Brian Armstrong, Randy Baer, Chris Hinojosa, Michelle Crenshaw Assistants: Don Davis, Missy Toy, Vito De Palma, Adan Torres, Al Myers Digital Imaging Tech/Video Controller: Rick Dungan Camera Utilities: Erinn Bell, Steve Masias

“ELEMENTARY” SEASON 7 Director of Photography: Thomas Houghton, ASC Operators: Carlos Guerra, Jeremy Weishaar Assistants: Jason Cleary, Charlie Foerschner, Kyle Blackman, Patrick O’Shea Loaders: Dylan Endyke, Ryan Haddon Still Photographer: Elizabeth Fisher

DC COMICS “DOOM PATROL” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Chris Manley, Noah Greenberg Operators: Tim Fabrizio, Ross Sebek Assistants: Ryan Weisen, Paul Saunders, Jackson McDonald, Sagar Desai Digital Imaging Tech: Jonny Revolt Digital Utility: Torey Lenart Loader: Caroline Oelkers DELTA FILMS, LLC “HARRIET” Director of Photography: John Toll, ASC Operator: Kim Marks Assistants: Christopher Toll, Dwight Campbell, Terry Wolcott, Eric Eaton Digital Imaging Tech: Maninder Saini Loader: Rinny Wilson Still Photographer: Glen Wilson ENJOY IT, INC. “BROCKMIRE” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Adam Bricker Operators: Parker Tolifson, Ben Verhulst Assistants: Dan Turek, Nick Montalvo, Mary-Margaret Porter, Kyle Simmons, Violet Jackson Steadicam Operator: Ben Verhulst Camera Utility: Marshall Johnson Digital Utility: Sam Chun

“MADAM SECRETARY” SEASON 5 Director of Photography: Learan Kahanov Operators: Jamie Silverstein, Peter Vietro-Hannum Assistants: Heather Norton, Jamie Fitzpatrick, Amanda Rotzler, Damon LeMay Digital Imaging Tech: Keith Putnam Loaders: Christopher Patrikis, Kristina Lally Still Photographer: Mark Schafer “MACGYVER” SEASON 3 Directors of Photography: Mike Martinez, James L. Carter, ASC Operators: Ian Forsyth, Allen D. Easton, Paul Krumper Assistants: Al Cohen, Stefan Vino-Figueroa, Trevor Rios, Easton Harper, Mike Torino, Danny Vanzura Steadicam Operator: Ian Forsyth Digital Imaging Tech: Greg VanZyck Utility: Tyler Bastianson “MAGNUM P.I.” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Krishna Rao, Rodney Charters, ASC Operators: Keith Jordan, Jay Herron, Scott Mason Assistants: Tony Nagy, Rylan Akama, Brian Mastumura, Zeke Hanohano, Tommy Lewis, Sal Alvarez Digital Imaging Tech: Caleb Lucero Loader: Kilani Villiaros Digital Utility: Blane Eguchi


FOX 21 “THE CHI” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Abraham Martinez Operators: Garret Benson, Richard Crow Assistants: Paul DeMarte, Rachel Donofrie, Michael Fierros, J’mme Love Loader: Brian Kilborn Utility: Josh Smith Still Photographer: Parrish Lewis FTP PRODUCTIONS “MALIBU RESCUE” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Keith Dunkerley Operators: Laurent Soriano, Dale Vance, Jr. Assistants: Ken Tanaka, Patrick Blanchet, Brendan Devanie, Carter Smith Steadicam Operator: Dale Vance, Jr. Digital Imaging Tech: Dan Moses Loader: Chad Nagel Still Photographers: Tony Rivetti, Scott White

HBO “VEEP” SEASON 7 Director of Photography: David MIller Operators: Bo Webb, Josh Williamson, Johnny Martin, April Kelley Assistants: Mark Figueroa, Greg Kurtz, Aaron Bowen, Will Evans, Tony Martin, Chris Garland, Maryan Zurek, Tyler Ernst Digital Loader: Rachel Mangum Digital Utility: Luigi Ventura Still Photographer: Colleen E. Hayes

2ND UNIT Director of Photography: Jayson Crothers Assistant: Delfina Garfias

HOLD FAST PRODUCTIONS “BOSCH” SEASON 5 Directors of Photography: Michael McDonough, Theo Van de Sande, ASC Operators: Nicholas Davidoff, Dan Coscina Assistants: Danny Brown, Mike Thomas, Tim Hennessy, Kokoro Lee Steadicam Operator: Nicholas Davidoff Loader: Bob Campi Utility: Jake Schultz Still Photographers: Aaron Epstein, Ron Jaffe

FWC PRODUCTIONS, LLC “FIRST WIVES CLUB” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Matthew Edwards Operators: Parris Mayhew, Daniel Sharnoff Assistants: Nicholas Hahn, Christopher Gleaton, Julian Bass, Zakiya Lucas-Murray Digital Imaging Tech: Guillermo Tunon Loader: Derrick Dawkins

HORIZON SCRIPTED TELEVISION, INC. “ANDI MACK” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Matthew Williams Operator: Scott Hoffman Assistants: John Williams, David Rhineer, Kurtis Burr, Nick Nebeker Steadicam Operator: Scott Hoffman Digital Imaging Tech: Sean McAllister “DAVID MAKES MAN” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Todd A. Dos Reis, ASC

Operators: Robert Scott, Grayson Austin Assistants: Kevin Smith, Steven Latham, Julianna Junker, Ognjen Sarovic Steadicam Operator: Grayson Austin Steadicam Assistant: Steven Latham Digital Utility: Jaime Striby IT’S A LAUGH PRODUCTIONS “SYDNEY TO THE MAX” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: George Mooradian, ASC, Tom Eckelberry Operators: Ken Herft, Cory Gunter, Tom Conkright, Jack Chisholm, Vince Singletary Camera Utilities: Terry Gunter, Kate Steinhebel Digital Utilities: Mike Pusatere, Monica Schad Video Controllers: Keith Anderson, Brian Dodds Still Photographer: Ron Tom JAY SQUARED PRODUCTIONS, LLC “BLINDSPOT” SEASON 4 Directors of Photography: Andrew Priestley, Jon Delgado Operators: Pyare Fortunato, Peter Ramos, John Romer Assistants: Andrew Smith, Aleksandr Allen, Kyle Clark, Christian Bright, Bryant Bailey, Deborah Fastuca, Kjerstin Rossi, Darnell Steadicam Operator: Pyare Fortunato Digital Imaging Tech: Chloe Walker Still Photographer: Phil Caruso “MANIFEST” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Timothy Norman,

107


Brad Smith Operator: Jeff Muhlstock Assistants: Robert Mancuso, Adriana Brunetto-Lipman, Michael DeRario, Amber Rosales Loaders: Matthew Richards, Cory Maffucci Still Photographers: Giovanni Rufino, Christopher Saunders, Phillip Caruso LADY PRISON PRODUCTIONS, INC. “ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK” SEASON 7 Director of Photography: Ludovic Littee Operators: Scott Tinsley, Rebecca Arndt Assistants: Beka Venezia, James Daly, Justin Mancuso, Maxwell Sloan Digital Imaging Tech: Andrew Nelson Loader: Joshua Waterman Still Photographer: JoJo Whilden LATE SEVENTIES “MINDHUNTER” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Eric Messerschmidt Operators: Brian Osmond, William Dearborn Assistants: Alex Scott, David Edsall, Gary Bevans Loader: Liam Doyle Still Photographer: Merrick Morton LWY PRODUCTIONS, LLC “LIVING WITH YOURSELF” Director of Photography: Yaron Orbach Operators: Jim McConkey, Charles Beyer Assistants: Basil Smith, Steven Search, Marvin Lee, Justin LeBlanc Loaders: Matthew Martin, David Gallagher Still Photographer: Eric Liebowitz MAIN GATE PRODUCTIONS, LLC “GOD FRIENDED ME” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Stefan Czapsky, ASC Operators: Thomas Schnaidt, Daniel Hersey Assistants: Blackford Shelton, Marcos Rodriguez-Quijano, Behnood Dadfar, Alfonso Diaz Digital Imaging Tech: Chandler Tucker Loaders: Miguel Gonzalez, Angel Vasquez Still Photographers: David Giesbrecht, Sarah Shatz MESQUITE PRODUCTIONS “FOR ALL MANKIND” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Stephen McNutt, ASC, Ross Berryman Operators: Tim Spencer, Mike McEveety Assistants: Stephen Pazanti, Haydn Pazanti, Jorge Pallares, Arthur Zajac Steadicam Operator: Tim Spencer Steadicam Assistant: Stephen Pazanti Digital Imaging Tech: Mike DeGrazzio Digital Utility: Robert Ruelas Still Photographer: Nicole Wilder “LA’S FINEST” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Robert Gantz Operators: Ian Fox, Jody Miller, Pete Romano Assistants: Jamie Felz, Casey Muldoon, James Barela, Luis Gomez, Mark Connelly Digital Imaging Tech: Kevin Britton Digital Loader: Kyle Jacobs Digital Utility: Claudio Banks Still Photographer: Nicole Wilder “SNEAKY P3TE” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Arthur Albert Operators: Nick Albert, Jordan Keslow Assistants: Ron Peterson, Casey Nearing, Greg Williams, Tamara Arroba Steadicam Operator: Jordan Keslow

108

Loader: Sam Petrov Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe NY UNIT Assitants: Aileen Taylor, Joshua Waterman, Carlos Barbot MINIM PRODUCTIONS, INC. “DEVS” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Rob Hardy Operator: Grant Adams, SOC, Assistants: Patrick McArdle, Ray Milazzo, Seth Gallagher, Blake Collins Steadicam Operator: Grant Adams, SOC Steadicam Assistant: Ray Milazzo Digital Imaging Tech: Natalie Carr Loader: Mike Prior Digital Utility: Zach Madden NBC “CHICAGO FIRE” SEASON 7 Director of Photography: Lisa Wiegand, ASC Operators: Will Eichler, Vanessa Joy Smith Assistants: Luis Fowler, Zach Gannaway, Brian Romano, Gary Malouf Steadicam Operator: Will Eichler Digital Loader: Derek Ashbaugh Digital Utility: Amy Tomlinson Still Photographer: Elizabeth Morris “CHICAGO MED” SEASON 4 Director of Photography: Lex duPont, ASC Operators: Faires Anderson Sekiya, Chris Hood, Joe Tolitano Assistants: George Olson, Laura DeFiglio, Keith Hueffmeier, Patrick Dooley, Sam Knapp, Joey Richardson Steadicam Operator: Faires Anderson Sekiya Loader: Matt Brown Utility: Emmanuel Bansa Still Photographer: Liz Sisson “CHICAGO PD” SEASON 6 Director of Photography: James Zucal Operators: Scott Dropkin, SOC, Darryl Miller, Seth Thomas Assistants: John Young, Don Carlson, David “YT” Wightman, Jamison Acker, Phillip Walter, Kyle Belousek Steadicam Operator: Scott Dropkin, SOC Loader: Nick Wilson Utilities: Marion Tucker, Alan Dembek 2ND UNIT Director of Photography: Darryl Miller “F.B.I.” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Tari Segal Operators: Afton Grant, Phil Oetiker Assistants: Lee Vickery, George Lookshire, Niknaz Tavakolian, Jorge Del Toro Steadicam Operator: Afton Grant Loaders: Amber Mathes, Nkem Umenyi Still Photographers: Michael Parmelee, Christopher Saunders “I FEEL BAD” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Tom Magill Operators: Josh Harrison, Bry Sanders Assistants: Adam Cowan, Dustin Fruge, Melissa Fisher, Skip Mobley Utility: Phoebe Krueger Loader: Dustin Keller Still Photographer: Evans Vestal Ward “NEW AMSTERDAM” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Andrew Voegeli Operators: Julian Delacruz, Fabio Iadeluca Assistants: Alexander Worster, James Madrid, Samantha Silver, Stephen McBride

Digital Imaging Tech: Luke Taylor Loaders: Jye-en Jeng, Lorenzo Zanini Still Photographers: Christopher Saunders, Will Hart “SUPERSTORE” SEASON 4 Director of Photography: Jay Hunter Operators: Adam Tash, Hassan Abdul-Wahid, Danny Nichols Assistants: Jason Zakrzewski, Brandon Margulies, Eric Jenkinson, Ryan Sullivan, Esta Garcia, Rikki Alarian Jones Loader: Grace Thomas “TALES OF THE CITY” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Federico Cesca Operators: George Bianchini, Jennie Jeddry Assistants: Ben Spaner, John Fitzpatrick, Brent Weichsel, Tsyen Shen Digital Imaging Tech: Paul Schilens Loaders: Holly McCarthy, Katherine Rivera “THE ENEMY WITHIN” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Frank Prinzi, ASC Operators: Todd Armitage, Jay Silver Assistants: Rory Hanrahan, Keitt, Sean Souza, Sebastian Iervolino Digital Imaging Tech: Lewis Rothenberg Loader: Brenton Ayers Still Photographer: Will Hart “WILL & GRACE” SEASON 10 Director of Photography: Gary Baum, ASC Operators: Glenn Shimada, Travers Hill, Lance Billitzer, Ed Fine Assistants: Adrian Licciardi, Jeff Goldenberg, Alec Elizondo, Clint Palmer, Jason Herring Utilities: Danny Lorenze, Sean Askins Digital Imaging Tech: Derek Lantz Video Controller: Stuart Wesolik Still Photographer: Chris Haston NETFLIX “TRINKETS” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Jason Oldak Operators: Gary Camp, Shawn Sundby Assistants: Nicolas Wachter, Eric Macey, Devin Greenman, Rodrigo Melgarejo Steadicam Operator: Gary Camp Digital Imaging Tech: John Spellman Still Photographer: Allyson Riggs “UNTITLED HENRY JOOST/ARIEL SCHULMAN SCI-FI PROJECT” Director of Photography: Michael Simmonds Operators: Paul Daley, Chad Chamberlain Assistants: Justin Simpson, Cody Gautreau, Chris Flurry, Bryce Marshall Steadicam Operator: Chad Chamberlain Digital Loader: Zander White Camera Utility: Eric Van der Vynckt Still Photographer: Skip Bolden Publicist: Diane Slattery ORANGE CONE PRODUCTIONS “LEGACIES” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Michael Karasick, John Smith Operators: Reid Russell, Brian Davis Assistants: Rick Crumrine, Geran Daniels, Kelly Poor, Kyler Dennis Steadicam Operator: Reid Russell Digital Imaging Tech: Billy Mueller Digital Utility: Jesse Eagle PACIFIC 2.1 “THE POLITICIAN” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Nelson Cragg, Simon Dennis


“By far the best nd filters we have ever used.” Andrew Petersen

FROM DSLR’S AND MIRRORLESS SYSTEMS TO HIGH END CINEMA CAMERAS AS WELL AS DRONES, TIFFEN NATURAL ND FILTERS GIVE YOU PERFECT NEUTRALITY ACROSS ANY CAMERA SYSTEM. LEARN MORE AT TIFFEN.COM/NATURALND

The Tiffen Company LLC. 90 Oser Avenue Hauppauge, NY 11788 ©2018 The Tiffen Company. All trademarks or registered trademarks are property of their respective owners.

109


The New Hollywood Standard 2700K - 6500K Variable Color +/- Green Correction Touch Screen Interface AC/DC Powered Bluetooth Capable Built-In LumenRadio

mole.com

12154 Montague St. Pacoima, CA 91331

Operators: Andrew Mitchell, Jesse Feldman, Nicole Lobell Assistants: Penny Sprague, Markus Mentzer, Matt Brewer, Ben Perry, Jared Wilson, Nate Lewis, Shannon Van Metre, Justin Steptoe Steadicam Operator: Andrew Mitchell Steadicam Assistant: Penny Sprague PALLADIN PRODUCTIONS, LLC “RED LINE” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Kira Kelly Operators: Scott Thiele, Blaine Baker Assistants: Jason Bonner, Nina Pilar Portillo, Matt Rozek, Matthew Feasley Digital Imaging Tech: John Waterman Loader: Drew Fulton Digital Utility: Litong Zhen PARAMOUNT PICTURES “ISLAND PLAZA” Director of Photography: Claudio Miranda, ASC Operators: Chris Haarhoff, John Connor Assistants: Dan Ming, Bob Smathers, Mateo Bourdieu, Max DeLeo, Natasha Mullan, Nathan Stern Steadicam Operator: Chris Haarhoff Digital Imaging Tech: Rohan Chitrakar Loader: Farisai Kambarami, Kalli Kouf Still Photographer: Scott Garfield Publicist: Michael Singer PATCH BAY PRODUCTIONS, LLC “THE WRONG MANS” PILOT Director of Photography: Jim Denault Operators: George Bianchini, John Pirozzi Assistants: Kevin Potter, Adam Miller, Kevin Miles, Austin Chang PICROW STREAMING, INC. “MODERN LOVE” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Yaron Orbach Operators: Philip Martinez, Lucas Owen Assistants: Waris Supanpong, Becki Heller, Randy Schwartz, Nathalie Rodriguez Loaders: Mateo Gonzalez, Brian Lynch Still Photographer: Christopher Saunders

110

POSSIBLE PRODUCTIONS “BILLIONS” SEASON 4 Directors of Photography: Giorgio Scali, Alexander Dynan Operators: Peter Agliata, Mark Schmidt Assistants: Edwin Effrein, Cai Hall, Leonardo Gomez, Andrew Hamilton Digital Imaging Tech: Joe Belack Loaders: Kansas Ballesteros, Christopher Charmel PP21 PRODUCTIONS, LLC “BLACK LIGHTNING” SEASON 2 Directors of Photography: Scott Peck, Michael Watson Operators: Glen Brown, Fernando Reyes Assistants: Anthony Zibelli, Alan Newcomb, Alfredo Santiago, Rodell Francis Steadicam Operator: Glen Brown Steadicam Assistant: Anthony Zibelli Digital Imaging Tech: Justin Warren Digital Utility: Chandra Sudtelgte REPRISAL PILOT PRODUCTIONS, LLC “REPRISAL” PILOT Director of Photography: Larkin Seiple Operators: Ari Robbins, SOC, Michael Repeta Assistants: Patrick Borowiak, Sean Yaple, Roy Knauf, Darwin Brandis Digital Imaging Tech: Andy Bader SALT SRING MEDIA “ARE YOU SLEEPING” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Colin Watkinson (Pilot), Nicole Whitaker, Russ Alsobrook, ASC Operators: Josh Medak, Justin Browne Assistants: Niranjan Martin, Darin Necessary, Jeremy Cannon, Claudio Banks Steadicam Operator: Justin Browne Steadicam Assistant: Darin Necessary Digital Imaging Tech: Pat Paolo Digital Utility: Nicola Caruso SONY “JEOPARDY!” SEASON 35 Director of Photography: Jeff Engel Operators: Diane L. Farrell, SOC, Mike Tribble, Jeff Schuster,

L. David Irete Jib Arm Operator: Marc Hunter Head Utility: Tino Marquez Camera Utility: Ray Thompson Video Controller: Gary Taillon Still Photographer: Carol Kaelson “SCHOOLED” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Steve Gainer Operators: Brian Shanley, Jonathan Goldfisher Assistants: Shereen Saleh, Kymm Swank, Joseph Cheung, Colleen Haley Digital Imaging Tech: Mike Bosman Digital Loader: Mimi Phan “THE GOLDBERGS” SEASON 6 Director of Photography: Jason Blount Operators: Scott Browner, Kris Denton Assistants: Tracy Davey, Nate Havens, Gary Webster, Jen Bell-Price Digital Imaging Tech: Kevin Mills Digital Utility: Dilshan Herath Still Photographers: Nicole Wilder, Adam Taylor “WHEEL OF FORTUNE” SEASON 36 Director of Photography: Jeff Engel Operators: Diane L. Farrell, SOC, Jeff Schuster, Ray Gonzales, Steve Simmons, L. David Irete, Mike Corwin Camera Utility: Ray Thompson Head Utility: Tino Marquez Video Controller: Gary Taillon Jib Arm Operator: Randy Gomez, Sr. Still Photographer: Carol Kaelson STALWART FILMS, LLC “NOS4A2” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Martin Ahlgren Operators: Alec Jarnagin, Edwin Rubio Assistants: Liz Silver, Robert Bullard, Richelle Topping, Chris Boylston Still Photographer: Dana Starbard STARS POWER, LLC “POWER” SEASON 6 Director of Photography: Mauricio Rubinstein Operators: Scott Maguire, Alan Mehlbrech Assistants: Michael Garofalo, Hamilton Longyear, Rodrigo Millan Garce,


111


Alivia Borab Digital Imaging Tech: Douglas Horton Loader: Anjela Coviaux Still Photographer: Myles Aronowitz STARZ SWEETBITTER PRODUCTIONS, LLC “SWEETBITTER” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Radium Cheung, HKSC Operators: Justin Foster, David Kimelman Assistants: Gus Limberis, Glen Chin, Nicholas Koda, Ian Carmody Digital Imaging Tech: Malika Franklin Loaders: Calen Cooper, James Demetriou TOPANGA PRODUCTIONS, INC. “SWAT” SEASON 2 Directors of Photography: Francis Kenny, ASC, Craig Fikse Operators: Tim Dolan, Brian Pitts, Michael Otis Ropert Assistants: Ryan Parks, Logan Turner, Thane Characky, Riley Padelford, Esther Woodworth, Mike Fauntleroy Camera Utility: Carl Lammi Loader: Jonathan Taylor Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe UNIVERSAL “GOOD GIRLS” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Tim Bellen Operators: Dave Hirshmann, Chris Haifley, Ana Amortegui Assistants: Steve Bellen, Jessica Ramos, Erik Emerson, Jennifer Stuart, Jim Nygren, Kristina Lechuga Digital Loader: Bryce Marraro Digital Utility: Sooz Edie Still Photographer: Justin Lubin “LAW & ORDER: SVU” SEASON 20 Director of Photography: Michael Green Operators: Brant Fagan, SOC, Mike Latino Assistants: Chris Del Sordo, Matt Balzarini, Emily Dumbrill, Justin Zverin Loader: Jason Raswant Still Photographer: Michael Parmelee “THE ACT” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Zachary Galler Operator: Danny Eckler Assistants: Josh Hancher, Saul McSween, Warren Brace, Aaron Willis Steadicam Operator: Danny Eckler Loader: Jennifer Braddock Digital Utility: Matt Nelson Still Photographer: Brownie Harris WARNER BROS. “BIG BANG THEORY” SEASON 12 Director of Photography: Steven V. Silver, ASC Operators: John Dechene, Richard Price, SOC, Jamie Hitchcock, Brian Armstrong Assistants: Nigel Stewart, Chris Hinojosa, Steve Lund, Meggins Moore, Whitney Jones Camera Utilities: Colin Brown, Jeannette Hjorth Video Controller: John O’Brien Digital Imaging Tech: Benjamin Steeples Still Photographer: Michael Yarish Publicist: Marc Klein “JOKER AKA ROMEO” NY UNIT Director of Photography: Lawrence Sher Operator: Geoffrey Haley Assistants: Craig Pressgrove, Joseph Metzger, Tony Coan, Sarah Guenther Digital Imaging Tech: Nicholas Kay Loader: Carolyn Wills Digital Utility: Keith Anderson Still Photographers: Glen Wilson, Nico Tavernise

112

“LETHAL WEAPON” SEASON 3 Directors of Photography: Andy Strahorn, William Wages, ASC Operators: Victor Macias, Joseph Broderick Assistants: James Rydings, Kaoru “Q” Ishizuka, Troy Blischok, Kelsey Castellitto Digital Imaging Tech: Peter Russ Digital Utility: Spencer Shwetz Still Photographers: Ron Jaffe, John P. Fleenor 2ND UNIT Director of Photography: Brian Pearson, ASC Operator: Stefan von Bjorn Assistants: Carlos Doerr, Phil Shanahan, Ron Elliot Digital Imaging Tech: Scott Resnick Camera Utility: Nicholas Martin UNDERWATER UNIT Operator: David William McDonald Assistant: Corey Bringas “MOM” SEASON 6 Director of Photography: Steven V. Silver, ASC Operators: Cary McCrystal, Jamie Hitchcock, Larry Gaudette, Candy Edwards Assistants: Meggins Moore, R. Nigel Stewart, Damian Della Santina, Mark Johnson, Whitney Jones Camera Utilities: Alicia Brauns, Andrew Pauling Video Controller: Kevin Faust Digital Imaging Tech: Benjamin Steeples Still Photographer: Darren Michaels Publicist: Marc Klein “THE PERFECTIONISTS” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Larry Reibman Operators: Matt Moriarty, Phil Anderson Assistants: Kyril Cvetkov, Jerry Turner, Mike Crockett, Patrick LaValley Steadicam Operator: Matt Moriarty Steadicam Assistant: Kyril Cvetkov Digital Imaging Tech: Sean Rawls Loader: Jasmine Karcey Still Photographer: Allyson Riggs “YOUNG SHELDON” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Buzz Feitshans, IV Operators: Neil Toussaint, SOC, Aaron Schuh Assistants: Matt Del Ruth, Tom Vandermillen, Grant Yellen, Brad Gilson, Jr., Megan Boundy Digital Loader: James Cobb Digital Utility: Joe Sutera Still Photographers: Bill Inoshita, Michael Desmond “SPLITTING UP TOGETHER” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: John Tanzer Operators: Andrew Shuttleworth, Gretchen Warthen Assistants: Rob Monroy, Darin Krask, Jeff Lynn, Aldo Porras Steadicam Operator: Andrew Shuttleworth Camera Utility: Raul Perez Digital Imaging Tech: Francesco Sauta “WHAT/IF” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Jeffrey C. Mygatt Operators: Benjamin Spek, Joel Schwartz Assistants: Dennis Seawright, Dale White, Steven Magrath, Dustin Keller Steadicam Operator: Benjamin Spek Loader: Leslie Kolter Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe DOUBLE UP UNIT Dir. of Photography: Joel Schwartz

WOODBRIDGE PRODUCTIONS “THE BLACKLIST” SEASON 6 Directors of Photography: Michael Caracciolo, Saade Mustafa Operators: Derek Walker, Devin Ladd, Jack Donnelly, Peter Reniers Assistants: Daniel Casey, James Gourley, Gareth Manwaring, Edwin Herrera Mike Guaspari, Edgar Velez Loaders: Katheryn Iuele, James Parsons Still Photographers: Christopher Saunders, Will Hart, Virginia Sherwood YAS ENTERTAINMENT, INC. “CAN YOU KEEP A SECRET?” Director of Photography: Autumn Eakin Assistants: Robert Arnold, Tommy Scoggins Digital Imaging Tech: Justin Hartough

COMMERCIALS ANONYMOUS CONTENT “BELIEVE IN DREAMS” Director of Photography: Adam Richards Assistants: Brett Walters, Rick Gioia, Nate McGarigal, Austin Kite Digital Imaging Tech: Tom Wong Steadicam Operator: George Bianchini Scorpio Head Techs: Al Rodgers Scorpio Crane Tech: Martin Yee ARTS & SCIENCES “AT&T” Director of Photography: Sean Meehan Assistants: Roger Wall, Matthew Freedman Digital Imaging Techs: Steve Harnell “GOOGLE” Director of Photography: Peter Deming, ASC Operator: Michael Merriman Assistants: David Eubank, Hector Rodriguez, James Jermyn, Brandon Szajner Digital Imaging Tech: Kyle Hoekstra BULLITT “BULLITT” Director of Photography: Eric Treml Operator: Michael Ashe Assistants: Lucas Deans, Eric Jensch, David Auerbach Digital Imaging Techs: Scott Stephens, Randy Kaplan BULLY PICTURES “MCDONALDS” Director of Photography: Maryse Alberti Assistants: Micah Bisagni, Kymm Swank Digital Imaging Tech: Scott Beckley BACON & SONS, FILM CO. “AMC TWD PROMO” Director of Photography: Eric Schmidt Operator: Pete Wages Assistant: Ethan McDoanld CAP GUN COLLECTIVE “KNICKS/BUD” Director of Photography: Dan Stewart Assistants: Rob Lau, Mike Swearingen Phantom Tech: Steve Romano CAVIAR “GEORGIA PACIFIC: VANITY FAIR NAPKINS” Director of Photography: Joshua Hess Operator: Tanner Carlson Assistants: Nina Chien, Kevin Walter,


Scott Miller Digital Imaging Tech: Thomas Wong CENTRAL FILMS “TOYOTA” Director of Photography: Eric Schmidt Operators: Ian Clampett, Gilbert Salas Assistants: Dennis Lynch, Luis Suarez, Nicole Martinez, Delfina Garfias, Victor Chon Digital Imaging Tech: Calvin Reibman CMS “NEUTROGENA” Director of Photography: Pieter Vermeer Assistants: Mark Santoni, Andrew Crankshaw Digital Imaging Techs: Steve Harnell COMPANY FILMS “BURLINGTON” Director of Photography: Joseph Aguirre Operator: Kate Phelan Assistants: Nina Chien, Joe Volpe, Mitch Malpica Digital Imaging Tech: Tyler Isaacson DEVINE MULVEY LONGABAUGH “AFTAB PUREVAL FOR CONGRESS” Director of Photography: Michael Mulvey, SOC Assistant: Joe Bou DUMMY “LIBERTY MUTUAL” Director of Photography: Jonathan Freeman Assistants: Lila Byall, Kira Hernandez Digital Imaging Tech: Jesse Tyler ELEMENT PRODUCTIONS “DEB GOLDBERG FOR TREASURER” Director of Photography: Patrick Ruth 2ND UNIT Dir. of Photography: Joseph Lavallee EPOCH “SUBARU” Director of Photography: Kasper Tuxen, DFF Operator: Michael Merriman Assistants: Chris Cunningham, Ryan Rayner, Paul Santoni, Noah Thomson, Tyler Emmett Digital Imaging Techs: Jason Bauer, Joe Kocsis ESKIMO “GMC” Director of Photography: Michael FitzMaurice Operator: Jason La Fargo Assistants: Greg Benitez, Andrew Porras, Brad Rochlitzer, Jordan Martin Ronin Tech: Stephen Scherba Digital Imaging Tech: Steve Harnell FULL MOON FILMS “ELAINE LUCIA FOR US CONGRESS VA” Director of Photography: Jim Simeone Assistants: Austin Burnette, Rinny Wilson HEY BABY “COLORADO LOTTERY” Director of Photography: Rob Hauer Assistants: Doug O’Kane, Chris Nightingale HEY WONDERFUL “KY” Director of Photography: Daniel Bombell HONOR SOCIETY “CRAYOLA” Director of Photography: Ivan Abel Assistants: James Hair, Doug Kofsky Digital Imaging Tech: Ryan Winsor

HUNGRY MAN “KIA” Director of Photography: Scott Henriksen Assistants: Peter Morello, Rick Gioia, Nate McGarigal, Jordan Levie Steadicam Operator: Michael Fuchs Digital Imaging Tech: Jeff Flohr

O POSITIVE “ESPN WRECK IT RALPH” Director of Photography: Jay Feather Operator: Matt Lyons Assistants: Jeff Taylor, Nina Chien, Tommy Scoggins Digital Imaging Tech: George Robert Morse

“USPS” Director of Photography: Scott Henricksen Assistants: Dennis Lynch, Jay Hardie, JD Murray, Noah Glazer Steadicam Operator: Chris Cunningham Digital Imaging Tech: Zakaree Sandberg

“VISA NFL” Director of Photography: Eric Steelberg, ASC Operator: Michael Berg Assistants: Al Rodgers, Sam Elliot, Dante Corrocher Digital Imaging Tech: Robert Cauble

“VERIZON” Director of Photography: Scott Henriksen Operator: Chris Cunningham Assistants: Dennis Lynch, JD Murray, Jay Hardie, Noah Glazer Digital Imaging Tech: Zakaree Sandberg

“VITAL FARMS” Director of Photography: Richard Henkels Operator: Jordan Marable Assistant: Collin Martin

ICONOCLAST “AIR JORDAN” Director of Photography: James Laxton Operator: Michael Merriman Assistants: Stephen Taylor-Wehr, Nito Serna, Chris Burket, Otis Sherman Digital Imaging Tech: Ryland Jones Camera Utility: Dustin LeBoeuf “BEATS” Director of Photography: Andre Chemetoff Operator: Michael Merriman Assistants: Hector Rodriguez, Eric Jensch, Brandon Szajner Steadicam Operator: Stefan von Bjorn Digital Imaging Tech: Randy Kaplan “HUGO BOSS” Director of Photography: Matias Boucard Assistants: Chris Strauser, Lucas Deans Digital Imaging Tech: Steve Harnell Steadicam Operator: Ross Coscia “JAGUAR” Director of Photography: Arnaud Potier Operator: Richard Sarmiento Assistants: Robert Ragozzine, Brett Walters, Dan Keck, Kyle Repka Digital Imaging Tech: Mariusz Cichon LETCA FILMS “RUFFLES” Director of Photography: Luca Fantini Assistants: Megaera Stephens, Filipp Penson, Daniel Cardenas, Jeffrey Hagerman Digital Imaging Tech: Arthur Ellis MIDWAY FILMS “MAZDA” Director of Photography: Jan Prahl Assistants: Brett Walters, John Clemens, Eric Schwager Steadicam Operator: Brant Fagan Digital Imaging Tech: Tyler Isaacson M SS NG P ECES “SKY VODKA” Director of Photography: Damian Acevedo Assistant: Marty Stiles Digital Imaging Techs: Steve Harnell MJZ “M&M’S” Director of Photography: Masanobu Takayanagi Assistants: Don Burghardt, Val Sklar, Phil Volkoff Digital Imaging Tech: Jamie Metzger Crane Operator: Rob Rubin Head Tech: Peter Tommasi

PARK PICTURES “BISH” Director of Photography: Donavan Sell Operator: Greg Benitez Assistants: Errin Zingale, Travis Daking, Jason Adler Digital Imaging Techs: Steve Harnell, Matthew Love Digital Utility: Tim Unger PARTIZAN ENTERTAINMENT “TARGET” Director of Photography: Shawn Kim Operator: Josh Medak Assistants: Lila Byall, Carrie Lazar, Daniel Ferrell Digital Imaging Tech: Dylan Johnson PONY SHOW ENTERTAINMENT “CROWN ROYAL RICHEST MAN IN THE WORLD” Director of Photography: Robert Elswit, ASC Operator: Daniel Patterson Assistants: Chevy Anderson, Walter Rodriguez, Alec Nickel, Jeff Taylor Digital Imaging Tech: Joe Belack Technocrane Tech: Stuart Allen Camera Utility: Daniel Cardenas Digital Utility: Sachi Bahra “HEFTY” Director of Photography: Giles Dunning Operator: John Veleta Assistants: Nito Serna, Noah Glazer, Wayne Goring Digital Imaging Tech: Scott Beckley “SAMSUNG” Director of Photography: Lasse FrankJohannessen Operator: Michael Merriman Assistants: Lucas Deans, Stephen MacDougall, John Parson Steadicam Operator: Chris Cunningham Digital Imaging Tech: Mark Wilenkin RADICAL MEDIA “AT&T” Director of Photography: Eric Schmidt Operator: Chris Bottoms Assistants: Lila Byall, JD Murray, Noah Glazer Digital Imaging Tech: Calvin Reibman RATTLING STICK “NISSAN” Director of Photography: Shawn Kim Assistants: Lila Byall, Nate Cummings Steadicam Operator: Dennis Noyes Digital Imaging Tech: Dylan Johnson

113


RESET “AT&T” Director of Photography: Mihai Malaimare, Jr. Operators: Josh Medak, Michael Merriman, Vincent Foeillet Assistants: Shaun Mayor, Ethan McDonald, Lucas Deans, Matt Laroche, Marcus Del Negro Digital Imaging Techs: Eli Berg, Scott Resnick Digital Utility: Matthew Ewing

Assistants: George Hesse, Dan Taylor Steadicam Operator: Chris Cunningham Digital Imaging Tech: Wilson Chung

Director of Photography: Jim Belkin Assistants: Walter Rodriguez, Matt Degreff Digital Imaging Tech: Dave Berman

SPARE PARTS “THE MORE YOU KNOW 2018 NY PSA” Director of Photography: David Waterston Assistants: Alex Waterston, Scott Miller Digital Imaging Tech: Amanda Uribe

SANCTUARY “JCPENNEY” Director of Photography: Rasmus Heise Assistants: Walter Rodriguez, Matt Degreff Digital Imaging Tech: Patrick Cecilian

THE CORNER SHOP “US CELLULAR” Director of Photography: Bryce Fortner Assistants: Salvatore Coniglio, Suzy Dietz Digital Imaging Tech: Paul Maletich

WORLD WAR 7 “SPRINT” Director of Photography: Giles Dunning Operator: Johanna Cerati Assistants: Wayne Goring, Lorenzo Porras, Patrick Romero Digital Imaging Tech: Scott Beckley

SMUGGLER “DICK’S SPORTING GOODS” Director of Photography: Max Goldman Assistants: Walter Rodriguez, Matt Degreff Digital Imaging Tech: Mariusz Cichon

THE DIRECTORS BUREAU “DELL” Director of Photography: Autumn Durald Arkapaw Assistants: Ethan McDonald, Sasha Wright Digital Imaging Tech: Steve Harnell

“DIET DR PEPPER” Director of Photography: Bryan Newman Operator: Vincent Foeillet Assistants: Richard Osborn, Corey Bringas, Matt Sumney Digital Imaging Tech: Steve Harnell SOMOROFF STUDIOS “RED LOBSTER” Director of Photography: Michael Somoroff Assistant: Tom Bracone Digital Imaging Tech: David Berman Phantom Tech: Steve Romano SPEERS & ARROWS “ILUMYA” Director of Photography: Maz Makhani

TOOL OF NORTH AMERICA “POPTART” Director of Photography: Autumn Durald Arkapaw Assistants: Ethan McDonald, Marcus Del Negro Steadicam Operator: Chris Cunningham Digital Imaging Tech: Conrad Radzik “UBER” Director of Photography: Laura Merians Assistant: Ethan McDonald Digital Utility: Matt Ewing Digital Imaging Tech: Michael Kowalczyk WEE BEASTIE “A+E/LIFETIME”

Advertisers Index

114

COMPANY PAGE

URL

20th Century Fox 33 Amimon 51 ARRI 17 Backstage Equipment 100 Blackmagic 15 Canon 111 Chapman Leonard 11 Cine Gear Expo 4 Cinemoves 9 Cineo Lighting 28 CL Enterprises 13 Cooke Optics 95 Filmotechnic 71 Fox Searchlight 25 IDX 101 JVC 61 Leitz 109 Light Gear 24 Kino Flo 34 Mole Richardson 104 NBC Universal Lightblade 105 Netflix 7, 21, 23, 29, 31, 35, 39 Paramount 27 Sundance Film Festival 94 Technicolor 41 Teradek 2,3 , 112 Tiffen 103 TV Logic 99 Sony Pictures 19 Tiffen 103 Universal Pictures 5 Warner Bros 98

www.foxscreenings.com www.amimon.com www.arri.com/stellar www.backstageweb.com (212) 502-6370 www.blackmagicdesign.com www.usa.canon.com/provideo www.chapman-leonard.com (888) 88 DOLLY www.cinegearexpo.com www.cinemoves.com www.cineolighting.com www.spacecam.com (818) 262-3111 www.cookeoptics.com (818) 262-9284 www.filmo-usa.com www.foxsearchlight.com/fyc www.idxtek.com www.connectedcam.com www.leitz-cine.com www.litegear.com www.kinoflo.com (818) 767-6528 www.mole.com www.lightbladeled.com (818) 777-1281 www.netflix.com www.AQuietPlaceMovie.com www.sundace.org/festival www.technicolor.com/create www.cinema.teradek.com (888) 941-2111 www.tiffen.com/naturalnd www.tvlogic.tv www.SonyPictures-Awards.com www.tiffen.com/naturalnd www.universalpicturesawards.com www.setlighting.com

TELEPHONE

ADVERTISING  REPRESENTATIVES WEST COAST & CANADA

ROMBEAU INC. Sharon Rombeau Tel: (818) 762-6020 Fax: (818) 760-0860 Email: sharonrombeau@gmail.com

EAST COAST & EUROPE

ALAN BRADEN INC. Alan Braden Tel: (714) 846-7147 Fax: (714) 846-8271 Email: alanbradenmedia@gmail.com


CW Sonderoptic has become Leitz. Over a century ago in Wetzlar, Germany, Leica founder Ernst Leitz began a tradition of optical excellence that revolutionized photography and directly informed our design of the Leica cine lenses. CW Sonderoptic has taken on the name Leitz to recognize this legacy and continue the tradition of craftsmanship and innovation in service of the filmmaking community.

www.leitz-cine.com

115


S T O P

M O T I O N

M AT T K E N N E D Y ADAM MCKAY’S NEWEST FILM, VICE , FOLLOWS DICK CHENEY (PLAYED BY CHRISTIAN BALE) EARLY IN HIS LIFE AND ON HIS PATH TO BECOMING VICE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES. AT ONE POINT CHENEY WORKED AS A LINEMAN IN HIS NATIVE WYOMING, AND THIS SCENE DEPICTS THAT TIME FRAME, WITH A LOCATION OUTSIDE LOS ANGELES STANDING IN FOR WYOMING, DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY GREIG FRASER, ASC, ACS, AND 1ST ASSISTANT CAMERA BILL COE ARE UP IN THE SKY WITH CHRISTIAN BALE CHASING THE LIGHT. SHOT ON A FUJI XT-2, WITH A 16-55MM LENS, F22 @ 1/250 SECOND.

116


Meet your new partner. Cinema RAW Light, an 8.85 Megapixel Super 35mm CMOS sensor, and 4K UHD/Full HD MP4 recording make the Canon C200 intuitive and reliable so you can direct your focus on telling the story every time. LEARN MORE AT USA.CANON.COM/PROVIDEO

RELIABILITY CAPTURED

Š2018 Canon U.S.A., Inc. All rights reserved. Canon and EOS are registered trademarks of Canon Inc. in the United States and may also be registered trademarks or trademarks in other countries.