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ICG MAGAZINE

THE LION KING ANNUAL PRODUCT GUIDE SUCCESSION


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contents

THE PRODUCT GUIDE August 2019 / Vol. 90 No. 6

DEPARTMENTS depth of field ................ 14 deep focus ................ 18 pre-production ................ 22 exposure ................ 24 production credits ................ 86 stop motion ................ 98

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THE LION KING

Jon Favreau and VFX Supervisor Rob Legato, ASC, revisit (a virtual) Africa for another Disney classic, shot by Caleb Deschanel, ASC.

SUCCESSION HBO’s dark “family story” offers train-wreck-bound characters and a compelling shot-on-film look, the latter courtesy of series DP’s Patrick Capone and Christopher Norr, and award-winning Pilot DP/Director Andrij Parekh, ASC.

THE PRODUCT GUIDE Display / Capture / Lighting / Support / Workflow

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40 52


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Explore the new SkyLink: www.arri.com/skylink SkyPanelÂŽ is a registered trademark of Arnold & Richter Cine Technik GmbH & Co. Betriebs KG.

THE PROD U C T GUIDE

7


Photo by Tobin Yelland

PRESIDENT'S LETTER //

Change and Similarity I’m sure you’ve noticed there is a different picture on the top of this page. Earlier this year, I was elected and sworn in as President of IATSE Local 600, International Cinematographers Guild. I am truly humbled to be in this position. I look forward to sharing our goals and ideals with our membership and the industry at large over the next three years of my term. This is a big change. Or is it? While there are some clear differences between my predecessor, Steven Poster, ASC, whom I am honored to follow, and myself, there are also many similarities. This was pointed out to me by ICG Magazine Executive Editor David Geffner, who recently interviewed both Steven and me about this transition. It seems that our early careers, and how and why we got involved in union leadership, contain many parallels. Change is an interesting thing. It can happen for a number of reasons. And while I strongly felt that this was the time for change in the leadership of our union, I am also very proud of the work that was done by the previous administration; and I very much want to continue that momentum. We will look to make some internal changes as well as some changes in our overall goals. But at the end of the day, the vision that has guided this organization since its inception, really, will remain the same: the needs of this membership drive every decision we make. My classification in Local 600 is as a Digital Imaging Technician (DIT). Our former President is a Director of Photography. That would appear to be another dramatic change. Or is it? As a DIT my job has been to collaborate with and support cinematographers and the camera crews with whom they work. My 40-year career, which includes almost every facet of the Film and Television industry, has supplied me with a wealth of experience, technical knowledge, and aesthetics, as well as best practices in workplace etiquette and safety. At the end of the day, aren’t we all filmmakers? An annual transition is also at play in our industry. Writing this in the middle of summer, when many people are thinking about swimming pools and BBQs, my thoughts (and those of many Guild members) turn to the technology and equipment that drive so much of our work. Many television shows begin or

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renew production in summer, and as a DIT, it’s my time to reassess my cart and decide what equipment upgrades are necessary. New technology comes out every year to make us more efficient at what we do, and being a “gear head,” my immediate response is: “I need this!” But recognizing that what we do is both art and commerce, the businessperson in me says: “Wait, how will this be paid for?” This is a paradox of our crafts and industry. We are not just artists and technicians; we are also businesspersons. This month’s Product Guide issue of ICG Magazine highlights some of the innovative technology that’s showcased at industry trade shows like NAB and Cine Gear. How we get our clients to recognize the worth of these capital improvements, and, more importantly, how we get them to be willing to pay the extra money we will need to charge in order to justify those purchases, are considerations that are always on my mind. So, while the equipment changes, those of us who use it have the same problem of how we can educate our clients in the need for this change. Thinking about new technology, the training, educating and organizing of which will certainly be a key part of my term as President, there are so many exciting products coming to market, literally every day. HDR monitoring on set will absolutely become a reality. Cinematographers are going to need to be able to make qualified decisions as to how they accommodate both an SDR and HDR grade of their images. How we accomplish this is going to be a challenge. I was recently at a seminar where a manufacturer said that the only way to properly monitor HDR on set is with a 65-inch monitor. I felt compelled to raise my hand and ask, “On what cart will I drag that monitor around?” So, while changing to monitoring HDR may become necessary, we on set will still face the same problems in how to accomplish this. Change is a funny thing; sometimes the biggest transitions are the easiest within which to find commonality. In the end, we must all remember that change is often for the better, but also recognize that core values of morality, ethics and yes practicality, will always remain the same.

Lewis Rothenberg National President International Cinematographers Guild IATSE Local 600


August 2019 vol. 90 no. 06

Publisher Teresa Muñoz Executive Editor David Geffner Art Director Wes Driver EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Tyler Bourdeau STAFF WRITER Pauline Rogers ACCOUNTING Glenn Berger Dominique Ibarra COPY EDITORS Peter Bonilla Maureen Kingsley CONTRIBUTORS Michael Chambliss Greg Gayne Margot Lester Kevin Martin Myles Mellor

INTERNATIONAL CINEMATOGRAPHERS GUILD Local 600 IATSE NATIONAL PRESIDENT Lewis Rothenberg NATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT Dejan Georgevich, ASC 1ST NATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT Christy Fiers 2ND NATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT John Lindley, ASC NATIONAL SECRETARY-TREASURER Stephen Wong NATIONAL ASSISTANT SECRETARY-TREASURER Jamie Silverstein NATIONAL SERGEANT-AT-ARMS Deborah Lipman NATIONAL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Rebecca Rhine

COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE Spooky Stevens, Chair

CIRCULATION OFFICE 7755 Sunset Boulevard Hollywood, CA 90046 Tel: (323) 876-0160 Fax: (323) 878-1180 Email: circulation@icgmagazine.com

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES WEST COAST & CANADA Rombeau, Inc. Sharon Rombeau Tel: (818) 762 – 6020 Fax: (818) 760 – 0860 Email: sharonrombeau@gmail.com EAST COAST, EUROPE, & ASIA Alan Braden, Inc. Alan Braden Tel: (818) 850-9398 Email: alanbradenmedia@gmail.com

ADVERTISING POLICY: Readers should not assume that any products or services advertised in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine are endorsed by the International Cinematographers Guild. Although the Editorial staff adheres to standard industry practices in requiring advertisers to be “truthful and forthright,” there has been no extensive screening process by either International Cinematographers Guild Magazine or the International Cinematographers Guild. EDITORIAL POLICY: The International Cinematographers Guild neither implicitly nor explicitly endorses opinions or political statements expressed in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. ICG Magazine considers unsolicited material via email only, provided all submissions are within current Contributor Guideline standards. All published material is subject to editing for length, style and content, with inclusion at the discretion of the Executive Editor and Art Director. Local 600, International Cinematographers Guild, retains all ancillary and expressed rights of content and photos published in ICG Magazine and icgmagazine.com, subject to any negotiated prior arrangement. ICG Magazine regrets that it cannot publish letters to the editor. ICG (ISSN 1527-6007) Ten issues published annually by The International Cinematographers Guild 7755 Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, CA, 90046, U.S.A. Periodical postage paid at Los Angeles, California. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ICG 7755 Sunset Boulevard Hollywood, California 90046 Copyright 2018, by Local 600, International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employes, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States and Canada. Entered as Periodical matter, September 30, 1930, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under the act of March 3, 1879. Subscriptions: $88.00 of each International Cinematographers Guild member’s annual dues is allocated for an annual subscription to International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. Nonmembers may purchase an annual subscription for $48.00 (U.S.), $82.00 (Foreign and Canada) surface mail and $117.00 air mail per year. Single Copy: $4.95 The International Cinematographers Guild Magazine has been published monthly since 1929. International Cinematographers Guild Magazine is a registered trademark.

www.icgmagazine.com www.icg600.com


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WIDE ANGLE //

T

he industry trade shows that lead up to compiling our Product Guide issue – Consumer Electronics Show (CES), Hollywood Production Alliance (HPA), National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), and Cine Gear Expo – are built around the twin themes of progress and disruption (with a fair bit of marketing hype thrown in). I’m not quite sure what to make of the word “disruption,” since change, by definition, will always alter what is already in place. That’s not a good or bad thing; it’s just the nature of human endeavors to build upon the shoulders of those who came before. Most likely, the cultural wordsmiths who land on such terms are trying to describe change without precedent – in this example, technology so different its wake sends the ship into uncharted waters. Our cover story on Jon Favreau’s The Lion King (page 28), shot by Oscar nominee Caleb Deschanel, ASC, with a veteran Local 600 camera team who provided real-world camera movement for a story created entirely inside a computer, may be that kind of disruption. The Lion King builds upon Favreau’s The Jungle Book (shot by Bill Pope, ASC, and covered in ICG’s April 2017 issue); it reflects an ongoing convergence between live-action filmmaking and CG animation that is being realized via game-engine technology on sets (as VFX Supervisor Rob Legato, ASC, used on The Lion King) to help create imagery not even Walt Disney could have envisioned. As for the new technology featured in our Product Guide section (page 50), the Display category (Twice As Nice, page 52) will see major changes from emissive LED screen technology, courtesy of consumer electronics giants like Sony (CLED) and Samsung (QLED). Of course, LED can make the case for the most disruptive new technology since sound. Staff writer Pauline Rogers’ Silver Linings article (page 70) relates how LEDs are replacing every type of historically traditional lighting element on film, TV and live-event sets. Another course-shifter this year is 8K. In Silver Linings, Local 600 DIT Barry Russo, who works in Cinema Business Development for Panasonic, talks about his company’s work with

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8K ROI (Region of Interest) capture, where eight 8K cameras are integrated into a single system, with specific (HD) crop areas linked in one camera to multiple crop images in other cameras. Bringing HDR (high dynamic range) into the broadcast world grows ever higher on many NAB vendor lists; and Michael Chambliss’ article on new workflows, Making “Just Okay” Great? (page 78) highlights companies like Grass Valley, whose Creative Grading App includes a top-to-bottom rework of the video controller’s toolset. Some feel HDR is the most dramatic change since the transition from film to digital. That’s why Michael Cioni, senior vice president of innovation for Panavision, insists his company’s new LINK HDR: On-Set HDR & SDR Monitoring and Post Workflow will be a vital tool, allowing all stakeholders – cinematographers, directors, editors, VFX supervisors, etc. – to view the same imagery throughout the pipeline. “It’s a problem when cinematographers cannot see the image until the end of the process,” Cioni is quoted. “And the DI gets complicated when the directors see one thing on set and then spend six months looking at something else in editorial.” Change, disruptive or otherwise, is inevitable. And we at ICG Magazine want to express our debt of gratitude to Steven Poster, ASC. In the thirteen years he led this Guild, former President Poster not only elevated the art and craft of image-making in every possible way, he was also a staunch supporter of the work this magazine does to promote Local 600’s membership to the greater industry. Poster’s labor roots run deep, and his passion for trade unionism has always been inspirational. On a personal level, he provided me with a wealth of information, education and friendship in the decade I’ve been at this post. What then, does disruption at ICG look like after thirteen years? It would be hard to imagine a more qualified, yet fresh-thinking leader than President Lewis Rothenberg, whose industry background includes directing, editing, lighting design, cinematography and an engineer’s knowledge of digital imaging. His union (and entertainment) ties in New York City date back to his father, the first working member of Local 802 – American Federation of Musicians – to receive a pension. President Rothenberg’s passion, energy and enthusiasm to better the lives of working families is supremely contagious, and his clear respect for the history of this Guild (and for the advancements made by his predecessor) is disruptive – in the best possible way. David Geffner Executive Editor

Twitter: @DGeffner Email: david@icgmagazine.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Greg Gayne

(Product Guide) “Shooting NAB was a new and fun experience. It was the perfect intersection of two things that I really enjoy: technology and connecting with people. It was also cool to be able to finally put faces to the names of many of the artists and technicians whose work I admire. It was an honor photographing them.”

Myles Mellor (Stop Motion)

“I created this month’s puzzle by weaving together cutting-edge products for the film community into a word-web. (Although any other audience may think otherwise). That means Alexa shouldn’t be confused with Amazon’s voice assistant, helium isn’t just a balloon gas, and Venice isn’t just a setting for incredible photos at dawn! You’ve been warned….”

ICG MAGAZINE

THE LION KING ANNUAL PRODUCT GUIDE SUCCESSION

Cover image courtesy of Walt Disney Co.


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14 DEPTH OF FIELD

08.2019

Panavision’s New Filmmaker Program BY PAULINE ROGERS PHOTOS COURTESY OF EFRAIN PINEDA/PANAVISION

“My guess is that there will be an entire generation of filmmakers who owe the start of their careers to the efforts of people at Panavision – people like [Panavision Marketing Executive] Alexa Lopez,” relates Local 600 cinematographer Bill Dill, ASC, who is also on the faculty at Chapman University/ Dodge College of Film and Media Arts. Panavision’s efforts to provide equipment to colleges around the country is just one part of the iconic company’s larger plan of giving back to an industry to which they have come to embody excellence in service and supply. One prime example of those efforts to inspire a new generation is Panavision’s New Filmmaker Program. As Michael Dallatorre, Manager, New Filmmaker Program describes: “In the late 1980s, the New Filmmaker Program was developed based on the belief that helping film students and

emerging filmmakers by providing technical information and camera equipment was paramount to enabling the next generation of filmmakers to reach their potential.” Based in the United States, the New Filmmaker Program is submission-structured and can be accessed via Panavision’s website. Each year it grows bigger and broader. “We support all kinds of projects, including drama and comedy, action and documentary, long-form and short-form,” Dallatorre explains. “We also look at thesis projects and proof-of-concept projects. We look for proposals that are well thought-out and have a certain level of preparedness, including detailed information on crew, locations, gear list, production schedule, and budget.” As the industry changed, so has Panavision’s participation and reach to

filmmakers. “With the advance of digital technology, the program has expanded greatly in the last 15 years,” Dallatorre adds. “We offer the next generation of filmmakers greater access to both film and digital equipment with which to produce their projects. The range of applicants has also grown to include not only students but independent filmmakers, crew members who aspire to move up to the cinematographer’s rank, producers, directors, and screenwriters.” Once each proposal (and there are hundreds) has been carefully reviewed, meeting Panavision standards for content, grants are issued. As with professional productions, the filmmakers are responsible for insurance and back-up plans should equipment become unavailable, and the proper service of equipment. Panavision (cont'd on page 16)

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16 DEPTH OF FIELD

08.2019

GRANT RECIPIENT/ CINEMATOGRAPHER MADELINE LEACH WITH HER CAMERA TEAM FROM DELIVER US : L TO R: GAFFER MIKAELA ADDISON, LEACH, 1ST AC MELISSA BALTIERRA, 2ND AC HILLARY TZENG

helps future filmmakers set the right standard for future productions early. For Madeline Leach (who’d worked with Panavision on two previous University of Southern California MFA projects – sans grant – one of which, Ponyboi, just premiered at Tribeca), the grant-application process was smooth and efficient. “Deliver Us is a fiction thesis project, written and directed by Kevin McCormack. It was a female-driven horror period film that took place during the California Gold Rush era,” Leach explains. “It was my first time working with Alexa Lopez, at Panavision Woodland Hills,” she adds. “Since then, she’s been there for me on several other projects. She supplied us with an ALEXA Mini and a set of Super Baltars. The lenses have a great softness to them, which helped with the time period. Since there wasn’t electricity during the Gold Rush, and the shoot was predominantly at night, I lit mainly with a blend of warm candlelight and moonlight. The Super Baltars really played into the look. “The ALEXA Mini was also very important as a camera choice because I was operating in a small cabin with restricted space up in Big Bear,” Leach continues. “I was also doing a few tracking shots handheld and with the EasyRig. They were essential to the story.” The film premiered at USC in May and has been submitted to festivals across the country. Today, Leach is freelancing, working in music videos and shorts – one of which was recently shown at Tribeca. She credits

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Panavision’s support as key to allowing her to grow in the craft she loves. “The program was such a fantastic opportunity for me,” Leach says. “I got to push myself as a cinematographer – and learn. I got to achieve the look I wanted that was right for the story, and Panavision supplied me with the opportunity and tools I needed to succeed.” Bruce Cole is another recipient who says the program was a major career boost. An AFI graduate, Cole started working as a gaffer. Like many emerging cinematographers, he connected with a screenwriter who wanted to get a project going – by any means necessary. “I had put Panavision into the ‘unattainable’ category,” Cole admits. “I think many independent filmmakers have this misconception that Panavision is only for the privileged – and until I was informed of the New Filmmakers Program, I assumed the same.” Cole applied, and his project Jinn (the story of a young black woman who struggles to accept her mother’s conversion to Islam) was accepted. He admits it was a tough project conceived on a minimal budget. “The Panavision package from the grant was most of our gear,” he recalls. “The fact that our vision was being captured using Panavision glass was a huge plus because once we saw it on the screen, it gave the film all the legitimacy of a studio project.” The project premiered at SXSW, won several awards and was picked up by MGM Classics. Because of Jinn, Cole was able to find

representation with The Gersh Agency. “ This program allows emerging filmmakers from all backgrounds and budgets to compete on the same level,” Cole continues. “The professionalism at Panavision alone is a continued reminder of the years of dedication and sacrifice it has taken to maintain excellence and confidence within the relationship between filmmakers and technicians.” Panavision’s participation in future filmmakers’ careers extends beyond this successful program. As Alexa Lopez details: “We regularly host filmmakers with product workshops, technology presentations, and facility tours. We work closely with industry organizations and non-profits, including Film Independent with Project Involve, the AMPAS Grants program, ASC Master Classes, ICG training workshops, and the ICG Emerging Cinematographer Awards. We are also actively involved in regional film festivals, offering educational seminars and workshops, which enable us to provide support for filmmakers in many diverse communities. “Panavision recognizes the next generation of filmmakers are our future,” Lopez concludes, “and we encourage and actively support their early projects and continue nurturing them through their careers. We feel it is important that filmmakers from all backgrounds have an opportunity to realize their artistic vision and to tell their stories to an audience.”


18 DEEP FOCUS

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“Audiences want to confront their fears, whatever those may be...”

retold with a redefinition of the craft. [Directors] Mike Flanagan and Jordan Peele have done this on various budget levels, so it’s not the scope or scale that defines their success, it’s their ability to translate our deepest fears into something that resonates emotionally and is both entertaining and terrifying.

Michael Fimognari DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTO BY TINA ROWDEN

The genre means different things to different audiences; I prefer ghost stories to

slasher films or demonic elements because the latter two don’t really scare me. Audiences want to confront their fears, whatever those may be, to deal with anxieties in ways that ultimately end safely when we can turn the lights back on.

For me, it’s almost always more effective to create a sense of dread than it is to show

Even on a limited budget, you can effectively scare an audience with the right balance of strong, empathetic characters and a relentless, powerful opposing

force. Creating a sense of dread can take place anywhere, and we are most terrified by stories that we can relate to our everyday lives. That is an opportunity to make films in contained, budget-friendly environments and still live up to the expectations of the genre.

Stories intended to terrify the audience change with what each era’s

culture fears, as do the effective methods of scaring the audience. There have been several eras of cinema where horror was pronounced dead only to be made relevant again by good storytellers who connected audiences’ anxieties with an aesthetic that felt right for the moment.

With horror, there are primal fears that hold true over time, like losing a

child or figures that lurk in the dark, and it’s no coincidence that those fears are stories

something gratuitously. The unknown in the shadows or around the corner drives our deepest anxieties to conjure our personal fears, which will always be more terrifying. Films like Rosemary’s Baby, The Exorcist, Poltergeist, and The Blair Witch Project all succeed in scaring based more on what you don’t see than what you do.

Most of my work has been with Mike Flanagan (The Haunting of Hill House, Doctor

Sleep, Oculus, Gerald’s Game, Ouija: Origin of Evil, Before I Wake). They deal with the confrontation of personal trauma and loss – often in childhood. Our aesthetic choices are driven by how families experience their grief, anger, and fear on an emotional level. The terror is often in the careful construction of slow camera moves or perfectly timed editing to set up action and reaction. But in (cont'd on page 20)

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20 DEEP FOCUS

08.2019

episode six of The Haunting of Hill House, we did something different. We put together five long shots (the longest was 18 minutes) as the appropriate exploration of past and present, and in doing so sought to visually connect the present emotional worlds of the characters with their deepest fears and regrets of the past.

high contrast, where today’s subtle tonal values of darker grays are more akin to our eye’s interpretation of how darkness can be achieved. This is in equal parts due to the lighting technology available, with low heat LED’s, and the color science and talent of colorists who can paint a frame with incredible detail.

There is no negotiation when it comes to safety. Our

Among the many stories I’ve been fortunate to tell with Mike Flanagan, two were based on Stephen King’s novels: Gerald’s

imaginations and aspirations can be big, but there’s always a safe way to get it done. Film sets can be dangerous places by the nature of the moving parts and physical challenges, but a commitment to getting everyone home safely is the first priority.

The improvements in color science have made such a difference in crafting how the perception of darkness is interpreted. Cinema lighting language of the past relied more on hard light and

Game and Doctor Sleep (the upcoming sequel to The Shining). We have always approached our work honoring the storytellers and filmmakers who have inspired and scared us – for Oculus we drew from Poltergeist, for Ouija it was The Exorcist. With Doctor Sleep, King’s writing and Kubrick’s film speak for themselves, and we respect those epic entities immensely. It was an opportunity we celebrated every day, and we’re thrilled to share it in November.

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22 PRE-PRODUCTION

08.2019

Gregory Irwin 1ST AC BY PAULINE ROGERS PHOTO BY KYLE KAPLAN

Gregory Irwin is one of the most soughtafter 1st ACs, with recent credits like Joker, Interstellar, The Fate of the Furious, and Star Trek Beyond complementing early works such as New Jack City and Wayne’s World 2. There isn’t a challenge Irwin hasn’t met, or a piece of equipment he hasn’t mastered. He credits that cool under pressure to mentors who helped him along the way, as well as to his careful study of the craft he chose for his career. “It’s possible to struggle through growing your career alone, but this is an industry where nurturing is important,” he reflects. “I had the right guidance, and it’s important to me to pass it along.” Growing up in Southern California, the movie industry was in Irwin’s backyard. But it didn’t become a serious vocation until he met English teacher Jerry Kestinberg, whose Rolling Hills High School’s “Beginning Film

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Production” course enthralled him. While at California State University Long Beach, film instructor Stephen Hubbert took a special interest in Irwin’s development – and is still a friend to this day. “He didn’t just teach the art and science of cinematography, he also held them to a high level of selfresponsibility – the very kind they would need to have for survival in this competitive business,” Irwin explains. It was around that time that Irwin began to build a library of films that would influence his creativity. The visual splendor created by Nestor Almendros, ASC (Days of Heaven, Sophie’s Choice), as well as that of Vittorio Storaro, ASC, AIC (Apocalypse Now) had a significant impact. “I began to understand the visual power of the medium as I watched Kevin Kline conducting music in multiple

mirrored reflections, all without seeing the camera, in Sophie’s Choice,” Irwin recalls. “And, of course, the ‘helicopter attack’ in Apocalypse Now that left audiences speechless,” he adds. “The Black Stallion, and Caleb Deschanel’s choice to photograph the images without dialog and how that affected an audience, was another.” An internship under Dominic Palmer Jr., ASC, on M*A*S*H had even more impact. Not only did Irwin learn the structure of a camera department, he also learned to engage with other departments to obtain a goal. Technically, he was growing. But there was still more to learn. That came from Jonathan Alcott, BSC, on one of his early 1st AC jobs. Irwin was young – and, he admits, maybe a little cocky, as 20-year-olds can be, especially when compared to an old-school master like Alcott, an Oscar-winner who shot four movies for Stanley Kubrick. “I was sporting long hair, torn shorts and stretched-out T-shirts,” Irwin laughs. “And here I was working for a poised, proper and very English cinematographer.” One day Alcott called Irwin over. “What department are you in?” “Camera…,” Irwin stammered. “That’s right. You’re in the camera department. And may I remind you that you are one of the educated ones and the center of the process?” Alcott countered. “I recommend a haircut and a collared shirt. If you can’t [do those things], feel free to join the grips. Now, off with you, boy!” That was on Friday. By Monday, the hair was short and collared shirts made a regular appearance. Wardrobe and manners adjusted, Irwin lucked into another significant influence – William Fraker, ASC. “He was always impeccably groomed,” Irwin comments. “But more than that, he showed me how to deal with production, rise above it all, and always maintain one’s sense of integrity. He also made everyone work at the highest level. Anyone can basically learn the craft, but not all can learn the intangibles that go with it. They were all valuable lessons towards success.” As time went on, Irwin sought out major 1st ACs, like Kenny Nishino, Cal Roberts, Johnny Walker, and others – to learn from and emulate. “You can never stop learning,” he says. “Their ideas in leadership, management, and again, character, are things that everyone should follow.” Today Irwin is adamant about instilling what he learned into newcomers to the Guild. He has mentored numerous young people who have gone on to successful camera careers – and he would like to see mentorships grow within the Guild. “It’s the only way to successfully pass on the values of the craft and maintain the standards that were passed on prior,” he concludes.


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Robert Carroll BY DAVID GEFFNER PHOTO BY GREG GAYNE

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Chatting with Robert Carroll, Senior Director Content Solutions for Dolby Laboratories, at NAB this past April, felt like sneaking into a mini-seminar on the past, present, and future of visual storytelling. Carroll promotes Dolby’s muchlauded Vision and Atmos tools, the former of which uses a sophisticated set of metadata to translate HDR content to home displays. Carroll helps ensure the Dolby pipeline from set to post to your living room is seamless, including working with third-party vendors who create content for Dolby Cinema and in Dolby Vision. The three-decades-plus professional began his career as a news and live-sports cameraman, before moving into engineering and product development. Carroll says good fortune has allowed him to work with teams that have created five Emmy-awardwinning products, but technological savvy and a strong grasp of where the industry is going have played the bigger roles. Prior to working at Dolby, Carroll was CEO of Cine-tal, an Indianapolis-based firm that develops monitoring and colormanagement solutions for digital cinema, video production, and post-production applications, and was acquired by Dolby in 2010. As a founder and CEO of three start-ups, Carroll understands the trials and tribulations of fast-growing organizations – a role that Dolby, created by its namesake founder in the field of audio noise reduction more than 50 years ago, has embraced more than ever. ICG: I’m seeing displays at this NAB far brighter than the Dolby Vision threshold of 1000-nits. Is Dolby’s HDR ecosystem driving that? Robert Carroll: Dolby Vision has a recommended minimum, not a requirement, of 1000nits peak brightness and 000.5 blacks, which results in a contrast ratio of greater than 200,000 to 1. So displays at this show, like those from Flanders and Sony, easily reach those minimum specifications and go well beyond. But the way I look at it is that in the past we’ve always had to set standards to keep everything the same. As technology progressed, we would always meet or surpass the old standards, resulting in... Brand-new standards? Right. Going from black and white to color, we did that, and from SD to HD, we did that. So as we were looking at the most recent transition from high definition to ultrahigh definition – HD to UHD – we saw

an opportunity to flip the paradigm, and look at things a little differently. How so? Instead of setting standards with limits when it comes to human visual perception, standards were created that are at the very edge of visual perception. That was done in two areas. One was SMPTE 2084 – the PQ standard for the electrooptical transfer function, or EOTF, which goes from zero to 10,000 nits. Likewise with colorimetry, with BT.2020 [Rec.2020], which is pretty much at the limits of human perception for color. So what we have now is a very large path, with a palette that can create any image that human beings can perceive. One of the concepts behind Dolby Vision was to provide a method for delivering artistic fidelity and intent, not only with that large path to get to the edge of human visual perception, but also because consumer devices are going to have a divergent set of specifications as technology continues to speed forward.

Break that down for what it means for filmmakers on set. As you observed here at NAB, consumer displays are being introduced with much higher peak brightness, and that will engender two requirements from the creative community. One is to have a measure of control over how the work is ultimately seen – Dolby Vision is an ecosystem that provides control over playback devices so artistic fidelity and intent can be preserved. The other is that filmmakers now want to take advantage of an expanded palette that’s entered the consumertechnology market. But they’ll need reference displays – on set and in post – to help them understand where they are sitting with the image. The key to all this is that we, as a community, did something much smarter this time around with regard to standardization. We set a spec that isn’t absolutely obsolete a year or two after its creation [laughs]. Creating and setting standards has always been challenging as it feels like the tail wagging the dog. That’s one way to describe it. The reality is that when we try to create standardizations, we’re documenting processes that are already in the marketplace, so it feels like a reactive process. But we do usually work ahead of the curve; it just takes so much time to have everyone come together and agree on a standard, we are often behind it. You mentioned Rec.2020 as an outside edge for color. But in the cinema space, we’re at DCI-P3 with no apparent signs of going much further. What’s the point of having a limit if we can’t ever reach it, particularly for theatrical exhibition, which should be a peak experience? Very similar to the consumer market, we’re starting to see that divergence in cinema, where several manufacturers have introduced projection systems with a variety of dynamic range that’s different from DCI, as well as peak brightness different from DCI. Dolby has its own branded version in Dolby Cinema theaters that’s different than DCI. So as creatives start looking to deliver in these multiple environments, we’ll see that envelope being pushed out more, just as it’s being extended in the consumer market. Of course, the same need for gamma and luminance control in the cinema space will be required, as it is now being fine-tuned for home displays. Can you refresh our readers as to how Dolby’s approach to HDR differs from other systems? Is there a sense of competition among the different HDR systems? One thing Dolby has done well for the past 50 years is to create complete ecosystems. Going back to our origins, taking hiss off of tape and allowing that [noise-reduction system] to be incorporated into the delivery system – LP, tape, CD, et cetera – made the overall experience better for the consumer, as well as providing better fidelity for musicians to create their art. As we moved into

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audio in theaters, and then into the home, and, fifteen years ago, into imaging, that same mindset has prevailed. We pay as much attention to the environment creatives work in, the tools they use to create and ultimately want to preserve artistic intent, and the distribution and playback points, as we do to the actual science and technology of our products. Playback devices are as rigorously checked, certified, and validated for implementations as our content-creation tools are. What are the technical differences? Technically, our HDR system is based upon frame-by-frame, shot-by-shot metadata that the artist can adjust. It’s not only dynamic but scalable, meaning that if the automatic process in a given scene is not what the creator wants – that object is too bright and is distracting from the actor’s performance, for example – the DP can take it down. Moreover, it will still look that way across the many divergent devices down the chain. As far as competition, I don’t think there is that mentality. Other than Samsung, most of the home display systems support all versions of HDR. The approach from the manufacturer’s side is to be homogenous: “I have to make sure my display supports everything out there so the consumer has a full range of choice.” Two years ago, I wrote about an HBO show called The Deuce, where the DP was informed several episodes in that the network wanted an HDR version. It meant a quick change in his approach to exposure, lighting, and color. What is Dolby doing to make HDR capture easier for those on set? When we launched Dolby Vision, it was in the color-grading suites with the understanding that modern digital cameras were capturing more stops than SDR was giving us the ability to see. That meant people were throwing away image data. We’re just now really getting that message out on-set, working with companies like Atomos, which debuted a device with Dolby Vision play-out here at NAB, and other dataand asset- management companies. Would you describe Dolby Vision as a production format? No. It’s a distribution format. But because we have the ability to bring this ecosystem to such a divergent range of devices, there certainly will be workflows where Dolby may be able to bring some value. An example would be reviews done in a decentralized way – producer in

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“Right now there’s virtually no control for different viewing environments, so any small steps we take are a good thing.”

New York, DP on-set in L.A., second unit in South America – Dolby Vision would facilitate a cohesion without having to calibrate reference displays for each location. And because we work across so many consumer devices, the visual experience for those on the project, who may be watching footage on a myriad of displays systems, is brought into alignment with Dolby’s ecosystem. That creates better efficiency with the image. That’s a key point. Cinematographers want the image on set to look the same as the HDR master. They don’t want to worry about heavy lifting done in post and things changing down the pipeline. Absolutely. For years people have grown used to seeing SDR on set, and they tend to associate the feelings and emotions of that image with the SDR version. If the first time you see something is with a much bigger palette, it’s hard to move away from what you’ve grown used to for six months. We didn’t have that issue with film. The workflow mentality was: “I know what my emulsion does, I know what my print stock does, I’m not going to worry about what I see on this video tap because that’s mostly for composition.” Understanding today’s various digital camera systems is important because that display-referred image [on set] is not true north. DP’s still must trust their light meters and their own instincts and experience for lighting. So, anything we can do to make that display system move from SDR to HDR, and HDR into something that’s easily understood on set, will really help onset workflows. Last year, Samsung debuted an emissive theatrical projection system capable of high brightness levels. Does Dolby see a path for HDR into movie theaters? LED technology has changed the world

in so many ways. We continue to see LED lighting penetrate so many different worlds – automotive, smart homes, public environments. Economies of scale come into play when you’re talking about large cinema screens, in theaters across the world. But I think we will get there. I mean, whoever thought we’d be talking about 8Kresolution images? Why would we ever need to do that? [Laughs.] Because now we can do it – the costs are scalable, and there are some value propositions with worthwhile discussion points. That’s another reason why pushing standards out to the boundaries of human perception is a viable approach. We’ll eventually see that big jump in brightness and color gamut you’re talking about [in cinema], but not for a while. What can we expect in the near term? I think adjusting the image to the playback environment is within reach. Cinema is a fairly controlled sandbox, but watching a Netflix show at home during the day, versus watching it at night in a pitch-black room, versus watching it on your phone at work allows for a broad range of ambient lighting situations, and there are more devices being introduced that can measure that ambient light and account for it. One of the nice things about frame-by-frame, shot-byshot metadata, is that if we understand the ambient environment, and we understand artistic intent and how human vision is modeled, we can provide better artistic representation, in a wider range of viewing situations, on more and smarter devices. Right now there’s virtually no control for different viewing environments, so any small steps we take are a good thing. I always tell people we are on a path of continual improvement, striving for perfection. What we do today matters today; what we do tomorrow…


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JON FAVREAU AND VFX SUPERVISOR ROB LEGATO, ASC, REVISIT (A VIRTUAL) AFRICA FOR ANOTHER DISNEY CLASSIC, THE LION KING , SHOT BY CALEB DESCHANEL, ASC.

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W Walt Disney Feature Animation’s The Lion King was among the early 1990’s biggest hits, cementing the studio’s resurgence in the industry. The coming-ofage tale of an African lion prince striving to succeed his late father as ruler was even successfully translated into a Tony-winning Broadway musical. Jon Favreau, who directed a hit reboot of another Disney animated classic, The Jungle Book, which employed virtual world-building, was a natural choice to lead a new version of The Lion King. But rather than incorporating a live-action element with virtual environments (as in The Jungle Book), The Lion King’s entire universe, with its abundance of animal life, would be simulated. This process was enhanced through the use of virtual reality (VR) to plan for the practical aspects of the shoot, which would be driven by real-world film methodologies alongside cutting-edge new tech.

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FAVREAU AND COMPANY IN VR LAND. “YOU STILL SCOUT LOCATIONS, BUT INSTEAD OF GETTING IN A 15-PASSENGER VAN AND DRIVING ON DIRT ROADS, YOU PUT ON GOGGLES AND CAN FLY AROUND THE ENVIRONMENT USING THESE LITTLE HANDSETS WITH LASER POINTERS,” DESCHANEL RECALLS.

DESCHANEL ON LOCATION IN AFRICA SHOOTING REFERENCE MATERIAL. OF THE VIRTUAL WORKFLOW FAVREAU NOTES: “CALEB HAD ONLY DONE LIVE-ACTION FILMS, BUT HE SETTLED RIGHT IN, SAYING, “I WOULD PUT A CRANE HERE, AND LAY DOLLY TRACK THERE,” JUST LIKE HE WAS DOING A PROPER TECH SCOUT OUT IN THE FIELD.”

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Favreau reunited with many key players from The Jungle Book, including Visual Effects Supervisor Rob Legato, ASC, and Technicolor’s MPC Film (the only VFX house on the show). MPC Co-Supervisors Elliot Newman and Adam Valdez oversaw 1,200 artists and animators, whose efforts were enhanced via an innovative collaboration with Magnopus (headed by virtual production supervisor Ben Grossman), along with Vive, Oculus, and Unity, resulting in a unique workflow that leveraged VR, as well as CG, advances. New enlistees for the virtual odyssey included Production Designer James Chinlund and Director of Photography Caleb Deschanel, ASC, who was supported by a team of Guild members, including A-Camera/ Steadicam Operator Henry Tirl and Key 1st AC Tommy Tieche.

– PREPRODUCTION / LOCATION – Jon Favreau (Director): When you’re taking on a well-known and beloved story, you are doing so knowing that the element of surprise is not going to be the factor it would be in a new film as it unfolds. There is some additional content here – we’re about a reel longer than the original – but the basic beats are essentially the same. As a result, the effort has to be focused on the quality of the thing, meaning you have to put on a wonderful production.

of traditional animation. On Jungle Book I had worried we wouldn’t have any happy accidents, but then I found that by walking a couple of feet to the right, I’d see something that hadn’t been intended but looked better. I learned to take advantage of that, and I think Caleb went through a similar experience on this film.

of the real country they referenced before taking our own excursion on location [with Blue Sky Films.] None of the location shooting was intended to be used for finals, just as reference for the animation. But I did throw one real shot into the movie – just to see if anybody can spot that out of the other 1,400 [laughs].

Caleb Deschanel, ASC (Director of Photography): I think what Jon saw in me is a guy who would bring a realistic Rob Legato, ASC (VFX Supervisor): We’re look, while still being open to exploration. using the same approach as The Jungle Book, Wherever you are shooting, the job is still but without having to insert live-action into to find the best angle, and then determine our created-from-scratch virtual world. We how to shoot it and move the camera to got rid of the backbone of our old virtual express the emotional content of that scene. camera system, [Autodesk] MotionBuilder, At first I was thinking we would miss the and did everything on the Unity game serendipity of a sudden thunderstorm, or an engine, for its VR capability. This let us actor doing the unexpected to add character walk around [the capture volume] with nuance. But there were many examples of headsets on, “seeing” the environment serendipity owing to being able to do so like we were scouting an actual location. many takes quickly, which also allowed for Working as it if were live action influenced experimentation. the look of the film by taking it towards traditional cinematic language, shooting Favreau: For a 2D movie, the 1992 film did multiple takes, which let us get away from a really nice job depicting Africa, so we took the more rigidly storyboarded execution inspiration from that, decoding which parts

Deschanel: We spent two-and-a-half weeks in Africa, shooting with the [Panavision Woodland Hills-supplied] ARRI ALEXA 65, capturing animals, sunrises and different locations. For the spots we really liked, MPC Film’s guys photographed a lot of details – vegetation, rocks, sand and other textural bits, which helped us capture atmosphere. Tommy Tieche (Key 1st AC): In Kenya, we used Panavision Sphero 65 prime lenses and a custom modified Panavision 150 to 600mm zoom with a built-in 1.4 extender. Additional photography in the high desert of California for moon and night sky elements used a Panavision 2400mm – [actually a] Canon 1200mm with customized 2x extender [that] covered the ALEXA 65 sensor.

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AS KEY 1ST AC TIECHE DESCRIBES: “WHEN WE BEGAN STAGE WORK AFTER KENYA, WE FILMED ACTORS PLAYING OUT DIFFERENT SCENES ON A SMALL-SCALE THEATER, SO ANIMATION COULD USE THE FOOTAGE TO CREATE MANNERISMS AND EXPRESSIONS FOR THE CHARACTERS.”

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beautiful “cloud forest” on the slopes of Mt. Kenya like nothing I’d seen in my life. Injecting that into the forest space gave us a new way to depict that locale while revealing an exciting and unique ecosystem.

– STAGE –

Favreau: These hundreds of textures and thousands of reference pictures let us build up Africa from scratch. Like any animated film, the artists we had were the key, and if you looked at our preproduction art, it was like walking the hallways of Pixar. We worked our way toward photorealism, first with animatics, then with more fully rendered CG 3D environments that we could pull into virtual reality. As a group, we’d do a scout – six of us wearing VR headsets, walking around the “location” we were filming. Caleb had only done live-action films, but he settled right in, saying, “I would put a crane here, and lay dolly track there,” just like he was doing a proper tech scout out in the field.

Deschanel: I worked with [lead lighting artist] Sam Maniscalco, picking one of the 350 skies we had, then we’d move the sun around to where we wanted it. On a conventional movie, the sun comes up and moves across the sky while clouds come in and out. You take all that into account, shooting in one direction during the morning and the other in afternoon. In the computer, we could have decided to not let the sun move at all – but found it worked better to move the sun for nearly every shot, marching it to our orders instead of nature’s. Legato: When you looked through the portal, it excludes everything that is not in the composed frame, so you can’t plan your move around the off-camera logistical elements. You can switch and look at things in VR, making it all appear more like a live-action stage, because your brain is cemented into a whole space beyond what the camera sees – you know that there is a tree just off-camera to one side and can plan your move accordingly with the same sense of assurance that you’d have if you kept your other eye open while looking through a regular viewfinder. The VR approach can help inspire you. When you’re supposed to be atop a cliff, you’re going to have a visceral response to looking down from such a vertiginous space. It isn’t real, but it feels to you like you could fall a thousand feet if you missed a step, and that triggers you as a cameraperson to react accordingly.

39 years. Shooting things that don’t exist isn’t usually a big deal, but this process was really exciting, to the point it twisted my head around in a circle. When I was first shown what I thought was a reference image of a baboon, I studied it and then asked to see their computer representation of this character. I got these funny looks and they pointed at the screen. It was only then it dawned on me that I was not watching some National Geographic 4K documentary footage! Chinlund: We launched heavily into character development at the start. Our intention was to make the characters photoreal and believable as what they were, rather than caricatures. We looked at a lot of documentaries, and Jon’s goal was to have an experience resembling what is found in nature. There are some adjustments to that along the way, but what we really learned is that you can’t improve on nature.

Favreau: In the animal kingdom, you don’t see warthogs grinning and raising their eyebrows. Rather than mash-in a humanlooking performance, we leaned heavily into genuine animal behavior. If you listen to Bambi’s commentary, you hear Disney wanting it to feel more real than Snow White, and they discuss having to embrace animal behavior, and not draw too much attention to the artifice inherent with animals talking. With libraries of meerkat reference, you might find the animal expresses that emotion through jumping. So the actor performance is the emotional core of the animation, which in turn is influenced by what we observe in nature. Deschanel: You still scout locations, but With lions, they don’t have a lot of facial instead of getting in a 15-passenger van and expression, so the animators had to become driving on dirt roads, you put on goggles and can fly around the environment using Tieche: When we began stage work experts in body language as well, since the these little handsets with laser pointers. after Kenya, we filmed actors playing out lion’s posture would reflect its emotional That let us fly around Pride Rock and the different scenes on a small-scale theater, state. various watering holes and other locales so animation could use the footage to built for and featured in the movie. If we create mannerisms and expressions for the Deschanel: When we shot on stage, [MPC Film] had already rendered a pretty goodfound a spot where we wanted the camera characters. looking but limited version of what we for a particular setup, we could set a marker that looked kind of like an iPad, dropping Favreau: What’s nice about having a would ultimately wind up with – the animals it in place with a particular lens on it as a human performer as a basis for animation had been animated very realistically, but is that you inherit all the acting and vocal the leaves and grass weren’t all the way reminder. choices. Unlike motion capture, where you there. Jon worked with Andy to get the James Chinlund (Production Designer): retarget a performance onto a CG rig, this performances out of the animals that were We tried to incorporate what we found on was all keyframe animation. [Production possible given the limitations of this game location, while also remembering we had Animation Supervisor] Andy Jones and engine. The one rule that Jon really wanted to create a bridge between our picture and his team would see Billy Eichner express was that the animals wouldn’t do anything the original. We built the whole location an emotion, then have to figure out how a they couldn’t do in real life. Lions don’t pick as one continuous environment with a meerkat’s features would move to convey up food with their hands and eat with their fingers. They do talk and sing – but aside true geography, with an eye toward the that same feeling. from that, the movements are very much distinctive formations in the original, but assembled from the best of what we found Henry Tirl [A-Camera Operator]: I’ve like the real thing. Mandrels have hands like on location. That film had a generic sort operated camera for plenty of blue screen, ours, so their gesturing can be much more of jungle rainforest, but we discovered a green screen, and miniatures for the last human while still remaining in character.

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– CAMERA MOVEMENT – Tirl: The filmmakers wanted something less clinical than a perfect computer camera move. Ultimately, we wound up with all the usual filmmaking tools when a human operates camera, including dolly, Steadicam and fluid heads. We worked from what was essentially a sophisticated previs animated in 3D space. I made meticulous tracing marks on the carpet showing where I needed to move. These indicators would show up on my monitor when I hit the right spot. That gave us such a good representation of the characters and environment playing back during shooting, I had to fight to keep from getting dizzy a couple of times. Tieche: We began virtual production as scenes arrived from animation and Magnopus [responsible for the GUI interface], hybrids of the environments we filmed, like the stormy sky from the Masai Mara over the rolling hills of Borana Conservancy, or a Samburu sunset on the lush marsh and

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trees of Amboseli. [There was] a virtual dolly, a virtual crane and a virtual remote head, which all could be modified in terms of scale once we had plotted the shots through VR goggles. After the goggles came off, we’d hop behind our monitors – which essentially became the eyepiece of the virtual camera. Our virtual camera, designed with ALEXA 65 specs, [let us] choose lens sizes and T-stops and pull focus between characters. Tirl: In traditional filming, I would have a transmitter on my Steadicam sending the image out, but here, they had the transmitter and I had the receiver on my Steadicam, so depending on where I was on stage, I would be seeing the correct view. Since I had no actual camera on my Steadicam, Panavision Woodland Hills helped fashion a camera plate that mimicked the weight and inertia of an actual camera as you panned it. They took extensive measurements, taking into account where the lens would be relative to


the fulcrum and tilt points, then added a little helicopter blade of sensors on top of the plate arrangements. Deschanel: There were OptiTracks with cameras all the way around the stage that read LEDs that were in the place of the camera on the Steadicam, so when Henry moved up/down or right/left, it would move in the virtual space in a corresponding way. Henry had to learn to trust what he saw on a seven-inch monitor instead of what he felt under his feet. Steadicam operators typically learn from the feel of climbing stairs or hills, but in this case, the computer would build a ramp to represent the slope of a hill, while he was in actuality only moving on flat ground. So there’s a disconnect between what he saw on the Steadicam versus how he felt moving around. It was a different kind of choreography for him to learn. Tirl: Nothing in Africa is flat. And Pride Rock was not plumb to the ocean, with an 8- to 10-degree slant. So when a character comes toward me and I’m backing up, I realized that I was suddenly ten feet above them, because while they were descending the rock, I was on a flat-carpeted surface. The programmers said, “No problem” and entered a correction that put me in synch with the characters, without having to squat or change my shooting. They tilted the previs image to suit my perspective. And if I ran on a path that would take me through a tree, VFX could tag the tree and pull it out during the part of the shot when I’m passing through, then plug it back in before it reenters frame. It was like being on a stage where you fly walls, but with infinite flexibility. Tieche: The idea was to always achieve each shot with a practical approach as if we were making live action. We didn’t want to stretch beyond the use of any modern tool or device you’d find on a live production. For example, if a shot needed a crane move at the top, but [with] Steadicam stepping off the crane to follow, we would plot the camera move that way, always rooted to the reality of practical filming. Even if the shot essentially required an arm car or motorcycle with a stabilized head on the back, that’s what we’d try to emulate. We even had drone work at our virtual set with a real drone.   Legato: We wanted the drone pilot to do a VR walkthrough to get the sensation of flight beforehand, so he could sense obstructions like tree branches. That experience added to the flavor of the shot and the reality of the world, but this approach would be useful on a more traditional shoot, too, letting you work out all of your issues on the ground beforehand, so when you took the vehicle airborne, you could get the shot in record time. Tirl: A bunch of the characters are walking along singing a song, with a lemur bouncing on the warthog, and they walk for a mile during this passage. I was supposed to walk along with them, circling around behind, kind of me dancing around them with Steadicam for five or six minutes. No stage can accommodate that size move, but they devised “the magic carpet.” It was like I was attached via a very flexible bungee to the nose of the warthog. As the trio walks along, I remain tethered, so I can come in close enough to kiss them, but then range back twelve feet. It was like I was on a virtual circular treadmill. Deschanel: After a while, it really felt like making a regular movie. Except that you didn’t need handlers to wrangle 500 wildebeest back to their starting point for another take. And then we didn’t have to wait for the dust to settle!

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– POST –

“AFTER A WHILE, IT REALLY FELT LIKE MAKING A REGULAR MOVIE. EXCEPT THAT YOU DIDN’T NEED HANDLERS TO WRANGLE 500 WILDEBEEST BACK TO THEIR STARTING POINT FOR ANOTHER TAKE,” DESCHANEL RELATES.

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Favreau: All the elements of a real environment are integrated into our scenes. When Simba walks across dunes, the desert winds blow dust behind him. That kind of detail was a direct benefit of our committing to MPC Film as the sole vendor because we could allocate the full effects budget in a way that let them make investments in R&D. They were able to develop and greatly refine fur simulations, atmospheric effects, and stuff that may not make for headlines in periodicals, but when you watch the movie, is the kind of stuff that makes the picture breathe with its convincingly naturalistic detail. Legato: We relied on photographic reference to stay close to the way dust hits look in sunlight. Though it is expensive computationally, these simulations can recreate the properties of real-life, like water simulations when you have a hand stirring liquid. Light simulations deal with how it bounces off walls and absorbs certain colors. Shooting reference is now preferable to shooting actual elements. I tried to shoot a live dust element and couldn’t get it to work because it just didn’t make for a perfect fit with the world we were building. Sometimes the real thing looked more impressionistic, strange as that sounds. A lot of our most difficult stuff gets simulated through real physics, but it means having to go for it because you don’t just get a rainbow from prismatics in the air. The caustics in light are valuable because when you bounce light off a shiny object, you’re going to reflect on a wall like an underwater effect.


Favreau: Another thing that helped was that we weren’t changing concepts or doubling back on creative decisions halfway through. Liveaction films tend to adjust constantly throughout production and post, which leads to a lot of rushed work happening before release. If you don’t give the artists time to dig in and do the work properly, the results are not going to be at the same high level that they are otherwise capable of delivering. Deschanel: You try to get things to come through as they were first filmed, but since every day had been a process of discovery and problem solving, there was still some serious DI. But what I found phenomenal was how excited I got when seeing these final tiny VFX details, like the way fur looks and moves when hit by wind. Favreau: [Supervising finishing artist] Steve Scott is a colorist who came out of compositing, which is fitting given that there’s only a fine line separating VFX compositing and current DI tools. Getting all of the elements together to go into this film is like putting on a magic show. Part of fooling the audience is telling a compelling story. If you ever saw [magician] Ricky Jay perform, the storytelling aspect was even more compelling than the illusion. When I saw The Lion King on stage, I knew what was going to happen from the movie, but the way they did the puppets and staging along with how the music was interpreted all added up to something compelling and changed the way you watched it. There were a lot of clues for me when watching [the Broadway production] that I kept in mind while making this film.

LOCAL 600 CREW Director of Photography Caleb Deschanel, ASC VFX Supervisor Rob Legato, ASC A-Camera Operator/Steadicam Henry Tirl, SOC Key 1st AC Tommy Tieche 2nd AC Eric Amundsen Still Photographer Glen Wilson, SMPSP Unit Publicist Gregg Brilliant

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DADDY HBO’S DARK “FAMILY STORY” OFFERS TRAIN-WRECK BOUND CHARACTERS AND A COMPELLING SHOT-ON-FILM LOOK, THE LATTER COURTESY OF SERIES DPS PATRICK CAPONE AND CHRISTOPHER NORR, AND AWARD-WINNING PILOT DP/DIRECTOR ANDRIJ PAREKH, ASC. BY

DEAR M A RG OT C A RMICHAEL L ES TER

PHOTOS BY

PE T ER KR A MER

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E EVEN IF YOU DON’T LIKE ANY OF THE CHARACTERS IN HBO’S SUCCESSION (AND WHY WOULD YOU? THEY’RE DEPLORABLE PEOPLE), YOU HAVE TO LOVE THE SHOW’S RIVETING VISUAL LANGUAGE. THE SERIES, WHICH WILL PREMIERE ITS SECOND SEASON AT THE END OF THE SUMMER, IS SHOT ON FILM IN A JOURNALISTIC STYLE THAT’S LUSHER THAN DIGITAL AND EDGIER THAN BIG-BUDGET CINEMA. THAT WORKS WELL FOR A SERIES THAT BLENDS SHAKESPEAREANSTYLE POWER STRUGGLES WITH THE DARK HUMOR OF A SHOW LIKE BETTER CALL SAUL .

But Executive Producer/Director (and 2016 Oscar winner) Adam McKay and pilot director of photography Andrij Parekh, ASC, actually drew their inspiration from the movies – baking a filmic look into the show’s DNA. As Parekh, who was last profiled in the September 2017 issue of ICG Magazine for HBO’s The Deuce, and who also directed three episodes of Succession relates, “The tentpole films were James Gray’s The Yards, Adam’s own film The Big Short and Paul Greengrass’ United 93. Adam wanted something with a documentary style, very freeing for the actors, which

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to me was an inspired approach. I wanted to bring some formality into the mix to combine the immediacy of the handheld work with a bit more elegance and control. The long zooms allowed me to be more like a fly on the wall, capturing the moment and not affecting the energy or the sense of immediacy with boring standard coverage. The ‘zoom pops’ are used as emotional exclamation points to the characters’ experiences.” Succession is shot on threeperf ARRICAM LTs, outfitted with an Angénieux lens set (15–40mm, 28–76mm and two 45–120mm zooms) and HD taps for the handheld sequences. The lens package enables the crew to go from extremely wide to uncomfortably tight. They also carry two 24–290mm zooms for telephoto work and Leica Summilux Primes for low-light situations. The ARRI MRW-1 master grip zoom control is also a must-have tool. Co-series DP Patrick Capone explains the approach this way: “When we can, we will run the scene from top to bottom up to 10 times. The operators are always doing something different, hunting for the moments that in most films would be happening off camera while covering other lines. The reactions, the looks

to each other commenting on the spoken words, the mistakes, the lateness to a line, that is what helps create that edge. Before you know it, we have all the moments and more, the cast is still fresh, and some have no idea their work had been covered!” Getting that type of rawness to the coverage is tricky, as A-Camera/1st AC Ethan Borsuk describes. “We’re often chasing bits of dialogue, nonverbal interaction, entrances, exits, or even an insert, where each take is completely different from the last. Given the improvisational nature of the work, we would easily be lost were it not for a glance to the onboard.” Borsuk and B-Camera/1st AC Cory Stambler wear “purses” featuring a dionic battery, a Teradek Sidekick and cables to onboard monitors attached to small HD 503 and HD 702 handsets. The approach empowers the camera department to experiment with ways of creating tension and bringing the audience into the Roy family’s chaotic world. Co-series DP Christopher Norr notes that “the handheld, cinema vérité, and/or zooming-long-lens approach is great to build tension. But I also track the script and the characters’ arcs to find places to break that language with a designed linear camera move or absolute stillness, giving it even more dramatic impact – using this technique with intent creates a cinematic look and feel.” Consider the bachelor party for the soon-to-be husband of the family’s only daughter, Siobhan “Shiv” Roy (Sarah Snook) in episode 108, which was shot in a Long Island City, Queens events space converted into part-rave, part-psychedelic 1960s party. A sixpage “oner” tracks the youngest Roy brother, Roman (Kieran Culkin), as he leads the groomsmen through dark tunnels and hallways, into an elevator and into the giant and vibrant party room, another room and back into the big room. Norr says the sequence provided plenty of opportunity for creativity. “Director S.J. Clarkson wanted the party to have projection everywhere, so we carefully placed projected images in every room, along with smoke and strobes and 150 extras,” Norr recalls. “It was insane and hightech beautiful. I used extra projectors as key lights and back lights, so the


“WHEN WE CAN, WE WILL RUN THE SCENE FROM TOP TO BOTTOM UP TO 10 TIMES. THE OPERATORS ARE ALWAYS DOING SOMETHING DIFFERENT, HUNTING FOR THE MOMENTS THAT IN MOST FILMS WOULD BE HAPPENING OFF CAMERA WHILE COVERING OTHER LINES.” Co-Series Director of Photography Patrick Capone

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lighting sometimes dances on the actors’ faces. Even though we’re mostly on a long lens, we used the Leica Summilux 29 to get closer to our subjects and create a shallower depth of field. The Leica lenses have a beautiful fall-off.” The result was an environment of filmed theater where the actors never really knew camera placement. And, according to B-Camera Operator Alan Pierce, SOC, executing such a plan requires total engagement and innovation. “The challenge of operating on Succession is to be immersed in a scene as an observer and capture the story while trying to avoid unnecessary edits,” Pierce reveals. “If I cover a scene and avoid the need for traditional cutaways or inserts, I’ve done well. I become a part of the scene with the actors through nonverbal communication and the trust we’ve developed with each other.” One such example from the pilot is a scene in which, after a crushing professional blow at the hands of his father, the eldest Roy son, Kendall (Jeremy Strong), retreats to a diminutive bathroom and violently tears the place apart. “It was a practical bathroom with some breakaway fixtures and no real room for more than a couple of people,” Borsuk recounts. “Andrij and [B-Camera operator] Rachael Levine [SOC] sat in the bathtub, each with a camera, while [A-Camera focus puller] Toshiro Yamaguchi and myself sat just outside the door with our Prestons and a wireless seven-inch monitor each. None of us knew what Jeremy would do – only that we would have one chance to capture it.” Succession is set in the heady world

of New York’s ultra-rich. While the sets and settings are opulent, curated and extravagant, the crew’s goal is to avoid a generic or polished look. As Production Designer Stephen Carter half-jokes about the show’s look, “It’s the opposite of magical realism – disenchanted realism, maybe? One of our chief design goals is to create a realistic portrait of the world of extreme wealth the Roy family inhabits, but in no way fetishize it. Our characters are numbed to and by the privilege they have, and I’d like the audience to feel that. I try to use a lot of color control but keep things textured and lush to take advantage of the luxury of shooting on 35mm.” Producing Director Mark Mylod, who is in charge of keeping the look’s edge, says a key point of discussion is often about finding a sense of reality and not feeling visually manipulative or cosmetic. “We are all trained to seek out the aesthetically pleasing, and Succession is often about pushing against that instinct, which makes me the guy who keeps asking for things to look crappier,” Mylod laughs. “The DPs walk a tightrope between naturalism and visual storytelling through moments of eloquent composition.” The series is shot in New York City and blends soundstage work with locations in the surrounding environs and overseas. “For the creation of our Waystar Executive Office block,” Carter describes, “the team agreed to avoid a stage build in favor of building out a raw floor at Seven World Trade Center. We get amazing views of lower Manhattan that are always changing with

“IF I COVER A SCENE AND AVOID THE NEED FOR TRADITIONAL CUTAWAYS OR INSERTS, I’VE DONE WELL. I BECOME A PART OF THE SCENE WITH THE ACTORS...” B-Camera Operator Alan Pierce, SOC

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buildings going up, and incoming weather enveloping us; so we agreed to roll with that and make it work,” he adds. “It was a bold move, to give up all that control for a less-tangible but show-defining quality of naturalism. We never want to feel canned, and the investment in that aesthetic is one I’m proud we made. It took some guts.” To make the soundstage scenes blend naturally with practical settings, like the World Trade Center complex, the crew employs 10K MoleBeams that create a very intense shaft of light, or as Parekh observes: “It’s the only lighting unit that comes close to what the sun can do. In New York, the sun is always coming from a strange angle, through a cavern of buildings or reflecting off a glass skyscraper. I love it when that light is focused on and bounced off of glass or metal because you then get those incredible accidents of lighting that most stage work doesn’t have.” One sequence shot at the WTC was especially challenging. In episode 204, Kendall is on a skyscraper roof, contemplating. Capturing the action required a 29-foot Scorpio crane with a Libra head, operated by techs Brady Weston and Dan Sheets. The camera configuration included an ARRICAM with Angénieux 12:1 zoom lens and 400-foot magazine. “Even though we use cranes for

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beauty shots,” explains Operator Francis Spieldenner, SOC, “this time we were using it as a quick repositioning tool, opening wide and high, then booming down and zooming in on the lens with quick pops. After briefly informing the team, which included Dolly Grip Keith Bunting on the crane arm, and focus puller, Ethan Borsuk, we swung wide, then getting tighter to close-up as Jeremy approaches, then back around him, arching behind him high and wide as he reaches the edge of the rooftop deck.” All the while, Pierce and Stambler filmed different angles to give the editors additional footage to tell the story. The final two episodes of Season 1 took the crew to the U.K. for Shiv’s epic wedding. In episode 110, Kendall is involved in a watery car wreck with a member of the event staff. Capone says the creative team wanted it all “as natural as possible, with only a few lights on the bridge and dark murky shadows underwater.” Capone says that for the lead-up to the crash, the crew mounted lights on the car to illuminate the road and rigged LED ribbons in the vehicle for actors’ coverage. The action – Kendall surfacing from the wreckage, trying to rescue the passenger, and crawling from the water – was done in-camera at a lake in Victoria Park using hidden lighting cranes and cameras


“THE DP’S WALK A TIGHTROPE BETWEEN NATURALISM AND VISUAL STORYTELLING THROUGH MOMENTS OF ELOQUENT COMPOSITION.” Producing Director Mark Mylod

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PHOTOS THIS PAGE COURTESY OF HBO

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on boats. A Sony a7s II with a vintage Canon K35 prime lens was used for one small VFX sequence – a green screen scene inside the car – since the vehicle would be aircannoned into the water. Underwater work was shot by Mike Valentine at Pinewood Studios. After giving up on the rescue, Kendall journeys back through the countryside to the castle – a long sequence with no dialog that was shot in partial darkness, with the only light occasional fireworks from Shiv’s distant wedding reception. “The weather was awful and the fields were a quagmire,” Mylod recounts. “It was miserable but we all felt that this would fuel the tension and verisimilitude of the scene, and it seems to have worked.” Season 2 has its share of location work. The team decamped to Iceland for episode 201, where, as Pierce laments, “in one hour, the weather can change from sunny to snowing, then rain and suddenly winds over 50 miles per hour. With the knowledge

and guidance of our amazing Icelandic crew, we were able to take it all in stride and keep shooting.” Back in New York, Pierce shot a swimming sequence in a calmer location for episode 206 with action taking place above and below the water. The scene featured ARRICAM LT’s handheld in a splash bag for water-level work and ARRI 435 in a Hydroflex remote Aquacam plus a GoPro for the submerged footage. Everyone on the Succession crew says fans can expect an even more intense look as the creative team takes more risks and raises the bar in the second season. As Mylod concludes: “Directors and DP’s don’t need prompting or permission to bring their unique talents to a project; it’s in their DNA, and they’re creative enough to adapt their vision to fit within the show’s blueprint, often pushing the boundaries just the right amount. That’s absolutely the case on this show, and it’s obviously paid off.”

LOCAL 600 CREW SEASON 1

SEASON 2

Directors of Photography Andrij Parekh, ASC Patrick Capone Christopher Norr

Directors of Photography Patrick Capone Christopher Norr

A-Camera Operator Rachael Levine, SOC A-Camera 1st AC Toshiro Yamaguchi A-Camera 2nd AC Chris Cafaro B-Camera Operator Gregor Tavenner, SOC B-Camera 1st AC Cory Stambler B-Camera 2nd AC Cornelia Klapper Loaders Billy Holman Harold Erkins Still Photographers Craig Blankenhorn Peter Kramer

A-Camera Operator/Steadicam Francis Spieldenner, SOC A-Camera 1st AC Ethan Borsuk A-Camera 2nd AC Tony Coan B-Camera Operator Alan Pierce, SOC B-Camera 1st AC Cory Stambler B-Camera 2nd AC Cornelia Klapper Loaders Billy Holman James Dean Drummond Still Photographer Peter Kramer

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Walking the floor at NAB 2019, several things became clear when assessing the current (and future) state of display technology in cinema and television. One: The days of OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diode) displays on set and as reference monitors in DI suites are numbered; two: traditional IPS (in-plane switching) LCD (liquid quartz display) panels are making a resurgence thanks to new dual-layer cell technology that improves viewing angles and offers OLED-like blacks; three: high brightness HDR displays are arriving with more regularity, and are keyed to viewing/distribution technology like Dolby Vision; four: wireless displays on sets and locations are expanding production capabilities for cinematographers, operators, and focus pullers alike. As Wes Donahue, vice president sales and marketing, Postium America, told me in Las Vegas: “The recent switch to dual-modulation LCD panels was triggered by Sony, who decided their OLED panels, which had become a de facto industry standard, were just not cost-effective to produce.” Donahue, who was showing off Postium’s new OBM-X310 4K HDR 31-inch reference monitor ($35,000 list price), which meets Dolby Vision mastering specs of 1000-nits

TWICE AS NICE? peak brightness, and covers 99 percent of the DCIP3 color gamut, said that whether dual-layer LCD technology is superior to OLED is an arguable point. “These new panels are better at producing uniform white,” he explained, “because sustaining OLED at peak brightness levels burns up the blue. [The OBM-X310] produces .005 black, which is well below what Dolby Vision requires. But you need to push a lot of light through both panels, which means multiple cooling elements, and a powerintensive unit. Also, they’re expensive to produce. I think everyone looks at this as a temporary solution [to replace OLED] until something better comes along.” Mike Kovacevich, Sony’s Senior Acquisition & Sales Support Engineer, and Shinji Kuni, Product Manager, Sony Displays, both feel that something

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NEW DUAL-LAYER LCD TECHNOLOGY IS MORE HDR-FRIENDLY THAN OLED. BUT ARE THE EXPENSIVE, POWERHUNGRY DISPLAYS JUST A STOPGAP TO WHATEVER IS COMING NEXT?

BY DAVID GEFFNER


FLANDERS SCIENTIFIC’S XM310K, A 3000-NIT REFERENCE MONITOR THAT WON A PRODUCT OF THE YEAR AWARD WINNER AT NAB 2019, IS TAILOR-MADE FOR HDR. THE DISPLAY CAN REACH HIGHER PEAK BRIGHTNESS LEVELS THAN THE MANY DUAL-LAYER LCD MONITORS THAT POPULATED SHOW FLOORS VIA ITS LOCAL DIMMING TECHNOLOGY.

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better is here. In the Sony booth at NAB 2019, the pair were showing off the BVM-HX310, 4K Mastering Monitor ($23,400 at B&H Photo Video), which went on to win an NAB Product of the Year Award and is being touted by Sony as “ideal for demanding on-set, studio and postproduction applications including 4K digital cinematography.” The HX310 supports standardized ElectroOptical-Transfer-Functions (EOTF) for HDR, like SMPTE.2084 and BT.2100 (HLG), with additional EOTF tables for live and postproduction environments like S-Log2 and S-Log3 (Live HDR), making it particularly attractive on a set or in a broadcast studio for monitoring HDR from camera source. Kuni compared the display to Sony’s industry-standard OLED monitor, BVM-X300, saying this new technology resolves the problem of “lifted blacks” in earlier LCD displays. “It displays true blacks, with an always-on backlight to control each pixel, and not through local dimming,” Kuni said. “The big difference [from OLED] is that while both are 1000-nit peak luminance, [the HX310] can display 100 percent peak luminance across the screen, versus about 10-15 percent of the screen with OLED.” “Dolby has blessed this monitor, along with streaming producers [like Netflix and Amazon], who are all capturing in 4K and wanting HDR content,” Kovacevich added. “But, of course, 1000-nit brightness is just a baseline these days – everyone is pushing for 2000, 3000 nits and beyond. That demand [for HDR] is the main reason we introduced this technology over OLED, which has limitations on brightness for a fullscreen signal. Of course, to get to 2000 or 3000nits, we’d have to use local dimming, which, currently, cannot produce the true blacks needed for mastering.” Numerous other NAB vendors had similar duallayer LCD reference displays as Sony and Postium, including TVLogic’s LUM-310R, a 4K 31-inch display ($31,500 list price) that TVLogic Sales Manager Jin Lee says supports 99 percent of the DCI-P3 color space, and various HDR standards. “Obviously the local dimming panels have much higher peak brightness – 2000-nits and above – than these new dual-layer LCD’s,” Lee described. “But there’s a halo effect with the local dimming that smears the highlights into the blacks and impacts contrast ratios, which aren’t an issue with the dual-layer panels. Then again, viewing angles are better with local dimming than these new panels, as the two LCD layers are laid one behind the other, and once off access you see those mirrored images.” Those seeking out both ultra-high brightness levels and OLED-like blacks could find interesting new examples in the Flanders Scientific booth at NAB 2019. The company’s XM310X is a 4K 3000-nit reference display ($45,000 list price) that may well be the brightest commercial HDR monitor

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on the market. “It’s a 3000-nit local dimming display that will be showing up in postproduction facilities where there is a mandate to deliver HDR masters,” explained Bram Desmet, president and CEO of Flanders Scientific. Desmet said Flanders’ XM311K 31-inch monitor “uses the new light-modulating cell technology to achieve 1000-nit peak brightness, and will most likely be the new choice for DIT’s. It’s more straightforward than a zone backlight [local dimming] system, as there will always be certain types of content that will challenge those local dimming algorithms; you never have to worry about that with light-modulating cell layer.” The XM311K provides one-million-to-one contrast ratios and OLED-type blacks, with 1000nit full screen and no worry of burn-in. “There’s no loading behavior – small object, big object, it doesn’t matter as the same luminance levels can be maintained with this light-modulating technology,” Desmet added. “We were able to bring the price down [with the XM311K] to $35,000, which hopefully makes it more in reach for those working on HDR projects. One difference between the [XM311K] and Sony’s light-modulating display is that they’ve elected to use a glossy surface on the front of their panel, and we’ve chosen to stay with a matte surface.” Desmet said the light-modulating LCD display is the first he’s built that’s required cooling fans. “The transmission efficiency is low, so the backlight is working much harder than our 3000nit monitor and requires four fans,” he noted. “OLED is still fine for a home display, which does 650 to 700-nits with tone mapping, and offers a very pleasing HDR image. But OLED is not well suited to professional HDR mastering. “Light-modulating cell layer and zone backlight are the current options,” Desmet continued, “and we’ll hopefully see evolution in downward pricing and sizes, as well as higher density LED arrays in the zone backlight displays. Once you hit 20,000-30,000 zones, the concerns about artifacting with local dimming go away. But [light modulating panels] are a five- to maybe tenyear at most stopgap until we get to affordable, small-size emissive technologies that are not necessarily organic based, like micro-LED, which carries a lot of promise for where the industry may be headed.” Where production is headed, at least for exterior location shooting, is smaller, brighter, LCD camera-top/wireless monitors that are HDR capable. Visiting the Atomos booth at NAB is always a fun experience, and this year’s version (highlighted by a huge BMX bike/skateboard ramp with professional stunt riders) was no exception. Atomos was showcasing a new iteration in its popular Shogun line, the Shogun 7 ($1,500), which uses a 360-zone backlight control for a broader range of contrast. “Everything in term of gradients – deep blacks


TV LOGIC’S F-7H MK2 IS AN UPGRADED VERSION OF THEIR POPULAR FIELD MONITOR. THE COMPANY CLAIMS 3600-NITS OF MAX LUMINANCE, WHICH WOULD MAKE IT IDEAL IN EVEN DIRECT SUNLIGHT.

THIS RUGGED NEW 21-5-INCH FIELD DISPLAY FROM ACTION HD COMES READY-BUILT INTO AN ALUMINUM ALLOY/ABS CASE. WE DROPPED IT FROM 50 CENTIMETERS ABOVE THE GROUND AT A CINE GEAR DEMO AND IT DIDN’T MISS A BEAT.

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SMALLHD’S POPULAR 702 BRIGHT FIELD MONITOR IS GIVEN A REFRESH WITH THE 702 TOUCH (ABOVE). WITH 1500-NITS PEAK LUMINANCE (COVERING 100 PERCENT OF THE SCREEN), THE 702 TOUCH ALSO COVERS 100 PERCENT OF DC1-P3 AND COMES WITH MULTIPLE BATTERY MOUNT OPTIONS.

ATOMOS’ CAMERA-TOP DISPLAY LINE “SHOGUN” WAS BOOSTED THIS YEAR AT NAB BY THE SHOGUN 7, 1 500-NIT FIELD MONITOR WITH A 360ZONE BACKLIGHT CONTROL AND (AN INDUSTRY FIRST) DOLBY VISION PLAYOUT.

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SMALLHD’S CINE 7 RX500 FIELD MONITOR INTEGRATES THE TERADEK’S POPULAR WIREL ES S T E CHNOLO G Y , WHILE KEEPING THE FOOTPRINT THE SAME AS THE NON-WIRELESS VERSION.

to bright highlights – just pops with more detail and color,” explained Travis Sims, Atomos’ manager of business development, North America. “It also has a Quad 3G input to take four HD streams, like with our Sumo 19 monitor, but in a seven-inch form factor that can be used as a touch-screen switcher. The big news is that this unit has Dolby Vision output. That means it can be used as a player to kick out any image being recorded and play it back on a Dolby Vision-compatible display, i.e., a consumer panel, for true HDR on set.” Sims added that all the dynamic metadata (frame-by-frame control) that has made Dolby Vision the premiere HDR system is preserved when the Shogun 7 is used for play-out. “It’s great for postproduction professionals and on-set camera teams to be able to see Dolby Vision during playback and in a live function,” he added. “It’s camera agnostic, and 1500-nits, so no need for sun hoods in the field.” Atomos has always tried to marry its products to the rapid pace of technological development, and Sims noted that the company’s solid

relationships with all the major camera vendors have helped propel that. “We know ahead of time what the camera manufacturers are working on, and that typically matches the demand of our users,” he said, “which is brighter and better, with a form factor that’s trending toward modularity. Metadata is also a big ask, as these monitors need to preserve all of the different camera metadata across multiple file options. Our software is where we have always stood apart, and that will continue to be the core of our appeal.” The core of Japan-based Eizo Corp.’s appeal has been with CGI artists and VFX professionals; at NAB 2019, the company was showing off its CG279X ($2,500), a 27-inch edge-lit SDR display with improved blacks and HDR presets. “It has USB-C connectivity, so you can go right from a Mac laptop with a single cable,” explained Kevin Burke, Eizo Western Region Sales Manager. “We’ve built in our own colorimeter to the unit’s self-calibration, which can be scheduled at any interval. With Color Navigator 7, users can drive any other Eizo monitor with built-in calibration

to the same target and schedule. You get the color and blacks dialed in and off you go.” “Dialed in” is a good way to describe smallHD, whose leading-edge camera-top and wireless displays were again a popular see at NAB 2019. Visiting with smallHD Co-Founder Dale Backus revealed additions to a line of products that are often targeted at Local 600 camera team members, as well as on-set department heads and creatives. “The 702 Bright became an industry-standard seven-inch monitor, but it needed a refresh,” Backus explained. “That’s here in the 702 Touch ($1,200), a durable, all-touch-screen unit that has a DC power input, and Sony L Series battery bracket, with Gold and V-Mounts available, along with a very bright 1500-nit screen, with peak luminance covering 100 percent of the display. It covers 100 percent of DCI-P3 color gamut, and is equally at home in direct sunlight or a studio.” Backus was also touting the Touch’s “big brother,” the Cine 7 ($1,799), which bumps up to 1800-nits and an RJ-45 Ethernet jack for camera control. “The Cine 7 also has three different wireless versions,” he added. “Cine 7 500 TX and RX ($2,749), and the Cine 7 Sidekick RX ($3,699), which all integrate with Teradek Bolt and are the same form factor as the non-wireless version. The Cine 7 has camera control, starting with ALEXA Mini, AMIRA and Mini LF, with RED and the Sony Venice soon to come.” While Backus says the stand-alone Cine 7 is targeted for camera-top, the wireless version works great as a director’s monitor. “When you add that second antenna,” he said, “you’re controlling a camera and transmitting wirelessly to another monitor, which makes it a full-fledged ecosystem. The added brightness of these new units is not just in response to more HDR workflows; it’s really about filmmakers not wanting to deal with tents, sun hoods or squinting to see the image. We’ve been leading that charge for [brighter displays] five years and will continue to do so.” Another interesting display Guild D.I.T.’s (especially those working in remote conditions) should consider comes from China-based Ruige, and its Action HD monitor ($2,499 at B&H Pro Video) Action General Manager Alfie Ma was demonstrating the 21.5-inch field display at Cine Gear Expo. “It’s built into an aluminum alloy/ABS case that is extremely durable,” Ma described. “Affixing the display to a pulley system, Ma then dropped the monitor from 50 centimeters above the ground, with the signal on, and it never missed a beat. “We doubled the industry standard, which used to be 25 centimeters,” she smiled. “We’ve set up this display at each of the trade shows and offer $100 to anyone who can break the monitor – no one has been able to cash in!” Cashing in on a different sort of trend are three consumer electronic giants – Sharp, Samsung, and Sony – who were all showcasing game-changing new technologies at the 2019 trade shows. Sharp’s

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8K NAB demo included its B30 mirrorless compact camera, which can capture full 8K resolution (7680 by 4320) up to 30 frames-per-second in H264, 8-bit 4:2:0, to an internal SD card. The camera is built around Sharp’s own 33-megapixel micro fourthirds sensor and will retail for under $4,000. Sharp representatives said they expect the B30 will “have a dramatic impact on helping 8K production be embraced by all filmmakers – not just large studios and networks.” Speakers at the Sharp demo included Robert Albariño, Jr., President/Executive Producer, San Francisco 49ers, who oversees video production, branding, experience, events and digital properties/ social media platforms for the sports franchise. Albariño talked about using 8K to “better reflect the innovative tools being developed here in the Bay Area and Silicon Valley. We used the [Sharp] camera in different lighting conditions at various settings,  and while we knew the large file sizes could present a challenge,” he explained, “we were impressed with 8K’s flexibility, editing through proxies and capturing at both 24 frames per second and 60 frames per second.” 8K displays have also been on the minds of Samsung engineers, particularly in the broadcast world. Christopher Simpson, senior business development manager, detailed how Samsung has leveraged its popular new QLED consumer display technology. “Our 8K QLED signage displays, based on the same quantum dot technology as our consumer displays, use an AI algorithm that essentially draws from a database of millions of images to ‘up-rez’ a lower resolution product to 8K,” he described to me at NAB 2019. “The process is 30-percent faster than competing technologies, and the color reproduction is now reaching the reference monitor level – it’s that good.” The 4000-nit screen in the Samsung booth rendered superb HDR (Samsung’s own flavor, HDR10+), with peak brightness levels and a wide color gamut suitable to large-scale commercial installations (or perhaps on sets as a green screen replacement). Simpson added that while there is no 8K content yet available, the up-scaling abilities of SAMSUNG WAS SHOWING OFF THIS 4000-NIT 8K QLED DISPLAY AT NAB FOR COMMERICAL SIGNAGE APPLICATIONS, BUT THE ULTRA-BRIGHT LED TECHNOLOGY MAY WELL REPLACE GREEN SCREEN BACKGROUNDS ON FILM AND TV SETS.

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Samsung’s 8K QLED display make it relevant here and now. “There is a whole 8K infrastructure being built for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, so this product would be ready to go right out of the box for that application,” he noted. For last year’s Product Guide, I wrote about the U.S. debut of Samsung’s Onyx Cinema, an emissive 4K LED theatrical projection system that’s comprised of modular “cabinets,” 24 modules per cabinet containing nearly 4000 LED’s/pixels per module. Images were stunning at that launch, carrying the promise of truly immersive theatrical exhibition (that’s immune to ambient light issues). This year’s wow factor came on the eve of Cine Gear Expo, at the launch of Sony’s new Digital Media Production Center (DMPC), near downtown L.A., where a crystal LED screen won the evening. The 212-square-foot display (305 inches measured diagonally) is made up of Sony’s own microLED technology; it has a 1.2-mm pixel pitch, a one-million-to-one contrast ratio, 1000-nit peak brightness and covers 140 percent of sRGB color space. While the CLED display is in limited commercial use around the world – a Honda R&D facility in Tokyo, Akayama History and Nature Park in Kawaguchi, Japan, and EDGE Corp.’s sustainable headquarters in Amsterdam – its presence at Sony’s DMPC is particularly exciting for filmmakers. “Content creators will be able to see the best representation of their creative vision [including HDR versioning] on a unique 6K-by-2K widescreen video wall, with input directly from the DMPC’s color-grading suite,” described Kevin O’Connor, director of sales and marketing, Visual Presentation Solutions at Sony Electronics Professional Solutions Americas. “We are working with the Hollywood community to bring CLED into this vertical in the right way – gathering feedback, implementing necessary features for these respective verticals for post environments, including grading, screening rooms, and exhibition.”

“1000-NIT BRIGHTNESS IS JUST A BASELINE THESE DAYS – EVERYONE IS PUSHING FOR 2000, 3000-NITS AND BEYOND.” Mike Kovacevich, Senior Acquisition & Sales Support Engineer, Sony

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FROM THE AGE OF 12, ART ADAMS KNEW THAT HE BELONGED BEHIND A MOVING CAMERA, BUT THIS LOCAL 600 MEMBER HAD NO IDEA THAT HIS INSATIABLE CURIOSITY WOULD LEAD HIM TO A SECOND CAREER AS AN EDUCATOR AND WRITER. HIS WORK HAS BEEN PUBLISHED IN AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER , AUSTRALIAN CINEMATOGRAPHER , CAMERA OPERATOR MAGAZINE AND PROVIDEO COALITION . AS A FREELANCE CINEMATOGRAPHER, HE HAS SHOT COMMERCIALS, VISUAL EFFECTS, BRANDED CONTENT AND SECOND UNIT ON FEATURE FILMS. CURRENTLY, ADAMS WORKS AS A CINEMA LENS SPECIALIST AT ARRI, INC. 60

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What lens trends did you see at NAB 2019? Art Adams: It’s the year of the homebrew lens. I’ve never seen so many small companies introducing custom optics. This is exciting, but also confusing, as it is hard to discern the quality of a lens on a trade-show floor. We’ve also moved beyond the era where large-format cinematography is expensive and exclusive. A feature shot on 65 mm made headlines around the world only ten or 15 years ago, but large format is now an everyday choice at every level. What about the trend toward vintage lenses? Cinematographers complain about digital images looking too “clean.” They yearn for film grain and gate weave. I see this reflected in the popularity of Instagram, where visual abstraction is as much a part of the story as the subject matter. As film is no longer a viable option, I’m seeing a desire to introduce a layer of visual abstraction in other ways. For many, it is in the optical path. Will the more commonplace use of UHD and HDR create a dilemma? It will impact how DP’s use lenses. Rec.709 images are abstract by virtue of their limited dynamic range, where UHD and HDR are more immersive. Increased dynamic range and resolution enhance and exaggerate a lot of the visual tricks that creatives currently use

to make visual abstraction. Lens flare, lens distortion, chromatic aberration, spherical aberration, et cetera, all look very different in UHD and HDR. What looks good in Rec.709 is extremely distracting in HDR. What effect might so many lens choices have on the industry? For many years, the camera was the rock star – surpassing the DP as a production priority. We saw a new hot camera at every NAB, and this forced rental houses and owner/operators to invest annually in new gear. Over time, the camera market stabilized, but then the vintage-lens craze hit, and rental houses were forced to invest in old glass at close to new-glass prices. Then we saw a resurgence in the anamorphic format, forcing further investment. Then large format hit – at which point a lot of rental houses said, “Oh, come on!” and started taking the idea of buying cheap glass seriously. What is driving the development of inexpensive lenses? A combination of camera and lens fatigue, and a desire for less predictable optical results. Rental houses and owner/operators are wary of new investment. At the same time, they have to stay current. Cheap is not always the answer. Many large-format lenses are repurposed still lenses, where focus breathing, image

distortion, and chromatic aberration are corrected digitally in the camera or in photoediting software. When used on a cinema camera, though, none of these attributes is addressed. These looks may be interesting now, and the price points are certainly attractive, but as display technologies improve, these may not be good long-term investments. Are you advocating for clean lenses? I’m advocating for testing. Cinematographers must think about the future. Streaming services are, in a way, archival vaults for feature films and TV series. When I was younger, I could watch a film for five minutes and tell you when a film was made and in what part of the world, because each era and region showed different cinematic styles. British films looked different from French films, which were different from Italian, Russian, and Australian films. Over time these regional styles have merged to the point where I can’t do this as easily with films made over the past 15 to 20 years, but I can still spot films and TV series from, say, the 1980s because the lighting and compositional styles are unique to that era. I suspect I’ll be able to spot films and TV series made between 2015 and 2020 because of the trend toward imperfect optics, softness, and flaring, especially as these characteristics appear about ten times stronger in UHD/HDR.

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Barry Russo BARRY RUSSO STARTED HIS CAREER IN PRINT BUT MOVED QUICKLY TO PRODUCTION. FOR MORE THAN 20 YEARS HE PROVIDED ON-SET EDITING AND VISUAL EFFECTS AS WELL AS DIT SERVICES. NOW IN HIS 28TH YEAR AS A MEMBER OF LOCAL 600, HE HAS SERVED ON THE NATIONAL EXECUTIVE BOARD AND CONTINUES HIS INVOLVEMENT WITH THE TRAINING COMMITTEE. HE WAS RECENTLY NOMINATED AS AN ASSOCIATE MEMBER OF THE ASC. AS A PANASONIC TEAM MEMBER SINCE 2008, RUSSO HOSTS EVENTS, IS INVOLVED IN TRAINING, AND IS LEAD DEVELOPMENT TEAM MEMBER FOR THE NEW VARICAM 35 CAMERAS. THIS HAS EARNED HIM THE COVETED PANASONIC PRESIDENT’S AWARD.

PHOTO BY GREG GAYNE

What surprised you at NAB this year? Barry Russo: I was quite surprised by the lack of requests for large-format cameras. But, also, many projects using largeformat cameras tend to shoot in Super 35 millimeter (crop mode). This is for a number of reasons, which include the cost of large-format lenses, availability of rental lenses, and challenging focus, especially for storytelling. To further support this, most of the cinematographers I work with prefer to shoot in Super 35 unless there is a specific reason for shooting full frame (anamorphic, VFX, etc.). In addition, ARRI has announced a new 4K Super 35 camera. This further supports that Super 35 is here to stay. Having said that, I personally like the idea of a larger sensor, so we have options available for various productions. Where are we with HDR? It’s become a requirement for manufacturers. While most of today’s cameras shooting in LOG offer the ability to create a beautifully graded HDR pass in post, we are now seeing HDR Live outputs from cameras. This live HDR is referred to as HLG (Hybrid Log Gamma). Basically, it is a baked-in HLG live output for productions such as HLG Broadcasting. This is now being requested by broadcasters and networks alike, even though they may not all broadcast HLG yet. Even lower cost camcorders like Panasonic

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AU-EVA1 and AG-CX350 offer HLG live outputs. Does this offer more than wide dynamic range? The much wider color space of BT2020 is huge. It is like having a jumbo box of crayons versus a tiny box with Rec.709. This increase in color volume not only allows more colors, but at higher brightness, too. Imagine the reds can look red instead of magenta. Example: Seeing bright theatrical lighting on a live show that actually looks like what it is. What is the challenge for HDR/HLG? Supported displays. While HDR OLED displays are still the best for this application, they are costly and have a somewhat lower life span than LCD’s. Display manufacturers are trying new technologies to overcome these OLED limitations. For example, we are now seeing double-stacked LCD panel technologies to improve the blacks while achieving higher brightness. The downside is reduced side-angle viewing. This can appear as a color shift when viewing off angle. Also, the blacks still aren’t as good as the OLED. Why are cinema cameras finding their way into live productions? Shallow depthof-field, cinematic colors, much wider dynamic range, live HLG outputs, better

low-light performance, and 4K compatibility – all of which future-proof their investments. NBC News, CNBC, Univision, even QVC – for news and especially long-form and in-house promotion creation. This can also be said for HOW (houses of worship) – megachurches are using them for IMAG (image magnification, i.e. delivering instant video projection of speakers and performers at corporate, conference, and faith-based events) and live. This demand for Cinema Live has led manufacturers to create studio camera controls for cinema cameras. What is ROI? Region of interest. Basically, we shoot an 8K image on a full-frame camera. But, instead of having one 8K image, we can take four HD images from a single camera position. For example, let’s say we have three actors in a living room. The camera is set to a wide frame so we can see the whole room. We then extract four HD images from one camera. Output one could be the wide shot, then two, three, and four could be individual medium shots of each actor. Manually or using auto-tracking software, the individual framed shots for each of the three actors can be tracked as they move around the room. While this definitely is an application for sports, it could also prove viable for live talk shows and even reality shows. This approach is also very good when we don’t want to see too many cameras on set – sort of a “stealth mode,” per se.


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Jane Fleck

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IN HILO, HAWAII, SEVEN-YEAR-OLD JANE FLECK WAS WATCHING BOZO THE CLOWN WHEN SHE TURNED TO HER PLAYWRIGHT MOM AND SAID, “I CAN DO BETTER!” SO BEGAN FLECK’S LIFE PATH TOWARD “THE INDUSTRY.” AFTER GRADUATING WITH HIGH HONORS FROM MICHIGAN STATE, AND A STINT PRODUCING DOCUMENTARIES SUPPORTED BY THE NEA AND FORD FOUNDATION, SHE TOOK A JOB IN DETROIT WITH AN AD AGENCY AS A PRODUCER ON THE NATIONAL FORD MOTORS ACCOUNT. SOON, THE LARGEST POST FACILITY BETWEEN NY AND LA LURED HER AWAY TO START AS AN ASSISTANT ONLINE EDITOR. FLASH-FORWARD A FEW DECADES, SOME EMMY NOMINATIONS, NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL AWARDS, ETC., AND AS A LOCAL 600 DIT (AND FIRST-TIME NATIONAL EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBER OF THE ICG). “I GOT BURNED OUT,” SHE LAUGHS. “IT HAD BEGUN TO FEEL LIKE FACTORY WORK. I LIKE BEING ON SET, AND I’VE FOUND THAT MY POST EXPERIENCE IS A REAL ASSET TO THE CAMERA TEAM.”

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What excited you most at NAB this year? Jane Fleck: Sony’s massive new CLED (crystal LED) display was a visceral experience. It’s a 32-foot-wide by 19-foottall window with 8K images at 1,000-nits. From near or far, it looked as good as any monitor I’ve ever seen. Sometimes it seems that 4K, 6K and 8K are not much more than camera manufacturer bragging rights or material for complicated special effects. But once you see the images on a display that has been designed to handle the higher resolutions, it can be beautiful. What did you see on the show floor that’s going on your cart? The volume of data is going up. Standard operating procedure now is for clients to provide two drives for delivery of camera and sound data. I usually make an additional copy to my own Raid 5 HDD. I use a checksum download, then visually QC all downloaded files. For transcodes, I make a copy onto one of my drives and then copy color-corrected files to the client drives once they’re completed.

Data cloning has become a constant task. There are about six companies in the market and most are shifting to a subscription model, so I wanted to do a competitive comparison. I looked at Pomfort’s Silverstack, Quine Box, Moxion, Shotput Pro, Yoyotta and Hedge. All of the systems promise very fast downloads, with some of the systems offering other features like automatic cloud backup and simultaneous creation of client viewing copies or LTO’s. In my experience, download speeds are often more affected by production’s slow destination drives than data transfer rates from the card. There is also a lot of virtual set technology being developed and energy being put into set-to-cloud workflows. It’s probably a couple of years out, but a lot is going to change when 5G is everywhere. Are SSD’s helping to speed data handling on set? I have three 4TB SSD’s; two are in OWC chassis and one AKiTiO. They’ve been rock-solid. I have custom cases for the drives and use them to transport data

to post. OWC now has two new SSD arrays. Their ThunderBlade can be up to 8 TB and is only about 500 dollars more than my current 4-TB ThunderBay 4 RAID. I’m really enthused about their Envoy Pro EX, which can be up to 2 TB and is bus powered, putting it directly into competition with the LaCie rugged drives. However, I get significant pushback from productions when mentioning SSD drives because the production is happier paying for the extra overtime caused by using slower drives than buying faster, more-expensive SSDs! Did you notice any major trends at NAB 2019? It seems like HDR is gaining traction and HDR displays are beautiful. If HDR is part of the delivery package for any program, the camera team needs to monitor both HD and HDR on set, since there are significant visual changes that may affect skin tones, especially in low light. Local 600’s presentation at Cine Gear had some examples that were very enlightening about how the same RAW footage looked with color correction to HD and HDR.

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Eric Fletcher HAVING WORKED AS AN GUILD OPERATOR/STEADICAM ON SERIES LIKE BALLERS , TIMELESS , DYNASTY , DEXTER AND MORE, ERIC FLETCHER, SOC, IS DEEPLY IMMERSED IN WHAT HE CALLS THE “BLEEDING EDGE” OF THE MOVE TO HD AND BEYOND. A NATIVE OF ST. LOUIS, MO, FLETCHER STARTED IN THE FILM INDUSTRY IN THE EARLY 1980S AS A CAMERA ASSISTANT BEFORE MOVING UP TO OPERATOR IN 1997. HE PARTICIPATED IN THE FIRST LIVE DEMO OF ANALOG HDTV TRANSMITTED VIA FIBER OPTICS. PRESENTLY, HE SERVES ON THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS FOR THE SOCIETY OF CAMERA OPERATORS (SOC), WHERE HE IS ALSO THE CHAIRMAN OF THE TECHNICAL STANDARDS COMMITTEE.

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How has support changed over the last few years? Eric Fletcher: Electronic stabilization is the biggest advancement in the last 10 years. It crossed into the mainstream about five years ago with the advent and acceptance of brushless gimbals, such as MōVI and Ronin. How is new technology driving those changes? Believe it or not, cell phones are responsible for the biggest changes in support. Inside every cell phone is something called an AHRS (pronounced A-hars) – Attitude Heading Reference System. It’s a set of piezoelectric acceleration sensors and reference gyros that allow you to know where the camera is and where it is pointing. Using that allows you to stabilize the camera in tilt and roll. Since these packages are small and easy to integrate, they offer more and more capabilities to system designers. What products stood out at trade shows this year? Cinemoves was showing their Matrix 4 stabilized head, which was

this year’s winner of the SOC Technical Achievement Award. The head has the advanced control software that allows for Frame Reference operating, allowing the tilt wheel always to control tilt and pan wheels, the latter no matter the roll angle of the head. It frees the operator from having to do the mental math for what wheel controls what. Tilta also showed the universal-mount shippable Russian arm for car work. It transports in six cases and allows for easy transport and mounting on any vehicle with no special preparation. Has the size and footprint of support gear changed? Believe it or not, when you want to do a majestic sweep of a vista, the last thing you want is lightweight support. Mass makes for a fantastic damping system. While there are products out there that are using electronics and motors to simulate a greater mass, like Tiffen’s Steadicam Volt series of stabilizers, those still have limitations due to the size of the motors. So smaller is not always better.

What is the biggest challenge for support designers today? Speed of change of electronics and feature implementation for the electronic-aided products. That is, keeping up with the Joneses. We always hear the words “smart technology.” What do they mean to you? I expect to see “smart” arms in the near future for arm cars. Using technology borrowed from self-driving cars (Lidar and photogrammetry cameras), I would expect to see the electronically driven arms to have some protection from hitting roadside obstacles and picture cars. I would also expect that camera groundings would be a thing of the past, and that remote heads and arms will have some form of artificial intelligence to assist the user and to maintain some safety limits. What do filmmakers need to know about today’s support technology? While capabilities have increased, it still requires skilled operators and grips to manipulate the equipment and help to tell a story. That will never change.

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John Schwartzman JOHN SCHWARTZMAN, ASC, HAS WORKED ON SOME OF THE HIGHEST GROSSING FILMS IN CINEMA HISTORY. UNIVERSAL’S JURASSIC WORLD AND TWO FILMS IN THE FIFTY SHADES SERIES ACCOUNT FOR THREE BILLION DOLLARS ON THEIR OWN. SMALLER PROJECTS, LIKE SEABISCUIT , SAVING MR. BANKS , THE FOUNDER , AND BENNY & JOON BALANCE OUT THE FRANCHISE EPICS, OF WHICH SCHWARTZMAN ALSO CAN COUNT THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN , NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM: BATTLE OF THE SMITHSONIAN AND NATIONAL TREASURE: BOOK OF SECRETS ON HIS RÉSUMÉ. SCHWARTZMAN TRIES TO VARY HIS WORK AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE; IT’S A STRATEGY THAT KEEPS HIM UP ON NEW EQUIPMENT AND RELEVANT TO YOUNGER FILMMAKERS. LAST YEAR HE DID BOTH A SMALL FEATURE WITH A CREW OF EIGHT AND NO GENERATOR, AS WELL AS A STUDIO FILM OVERSEAS. THE GOAL WAS THE SAME DESPITE THE DIFFERENCE IN SIZE AND BUDGET: FIND THE BEST WAY TO VISUALIZE THE STORY WITH THE TOOLS AVAILABLE.

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What are some of the challenges in lighting in the U.K. versus the U.S.? John Schwartzman: 50 hertz versus 60 hertz. We have a 60-hertz electrical grid in the U.S., which allows for shooting at 24 frames per second at 180-degree shutter. The 50 hertz doesn’t allow for that in today’s world of modern light sources. To shoot 24 frames per second, you must shoot with a 172.8-degree shutter. This doesn’t present a problem for studio lighting, but on location, it’s a bit of a disaster since the advent of LED’s. We shot on the streets of London for three weeks this past winter and were presented with many issues with existing practical lighting and flicker; although these sources appear to be constant, they are in fact flickering on and off too fast for the human eye to see but not too fast for a CMOS sensor. Adjusting the shutter angle might get rid of one storefront’s flicker, but that opens up another can of worms for the rest of the street. What’s the solution? Location scouting needs to be really careful because there is

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no international standard for these new discontinuous light sources and no fix on set. In our case, incandescent was a blessing – fluorescent, sodium, and mercury vapor all fell into the same workaround. Not so with LED. We tested 80 varieties of LED Christmas fairy lights for Last Christmas just to find four that didn’t flicker and had decent color – incandescent fairy lights are banned in the EU. Has your own choice of lighting elements changed a lot with the times? [Laughs]. Over the years, I have found the lighting instruments that complement my style, and I am slow to change. I still prefer tungsten lights for faces and HMI’s for daylight, but now that I am shooting primarily digital, I have fallen in love with the Kino Flo Freestyle fixtures. The color science is way ahead of the rest, and they are a cosmetically beautiful light for faces. Also, they can run at full output on batteries, which make them great for challenging location work. Another bonus is that crews find them very easy and intuitive.

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You’ve shot a lot of film over your career. Did you make a big change, lightingwise, once digital took over? With film, it’s the tried and true incandescent and HMI’s. The color science of these instruments paired with Kodak is familiar to me, as I have exposed probably 40 million feet of Kodak stock. I will use LED’s as accent lighting built into the set but not as a primary source if I am shooting film. Shooting digital, I am more open to newer technologies. The cameras are, as a rule, more sensitive to light, so I may need a large source that can be achieved with less wattage. What is the single most significant innovation in LED lighting today? I really would have to point to Kino Flo again. Not only are their lights easy to use, but they also have built-in wireless DMX, and, most importantly, built-in LUT’s to match the camera sensor. Every camera sensor sees light differently, and the sensor is not a smooth sine wave, like film is. Each camera is blind in certain areas of the visual spectrum and overly saturated in others. It’s been a godsend to have a lighting manufacturer understand this and go one step further to allow the DP to set the fixture to match the camera. Hopefully, other manufacturers will follow suit. How does building a lighting package today compare to a few decades ago? Well, twenty years ago, renting equipment for a production was relatively simple. It was incandescent and Kino Flo tubes for sets, and HMI’s for day exteriors. Today it’s the Wild West of LED. I don’t have the time to test them all, so I stay with the ones I know. Most LED vendors at the trade shows are designing lights with the “prosumer” – not the DP shooting a 200-million-dollar picture – in mind. For me, I don’t need to look too far beyond ARRI or Kino. They are making different styles of fixtures, but both are being built to an extremely high standard. What do you hope for the future of lighting for cinema and TV? My biggest hope is that lighting manufacturers will get together and create a true standard for color temperature. As of now, I am a bit gunshy to mix different vendors’ lights when lighting a set. Sure, there were differences when you rigged 60 Par cans, but they were usually related to bulb life; the differences between LED fixtures set to the same color temperature is quite wide.


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WHAT DID THIS YEAR’S TRADE SHOWS REVEAL ABOUT THE DIRECTION OF CAPTURE, LIGHTING AND SUPPORT? BY PAULINE ROGERS

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V5.0 OF THE SONY VENICE ALLOWS FILMMAKERS TO ACHIEVE MULTIPLE SPEEDS – UP TO 90 FPS AT 6K – WITH THE SAME FULLFRAME, SHALLOW DEPTH OF FIELD.

Whether there were major takeaways from NAB 2019 depends on whom you ask. Some vendors said it was the best traffic they’ve ever had. But the Local 600 members who attended all recognized a significant change. With attendance seemingly down or stagnant, the trend of this year’s show – moving toward broadcast and “prosumer” – spoke volumes. Booths were smaller, and vendors were holding back – or holding off until Cine Gear. As for Cine Gear 2019, held again at Paramount Studios in Hollywood the first weekend in June, there were more stages and more first-time exhibitors. Vendors like drone supplier DJI (their latest entry will be featured in our September Gear

Guide) weren’t at NAB, as in years past, but chose to make a big splash at Cine Gear. The excitement was definitely up at Cine Gear 2019, with plenty of social networking for Guild members and opportunities (in a less frantic, more laid-back environment than NAB) to test and learn about new gear. As for what’s going on with new products from both shows, capture systems seemed the least expansive. And that makes perfect sense. As BandPro Marketing Director Brett Gillespie commented, “it’s not about new cameras designed to destroy the competition anymore – it’s a lot about making great cameras do things they’ve

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“ IT’S NOT ABOUT NEW CAMERAS DESIGNED TO DESTROY THE COMPETITION ANYMORE – IT’S ABOUT MAKING GREAT CAMERAS DO THINGS THEY’VE NEVER DONE.” Band Pro Film & Digital Marketing Director Brett Gillespie

never done.” Case in point was a camera introduced earlier this year in ICG, the Sony VENICE. With v5.0 (available in January), filmmakers can utilize the same camera over multiple speeds (up to 90 fps at 6K), maintaining full-frame shallow depth of field. Speaking of Sony, their new UHC-8300 8K 3CMOS camera (which should see heavy usage at the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo) is already broadcasting at 8K in Japan. At 15.43 lb., it features camera-head connects to the control unit, via an SMPTE fiber. It will enable HDR production with a variety of workflows, as well as benefit from Sony’s SR Live, with simultaneous output of 8K, 4K, and HD in HDR and SDR. The system should create plenty of excitement in the world of live production. Probably the biggest buzz of any new camera system was the ARRI ALEXA Mini LF (shipping this summer). “It’s what everyone wanted – small, compact, lightweight with the flexibility filmmakers need. Same image quality – a combination of large-format and primes – for all genres,” explained Stephan Ukas-Bradley, Vice President, Strategic Business Development and Technical Marketing for ARRI. “A year from now we are going to introduce a new Super35 4K production camera, which can use any lens with the sensor,” added Ukas-Bradley. Great for fast production when time is crucial. Now for something completely different: ROI (Region of Interest) shooting. (Check out the Q&A with Barry Russo, page 62). Panasonic’s development of 8K ROI allows for up to four different HD videos from an 8K image. Great for low-profile on reality series, not to mention live events and sports. Its compact, box-type footprint features a full-sized CMOS image sensor and EF lens mount. A multiple of 8K cameras (maximum eight) can be connected and operated as one integrated system. By linking a crop area in one camera to multiple crop images in other cameras, pan, tilt and zoom link on the mainframe. That makes for even more exciting – and probably lower profile – capture. Speaking of low profile, we checked out Dream Chip’s new ATOM cameras. Small, powerful, and broadcast quality; the ATOM one mini is said to be

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the smallest SDI broadcast camera with full HD resolution. In the world of lenses, many vendors were touting “cinema style” and vintage. Randy Wedick, Senior Technical Consultant, Band Pro, shed some light on the latest glass trends. “As digital cameras, color pipelines and viewing environments improve, we are reaching a point where nearly all image systems can create the same or similar great image,” Wedick shared. “That’s wonderful for engineers and manufacturers, not so much for artists who wish to create unique palettes for each project. This has led to the rise in popularity of vintage lenses, which, of course, have their own inherent issues: coating damage, fungus, yellowing, et cetera. Great strides have been made in rehousing, as we saw at the shows – but that doesn’t resolve the manufacturers’ problem – the glass is no longer available.” To help out, rental houses are starting to modify certain lens sets on a per-job basis. A few exciting announcements were made this year. Angénieux is leading the full-frame market with their Optimo Prime series. “Highend, high-resolution, modern-look option, in a compact housing,” added Wedick. “And, they are designed for personalization and customization. The real magic – the Smart Optics – is a singleelement cartridge that can be removed from the lens in exchange for various options.” Primetime Emmy nominee Rob McLachlan, ASC, CSC (Game of Thrones, Ray Donovan, Westworld), says walking around this year’s trade shows led to a love affair with the Zeiss Supreme Primes, “which have extended data capabilities that we are going to use on Lovecraft Country for HBO,” he shares. “The VFX departments are very excited – because the lenses will eliminate the need to do lens charts. And I’m excited about how robust, small, and fast they are at T1.5.” Suki Medencevic, ASC (Stuck in the Middle, The Imagineering Story), reported that Infinity’s new line, The Nelsonians, and their MikroMak were worth a look. “They are really unique macro/micro lenses capturing amazing details of microscopic size,” he said. According to the company, each lens has its own mathematical magnification progression. Choose the lens for your shot – from their table.


ARRI’S NEW ALEXA MINI LF (LARGE-FORMAT) IS WHERE CAMERA DESIGN IS HEADED: FLEXIBLE SMALL FOOTPRINT WITH A BIG IMAGE SENSOR.

ROSCO’S NEW DMG LUMIÈRE MIX LED FIXTURES WILL ENABLE FILMMAKERS “TO CREATE FLATTERING WHITE LIGHT AND ACCURATE ROSCO GEL MATCHES,” THANKS TO THE TRUE ROSCO COLOR INSIDE.

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TIFFEN STEADICAM M-2

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SUPPORT PRODUCTS AT NAB AND CINE GEAR 2019 WERE AIMED AT ENHANCING OPERATOR COMFORT AND SAFETY. LIKE LOCAL 600 DP JESSE FELDMAN’S ERGORIG, AN INTUITIVE VEST “THAT TRANSFERS 100 PERCENT OF A CAMERA’S WEIGHT TO YOUR HIPS WITHOUT ATTACHING TO IT.”

As for the main stage category this year, it was clearly lighting. The bulk of new offerings, mostly in LED, is exciting but not without pause given the large amount of first-time overseas vendors. And while many appeared promising, most DP’s, LD’s and gaffers said they are holding off until the “science” and, more importantly, longterm durability, are proven. One thing was certain: LED manufacturers are looking to the future. Kino Flo, for example, seems well ahead of the game with its built-in LUTs. (See Q&A with John Schwartzman, ASC, page 68) Peter Flesner, President/Founder, BB&S Lighting, shared that “LED lights can now have more throw. They are starting to replace HMI’s.” Proof of concept is the company’s new CBL-12, which outputs 1500 foot-candles at 10 m/33 ft while drawing less than 500 W of power. Another cool lighting tool that caught the attention of both Schwartzman and Christopher Chomyn, ASC, was BB&S’ The Lightbridge (featured in ICG when it was just in prototype) – the first professional key-light solution that lets the user increase the natural quality of light without needing to place the fixture far away. “I can’t wait to try it out on my next project,” Chomyn commented. “There is so much of a push on LED lighting that it was nice to see a product about reflecting light,” Schwartzman added. “It’s a different level of diffused reflectors, an advancement over mirrors and reflector boards.” Industry trailblazer Litepanels always tries to provide users with as many creative options as possible. Retro 8 Films’ creative director Ryan Shove told us that Litepanels’ Gemini 1×1 Soft “will be on every one of the company’s shoots. The output is remarkable for the size; I can pack them in two Pelican cases and carry them anywhere in the world to have all of the RGBWW options and lighting effects at our fingertips.” The big news from Rosco was their DMG Lumière MIX LED fixtures. According to Nicolas Goerg, Technical Director at DMG Lumière by Rosco, “Mix LED fixtures enable filmmakers to create flattering white light and accurate Rosco gel matches, thanks to the True Rosco Color inside.” That means “Goodbye, gels” and “Hello, speed of setup” when cameras are rolling. No complicated menus – just three modes. Hive’s tiny Bumble Bee 25-C garnered eyeballs as did Hive’s new Super Hornet 575-C, introduced at Cine Gear and shipping Fall 2019.

The 550-W single-point-source LED promises fully saturated colors and full white light color temperature. “It’s modular,” explains Hive’s Robert Richardson. “It can be configured as a classic hardlight-source Par spot, adjustable Fresnel, Leko Source Four Spot – or used as a raw bulb source and put into rectangular, octagonal, parabolic and lantern softboxes.” From Creamsource (formerly Outsight) came SpaceX, for the broadcast world. “Highend studio lighting with exceptional power and controllable color in a lighter and nimbler unit,” detailed Tama Berkeljon, Creamsource’s CEO. “We created it for productions where volume lighting is required on a conservative budget.” With broadcast production becoming ever more elaborate, many new robotic products made their debuts at NAB2019 and Cine Gear. Marketing reps at Shotoku said the company’s new Robotic Pedestal can “drive a perfect curve” on a rail-based camera system that offers a new perspective – floor-to-ceiling shots. It’s fully robotic, and the three-wheel smooth-steer XY pedestal has total control over every axis at all times – enabling the pedestal to make complex synchronized curved moves.” Anyone who’s walked down Paramount’s New York Street during Cine Gear knows to keep one eye on the sky – where cranes, cables, and all manner of new support technology flies camera systems ever higher and further. High Sight introduced its XL, for larger format cameras like the Sony P1, FS5, RED, and ALEXA Mini. High Sight reps said the system has unlimited capabilities and addresses a major concern – safety – when shooting events, concerts and high-dollar scenes. It features autonomous endpoints, redundant safety line, return to home and radio failsafes to ensure accidents don’t happen. Of course, the support category is not just about finding new ways to hold and move lights and cameras – it’s also centered on tools that make sets and locations safer. A case in point is the ErgoRig, designed by Local 600 DP Jesse Feldman. After incapacitating back and shoulder pain from years of handheld, Feldman designed an intuitive vest “that transfers 100 percent of a camera’s weight to your hips without attaching to it, so it never influences camera movement – keeping

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your body healthy and preventing injury.” Operator support has always been important at Tiffen – and this year they’re leading the way with two new Steadicams. There was a secretive (prototype in a small room) intro of the M-2 (more on that in next month’s Gear Guide), and operator Sheila Smith, for one, says she can’t wait for it to be available. On the NAB show floor was Tiffen’s Steadimate-S, which, according to the company, “takes single-handed stabilizers to a new level of performance by incorporating a body-worn stabilizer to allow for comfortable mode operation and full manual panning as well as effortless stabilization.” It’s small, comfortable, and affordable for entry-level filmmakers. There were a few things in rear- and front-screen projection that caught our eyes, like an exciting car ride at the PRG booth with a great rear projection, or lights and action everywhere at Yes Tech’s NAB 2019 booth, or Rose Visuals on Stage 3 at Cine Gear. However, on the practical/support side, it is probably StarTrackerVFX from Mo-Sys that gives filmmakers an edge. It’s a real-time virtual production solution that streamlines green screen workflows and brings virtual scenes live on set, enabling the director, the cast and the crew to shoot in multiple virtual locations and do reshoots instantaneously. Many Local 600 members walking the trade show floors said it was usually the “small ticket” items that captured their attention. For live event/concert DP Vance Burberry, it was the prototype of Bright Tangerine’s Prodigy. “It takes a new aerodynamic approach to particle and water deflection,” Burberry said. “It directs a thin sheet of air across the special clear glass filter on the front at 300 miles per hour. No vibration. No dead spots in the center. You can clamp it directly to the lens. Compact and quiet, it’s far beyond anything that exists.” Speaking of filters, DIT Michael Romano (and cinematographer Christopher Chomyn) found Panavision’s (rental only) LCND the perfect solution to color shifts when stacking heavy ND’s to get the lens to the right spot. “It doesn’t polarize light, it functions at high frame rates, and it can be continuously controlled over the auxiliary channel on Preston handsets,” Romano enthused. “It doesn’t force us to compromise the lens characteristics of our chosen stop, and that means more creative freedom.” Although nothing was brand new at Preston, DP David Emmerichs loved the company’s proactive ethos. “I like what they are doing with the new focus system in

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ROB MCLACHLAN, ASC, CSC, LOVES THE EXTENDED DATA CAPABILITIES OF THESE NEW ZEISS SUPREME PRIMES, PARTICULARLY IN CONJUNCTION WITH VFX UNITS BEING ABLE TO ELIMINATE THE NEED TO DO LENS CHARTS. “I’M REALLY EXCITED ABOUT HOW ROBUST, SMALL, AND FAST THEY ARE AT T1.5,” MCLACHLAN NOTES.

TIFFEN’S NEW LINE OF STEADICAM PRODUCTS, INCLUDING THE M-2 (SEE PROTOTYPE ON DISPLAY AT NAB, PAGE 74) AND STEADIMATE-S ARE GEARED TOWARD RELIEVING WEIGHT AND BULK FOR CAMERA OPERATORS, WHILE ALSO TAKING ADVANTAGE OF NEW ADVANCES IN BODY AND SINGLE-HAND STABILIZATION.

terms of integration with the Light Ranger,” he shared. “They also have a smaller version of the Light Ranger sensor coming out for handheld and Steadicam, which is great.” Operator David Simmons was impressed by the ARRI OCU. “It works as a miniature focus controller, sitting on the camera iris rods,” Simmons told us. “With the push of a button, it interrupts the AC’s remote wireless focus controls, allowing the operator to focus the camera without having to physically disengage the lens motors, and quickly gives controls back to the AC.” Guild DP Mark Doering-Powell, ASC (Grown-ish, Uncle Buck), liked G-Force Grips/9.Solutions Python Clamp. “Key grip Chuck Smallwood was showing this,” Doering-Powell observed. “It’s extruded

aluminum and some steel – no cast metal parts. It is spring loaded, won’t fall apart on operation, and you will never need a hammer to loosen an iron grip. Yes, it’s just a grip clamp, but when it’s this well designed, it deserves notice. I took some people there, and even camera operators were buying it to rod-mount monitors.” We’ll give the last word to Emerging Cinematographer Awards Chairman and veteran commercial (and high-speed) DP Jim Matlosz, who said he found something of ongoing help for operators on geared heads. “It was at MK-V. A video-gametype system designed for operators,” Matlosz explained. “It’s a truly amazing way for operators to practice and learn the wheels.”

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GREAT? 2019 WORKFLOW TRENDS WON’T MOVE ANY PLANETS, BUT THEY ARE SIGNALS FROM AN EXCITING NEW UNIVERSE.

MAKING “JUST OKAY”

BY MICHAEL CHAMBLISS

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GRASS VALLEY’S CREATIVE GRADING APP – THE CCS ONE CAMERA CONTROL SERVER (L) AND THE CGP 500 CREATIVE GRADING PANEL (BELOW) FORM A COMPLETE REWORKING OF THE VIDEO CONTROLLER’S TOOLSET.

The broad trends at the 2019 HPA Tech Retreat, NAB Show and Cine Gear Expo industry trade conferences reflected incremental steps and making things that were working okay work better. At all three events, 4K HDR was center stage, making perfectly fine HD start to look a bit old-school. HDR is looking to be a deeper and more fundamental change in visual storytelling than its low-key appearance might suggest. As Guild DIT Jane Fleck noted in an accompanying Q&A to this article (page 64), “Sony’s 32-foot CLED display was a dramatic illustration of the kind of visual experiences 8K HDR at 1,000-nits can produce.” And for all the practical and technical issues that technology may raise (including judder), it points toward a world where the visual image will have renewed power to transfix audiences. The three-decade transmission standard, Serial Digital Interface (SDI), is incrementally giving way to Internet Protocol (IP) signal flows, replacing racks of specialized hardware with software running

on off-the-shelf computers. Increasingly, change is taking the shape of new software and firmware upgrades. With that said, what follows is a round-up of new products and tools observed at HPA, NAB and Cine Gear, and their potential impact on Guild workflows in the year(s) to come. Introduced at NAB, Grass Valley’s Creative Grading App – CGP 500 Creative Grading Panel and the CCS One camera control server – comprise a top-to-bottom rework of the video controller’s toolset. In a paper delivered at the Broadcast Engineering and Information Technology (BEIT) Conference at NAB, Grass Valley’s Klaus Weber explained how camera-shading solutions have been historically based on manipulating parameters inside the camera’s processors – following the logic of the signal flow. This approach is rooted in the early days of analog broadcast cameras, when the chore of keeping the images matched between cameras was

an active process. Today, the stability of digital cameras enables video controllers to take a more creative role to adapting the camera’s capabilities to different lighting environments. With broadcasters moving toward new formats such as HDR, wide color gamut (WCG), 4K UDH and the complexity of simultaneous HDR/SDR and HD/4K UHD broadcasting, creative control is requiring an increasingly agile approach. In designing this system, Grass Valley (GV) rethought the process of broadcast camera control. Klaus explained how the new system is “designed to achieve a level of flexibility and image control for live broadcasts that is similar to file-based workflows. With cameras now essentially being specialized computers, GV’s solution is software based with a newly designed control surface that enables video controllers to efficiently navigate through the most commonly used settings,” Weber noted. The Creative Grading App, which works with GV’s Focus- and LDX-series

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MOXION IS A NEW CLOUD-BASED DAILIES SERVICE THAT IS IS TIGHTLY INTEGRATED WITH QTAKE, AUTOMATICALLY POSTING VIDEO PLAYBACK FILES (AND METADATA) TO THEIR MPAA-APPROVED SECURE CLOUD SERVER WITHIN A MINUTE OR TWO OF ANY FINISHED TAKE.

CODEX HIGH-DENSITY ENCODING (HDE) IS A SOFTWARE TOOLSET WITHIN CODEX DEVICE MANAGER THAT’S DESIGNED TO COMBAT THE BALLOONING FILE SIZES ASOCIATED WITH RAW WORKFLOWS.

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connectivity via the control server, the CGP 500 control surface also gives the video controller the capability to adjust several cameras simultaneously, access camera diagnostic functions from substantial distances, and compare settings between individual cameras.

cameras, provides a high-level view of the image’s curves and color shaping while providing access to the granular settings video controllers are accustomed to having. Running on a tablet, the app provides a dynamic representation of the impact that changing camera parameters will have on the image, while also showing the video controller how changing one parameter will affect others. Camera controls, like range extender, iris, filters and exposure, are displayed graphically rather than numerically and arranged in logical “bubbles” for more intuitive access. Settings can be stored, enabling cameras to be shifted from one “look” to another with the push of a button or for toggling between “looks” when making creative choices. Meeting the requirements of HDR broadcast also requires new controls, and GV’s system addresses that. In SDR, gamma is adjustable via knee point or black stretch. HDR utilizes optoelectronic transfer functions (OETF) with no gamma parameter in the specification. So instead of manipulating gamma, video controllers working in HDR can alter the characteristics of the upper and lower part of the camera’s OETF curve to achieve similar image control. When these kinds of new requirements are coupled with the desire to potentially output SDR and HDR simultaneously, the VC’s control surfaces could become insanely complex. Grass Valley is attuned to that, giving the CGP 500 control surface a new 4-function joystick and adjustment knobs that allow all control functions to be userassigned via the software. Video controllers are free to choose which controls they want to have at their fingertips and customize the grading panel to the demands of different productions. Utilizing the camera’s IP

Codex Digital Media, Media Vault and Media Stations are well established on high-end productions, and now Codex Digital is expanding its ecosystem to include interchange with industrystandard software and technology to reduce the challenges of ARRIRAW data handling. Codex Device Manager is the centerpiece of this effort and is available license free. The application integrates with Mac’s Desktop and Finder to provide a unified view of connected Codex Docks and Capture Drives, with Capture Drives appearing as individual volumes on the Desktop instead of as an aggregated “codex VFS” drive. From the Desktop, files can be copied using industry-standard data-management applications. Device Manager also provides for load, eject, format and erase operations as well as device status, including RAID level. Codex High-Density Encoding (HDE) is a software toolset within Codex Device Manager designed to combat the explosion in file sizes experienced with large-format RAW workflows. It works with Bayer pattern images of any size and results in ARRIRAW files that are typically 60 percent of their original size. That means taking up 40 percent less storage space and 40 percent less data to move, resulting in faster file transfers, reduced bandwidth for I/O operations, fewer LTO tapes and fewer data to push and pull from the cloud. The concept behind Codex HDE is to make ARRIRAW workflows more efficient across the entire production chain, from the back of the camera through final grading in DI. A 40-percent smaller data profile amounts to significant savings in time and money, and helps to put the creative advantages of large-format cameras within reach for smaller productions. Brian Gaffney of Codex describes HDE as “a zip file for ARRIRAW. It’s completely lossless,” Gaffney noted. “So when the file is uncompressed, it’s a perfect bit-for-bit match to the original file. If you run an MD-5 hash of the original RAW file, compress it with Codex HDE and then decode it, the original hash will still match.” Encoding happens on the fly when a file is copied with Codex Device Manager from a Capture Drive, with the speed of HDE encoding being dependent upon CPU power. ARRIRAW

Open Gate 4.5K files can be encoded at 24 fps on a current-level MacBook Pro and at over 50 fps on a 10-core iMac Pro. When the file is encoded, the file extension changes from .ARI to .ARX. The image essence is encoded, but the file header remains identical, preserving the metadata. Decoding of .ARX files is currently supported by Filmlight’s Baselight and Daylight, Colorfront On-Set Dailies, Express Dailies, and Transkoder, Assimilate, Pomfort Silverstack, ShotPut Pro, Hedge, and YoYotta. Another intriguing new addition to dailies workflow comes from Hugh Calveley, CEO and founder of Moxion, who got the idea for his company while working as DIT on a production in New Zealand. “The editor was complaining about how long it took to get the files he needed,” Calveley told me. “While dailies are dailies and must go through their process, I realized that the files on the video playback operator’s QTake could get the editor started and might be able to solve a list of other production challenges as well.” While capable of accepting uploaded files from any source, Moxion is tightly integrated with QTAKE and automatically posts video playback files to their MPAAapproved secure cloud server within a minute or two of the director calling “cut,” including the full complement of QTAKE metadata. Moxion’s apps for desktop web browsers, iPads, iPhones and their own channel on Apple TV enable the files to be searched and viewed immediately after the upload finishes. Because uploads proceed through the shooting day, no one connected to the service is more than a couple minutes behind what’s happening on set. When dailies are completed, they can be uploaded to Moxion for transcoding and automatic distribution. Some productions are also choosing to upload their log image files, as the metadata from the original video playback file automatically transfers over, enabling all versions of a shot to share the same metadata without manual reentry. The Moxion apps mimic QTAKES’ ability to play only the “action” part of the clip, skipping over slates and make-up’s last touches; shots can be scrubbed from their icons without placing them on a timeline. The metadata is searchable by any of the fields. Calveley referenced a show that discovered dirt on one of their lenses. “They were able to quickly identify all of the shots that had been done with that lens to discover when the issue started to happen and then search them to understand the impact on their day’s work,” he shared. Outside of being perfect for Moxion’s “immediates,” the company’s Apple TV channel is also an easy-to-use, secure, high-

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quality playback platform for dailies. “Apple TV is a rigorous platform for HDR dailies,” Calveley concludes. “While their service is currently using H.264 as their standard encoding format, they don’t view moving to H.265 for HDR as much of a challenge and are just waiting for their clients to request it.” “One of the advantages we enjoy is feedback from cinematographers and camera crews on-set through Panavision, and then from cinematographers in the DI through Light Iron,” describes Michael Cioni, senior vice president of innovation for Panavision about the company’s new LINK HDR: On-Set HDR & SDR Monitoring and Post Workflow. “We can see into both ends of the pipe. I believe that the move to HDR is as significant as the shift from film to digital. It’s on that kind of game-changing level.” Cioni says it’s optimal for filmmakers to be looking at the same kind of images the entire time they’re working. “It’s a problem when cinematographers cannot see the image until the end of the process,” he adds. “And the DI gets complicated when the directors see one thing on set and then spend six months looking at something else in editorial.” The solution, developed with cooperation from AJA, Teradek, Sony and Colorfront, involves a nimble setup for on-set HDR/SDR monitoring and linked HDR/SDR dailies for editorial. The on-set monitoring cart utilizes two Sony BVM E171 monitors and a Sony BVM HX310 display, all of which can be toggled between HDR and SDR for side-by-side comparison. HDR-to-SDR conversion is accomplished via monitor profiles and LUT’s. Dailies are created in both HDR and SD and then linked, like the left eye and right eye in 3D. This enables editorial to efficiently work in both HDR and SDR simultaneously and to change between the two at will. That enables studio viewing to be in HDR, while viewing on SDR platforms, such as web browsers, can be achieved without any extra work on the part of the editorial team. The Panavision/ Light Iron demo at Cine Gear Expo showed how LINK HDR enabled live images from the show to match across on-set monitors to Avid screens in real time. For all practical purposes, scopes have

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become software as well. And while not a brand-new piece of hardware, AJA HDR Image Analyzer v1.1 firmware upgrade is a solid step toward shaping the AJA HDR Analyzer into a flexible set of on-set tools. In designing its HDR Image Analyzer, AJA combined their experience in building field-ready hardware with Colorfront’s well-respected understanding of the HDR image. The result is a 1RU box that is part waveform/histogram/vectorscope and part postproduction image analyzer. The upgrade introduces a new web user interface that helps to make it cart friendly, simplifying remote control and downloading screenshots from other computers and mating the unit with other applications. The feature set includes direct LOG support for ARRI, Canon, Panasonic, RED and Sony cameras, with automated color space switching over SDI for SDR, PQ, and HLG Hybrid Log-Gamma (HLG). The analyzer outputs its display in native resolutions with HDR/PQ over a display port. Designed around Rec. 2020 and Rec.709 color gamuts, the analyzer has most of the functions one would expect, including nit light level, out-of-gamut max warnings for P3, a frame average-light-level bar and outof-gamut and out-of-brightness alerts. Still, frames can be stored and recalled for quick reference and comparison. As for the oncoming wave of 8K workflows (set to hit after the 2020 Tokyo Olympics), pretty much everyone in the capture food chain is hard pressed to make a strong argument for 8K; but it’s worth noting that every major consumer TV vendor at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show (CES), in Las Vegas, had 8K displays on parade. Way back in 2009, it was hard to comprehend 4K’s slow creep onto the NAB Show floor. And while many 8K workflow products still seem to have marks left from the tape and rubber bands, AJA was an exception, teaming its KONA 5 with SGO’s Mistika Ultima editing and finishing software for 8K broadcast workflows. The KONA 5 and Mistika Ultima combo offers real-time 8K UHD at 60p with uncompressed formats. The KONA 5 has four bi-directional 12G SDI ports, supports multi-channel 4K, 12-bit color, and multi-format HDR and has an HDMI 2.0 output.


IN DESIGNING ITS HDR IMAGE ANALYZER, AJA COMBINED KNOWLEDGE OF FIELDREADY HARDWARE WITH COLORFRONT’S WORK WITH HDR. THE RESULT IS A 1RU BOX THAT IS PART WAVEFORM/ HISTOGRAM/VECTORSCOPE AND PART POSTPRODUCTION IMAGE ANALYZER.

PANAVISION/LIGHT IRON’S NEW LINK HDR SYSTEM ALLOWS ON-SET USERS AND POST PROFESSIONALS (LIGHT IRON COLORIST SEAN DUNCKLEY PICTURED HERE) TO MONITOR AND VIEW THE SAME HDR/SDR DAILIES VIA MONITOR PROFILES AND LUT’S, ALL IN COOPERATION WITH COLOR MANAGEMENT VENDORS LIKE AJA, TERADEK, SONY AND COLORFRONT.

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The world’s most influential media, entertainment and technology show 13- 17 September 2019 | RAI, Amsterdam

FROM THE WORLD OF MEDIA TO TELECOMS, CLOUD, MOBILE, ENTERTAINMENT & TECHNOLOGY Register before 16 August to get your free visitor pass or the early booking conference discount

See it differently. 84 AU G U S T 201 9

show.ibc.org


Join the biggest names and the brightest minds. Toronto International Film Festival September 5–15 Register now tiff.net/industry

#TIFF19

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PRODUCTION CREDITS COMPILED BY TERESA MUÑOZ – AS OF JULY 1, 2019 The input of Local 600 members is of the utmost importance, and we rely on our membership as the prime (and often the only) source of information. In order for us to continue to provide this service, we ask that Guild members submitting information take note of the following requests: Please provide up-to-date and complete crew information etc.). Please note that the deadline for the Production Credits is on the first of the preceding cover month (excluding weekends & holidays).

Submit your jobs online by visiting: www.icg600.com/MY600/Report-Your-Job

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Any questions regarding the Production Credits should be addressed to Teresa Muñoz at teresa@icgmagazine.com

First Man / Photo by Daniel McFadden

(including Still Photographers, Publicists, Additional Units,


20TH CENTURY FOX “911” SEASON 3

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOAQUÍN SEDILLO, ASC OPERATORS: CONNOR O’BRIEN, DUANE MIELIWOCKI, SOC, PHIL MILLER, SOC ASSISTANTS: KEN LITTLE, CLAUDIO BANKS, ERIC GUERIN, DAVID STELLHORN, MAX MACAT, JIHANE MRAD STEADICAM OPERATOR: CONNOR O’BRIEN SEADICAM ASSISTANT: KEN LITTLE CAMERA UTILITY: PAULINA GOMEZ DIGITAL UTILITY: JOSHUA SMITH

“FREE GUY” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GEORGE RICHMOND OPERATORS: PETER ROSENFELD, MAURICE MCGUIRE ASSISTANTS: ERIC SWANEK, GREGORY WIMER, CHRISTIAN HOLLYER, JOHN MCCARTHY DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DANIEL HERNANDEZ LOADER: TYLER SWANEK DIGITAL UTILITY: MICHAEL RODRIGUEZ TORRENT PUBLICIST: WILLIAM CASEY

“WEST SIDE STORY” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JANUSZ KAMINSKI OPERATORS: MITCH, DUBIN, SOC, JOHN MOYER ASSISTANTS: MARK SPATH, TIMOTHY METIVIER, CONNIE HUANG, CORNELIA KLAPPER LOADER: DAVID ROSS LIBRA HEAD TECH: PIERSON SILVER STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: NIKO TAVERNISE PUBLICIST: LARRY KAPLAN

“GREY’S ANATOMY” SEASON 15 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: HERB DAVIS OPERATORS: FRED IANNONE, STEVE ULLMAN ASSISTANTS: NICK MCLEAN, FORREST THURMAN, CHRIS JOHNSON, LISA BONACCORSO STEADICAM OPERATOR: STEVE ULLMAN STEADICAM ASSISTANT: FORREST THURMAN

“HIGH FIDELITY” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CARMEN CABANA OPERATORS: DAVID KNOX, CHRISTOPHER MOONE ASSISTANTS: JEROME WILLIAMS, JASON RIHALY, CAMERON SIZEMORE, KELSEY MIDDLETON LOADERS: JAKOB FRIEDMAN, FRANK MILEA STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: PHIL CARUSO

“JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE!” SEASON 17 LIGHTING DIRECTOR: CHRISTIAN HIBBARD OPERATORS: GREG GROUWINKEL, PARKER BARTLETT, GARRETT HURT, MARK GONZALES STEADICAM OPERATOR: KRIS WILSON JIB OPERATORS: MARC HUNTER, RANDY GOMEZ, JR., NICK GOMEZ CAMERA UTILITIES: CHARLES FERNANDEZ, SCOTT SPIEGEL, TRAVIS WILSON, DAVID FERNANDEZ, ADAM BARKER VIDEO CONTROLLER: GUY JONES STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: KAREN NEAL, MICHAEL DESMOND 2ND UNIT DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BERND REINBARDT, STEVE GARRETT

ABC STUDIOS

ABC SIGNATURE

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ALLAN WESTBROOK, KYLE JEWELL OPERATORS: BILL BRUMMOND, JOSH LARSEN ASSISTANTS: COBY GARFIELD, TIM COBB, DEREK HACKETT, JOSH NOVAK STEADICAM OPERATOR: BILL BRUMMOND STEADICAM ASSISTANT: TIM COBB DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: RYAN DEGRAZZIO DIGITAL UTILITY: MIKE RUSH

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: KEVIN ATKINSON OPERATORS: NEAL BRYANT, AMANDA TREYZ ASSISTANTS: ECAN WILHELM, NICOLE CRIVLARE, LANI WASSERMAN, JOE DIBARTOLOMEO STEADICAM OPERATOR: NEAL BRYANT STEADICAM ASSISTANT: EVAN WILHELM LOADER: ALEX GADBERRY DIGITAL UTILITY: BROOK ZBYTNIEWSKI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ALI GOLDSTEIN

“AGENTS OF S.H.I.E.L.D.” SEASON 7

“AMERICAN HOUSEWIFE” SEASON 3 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDREW RAWSON OPERATORS: RICH DAVIS, TIM WALKER, LISA STACILAUSKAS ASSISTANTS: MAX NEAL, ROBERT GILPIN, JOE TORRES, ELIZABETH ALGIERI, KARL OWENS, JASWINDER BEDI DIGITAL LOADER: LESLIE PUCKETT DIGITAL UTILITY: STEVE ROMMEVAUX

“CRIMINAL MINDS” SEASON 15 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DARCY SPIRES OPERATORS: GARY TACHELL, KEITH PETERS, BRIAN GARBELLINI, JOSH TURNER ASSISTANTS: BRYAN DELORENZO, TODD DURBORAW, TIM ROE, ROBERT FORREST, TOBY WHITE, CARTER SMITH UTILITIES: ALEX MARMALICHI, JACOB KULJIS STEADICAM OPERATOR: KEITH PETERS STEADICAM ASSISTANT: BRYAN DELORENZO

“DOLLFACE” SEASON 1

AFN PRODUCTIONS-TELEPICTURES “THE REAL” SEASON 6

LIGHTING DIRECTOR: EARL WOODY, LD OPERATORS: KEVIN MICHEL, NATE PAYTON, STEVE RUSSELL, CHRIS WILLIAMS STEADICAM OPERATOR: WILL DEMERITT CAMERA UTILITIES: HENRY VEREEN, SALVATORE BELLISSIMO, ANDRES VELASQUEZ, JR. JIB ARM OPERATOR: JIM CIRRITO VIDEO CONTROLLER: JEFF MESSENGER

TECHNOCRANE OPERATOR: BRIAN LOVE REMOTE HEAD TECH/OPERATOR: JAY SHEVECK STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: TYLER GOLDEN

A VERY GOOD PRODUCTION, INC. & WAD PRODUCTIONS

“THE ELLEN DEGENERES SHOW” SEASON 16 LIGHTING DIRECTOR: TOM BECK PED OPERATORS: DAVID WEEKS, PAUL WILEMAN, TIM O’NEILL HAND HELD OPERATOR: CHIP FRASER JIB OPERATOR: DAVID RHEA STEADICAM OPERATOR: DONOVAN GILBUENA VIDEO CONTROLLER: JAMES MORAN HEAD UTILITY: CRAIG “ZZO” MARAZZO UTILITIES: ARLO GILBUENA, WALLY LANCASTER, DIEGO AVALOS

BEACHWOOD SERVICES

“DAYS OF OUR LIVES” SEASON 54 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TED POLMANSKI, MARK LEVIN OPERATORS: MARK WARSHAW, VICKIE WALKER, MICHAEL J. DENTON, STEVE CLARK CAMERA UTILITIES: STEVE BAGDADI, GARY CYPHER VIDEO CONTROLLER: ALEXIS DELLAR HANSON

BIG INDIE BLISS, INC. “BLISS”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MARLUS FORDERER OPERATORS: HENRY TIRL, TIM OBECK ASSISTANTS: DENNIS SEAWRIGHT, HAYDN PAZANTI, JOZO ZOVKO, MANNY SERRANO STEADICAM OPERATOR: HENRY TIRL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JEROEN HENDRIKS DIGITAL UTILITY: BAILEY SOFTNESS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: HILARY GAYLE

BIG INDIE CHEMICAL HEARTS, INC. “CHEMICAL HEARTS”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ALBERT SALAS RECHE OPERATOR: THOMAS WILLS ASSISTANTS: ANTONIO PONTI, AUTUMN MORAN

BIG INDIE THE HUNT, INC. “LEVIATHAN”

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TIMOTHY NORMAN, WILL REXER OPERATORS: ALAN MEHLBRECH, MATTHEW PEBLER ASSISTANTS: MICHAEL BURKE, MICHAEL GUTHRIE, STEPHEN MCBRIDE, VINCENT TUTHS DIGITAL IMAGING TECHS: LUKE TAYLOR LOADER: CORY MAFFUCCI

“THE HUNT” SEASON 1

ALIVE AND KICKING

“DREAM CORP LLC” SEASON 3 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MARTEN TEDIN OPERATORS: ROMAN JAKOBI, LIAM CLARK ASSISTANTS: WILL EMERY, ALBERT FRIGONE, EVAN METCALFE-CHURCH DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BENJAMIN LONGSWORTH

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: FREDERICK ELMES, ASC OPERATORS: ALAN MEHLBRECH, MATTHEW PEBLER ASSISTANTS: MICHAEL BURKE, MICHAEL GUTHRIE, BENEDICT BALDAUFF, VINCENT TUTHS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: LUKE TAYLOR LOADERS: JAKOB FRIEDMAN, CORY MAFFUCCI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CHRISTOPHER SAUNDERS

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BLUE CAT PRODUCTIONS, LLC “OZARK” SEASON 3

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BEN KUTCHINS, ARMANDO SALAS OPERATORS: BEN SEMANOFF, MIKE HARTZEL ASSISTANTS: LIAM SINNOTT, KATE ROBERSON, CRIS TROVA, JOHN HOFFLER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOE ELROM LOADER: TAYLOR SEAMAN

CALLING GRACE PROUCTIONS, LLC “I KNOW THIS MUCH IS TRUE”

“STRANGE ANGEL” SEASON 2

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JODY LIPES OPERATORS: SAM ELLISON, ERIN HENNING ASSISTANTS: AURELIA WINBORN, KALI RILEY, ELIZABETH HEDGES, ALISA COLLEY LOADER: TONI SHEPPARD STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ATSUSHI NISHIJIMA

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CYNTHIA PUSHECK, ARMANDO SALAS OPERATORS: JOSHUA HARRISON, DEAN MORIN, YVONNE CHU ASSISTANTS: NEIL CHARTIER, KIRA MURDOCK, DEREK PLOUGH, TRACI CHARTIER, PRESTON PHILLIPS, LOREN AZLEIN STEADICAM OPERATOR: JOSHUA HARRISON STEADICAM ASSISTANT: NEIL CHARTIER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: AARON PICOT LOADER: CARMAN SPOTO CAMERA UTILITY: ANDY MACAT TECHNOCRANE OPERATOR: NAZARIY HATAK TECHNOCRANE TECH: BRIAN LOVE REMOTE HEAD TECH/OPERATOR: JAY SHEVECK

CBS

“ENTERTAINMENT TONIGHT” SEASON 38 LIGHTING DESIGNER: DARREN LANGER DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: KURT BRAUN OPERATORS: JAIMIE CANTRELL, JAMES B. PATRICK, ALLEN VOSS, ED SARTORI, HENRY ZINMAN, BOB CAMPI, RODNEY MCMAHON, ANTHONY SALERNO CAMERA UTILITY: TERRY AHERN VIDEO CONTROLLERS: MIKE DOYLE, PETER STENDAL

“MAN WITH A PLAN” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GARY BAUM, ASC OPERATORS: GLENN SHIMADA, TRAVERS HILL, LANCE BILLITZER, ED FINE ASSISTANTS: ADRIAN LICCIARDI, JEFF GOLDENBERG, ALEC ELIZONDO, CLINT PALMER, JASON HERRING UTILITIES: DANNY LORENZE, SEAN ASKINS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DEREK LANTZ VIDEO CONTROLLER: JOHN O’BRIEN

“NCIS: LOS ANGELES” SEASON 11 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: VICTOR HAMMER OPERATORS: TERENCE NIGHTINGALL,

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TIM BEAVERS ASSISTANTS: KEITH BANKS, RICHIE HUGHES, PETER CARONIA, JACQUELINE NIVENS STEADICAM OPERATORS: TERENCE NIGHTINGALL, TIM BEAVERS STEADICAM ASSISTANTS: KEITH BANKS, RICHIE HUGHES DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOHN MILLS DIGITAL UTILITY: TREVOR BEELER
 STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RON JAFFE PUBLICIST: KATHLEEN TANJI

AUGUST 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

“THE TALK” SEASON 9 LIGHTING DIRECTOR: MARISA DAVIS PED OPERATORS: ART TAYLOR, MARK GONZALES, ED STAEBLER HAND HELD OPERATORS: RON BARNES, KEVIN MICHEL, JEFF JOHNSON JIB OPERATOR: RANDY GOMEZ HEAD UTILITY: CHARLIE FERNANDEZ UTILITIES: MIKE BUSHNER, DOUG BAIN, DEAN FRIZZEL, BILL GREINER, JON ZUCCARO VIDEO CONTROLLER: RICHARD STROCK STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RON JAFFE

“WHY WOMEN KILL” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL PRICE OPERATORS: SCOTT BOETTLE, JOHN HANKAMMER ASSISTANTS: HEATHER LEA-LEROY, VANESSA MOREHOUSE, DARRELL HERRINGTON, DREW HAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ANDREW OSBORNE DIGITAL UTILITY: RICH CONTI

CMS PRODUCTIONS “ON THE ROCKS”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIPPE LE SOURD OPERATOR: VINCENT VENNITTI ASSISTANTS: RICHARD GIOIA, TOSHIRO YAMAGUCHI, JORDAN LEVIE, DAN MERRILL STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JOJO WHILDEN PUBLICIST: BROOKE ENSIGN

CONACO

“CONAN” SEASON 9 OPERATORS: TED ASHTON, NICK KOBER, KOSTA KRSTIC, JAMES PALCZEWSKI, BART PING, SETH SAINT VINCENT HEAD UTILITY: CHRIS SAVAGE UTILITIES: BARON JOHNSON, JOSH GWILT

CRANETOWN MEDIA, LLC

“WU-TANG: AN AMERICAN SAGA” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GAVIN KELLY OPERATORS: JON BEATTIE, KATE LAROSE ASSISTANTS: ANDREW JUHL, CHRISTOPHER WIEZOREK, YALE GROPMAN, DANIEL PFEIFER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: J. ERIC CAMP LOADERS: SEAN MCNAMARA, ADAM DEREZENDES

DC COMICS

“STARGIRL” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SCOTT PECK, MIKE KARASICK


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OPERATORS: DEKE KEENER, FERNANDO REYES, JOSH STERN ASSISTANTS: ADAM CASTRO, GERAN DANIELS, BILLY MCCONNELL, CAITLIN TROST STEADICAM OPERATOR: DEKE KEENER STEADICAM ASSISTANT: ADAM CASTRO DIGITAL UTILITIES: BECCA BENNETT, NASTASIA HUMPHRIES

DELTA BLUES PRODUCTIONS “QUEEN SUGAR” SEASON 4

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANTONIO CALVACHE, KIRA KELLY OPERATORS: GRAYSON AUSTIN, ROB STENGER ASSISTANTS: TROY WAGNER, RY KAWANAKA, JONATHAN ROBINSON STEADICAM OPERATOR: GRAYSON AUSTIN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BRIAN STEGEMAN STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: SKIP BOLEN

DISNEY+

“DIARY OF A FEMALE PRESIDENT” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ALISON KELLY OPERATORS: DAN AYERS, PAIGE THOMAS ASSISTANT: MARK LEGASPI

DUMMY 1, LLC

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DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CATHERINE GOLDSCHMIDT OPERATORS: BRIAN FREESH, APRIL KELLEY ASSISTANTS: LAUREN PEELE, MINMIN TSAI, DAVID EDSALL, JASON ALEGRE STEADICAM OPERATOR: BRIAN FREESH DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: PETER BRUNET CAMERA UTILITY: JOHANNES KUZMICH

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ABE MARTINEZ OPERATORS: MATTHEW HARSHBARGER, MATT VALENTINE, ZAC SIEFFERT ASSISTANTS: JASON GARCIA, RIGNEY SACKLEY, STEFAN TARZAN, TAYLOR PERRY, DAN MCKEE, ZANDER WHITE STEADICAM OPERATOR: MATTHEWINDE HARSHBARGER DIGITAL LOADER: ADAM LIPSCOMB

“DUMMY” SEASON 1

ENJOY IT, INC.

“BROCKMIRE” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GLENN BROWN OPERATORS: SPENCER HUTCHINS, HUGH BRASELTON ASSISTANTS: JOSH HANCHER, ROSS DAVIS, KYLER DENNIS, COURTNEY DREWES LOADER: JENNIFER BRADDOCK DIGITAL UTILITY: GRAYSON GULDENSCHUH STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: ELIZA MORSE, JACE DOWNS

FIVE PINTS HIGH, LLC

“FIVE POINTS” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MOIRA MOREL ASSISTANTS: SYMON MINK, JORGE GOMEZ, NINA PORTILLO, SOPHIA BRUZA DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: EMILIO MEJIA

“QUEEN OF THE SOUTH” SEASON 4

2ND UNIT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MATT VALENTINE

GATEWAY FILM, INC. “THE GATEWAY”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRYAN NEWMAN OPERATORS: AUSTIN BURNETTE, MARK GAMSEY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ANTONY PLATT

GOLDEN DRAGONS, LLC

“THE OUTSIDER” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: IGOR MARTINOVIC OPERATORS: BEN SEMANOFF, ARI ISSLER ASSISTANTS: LIAM SINNOTT, KATE ROBERSON, STEPHEN EARLY, MICHAEL FISHER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MICHAEL KIM LOADER: KAT SOULAGNET STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: BOB MAHONEY

AUGUST 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

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HODGE PRODUCTIONS, LLC

MINIM PRODUCTIONS, INC.

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ITAI NE’EMAN OPERATORS: RICK DAVIDSON, BO WEBB, FRANK GODWIN, TIKO PAVONI ASSISTANTS: ALAN ALDRIDGE, LOUIS SMITH, JR., SETH LEWIS, ERIKA HAGGERTY STEADICAM OPERATOR: RICK DAVIDSON STEADICAM ASSISTANT: ALAN ALDRIDGE LOADER: GEORGE ZELASKO STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: KENT SMITH

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JULIE KIRKWOOD OPERATOR: JAC FITZGERALD ASSISTANTS: NICK CUTWAY, JULE FONTANA, SHARLA CIPICCHIO, ANDY KENNEDY DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BRET SUDING UTILITY: HANS KUZMICH STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: SUZANNE TENNER

“MR. MERCEDES” SEASON 3

“GONE HOLLYWOOD” PILOT

MIXED BAG PRODUCTIONS, LLC

“THE RIGHTEOUS GEMSTONES” SEASON 1

HORIZON SCRIPTED TELEVISION, INC. “YOU” SEASON 2

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SEAMUS TIERNEY, CORT FEY OPERATORS: BUD KREMP, NICOLE LOBELL ASSISTANTS: MICHAEL ALVAREZ, STEVE PAZANTI, SUMMER MARSH, RICHARD KENT DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: PAUL MALETICH DIGITAL UTILITY: HUNTER JENSEN TECHNOCRANE OPERATOR: NAZARIY HATAK TECHNOCRANE TECH: BRIAN LOVE REMOTE HEAD TECH/OPERATOR: JAY SHEVECK

INTERSTELLAR SAMURAI PRODUCTIONS, INC. “NAKED SINGULARITY”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDRIJ PAREKH, ASC OPERATOR: AIKEN WEISS ASSISTANTS: JAMES SCHLITTENHART, TOSHIRO YAMAGHUCHI, CARLOS BARBOT, BRENDAN RUSSELL STEADICAM OPEATOR: AIKEN WEISS LOADERS: ADAM SCHLARB, MATTHEW MARTIN STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MARK SCHAFER

LITTLE PRODUCTIONS, INC. “LITTLE AKA TOPSIDE”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LOWELL MEYER STEADICAM OPERATOR: PETER KEELING ASSISTANTS: DAVID MASLYN, STACY MIZE, KYLE GORJANC, MYO CAMPBELL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BRANDON KELLEY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JEONG PARK

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AUGUST 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL SIMMONDS, PAUL DALEY OPERATORS: SAADE MUSTAFA, SIMON JAYES, BARRET BURLAGE ASSISTANTS: JUSTIN SIMPSON, NICK BROWN, MATTHEW MEBANE, EMILY RUDY COMBS, JUSTIN URBAN, DAN JONES LOADER: OREN MALIK

NARROW ISLE PRODUCTIONS, LLC “OUTER BANKS” SEASON 1

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRAD SMITH OPERATORS: BO WEBB, MATTHEW LYONS ASSISTANTS: LAWRENCE GIANNESCHI, WILLIAM HAND, MATTHEW KELLY, DOMINC ATTANASIO LOADER: NICK CANNON

NBC

“CHICAGO PD” SEASON 7 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JAMES ZUCAL OPERATORS: VICTOR MACIAS, DARRYL MILLER, SETH THOMAS ASSISTANTS: JOHN YOUNG, JAMISON ACKER, DON CARLSON, KYLE BELOUSEK, DAVID WIGHTMAN STEADICAM OPERATOR: SCOTT DROPKIN, SOC LOADER: NICK WILSON UTILITIES: MARION TUCKER, ALAN DEMBEK

“UNBREAKABLE KIMMY SCHMIDT” FINALE DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN INWOOD OPERATORS: DOUG PELLEGRINO, DAVID TAICHER

ASSISTANTS: DOUG FOOTE, RACHAEL DOUGHTY, ANDY HAMILTON, COREY LICAMELI DIGITAL LOADERS: ANABEL CAICEDO, MATT INFANTE

“WILL & GRACE” SEASON 11 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GARY BAUM, ASC OPERATORS: GLENN SHIMADA, TRAVERS HILL, LANCE BILLITZER, ED FINE ASSISTANTS: ADRIAN LICCIARDI, JEFF GOLDENBERG, ALEC ELIZONDO, CLINT PALMER, JASON HERRING UTILITIES: DANNY LORENZE, SEAN ASKINS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DEREK LANTZ VIDEO CONTROLLER: STUART WESOLIK STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CHRIS HASTON

NETFLIX PRODUCTIOS, LLC

“I AM NOT OKAY WITH THIS” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JUSTIN BROWN OPERATOR: BRICE REID ASSISTANTS: SPENCER GOODALL, ERIC GUERIN, DEVON TAAFFE LOADER: GABRIEL MARCHETTI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: NICOLE GOODE

NICKELODEON

“ALL THAT” SEASON 11 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL FRANKS OPERATORS: BOB MCCALL, JOHN DECHENE, JACK CHISHOLM TECHNO-JIB OPERATOR: ELI FRANKS ASSISTANTS: MEGGINS MOORE, DEREK LANTZ, JOSE GOMEZ DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: GARY TAILLON VIDEO CONTROLLER: BARRY LONG, KEITH ANDERSON

“HENRY DANGER” SEASON 5 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MIKE SPODNIK OPERATORS: TIM HEINZEL, CORY GUNTER, SCOTT OSTERMANN, DANA ROBERT ROSS CAMERA UTILITIES: BILL SEDGWICK, JIM ELLIOTT, DOUG MINGES JIB UTILITY: RYAN ELLIOTT STEADICAM OPERATOR: DANA ROBERT ROSS VIDEO CONTROLLER: JIM AGNOR


NIGHT HOUSE MOVIE, INC. “THE NIGHT HOUSE”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ELISHA CHRISTIAN OPERATORS: JAMES GOLDMAN, ROGER CHINGIRIAN ASSISTANT: JADE BRENNAN STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: BRETT ROEDEL

RYAN GRAVES ASSISTANTS: TYLER DETARSIO, ERIC SCHEINER, NICK MILLER, TAYLOR BEUMEL, YOGI NEELY, THOR FRIDLEIFSSON, DAVE OSTERBERG, JEN WHALEN, CHRIS LEE, RICH SMITH, TERRANCE LOFTON, GERRY LANO, RICARDO PONCE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MARC SURETTE, APPLE SCHLOSSER

NZK PRODUCTIONS

“THE BACHELORETTE” SEASON 15 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DENNIS WEILER, CHAD GRIEPENTROG, ANDRE MARTINEZ LIGHTING DESIGNER: OSCAR DOMINGUEZ OPERATORS: DOUG HENNING, MARK JUNGJOHANN, IVAN DURAN, ANDREW RAKOW JIB OPERATOR: RANDY GOMEZ ASSISTANTS: BRANDON NEELY, TYLER DETARSIO, JERRY HUDGENS, DAVE OSTERBERG, CHRISTOPHER LEE, ERIC SCHEINER, GUDMUNDUR FRIDLEIFSSON, APPLE SCHLOSSER JIB ARM TECH: JORGE VALENZUELA DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MARC SURETTE CAMERA UTILITY: RUBEN SANDOVAL VIDEO CONTROLLER: RICHARD STROCK

“THE BACHELOR IN PARADISE” DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DENNIS WEILER, ANDRE MARTINEZ OPERATORS: MARTIN MOURNO, IVAN DURAN, DOUG HENNING, JEREMY GUY, MARK JUNGJOHANN, TIM STAHL, ANDRE RAKOW, EZRA EPWELL, ERICA SHUSHA, NICK TULLY, JERRY HUDGENS,

OLIVE AVENUE PRODUCTIONS, LLC “CASTLE ROCK” SEASON 2

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: RICHARD RUTKOWSKI, JEFF GREELEY, JOHN LINDLEY, ASC OPERATORS: DENNY KORTZE, LAELA KILBOURN ASSISTANTS: TIMOTHY SWEENEY, ROBERT BULLARD, JASON BRIGNOLA LOADERS: JOSHUA WEILBRENNER, MATTIE HAMER STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: DANA STARBARD

PACIFIC 2.1 ENTERTAINMENT “RATCHED” SEASON 1

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: NELSON CRAGG, III, ASC, SIMON DENNIS, BSC OPERATORS: ANDREW MITCHELL, SOC, ROB GIVENS, MARK LASKOWSKI ASSISTANTS: PENNY SPRAGUE, BEN PERRY, MATT BREWER, JARED WILSON, DAVID LEB, NATE LEWIS, SPENCER SHWETZ, SHANNON VAN METRE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: SAEED ADYANI

PARAMOUNT

“DEFENDING JACOB” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JONATHAN FREEMAN OPERATORS: JASON ELLSON, JODY MILLER, JOHN GARRETT ASSISTANTS: CHAD RIVETTI, M. DEAN EGAN, ZACK SHULTZ, TALIA KROHMAL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: NICK PASQUARIELLO LOADER: THOMAS BELLOTTI STEADICAM OPERATORS: JASON ELLSON, JODY MILLER DIGITAL UTILITY: AUDREY STEVENS STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: SEACIA PAVAO, CLAIRE FOLGER, ROBERT CLARK PUBLICIST: DIANE SLATTERY

“THE BIG RED DOG” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PETER COLLISTER OPERATORS: PETER NOLAN, MICHAEL O’SHEA, JR. ASSISTANTS: A. CHRISTOPHER SILANO, OLGA ABRAMSON, TROY SOLA, EDDIE GOLDBLATT DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: GABE KOLODNY LOADERS: WYATT MAKER, BRITTANY JELINSKI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: K. C. BAILEY PUBLICIST: PETER SILBERMANN

PENNY LANE PRODUCTIONS, LLC

“THE DEUCE” SEASON 3

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: YARON ORBACH OPERATORS: PHILIP MARTINEZ, LUCAS OWEN ASSISTANTS: WARIS SUPANPONG, BECKI HELLER, RANDY SCHWARTZ, NATHALIE RODRIGUEZ

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ASSISTANTS: ADRIANA BRUNETTO-LIPMAN, KEVIN WALTER, AMBER ROSALES, SCOTT MILLER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: PAUL SCHILENS LOADERS: MATT ALBANO, BABETTE JOHNSON STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHELE K. SHORT

REPRISAL 1 PRODUCTIONS, LLC “REPRISAL” SEASON 1

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LARKIN SEIPLE, SHAWN PETERS OPERATORS: GRANT ADAMS, MICHAEL REPETA ASSISTANTS: PATRICK BOROWIAK, DEREK SMITH, ROY KNAUF, DARWIN BRANDIS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ANDY BADER

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SEVENTEEN BRIDGES, LLC “21 BRIDGES”

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DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDREW ROWLANDS OPERATOR: JAMIE SILVERSTEIN ASSISTANTS: DOUG FOOTE, ABNER MEDINA, HILARY BENAS, JORGE DEL TORO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ROBERT STRAIT LOADER: IVANA BERNAL

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SERIAL PICTURES “VOYAGER 2019”

LOADER: BRIAN LYNCH STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL SHIRALDI

“THE AFFAIR” SEASON 5

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: M. DAVID MULLEN, ASC, JEFFERY JUR, ASC OPERATORS: JIM MCCONKEY, SOC, GREG PRICIPATO ASSISTANTS: ANTHONY CAPPELLO, KELLON INNOCENT, NIKNAZ TAVAKOLIAN, JIEUN SHIM DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CHARLES ANDERSON LOADER: KATHERINE RIVERA STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: NICOLE RIVELLI, LESLEY ROBSON-FOSTER, DOUGLAS PURVER

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: STEVEN FIERBERG, ASC, JIM DENAULT, ASC OPERATORS: ERIC SCHILLING, NICOLE LOBELL ASSISTANTS: MICHAEL ENDLER, DON BURGHARDT, RUDY PAHOYO, ROBYN BUCHANAN STEADICAM OPERATOR: ERIC SCHILLING STEADICAM ASSISTANT: MICHAEL ENDLER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: KEVIN CELI LOADER: EMILY GOODWIN DIGITAL UTILITY: GLEN LANDRY TECHNOCRANE OPERATORS: CHAD ESHBAUGH, NAZARIY HATAK TECHNOCRANE TECH: BRIAN LOVE REMOTE HEAD TECH: JAY SHEVECK STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL SARKIS

POSSIBLE PRODUCTIONS

PROMISING YOUNG WOMAN, LLC

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRISTOPHER SOOS OPERATORS: BELA TRUTZ, JOHN CONNOR ASSISTANTS: SARAH BRANDES, ALICIA PHARRIS, DAN SCHROER, LARISSA SUPPLITT DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JAMES PETERSMEYER DIGITAL LOADER: LATERRIAN OFFICER-MCINTOSH DIGITAL UTILITY: TAYLOR KENNEDY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: NICOLE WILDER

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BENJAMIN KRACUN OPERATOR: DANA MORRIS ASSISTANTS: SARAH BRANDES, ROCHELLE BROWN, LA TERRIAN OFFICER-MCINTOSH DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CHASE ABRAMS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MERIE WALLACE PUBLICIST: JAMES FERRERA

PICROW STREAMING, INC.

“THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL” SEASON 3

“KIDDING” SEASON 2

“PROMISING YOUNG WOMAN”

RANDOM PRODUCTIONS, LLC

“THE PLOT AGAINST AMERICA” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MARTIN AHLGREN OPERATORS: STEWART CANTRELL, GARRETT DAVIS

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AUGUST 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SEBASTIAN WINTERO OPERATORS: JOSH MEDAK, VINCENT FOEILLET, DAVID RUDD, BOBBY DEL RUSSO, JOE CICIO, DJ HARDER, NATHAN LEVINE-HEANEY, R. MICHAEL MERRIMAN, MARK GOELLNICHT HOTHEAD OPERATORS: MARK KOONCE, TED ASHTON STEADICAM OPERATORS: DANA MORRIS, HENRY TIRL SPIDERCAM OPERATOR: RANDY GREER, JR. DOCU CAMERA OPERATORS: RICK SIEGEL, JIMMY O’DONNELL, SCOTT MONTGOMERY DRONE PILOT: LUDWIG NORTHERN DRONE TECH: MICHAEL PHILLIPS CO-LEAD ASSISTANTS: DANIEL FERRELL, RYAN GUZDZIAL ASSISTANTS: CONRAD CASTOR, LUCAS DEANS, PAUL SANTONI, NIRANJAN MARTIN, KEVIN ANDERSON, JOHN PARSON, TRAVIS DAKING, LILA BYALL, NATE CUMMINGS, LAURA GOLDBERG, JD MURRAY, PAT MCARDLE, JESSE FAIRLESS, JORDAN PELLEGRINI, ADA NEWELL, JENNA HOFFMAN, KIRA HERNANDEZ, CAM KEIDEL, CARRIE LAZAR, EDGAR GONZALEZ HEAD UTILITY: BOB BENEDETTI UTILITIES: ANTHONY DEFONZO, JIM WASHBURN, BILLY BUTLER, CHARLIE FERNANDEZ, JON ZUCCARO, DUSTN STEPHENS, MIKE VINYARD DIGITAL IMAGING TECHS: ERIC YU, STEVE HARNELL

SHOWTIME PICTURES

“CITY ON A HILL” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOSEPH COLLINS OPERATORS: EDGAR COLON, LAURA HUDOCK ASSISTANTS: ERIC ROBINSON, JOHN REEVES, SARAH SCRIVENER, QUINN MURPHY DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JEFFREY HAGERMAN LOADER: MAX COLLINS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: FRANCISCO ROMAN SANCHEZ

“RAY DONOVAN” SEASON 7 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: RON FORTUNATO, MAURICIO RUBINSTEIN OPERATORS: ERIC SCHILLING, PATRICK QUINN


ASSISTANTS: MICHAEL ENDLER, JUSTIN WHITACRE, JOSHUA WATERMAN, BRIAN GRANT, JR.

SKYDANCE TELEVISION

“GRACE & FRANKIE” SEASON 6 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GALE TATTERSALL, LUKE MILLER OPERATORS: DAN GOLD, BEN SPEK ASSISTANTS: DAVE EGERSTROM, NAOMI VILLANUEVA, DAN URBAIN, DAWN NAKAMURA STEADICAM OPERATOR: BEN SPEK STEADICAM ASSISTANT: NAOMI VILLANUEVA LOADER: NICOLA CARUSO STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: SAEED ADYANI

SQUAHAMISH FILMS, INC. “THE HALF OF IT”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GRETA ZOZULA OPERATOR: KYLE WULLSCHLEGER ASSISTANTS: JON COOPER, SARA BOARDMAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JAIME CHAPIN STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: K.C. BAILEY

SONY

“JEOPARDY!” SEASON 36 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF ENGEL OPERATORS: DIANE L. FARRELL, SOC, MIKE TRIBBLE, JEFF SCHUSTER, L. DAVID IRETE JIB ARM OPERATOR: MARC HUNTER HEAD UTILITY: TINO MARQUEZ CAMERA UTILITY: RAY THOMPSON VIDEO CONTROLLER: GARY TAILLON STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CAROL KAELSON

“WHEEL OF FORTUNE” SEASON 37 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF ENGEL OPERATORS: DIANE L. FARRELL, SOC, JEFF SCHUSTER, RAY GONZALES, STEVE SIMMONS, L. DAVID IRETE, MIKE CORWIN CAMERA UTILITY: RAY THOMPSON HEAD UTILITY: TINO MARQUEZ VIDEO CONTROLLER: GARY TAILLON JIB ARM OPERATOR: RANDY GOMEZ, SR. STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CAROL KAELSON

STALWART FILMS

“LODGE 49” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GLENN BROWN OPERATORS: MICHAEL GFELNER, JAN RUONA ASSISTANTS: JUSTIN DEGUIRE, JOSH GILBERT, TAYLOR CASE, CAMERON SCHWARTZ STEADICAM OPERATOR: GLENN BROWN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: NICK HILTGEN LOADER: DUMAINE BABCOCK STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JACKSON LEE DAVIS

STARS POWER, LLC

“POWER” SEASON 6 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: HERNAN OTANO, MAURICIO RUBINSTEIN OPERATORS: AARON MEDICK, SCOTT MAGUIRE ASSISTANTS: MICHAEL GAROFALO, CHARLIE FOERSCHNER, RODRIGO MILLAN GARCE, ALIVIA BORAB

DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JESSICA TA LOADERS: SCOTT GAROFALO, EVAN WALSH STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MYLES ARONOWITZ

“P-VALLEY” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: NANCY SCHREIBER, ASC, RICHARD VIALET OPERATORS: DAVE CHAMEIDES, JANICE MIN ASSISTANTS: ALAN NEWCOMB, CALLIE MOORE, BRIAN DECROCE, NUBIA RAHIM LOADER: ERIN STRICKLAND DIGITAL UTILITY: CHANDRA SUDTELGTE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: TINA ROWDEN

STARZ P-TOWN PRODUCTIONS, LLC “HIGHTOWN” SEASON 1

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: RADIUM CHEUNG OPERATORS: JUSTIN FOSTER, DAVID KIMELMAN ASSISTANTS: GUS LIMBERIS, GLEN CHIN, JAMES DEMETRIOU, IAN CARMODY LOADERS: CALEN COOPER, CHRISTOPHER CHARMEL STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: WALLY MCGRADY, JOJO WHILDEN, MARK SCHAFER

STILL LIFE PICTURES PRODUCTIONS SERVICES

2ND UNIT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PATRICK O’BRIEN OPERATORS: JAMIE STERBA, MIKE VEJAR, RAY MILAZZO ASSISTANTS: BRAD PETERMAN, MARK CONNELLY, MIKE VEJAR, KEVIN MILES, JOE PROVENZANO, MICHAEL YAEGER, TERRY WOLCOTT DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BRETT SUDING DIGITAL UTILITY: TYLER DENERING

TOPANGA PRODUCTIONS, INC.

“LIVE IN FRONT OF A STUDIO AUDIENCE” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GARY BAUM, ASC PED OPERATORS: RANDY BAER, JON PURDY, JOHN BOYD, RON HIRSHMAN, MARK GONZALEZ, ALLEN MERRIWEATHER JIB OPERATOR: RANDY GOMEZ STEADICAM OPERATORS: ANDREW ANSNICK, KEVIN TOLKAN HEAD UTILITY: SEAN WOODSIDE UTILITIES: JASON HERRING, ZAC JONES, DEREK LANTZ, FRANK MARONSKI, MATT MINKOFF STEADI UTILITIES: KEVIN TOLKAN, BRIAN WINIKOFF VIDEO CONTROLLER: JOHN O’BRIEN

“PAPER SPIDERS”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ZACH KUPERSTEIN OPERATOR: DAVID ISERN ASSISTANTS: MAXIMILLIAN BATCHELDER, JADE BRENNAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: LISA KONECNY

THE 24TH PRODUCTIONS, LLC “THE 24TH”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRETT PAWLAK OPERATORS: JOHN LEHMAN, CHRISTOPHER ARATA ASSISTANTS: EMIL HAMPTON, SAMUEL KIM, DWIGHT CAMPBELL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JASON JOHNSON

THE WATER MAN PRODUCTIONS, LLC “THE WATER MAN”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MATTHEW J. LLOYD OPERATORS: MATT MORIARTY, PHIL ANDERSON ASSISTANTS: KYRIL CVETKOV, JERRY TURNER, MIKE CROCKETT, PATRICK LAVALLEY STEADICAM OPERATOR: MATT MORIARTY STEADICAM ASSISTANT: KYRIL CVETKOV DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: SEAN RAWLS DIGITAL UTILITY: JASMINE KARCEY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: KAREN BALLARD

TNT

“ANIMAL KINGDOM” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LOREN YACONELLI OPERATORS: SCOTT DROPKIN, BROOKS ROBINSON ASSISTANTS: RAY MILAZZO, PATRICK BENSIMMON, BLAKE COLLINS, KIRSTEN LAUBE STEADICAM OPERATOR: SCOTT DROPKIN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JEFFERSON FUGITT DIGITAL UTILITY: GOBE HIRATA STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: EDDY CHEN

TWO NIGHT RENTAL, LLC “THE RENTAL”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRISTIAN SPRENGER OPERATOR: BENJAMIN VERHULST ASSISTANTS: JACQUELINE STAHL, RODRIGO MELGAREJO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CHRIS HOYLE DIGITAL UTILITY: ALISON HOFFMAN STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ALLYSON RIGGS

UNIVERSAL

“MR. ROBOT” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TOD CAMPBELL OPERATORS: JEFF MUHLSTOCK, BRIAN JACKSON ASSISTANTS: ROBERT MANCUSO, WESLEY HODGES, MICHAEL DERARIO, J.R. LARSON STEADICAM OPERATOR: JEFF MUHLSTOCK STEADICAM ASSISTANT: ROBERT MANCUSO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DOUGLAS HORTON LOADERS: AMANDA URIBE, TYLER MANCUSO REMOTE HEAD TECH/OPERATOR: LANCE MAYER

UNTITLED PUPPET SHOW, INC. “UNTITLED PUPPET SHOW”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: FREDERIC FASANO OPERATORS: MARK SPARROUGH, PATRICK MINIETTA JIB ARM OPERATOR: SHAUN HARKINS ASSISTANTS: ANDREW PECK, CHRISTIAN CARMODY DIGITAL UTILITIES: BARBARA BIANCO, CHARLES KEMPF

UPD FILMS, LLC

“STATEN ISLAND AKA UNTITLED JUDD APATOW/PET DAVIDSON PROJECT” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROBERT ELSWIT, ASC OPERATOR: STEPHEN CONSENTINO ASSISTANTS: ROBERT LAU, GRAHAM BURT, SARA MAY GUENTHER, SAMANTHA PANGER

AUGUST 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

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ICG 4.625 x 2.25 Python 2 Marks.pdf

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7/1/19

8:40 AM

CARLIN FILMS

“THE ADVOCATE” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BIANCA CLINE ASSISTANTS: GREG WILLIAMS, MARTY STILES DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MARK WILENKIN

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CAVIAR

“ENDO-FACTSONHANDS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROB HAUER ASSISTANTS: DOUG O’KANE, TOD BOYLE, ANNA JAY STEADICAM OPERATOR: KEVIN ANDREWS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CHRIS NIGHTINGALE BEHIND-THE-SCENES: SEAN ZACCHEO

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“MATCH”

LOADER: CAROLYN WILLS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MARY CYBULSKI PUBLICIST: AMY LEIGH JOHNSON BEHIND-THE-SCENES: JEREMY EMERMAN

COMMERCIALS

WALDO FILM PRODUCTIONS LLC

“PANDA EXPRESS”

“WALDO”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LYLE VINCENT OPERATOR: TIM FABRIZIO ASSISTANTS: RICHARD LACY, STERLING HIGGINS, TOM HUTCHINSON, GRIFFIN MCCANN DIGITAL LOADER: NICK YOUNG CAMERA UTILITY: ENRIQUE FERNANDEZ-BRAVO STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MURRAY CLOSE

WARNER BROS

“IN THE HEIGHTS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ALICE BROOKS OPERATORS: MARK SCHMIDT, PETER AGLIATA ASSISTANTS: BASIL SMITH, GAVIN FERNANDEZ, MARVIN LEE, CAROLINE IBARRA DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BJORN JACKSON LOADER: TANEICE MCFADDEN STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MACALL POLAY PUBICIST: FRANCES FIORE BEHIND-THE-SCENES: KALIYA WARREN

“SPACE JAM 2” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRADFORD YOUNG, ASC OPERATOR: KRISTEN CORRELL ASSISTANTS: JOHN WOODWARD, DANIEL WURSCHL, SERGE NOFIELD, ROCHELLE BROWN LOADER: RIO NOEL ZUMWALT DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MATTHEW LOVE DIGITAL UTILITY: E.J. DICKERSON STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JONNY COURNOYER

ANONYMOUS CONTENT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DAMIAN ACEVEDO OPERATOR: MAGNUS PERSSON ASSISTANTS: CLINT KASPARIAN, LORENZO PORRAS, CHRIS DE LA RIVA DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: STEVE HARNELL

ART & SCIENCES “SAMSUNG”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SEAN MEEHAN ASSISTANTS: CHRIS TOLL, TERRY WOLCOTT, ROGER WALL, JAJAIRA CORRIA STEADICAM OPERATOR: MARK GOELLNICHT DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: STEVE HARNELL

BELIEVE MEDIA “OLAY”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: FRANCK TYMEZUK ASSISTANTS: ROBERT RAGOZZINE, DAN KECK STEADICAM OPERATOR: TANNER CARLSON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: GEORGE ROBERT MORSE

BISCUIT

“FOX SPORTS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: OLIVER MILLAR ASSISTANTS: NICK TIMMONS, TOSHIRO YAMAGUCHI, RYAN NOCELLA, WILL POWELL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TIFFANY ARMOUR

“SHERWIN WILLIAMS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JON CHEMA ASSISTANTS: TROY DICKERSON, ROBIN PABELLO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ROHAM RAHMANIAN REMOTE HEAD TECH/OPERATOR: JAMES FAVAZZO

“STEP INSIDE” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROBBY BAUMGARTNER OPERATORS: CHRIS RAYMOND, JOHN INWOOD ASSISTANTS: GAVIN FERNANDEZ, CHRIS ENG, CAI HALL, CAROLINE IBARRA, KATE KENNEDY DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MARIUSZ CICHON

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AUGUST 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TOM SIGEL, ASC OPERATORS: CARY LALONDE, SCOTT SAKAMOTO, SOC ASSISTANTS: MICAH BISAGNI, DAN SCHROER, KYMM SWANK CAMERA UTILITY: MICHAEL LUNTZEL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: RYAN NGUYEN

“OMAHA 20” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TOM SIGEL, ASC OPERATOR: CARY LALONDE ASSISTANTS: MICAH BISAGNI, ERIK STAPELFELDT, KYMM SWANK, DAISY SMITH, MICHAEL LUNTZEL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: RYAN NGUYEN

CHROMISTA

“DRIP DROP” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JULIE KIRKWOOD ASSISTANT: RENE VARGAS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BRET SUDING PHANTOM TECH: MATT DRAKE

CMS PRODUCTIONS

“COMPARE THE MARKET” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MISCHA LLUCH ASSISTANTS: DENNIS ROGERS, ROBBIE JULIAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TIM ERICKSON

“SHISEIDO” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BENOIT DELHOMME ASSISTANTS: PETER MORELLO, NATE MCGARIGAL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JEFF FLOHR

DUMMY

“LIBERTY MUTUAL” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JAY FEATHER ASSISTANTS: LILA BYALL, KIRA HERNANDEZ DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MICHAEL BORENSTEIN

EAJ PRODUCTIONS

“CASINO CASH VIP” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DOUG CHAMBERLAIN OPERATOR: JEROME FAUCI ASSISTANTS: CHRISTIAN SHONTS, MONICA BARRIOS STEADICAM OPERATOR: JEROME FAUCI

FRAMESTORE PICTURES

“FINAL FANTASY SHADOWBRINGER” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ERIC TREML


ICG Ad Ergorig v6.3.pdf

1

6/28/19

1:32 PM

OPERATOR: GRANT ADAMS ASSISTANTS: MICHAEL ASHE, DAISY SMITH, LOUIS MASSOURAS, MICHAEL TROBISCH DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: SCOTT STEPHENS

FURLINED

“FARMERS INSURANCE” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF CUTTER OPERATORS: ERIC LEACH, TOBIN OLDACH, IAN CLAMPETT ASSISTANTS: DANIEL HANYCH, JOSH GREER, JORDAN PELLEGRINI DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOHN SPELLMAN

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“SUMMER OFJEEP FEATURING JEREMY RENNER” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JORDAN LEVY OPERATORS: DENNIS NOYES, JEREMIAH PITMAN, VINCENT FOEILLET ASSISTANTS: CHRIS GEUKENS, LEO ABRAHAM, JASON WITTENBERG, GENNA PALERMO, LOGAN TURNER, VANESSA WARD STEADICAM OPERATOR: DENNIS NOYES DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BEN MOLYNEUX TECHNOCRANE OPERATOR: NAZARIY HATAK REMOTE HEAD TECH/OPERATOR: JAY SHEVECK

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2ND UNIT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ADAM FRISCH ASSISTANT: THANE CHARACKY

HUNGRY MAN “GOOGLE”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ADAM BECKMAN OPERATOR: TOBIN OLDACH ASSISTANTS: JOHN PARSON, GARRET CURTIS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: STEVE HARNELL

“VERIZON”

IMPERIAL WOODPECKER “EE”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROBERT RAGOZZINE ASSISTANT: DAN KECK DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: GEORGE ROBERT MORSE

JOLLY FARMER, LLC “ROAD”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ALEX DYNAN ASSISTANTS: JOHN CLEMENS, MITCH MALPICA DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOE BELACK

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: AUTUMN DURALD OPERATORS: ANDREW FLETCHER, MICHAEL FUCHS, GERARD SAVA, CHRIS REYNOLDS, CHRISTINE NG, ARTHUR AFRICANO ASSISTANTS: BRADEN BELMONTE, BRADLEY GRANT, RORY HANRAHAN, GAVIN FERNANDEZ, WALTER RODRIGUEZ, BEKA VENEZIA, BRENDAN RUSSELL, MABEL SANTOS HAUGEN, ANDY HENSLER, MATT DEGREFF, SAM ELLIOT LOADERS: CARRIE WILLS, CHRIS CHAVES, SACHI BAHRA

“COACH”

LITTLE MINX

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOSH KRASZEWSKI OPERATOR: DAVID GORN ASSISTANTS: EMMA HING, CHEVY ANDERSON, DANIEL CARDENAS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: HUNTER FAIRSTONE

ICONOCLAST

“CALVIN KLEIN 2”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LARKIN SEIPLE OPERATOR: STANLEY FERNANDEZ ASSISTANTS: ZACH RUBIN, CHRIS ENG, CHRIS CAFARO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: KAZ KARAISMAILOGLU

“DICK’S SPORTING GOODS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: KAI SAUL ASSISTANTS: DIONA MAVIS, JESSICA RAMOS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: FREDDY FERNANDEZ

LONDON ALLEY

“AMAZON JONAS BROTHERS/SOCIAL CONCEPTS SHOOT” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROB WITT OPERATOR: IAN CLAMPETT ASSISTANTS: LUCAS DEANS, CAMERON KEIDEL, NATE CUMMINGS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: FABRICIO DISANTO

MAGGIE DOG, LLC “GEICO BOAT”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MEHRAN SALAMATI OPERATOR: JEFF SCHMALE ASSISTANTS: DARIN NECESSARY, MARCO BARTKOWIAK, KYLE SAUER TECHNOCRANE OPERATORS: BRIAN LOVE, CHARLES ESHBAU REMOTE HEAD TECH/OPERATOR: JAY SHEVECK, NAZARIY HATAK

MJZ

“DAIRY QUEEN” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEANNE VIENNE ASSISTANTS: NINA CHIEN, MITCH MALPICA DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: GEORGE ROBERT MORSE PHANTOM OPERATOR: STEVE ROMANO

AUGUST 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

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“WALMART” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GYULA PADOS ASSISTANTS: PAUL SANTONI, NOAH THOMSON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MICHELE DELORIMIER

MOVING PARTS “NBC NASCAR”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ERIC SCHMIDT OPERATOR: JEROME FAUCI ASSISTANTS: DANIEL HANYCH, FRANZI LEWIS, AKE BUTLER STEADICAM OPERATOR: JEROME FAUCI STEADICAM ASSISTANT: FRANZI LEWIS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JASON JOHNSON

MTV

“VMA’S” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MATTHEW WOOLF OPERATOR: HEATHER BROWN ASSISTANT: LUCAS DEANS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MICHAEL KOWALCZYK

NATIVE CONTENT

“HEAD & SHOULDERS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PIETER VERMEER ASSISTANTS: SCOTT KASSENOFF, MILES CUSTER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: STEVE HARNELL

“QUICKEN LOANS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROB HAUER ASSISTANT: JENNIFER GALIPAULT DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JON MCARDLE MOVI OPERATOR: JUSTIN MARX

OVERSCENE

“SOURPATCH KID” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROB WITT ASSISTANTS: LUCAS DEANS, EDGAR GONZALEZ, NATE CUMMINGS, JOHN PARSON STEADICAM OPERATOR: XAVIER THOMPSON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TYSON BIRMANN

PICROW, INC.

SOMOROFF STUDIOS

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ERIC SCHMDIT ASSISTANTS: LILA BYALL, KIRA HERNANDEZ DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOHN SPELLMAN

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL SOMOROFF ASSISTANT: TOM BRACONE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DAVID BERMAN PHANTOM TECH: STEVE ROMANO

“DIRECT AUTO”

RATTLE STICK

SPEARS & ARROWS

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ADAM ARKAPAW OPERATOR: JOSH MEDAK ASSISTANTS: LUCAS DEANS, NICOLE MARTINEZ, EDGAR GONZALEZ, LORNA LESLIE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ADRIAN JEBEF

“ENTERMANN’S”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDY LILIEN ASSISTANTS: ADAM MILLER, JEFF TAYLOR DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MARIUSZ CICHON

“REALTOR.COM”

“MOTOROLA” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: KAI SAUL ASSISTANTS: NICOLAS MARTIN, ALAN CERTEZA UTILITY: JACK NITZ

RACOUS

STATION FILM

“ESPN SEC NETWORK”

“SPONGEBOB”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRYCE FORTNER ASSISTANTS: CHRIS LYMBERIS, CHRISTIAN SHONTS, MONICA BARRIOS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: LEONARD MAZZONE

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOE DESALVO ASSISTANTS: CHEVY ANDERSON, KYLE PARSONS

SUPREME “TRUTH”

SAMM MEDIA “AAG”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID MORRISON ASSISTANTS: LAURA GOLDBERG, ERIC MATOS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: SCOTT BECKLEY

SANCTUARY CONTENT “CITIZENS BANK”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ALLISON ANDERSON ASSISTANTS: MEGAERA STEPHENS, FILIPP PENSON, DANIEL CARDENAS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TOM WONG STEADICAM OPERATOR: YOUSHENG TANG

SEEKER PRODUCTIONS

“ZARA MEN’S FW 2019”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF POWERS ASSISTANTS: JARED WENNBERG, JOSH VANDERMEER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TIM GAER

SIBLING RIVALRY

PSYOP

“BEST BUY” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: NATALIE KINGSTON OPERATOR: PIERCE ROBINSON ASSISTANTS: MELISSE SPORN, CHARLES BAE, MATTHEW BOREK, SEATON TROTTER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MICHAEL BORENSTEIN STEADICAM OPERATOR: ANDREW BETHKE

AUGUST 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

STARDUST

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ARNAU VALLS ASSISTANTS: ETHAN MCDONALD, MARCUS DEL NEGRO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: IAN SPOHR

“TOYOTA”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ELIE SMOLKIN ASSISTANTS: RYAN HOGUE, CRAIG SAMUELS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MICHAEL BORENSTEIN

“RED LOBSTER”

“HARLEY-DAVIDSON”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BENOIT DELHOMME ASSISTANTS: PETER MORELLO, BRETT WALTERS, NATE MCGARIGAL STEADICAM OPERATOR: YOUSHENG TANG DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JEFF FLOHR TECHNOCRANE TECH: PAUL GOROFF LIBRA HEAD TECH: MIKE INDURSKY

“DELTA DENTAL”

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RADICAL MEDIA

“CADILLAC XTCT” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PETE KONCZAL OPERATOR: R. MICHAEL MERRIMAN ASSISTANTS: ERIC SMITH, LOGAN HALL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: STEVEN HARNELL

“LEXUS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PETE KONCZAL ASSISTANTS: ERIC SMITH, STEPHEN LING DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: STEVE HARNELL EXO CAMERA OPERATOR: CHRISTIAN HURLEY REMOTE HEAD TECH: CHRIS DICKSON

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GILES DUNNING OPERATOR: JOHN VELETA ASSISTANTS: NITO SERNA, NOAH GLAZER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: SCOTT BECKLEY

THE CORNER SHOP “WYNN”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TRENT OPALOCH ASSISTANTS: TAYLOR MATHESON, JAN BURGESS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TED VIOLA CRANE TECH: BRADY WESTON REMOTE HEAD TECH: MIKE INDURSKY

THE RESERVE “FORD”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MATTHIAS KOENIGSWIESER OPERATOR: GARRETT BENSON ASSISTANTS: SHAUN MAYOR, JOHN RUIZ, GEORGE HESSE, JORDAN MARTIN STEADICAM OPERATOR: CHRIS CUNNINGHAM DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ELI BERG

TOMORROW “SUBWAY”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TIM HUDSON ASSISTANTS: ERIK STAPELFELDT, DAISY SMITH DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ERIC YU

TOOL OF NORTH AMERICA “RIDE WITH PRIDE PSA”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: HAROLD SKINNER ASSISTANT: PAUL TOOMEY DRONE OPERATOR: ZIV MAROM DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ROBBIE JULIAN


“UBER” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: NIC RESTREPO ASSISTANT: JILL TUFTS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: LEONARD MAZZONE

YARD DOG

“HOME DEPOT” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BIANCA CLINE ASSISTANTS: GREG WILLIAMS, MARTIN STILES DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MARK WILENKIN

YELLA

“INSTAGRAM” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROB WITT ASSISTANTS: LUCAS DEANS, CAMERON KEIDEL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: FABRICIO DISANTO

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ARRI 7 BACKSTAGE EQUIPMENT 88 BAND PRO 100 B&H THE STUDIO 90 BLACKMAGIC 15 CHAPMAN LEONARD 11 CINE GEAR EXPO ATLANTA 4 CINEMA DEVICES 95 CINEMOVES 9 CL ENTERPRISES 13 COOKE OPTICS 23 ECA AWARDS 99 GFORCE GRIPS 94 IBC 84 IDX 91 IMAGINE PRODUCTS 20 JVC 17 K5600 65 KINO FLO 61 LEITZ 19 LITEGEAR 67 LYNX 92 RED 5 SCHNEIDER OPTICS 89 TERADEK 2&3 TORONTO FILM FESTIVAL 85 UNIVERSAL/CINEO LIGHTING 20 ZEISS 27

URL

WWW.ARRI.COM/SKYLINK WWW.BACKSTAGEWEB.COM WWW.BANDPRO.COM WWW.BANDH.COM/THESTUDIO WWW.BLACKMAGICDESIGN.COM WWW.CHAPMAN-LEONARD.COM WWW.CINEGEAREXPO.COM WWW.CINEMADEVICES.COM WWW.CINEMOVES.COM WWW.SPACECAM.COM WWW.COOKEOPTICS.COM WWW.ECAWARD.NET WWW.GFORCEGRIPS.COM WWW.IBC.ORG WWW.IDXTEK.COM WWW.IMAGINEPRODUCTS.COM WWW.JVC.COM WWW.K5600.COM WWW.KINOFLO.COM WWW.LEITZ-CINE.COM WWW.LITEGEAR.COM/SPECTRUM WWW.LYNX-USA.COM WWW.RED.COM WWW.SCHNEIDEROPTICS.COM WWW.RT.TERADEK.COM WWW.TIFF.COM WWW.CINEOLIGHTING.COM WWW.ZEISS.COM/CIME/SUPREMEPRIME

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EAST COAST & EUROPE (818) 767-6528

ALAN BRADEN INC. Alan Braden Tel: (818) 850-9398 Email: alanbradenmedia@gmail.com

AUGUST 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

97


STOP MOTION //

ACROSS 1 THE A IN AI 7 AKA DRONE 9 LIGHT BEAM 10 ___ __ 8KS35, 2 WORDS 11 SHOW FOR BROADCAST ENGINEERS AND TECHNICIANS, ABBR. 13 CINE___ CABLE AND SATELLITE TV NETWORK 14 THEY’VE INTRODUCED A NEW STREAMING SERVICE WHICH COSTS HALF OF NETFLIX’S BASE PLAN PER YEAR 17 BROADCAST 19 AUGMENTED REALITY, ABBR. 21 ENDING FOR EAST AND WEST 22 IT’S USED TO REFERENCE HAZARDOUS OR TOXIC CHEMICALS/ SUBSTANCES THAT MAY BE USED ON SET 24 LOUDSPEAKER SYSTEM 25 SONY’S CAMERA SIMULATOR 28 STILL POPULAR IN HIGH END AND PROFESSIONAL CAMERAS 30 __ PRODUCTION 31 SOFTWARE TOOLSET WITHIN CODEX DEVICE MANAGER, ABBR. 32 ____ LOCAL 80, ON THE FOREFRONT OF INDUSTRY SAFETY 33 IN THE __, READY TO BE BROADCAST OR RELEASED 34 ASPECT ___ 35 CAMBRIDGE UNIV. 36 PEOPLE OF EXCEPTIONAL INTELLECT 38 SEE 1 DOWN 40 GPS SUGGESTION, ABBR. 41 POPULAR SMALL GIMBAL RIG FOR MOVING CAMERAS 43 BEAT 46 BASIC VERSION, ABBR. 47 MACHINE LEARNING SUBJECT, ABBR. 48 NO IN A BOND FILM 49 ___ LINGUS (IRISH AIRLINE) 51 COMPANY THAT HAS PLAYED A KEY ROLE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF HDR 52 DUAL LAYER ___ PANELS, NEW DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY REPLACING OLED ___ AU G USAFETY S T 201 9 APP, IMPORTANT IN THE GUILD’S PUSH FOR SAFER SETS 9853

DOWN 1 CAPTURE SYSTEM FOR A LEADING BRAND CAMERA WHICH YIELDS LARGE AMOUNTS OF DATA, GOES WITH 38 ACROSS 2 TV MORNING SHOW 3 DANGEROUS METHOD OF SHOOTING IN MOVING VEHICLES, 2 WORDS 4 FILM REVIEWERS’ SHOWINGS 5 MILITARY FORCES AS SEEN IN MANY EPICS 6 HOLLYWOOD’S HOME 8 ARRI ___ MINI LF (SMALL CAMERA WITH A LARGE FORMAT SENSOR) 11 ARTS DEGREE 12 BIG NAME IN WIRELESS LENS CONTROL 15 __LUSIVITY, AKA USING DIVERSE CREWS 16 QB’S GAINS 18 IT’S REPLACING SDI IN THE BROADCAST WORLD 20 PLEASURE VEHICLE, FOR SHORT 21 INSIDE, PREFIX 23 LIVE HDR, 3 WORDS 26 THE E IN EOTF 27 NYC TIME 29 THE S IN SDI 30 APPLE ___ (HIGH QUALITY VIDEO COMPRESSION FORMAT) 31 ____ 2.1, NEW STANDARD THAT NEARLY TRIPLES BANDWIDTH 37 “___ BLUE” FORMER TV SHOW 39 THE W IN WCG 41 MINE, IN ITALIAN 42 YALE OR HARVARD, E.G. 44 DOT-COM’S ADDRESS 45 BLUE 47 SUPER BOWL SPOT 50 PROVIDENCE’S STATE PUZZLE BY MYLES MELLOR


EMERGING CINEMATOGRAPHER AWARDS 2019

LOS ANGELES OCT. 6 NEW YORK CITY OCT. 27 ATLANTA NOV. 3 CHICAGO NOV. 3 WWW.ECAWARDS.NET #ECAWARDS

Event Sponsorships IngleDodd Media - ECAwards@IngleDodd.com - 310.207.4410 pictured: 2018 ECA Honoree Alicia Robbins


Profile for ICG Magazine

ICG Magazine - August 2019 - The Product Guide  

Filmmaking magazine featuring Lion King, Succession, Annual Product Guide and more. ICG Magazine has been the world’s premier cinematography...

ICG Magazine - August 2019 - The Product Guide  

Filmmaking magazine featuring Lion King, Succession, Annual Product Guide and more. ICG Magazine has been the world’s premier cinematography...