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Fit for 2020 The new Cleanness for Wat

& Hygiene Concept

Sakaeo Orphanage

On behalf of The ICEMAN CHARITY Volker Capito / Johannes Strasser / Chartchai Thammikakun April 2016


Preface After Volker Kevin Capito had supported the Wat Sakaeo Orphanage by providing rice and donations in kind for over twelve years, the Iceman Charity was established. The Iceman Charity is not a registered charity, but rather a personal mission undertaken by Volker Capito, together with his friends and business partners, to support the children at the orphanage. The Iceman Charity still concerns itself primarily with buying rice for daily meals; however, over the last few years enough money has been raised through sponsors to enable the charity to widen its activities to include improving living standards for the children living at the orphanage. Over the last few years, more than 300,000 € has been spent on furnishings and renovation works or planned renovation works. Detailed information about this can be found at www.icemancharity.com. Last year a total of 150,000 € was invested in the renovation of two buildings for boys. Despite careful consideration and planning about how best to use the sponsorship funds, it was ascertained just a few months after the renovation work was completed that the funds had not been used sustainably enough. The Iceman Charity attributes this to insufficient cleaning and hygiene provisions, as well as inadequate control over the correct use of fixtures and fittings. For this reason a set amount of money was then put aside to develop a new cleaning and hygiene concept. In order to implement this comprehensive concept as costeffectively as possible, student Johannes Strasser was engaged as a volunteer to help with the project. In addition, the company Kärcher Thailand agreed to support the project and help with implementation. The following report first details the existing shortcomings so that all the changes can be followed and to allow better understanding of the importance of the new cleanliness and hygiene plan. Furthermore, the report also puts forward a new cleaning concept for the orphanage. The new cleaning concept is based on recommendations and guidelines from international health organisations. It has been adapted to meet the needs of the temple and its feasibility has been tested by the report’s author. First and foremost, the recommendations from the Iceman Charity serve to prepare the Wat Sakaeo orphanage for Thailand’s imminent implementation of health and hygiene guidelines for public facilities. These guidelines are already applied in hotels and tourist facilities, hospitals, international companies and other public areas that are also regularly controlled by the Thai health authority. It is therefore only a question of time before these guidelines are also generally implemented in all such facilities.


The prompt implementation of our recommendations will allow the orphanage to prepare itself both financially and practically for future changes. Furthermore, sponsors of the Iceman Charity expect funds to be used in a more efficient and sustainable way in the future. If this is not the case, the sponsors will drastically cut their sponsorship.

Volker Capito The Iceman


Contents

1. Wat Sakeo description ……………………………………………………………

3

1.1 Wat Sakeo orphanage facilities ……………………………………..…………

4

1.2 Nursery ……………………………………………………………………………

4

1.3 Boys’ area …………………………………………………………………..….…

5

1.4 Girls’ area …………………………………………………………………….……

5

1.5 Kitchen ………………………………………………………………………..……

6

1.6 Canteen ………………………………………………………………...………….

6

2. Organisation of the children (Table)…………………………………….…...…… 7 3. General condition …………………………………………………………...............

8

3.1 Nursery (K1, K2, KW) ………………………………………………...................

8

3.2 Boys’ area …………………………………………………………………............ 20 3.3 Girls’ area ………………………………………………………………………….. 60 3.4 Kitchen and canteen ……………………………………………………………… 96 3.5 Summary …………………………………………………………………………... 103 3.6 Conclusion …………………………………………………………………………

104

4. Hygiene plan framework ……………………………………………………………

105

4.1 Introduction …………………………………………………………………..........

105

4.2 Hygiene management ……………………………………………………… ……

106

4.3 Basic hygiene ……………………………………………………………………..

107

4.3.1 Hygiene requirements………………………………………………………

107

4.4 Cleaning and disinfection …………………………………………….................

108

4.5 4.4.1 Hand hygiene ………………………………………………..………..……

109

4.5.1 Floors, other surfaces and objects ………....…................... ……………

111

4.5.2 Clothing, laundry hygiene ……………………………....……..…………..

113

4.6 Handling foodstuffs ……………………………………………………………….

114

4.7 Other hygiene requirements …………………………………...........................

115


4.7.1 Waste disposal …………………………………………….............

115

4.6.1 Keeping of animals…………………………………………...........

115

4.7.2 Preventive pest control……………………………………………..

116

4.7.3 Preventing risks from toxic plants………………...……………….

116

4.7.4 Drinking water……………………………………………………….

118

4.7.5 Water fountains and discovery areas……………………………..

118

4.7.6 Sandpit……………………………………………………………….

119

4.7.7 First aid………………………………………………………………

119

4.7.8 Recommended measures against infection……………………..

120

4.7.9 Childcare, educational professionals and supervisory staff……... 120 4.7.10 Children, teenagers…………………………………………………. 120 5. New cleaning structures…………………………………………………….. 121 5.1 Overview…………………………………………………………………….. 122 5.1.2 Fields of responsibility for carers (caretakers)/facility managers.. 125 5.1.3 Duties of Team 2 Clean children ………………………………….. 127 5.2

New organisation of the children’s daily routine……………………… 128

5.3

Reward or punishment in cases of noncompliance………………… 5.3.1 Reward

………………………………………………………….

129 131

5.3.1 Punishment………………………………………………………….

132

5.4 Daily cleaning plan………………………………………………………..

133

…………………………..

135

………………………………………………….

135

5.5 Weekly/monthly/yearly cleaning plans 5.5.1 Weekly tasks

5.5.2 Monthly cleaning plan…………………………………………….…… 135 5.5.3 Every two months……………………………………………………

136

5.5.4 Every four months (coinciding with beginning of school year in May)… 5.5.5 Once during the school year (at the end of the school year)……. 136 5.5.6 Kitchen and canteen………………………………………………… 137 5.6 The six golden rules……………………………………………………….

138

5.6.1 Six golden rules for general cleaning………………………………. 138

136


5.6.2 Six golden rules for cleaning bathrooms and toilets …………….. 138 5.6.3 Six golden rules for cleaning the kitchens ……………………….. 139 5.7 Additional cleaning personnel …………………………………………… 140 ………………………………………………………….

140

………………………………….

141

6.1 Children…………………………………………………………………….

141

6.2 Carers ……………………………………………………………………...

142

6.3 Facility manager …………………………………………………………

142

5.8 Volunteers

6. Communication within the community

6.4 Secular committee (people) ……………………………………………… 142 6.5 Monks ………………………………………………………………………. 142 6.6 Sponsors/contributors……………………………………………………... 143 6.7 Consultants …………………………………………………………………. 144 7. Damage ………………………………………………………………………………. 145 7.1.1 Damage caused during play……………………………………….. 145 7.1.2 Damage caused due to incorrect use

……………………. 146

7.1.3 Deliberate damage/vandalism …………………………….............. 149 7.2 Measurable extent of detected damage ………………………………... 150 7.3 Measures taken to prevent damage……………………………………... 150 7.4 Communication prohibits damage and vandalism

…………………… 152

8. Carers ………………………………………………………………………………

153

8.1 Possible solutions to problems……………………………………….……. 154 8.1.1 Clear job definition ……………………………………………. ……. 154 8.1.2 Areas of responsibility ………………………………………………. 154 8.2 Sanctions …………………………………………………………………..

155

8.2.1 Motivating carers ……………………………………………………. 155 9. Implementation of timeframe…………………………………………………….. 158 9.1 Phase 1 (Immediate implementation, with budget if necessary)……… 158 9.2 Phase 2 Extended implementation (budget necessary)…………. …… 158 9.3 Phase 3 Investment (a budget is necessary here)…………………….. 159


9.4 Implementation with sponsors……………………………………………... 159 9.5 Information signs………………………………………………………......

160

9.5.1 Information boards (blackboard)……………………………….. 160 9.5.2 Information signs…………………………………………………... 160 10. Appendix ……………………………………………………………………………. 161


Wat Sakaew Temple Thailand

1. Wat Sakaeo description

Die Wat Sakaeo temple complex was founded as an orphanage in 1942 by Luang (poor father) Chapat and then housed ten children. Today it is more than 2,400. The Wat Sakaeo temple is situated in the administrative district of Central Thailand and is around 80 kilometres away from the Thai capital Bangkok. For believers, the temple forms a Buddhist centre under the leadership of Abt Prof. Dr. B.A., M.A., Ph.D, Pramaha Phairoh Kritsanavadea. The orphanage is under the control of the actual temple in which 2,446 children are currently accommodated. The children range in age from 3 to 19 years. It is not only orphans who can find refuge in the temple but also children from very socially deprived families and also difficult children. The social facility houses children from all over Thailand, although the majority of children originate from the socially more deprived north of Thailand. In addition to the possibility of living here the children can also attend the state kindergarten and the state school in Wat Sakaeo in order to receive a decent basic education. At the state-aided school the children are taught in all obligatory subjects by official teachers during their entire time at school. Apart from sporting activities, in their free time the children have the option of extending their school knowledge. They learn languages such as English and Chinese at weekend courses or can extend their knowledge in science. This is regarded as a big benefit for the children for which the Wat Sakaeo School stands out from other state schools. The overall facility includes the temple (monks only), the children’s accommodation with a canteen and a kitchen, medical facilities, the kindergarten and the school as well as a gymnasium and a sports field.

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


1.1. Wat Sakaeo Orphanage Facilities

The facility is divided into a boys’ area, girls’ area, the kindergarten and the kitchen and canteen area. In addition, there is a visitors wing* for sponsors and friends with its own toilet block* and coffeehouse*.

The following demonstrates how the individual areas are structured, how the children live there and how the kitchen and canteen area look. It is intended that the reader, who cannot be on-site, is given an explanatory picture.

1.2. Children’s house There is a children’s house area within the facility for children from three years upwards. The children live there in two buildings in which they can sleep and play. In addition, the children’s house has a toilet block and a washing area (large washbasin for all). In the walled-in children’s facility with the accommodation there is also a playground (soft sand ground) with a roundabout, swings, a climbing frame and slides. The apparatus was set up by the Iceman Charity in 2014.

There is also a further play area below the childcare house (with shade) and an open area.

Simple toys are available. This is dependent on donations. Not all apparatus therefore corresponds to normal health regulations.

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


1.3. Boys’ area

The boys’ area consists of four two-storey houses in a walled-in facility. Boys House 5 is separate. The boys sleep or spend their free time here in the big inner courtyard. The courtyard offers little shade (it is not roofed over) and can therefore only be used to a limited extent on hot sunny days.

In addition, the boys’ area has large communal toilets and washrooms and also a drinking water dispenser.

1.4. Girls area

The girls’ area consists of a large main house with three storeys and three further, smaller houses, in which the girls live and sleep.

Below the big house there is a roofed-over area which offers the opportunity of being outdoors on hot and sunny days.

The main house is divided into six living areas (two living areas per floor), each with a washing and toilet area. There is also a large communal washing area outside with three large washbasins and a separate washing area for the two smaller houses.

There is a separate drinking water facility with a drinking water dispenser for the girls’ area.

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


1.5. Kitchen

Seven people cook for over 2,400 children in the main kitchen. The kitchen is subdivided into two sections. Food is prepared in the first section (cutting vegetables, peeling eggs etc.). There is a small, modern cold store. The food is cooked in the second section. There are big rice cookers and gas cooking zones for other dishes in this area.

The kitchen was completed in 2015 and created in accordance with modern, ecological principles. The gas required for cooking is mainly obtained from the decomposition gases of food leftovers.

1.6. Canteen

The canteen has enough space for all 2,446 children (boys and girls separately) and they are served breakfast, lunch and an evening meal here.

There are four water dispensers where the children can obtain drinking water. (Thai standard, which has not yet been realised in all state schools)

After meals each child has to wash up their plate, cup and cutlery in the stainless steel washing up sinks (the plate, cups and cutlery are kept separately by each child in their accommodation).

During meals, there are at least three adults in the canteen to help the children if necessary.

Meals are normally served by older children, or on days on which sponsors have borne the cost of the meal, by the visitors / sponsors. There are no hygiene regulations regarding serving meals.

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


2.

Distribution of the children (Table)

boys

girls

age

Kindergarten

40

3-5

Boys House 1.2

120

14-15

Boys House 2.1

60

16-17

Boys House 2.2

100

10

Sanitary facilities 2/3

sanitary

housing

60

183 605

40

587 627

326

Boys House 3.1

60

13-14

609

Boys House 3.2

89

11-14

609

Boys House 4.2

40

16-19

200

Sanitary facilities 4/1

254

Boys House 5.1

70

6-15

252

Boys House 5.2

70

6-15

252

Sanitary facilities 5

140

Girls House 1.1 Left living area

84

3-16

120

240

Girls House 1.1 Right living area

86

5-18

120

240

Girls House 1.2 Left living area

83

3-18

120

240

Girls House 1.2 Right living area

67

5-17

120

240

Girls House 1.3 Left living area

71

3-18

120

240

Girls House 1.3 Right living area

67

5-18

120

240

Outside Sanitary Facilities Girls House 1

414

Girls House 2.2 (Nalin House)

66

3-18

Girls House 3.1(Alice House)

92

5-18

Outside Sanitary Facilities Girls House 3

224

930 133

Girls House 4

110

13-19

215

Kitchen area

1818 407

Canteen

2,275

Total number of children

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406

649

726

2,526 m²

HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)

10,200 m²


3. General condition 3.1. Kindergarten (K1, K2, KW)

Concrete house with concrete floor, no air conditioning, open windows.

Apparently the floor in the living and storage area is cleaned regularly but windows, fans and cupboard neglected. Generally, the floor is too dirty for children playing on it.

Dirty fan

Condition of the windows

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Dirty window grille

Dirt-encrusted floor of the sleeping area

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


The drinking water dispenser is absolutely filthy, covered in limescale, mouldy and full of algae.

Heavily contaminated drinking water dispenser

Algae formation below the drinking water dispenser

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Dog excrement is often to be found in the outside area because the dogs are in this area day and night.

Dog excrement in the middle of the play area

The state of the toilets does not correspond to hygienic guidelines. Rubbish lies in the toilets and broken plastic water containers for cleaning.

Toilet with broken water container

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Filthy toilet filled with rubbish

The water basin was completely cleaned in March 2014 with a high-pressure cleaner and all algae removed from the pool. Apparently the pool has not been cleaned properly again since so that algae have formed again. The water quality does not correspond to the hygiene regulations as it is apparently used for several days.

Pool full of algae

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


The damaged roof no longer offers protection from the sun and therefore encourages the formation of algae.

Seriously damaged roof

Most cleaning equipment is defective or worn out. The cleaning device obtained in March appears so far not to have been replaced.

Antiquated cleaning equipment

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


In the storage area where bedding is stored during the day a sick dog was lying on one of the shelves and had contact with bedding and towels.

Dog on shelf next to bedding

Storage of bedding and pillows during the day

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


For the overall cleaning of the kindergarten it would be beneficial if the floor in the first outdoor area could be tiled.

Condition of the floor

Heavily worn floor in front of the rooms

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Generally it can be assumed that inadequate hygiene is the reason for the frequently seen skin rashes.

The dripping tap and the algae which have formed below it are proof of inadequate cleaning in the wet area.

Algae formation in the washing area

The area behind toilets which is not used (apparently an old wet area) is neglected and full of rubbish. In addition, a large puddle forms in which algae have formed and in which flies are spreading. No further investigation was undertaken as to where the water was coming from and why it does not drain away.

Puddle behind the kindergarten

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Covered in rubbish and flies

Old washing area but now unusable

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Generally, the drainage system for the toilets and the wet area needs to be inspected.

Open water drain

Holes everywhere in the drainage system

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


This hole is on the playground

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


3.2 Boys Area (B3.1, B3.2, B2.1, B2.2, B4.2, B1.2, Water dispenser, sanitary areas 3 and 2, Sanitary areas 4 and 1, B5.1, B5.2, sanitary area 5)

Concrete houses with concrete floors although some dormitories also have wooden floors. In addition, there is no air conditioning, just fans and open windows.

B3.1 and B3.2

One side of the dormitory

89 children aged between 11 and 14 live in this room. The room was completely renovated in May 2014. The walls were repainted, and the sleeping facilities completely replaced. All children also received a new cupboard.

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Broken, unusable locker

Night toilets The toilets appear to be cleaned regularly. However, there are towels on the floor in front of the toilets for wiping feet, which was does not correspond to hygiene requirements.

Filthy towel in front of the toilet

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


It was noticed that not all toilet rooms possess a toilet brush for each toilet. Toilets with brushes look significantly cleaner than toilets without brushes.

A good example of the sanitary facilities

Stairwell The stairwells are excessively dirty. This is not daily dirt from shoes but encrusted, smudged surfaces.

A dirty part of the stairs

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Stairwell anteroom

Cleanliness of the personal lockers Personal cupboards are never checked by the teachers. They are untidy, are misused as rubbish bins and totally filthy.

Broken locker full of rubbish

The spaces between the individual cupboards have also not been wiped down in the last year.

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Dirt both next to and on the lockers

The new, renovated, white storage shelves are used mainly as rubbish bins. There are also rotting leftovers to be found here too.

Fans Due to the open windows it is to be expected that the ceiling fans become dirty. The fans are not cleaned often enough, as can be seen from the thick layers of dust on the fans.

Filthy fan

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


The windows are dirty

Other fans are out of service and are not repaired. There are also fans which no longer conform to electrical safety regulations. It was not possible to find out who regularly feels responsible for the technical equipment in individual rooms.

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


B 2.1 and B 2.2

160 children live in this house on two storeys. The ground floor has a concrete floor and the first floor a wooden floor. The differences in cleanliness in this house are astounding.

However, the area in front of the house and next to the stairs is also used for rubbish and storage.

Bulky refuse and old cleaning equipment

Unfortunately, leaking water pipes also represent a health hazard here. Large puddles form here on which the children can slip. This area is full of algae. An entrance to the ground floor can be seen behind the puddle.

Water hole in front of House 2

There are concrete floors on the ground floor which are apparently rarely cleaned. Old, encrusted stains indicate this.

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


View of the dormitory

Extremely dirty floor

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Entrance area with old crate

Floor and column with old dirt

Old, dirty lockers show that the room or the furniture is rarely cleaned. In addition, the lockers are worn out, rusty and represent a further health risk due to protruding pieces of metal. The area in front of the lockers is also extremely dirty. The shoe shelf is filthy and obviously too small for 60 children.

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Filthy floor and old lockers

Damaged lockers and a toilet bucket

Shoe shelf with old broom

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Sleeping area for a number of children

Old, broken fans and bulky rubbish stand in this living area. Nobody appears to feel responsible for cleanliness here.

Rubbish next to personal hygiene articles

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Due to the open windows it is natural that the ceiling fans become dirty. The fans are not cleaned often enough, as can be seen from the thick layers of dirt on the fans.

Extremely dirty fan

Condition of the windows

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


There are 100 children on the first floor and the floor is made of wood. The windows are also open here and fans serve to ventilate the rooms.

View of the dormitory

The extreme contrast to the ground floor is striking. Here, some of the windows have been cleaned– however, some appear not to have been cleaned. .

Dust-free window

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Cobwebs and dust on the window

It is also evident here that the fans are extremely dirty.

Extremely dirty fan

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


The floor appears to be cleaned regularly. There are only new traces of dirt on the wood.

Traces of dirt on the floor

There has been a hole in the ceiling in the entrance area for some time. Further dirt gets into the dormitory through this hole and pests can easily get into the children’s sleeping area.

Hole in the roof described

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


B 4.2

40 children live in this house, distributed across two living areas. The dormitories are on the first floor.

The stairs to the dormitories are extremely dirty. They are too rarely cleaned. In addition, the steps exhibit clear signs of wear.

Dirty stairs

Rubbish is stored and piled up next to the stairs. Nobody feels responsible for it.

Old wheels and rubbish

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Apparently the floor in the living area is rarely cleaned and windows, fans and cupboards are also highly neglected.

View of one of the rooms

One of the rubbish corners

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


The furniture in this house also exhibits signs of a great deal of damage and contamination. Some compartments are only used as rubbish depots. There are old leftovers on top of the cupboards.

Furniture in the living area

Sleeping corner for a number of children

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Old food next to blankets

The children often have nowhere to put their shoes in these dormitories.

Shoe shelf and towels

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


B1.2

It does not appear that the night toilets are cleaned regularly. The door is heavily damaged. There are also old cleaning materials and tools in the toilet area.

Extremely dirty toilets

Tools in the sanitary area

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


In House B 1.2 the furniture is heavily damaged and contaminated. Some compartments are used just as rubbish depots. The lockers represent a serious injury hazard.

Dilapidated lockers without doors

Pieces of metal protruding from the lockers

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Obviously, the floor in the living area is not cleaned adequately. Windows and fans are neglected. There is also no opportunity to store shoes here.

Dirty floor

Old, stuck-on dirt remains

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


All shoes are on the ground

Windows and fans also seem only to be cleaned rarely.

Dirty fan

Dusty window with cobwebs

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Leaking taps and pipes are a health hazard. Large puddles form on which the children can slip up. This spot is covered in algae and mould. Mosquitos and flies can spread unhindered. In addition, the old lockers were simply stood behind the house. Playing children can therefore easily injure themselves on them.

Large, contaminated puddle

Old discarded lockers

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


The drinking water dispensers are totally filthy, full of scale, mouldy and full of algae.

Water dispenser and puddle

Filthy drinking water dispenser

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Sanitary areas 3 and 2

Both the washing area and the toilets were completely renovated in March 2014. New tiles were fitted in the water basins and new urinals installed.

Totally filthy water basin

Dirty water basin full of rubbish

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Mould on the water basin

The cleanliness of the toilet area does not correspond to hygiene guidelines. There is rubbish lying around in the toilet rooms and broken plastic water bowls which are used by children.

Some urinals have been removed or no longer work.

Broken urinal

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


View of the toilets

Dirty toilet, no brushes

Excrement in the toilet, no brushes PAGE 47

HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Sanitary areas 4 and 1

The cleanliness of the toilets does not correspond to hygiene guidelines. There is rubbish lying around in the toilet rooms and broken plastic water containers. Some urinals have been removed or no longer work.

Contaminated and bedaubed toilet

Filthy broken toilet

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Broken urinal

Algae in the entire urinal area

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


The water basin and the floor in the sanitary area were completely cleaned with a highpressure cleaner in March 2014 and all algae in the basin removed. Apparently the basin has not been cleaned properly since so that algae have formed again. The water quality does not correspond to hygiene prescriptions as it appears to be used several days at a time.

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Highly contaminated water basin

Blocked water basin drain

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Extremely dirty floor

Filthy floor as a washboard

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HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


B5.1 and B5.2

140 children distributed across two storeys live in this house. On each floor there are three dormitories in which the children are accommodated. The dormitories have concrete floors. There is also no air conditioning, just fans and open windows. The floor is in good condition and is obviously cleaned regularly. The furniture also exhibits no serious damage, just signs of wear.

Clean and tidy dormitory

Clean floor in a dormitory

There is a major contrast in this house. The children are not allowed to eat or watch TV in their dormitories. A room has been created especially for this purpose. This prevents the children from contaminating their sleeping area with perishable leftovers.

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The dining and television room of the house

It is, however, also the case here that the open windows are extremely dirty. The fans are also dirty. These are not cleaned frequently enough.

Dusty fan

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Dirty windows

The stairwell is also cleaned regularly. There are also large refuse bins available for the children. Unfortunately, we also see here that old, broken fans or bicycles are simply left in the stairwell. Nobody feels responsible for removing them.

Unusable fans

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Old, scrapped bicycles

The dhilcren have large shelves in front of each dormitory in which they can put their shoes.

Shoe shelf in front of a dormitory

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The walls and floor of the night toilets in the stairwell are covered in algae and dirty.

Toilet covered in algae

Dirty floor in the night toilet

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Sanitary area 5

The washing and toilet area of this house make a neat impression. Both the basins and floor have no algae.

Clean water basin

Unused but nevertheless cleaned basin

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Alongside this, the toilets are in a dirtier state. Here the usual algae are to be found and the floor and also the walls are dirty. However, there is no rubbish or broken objects in the entire sanitary area.

Filthy toilet

Dirty state of the toilet

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3.3 Girls Area (G1.1, G1.2, G1.3, G2.2, G3.1, G4.2, Water dispenser, sanitary area 1, sanitary area 2, sanitary area 3

Concrete houses with concrete floors, two dormitories with wooden floors, no air conditioning, just fans and open windows.

G1.1, G1.2 and G1.3 (Sievert Larsson House)

458 girls are distributed across three storeys in this house. Over 100 children aged from three to 18 years live in each floor. The stairwells are clearly dirty on all floors. This is not everyday dirt from shoes but stuckon, smeared surfaces. Dogs and cats live in the living rooms. There is dog excrement in several places in the stairwell.

Dirt and contamination in the stairwell

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A dog in the dirty stairwell

Dog excrement on the girls‘stairs

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On each of the three floors concrete floor is cleaned regularly. All dormitories make a neat impression.

View of a dormitory

Good example of cleanliness

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There are still dirty spots in the dormitories, particularly around the children’s lockers. These are often old, damaged or overfilled.

Glued on edge of locker

Old, overfilled lockers

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Due to the open windows it is to be expected that the ceiling fans are dirty. The fans are not cleaned often enough an all floors as is evident from the thick layers of dust in the fans.

Extremely dirty fan

Dirty window

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Each side (each living room) on each floor has its own toilet areas. These were thoroughly cleaned in March 2014. The toilet areas are now highly contaminated again. Old washbasins are no longer used and are covered in algae. Some toilets cannot be entered because drains blocked by rubbish flood the toilet area. The same problems as occurred before the last cleaning in 2014 and which were solved then.

Unused, wash basin covered in algae

Rubbish and dirt in old washbasins

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Extremely dirty toilet

Unused, broken toilet

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Overall view of the toilets

Flooded floor

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Sanitary area 1

The three water basins in front of the house were completely cleaned with a high-pressure cleaner in March 2014 and all algae in the basin removed. Apparently, the basin has not been cleaned properly again since then so that the algae have reformed. The water quality does not correspond to hygiene prescriptions.

Algae and rubbish in the water

The edge is also extremely dirty

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The water basin drains are dirty and blocked. For this reason, algae and mould have formed around the basin.

Drain blocked with clothing

This drain is used as a rubbish depot

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A further house with sanitary facilities is located not far from the basin. It contains further toilets for the girls and further water basins. The cleanliness of the toilet area does not correspond to hygiene prescriptions. There is rubbish in the toilet rooms and broken plastic water containers for cleaning. The water quality in the water basins does not correspond to hygiene regulations.

Unusable washbasins

Dirty toilet

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Algae in the water basins

The water basin drains are dirty and blocked. Algae and mould have formed around the basin as a result.

Algae and rubbish in the drain

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G2.2 (Nalin House)

66 children live on one floor in this house. They are distributed across two dormitories. The dormitories have wooden floors. There is also no air conditioning, just fans and open windows.

The entrance area of the stairwell is extremely dirty and leaking water also causes algae to form.

Damp dirt and rubbish in the entrance

Dirty stairs to the dormitories

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The area in front of the rooms is used for dumping rubbish.

Rubbish tip in the entrance door

Children’s plates amongst shoes and rubbish

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Animals can be seen in the children’s living area, both in the stairwell and in the accommodation.

Cat on pillows and shoes

Obviously, the floor in the living area is seldom cleaned. Windows, fans and cupboards are extremely dirty.

View of a dormitory

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Dusty fan

Clothes drying on a dirty door

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Sanitary area 2

The sanitary area is located to the right next to the house. It includes toilets, water basins and several washbasins. The cleanliness of the toilets does not correspond to hygiene guidelines. Rubbish and broken doors lie around in the toilet rooms. The space in front of the toilets looks like a rubbish tip. There are even used, blood-stained women’s hygiene articles simply lying on the ground.

Rubbish and hygiene articles on the ground

There is rubbish everywhere

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Filthy toilet covered in algae

There is even rubbish in the water basin

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Basin covered in algae

Rubbish is blocking the drain

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Unusable washbasin

Broken door laid on the toilet

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The second sanitary area for the girls is on the left side of this house. The picture here is the same. The cleanliness of the toilets does not correspond to hygiene guidelines and the water quality in the water basin does not correspond to the hygiene regulations.

Used toilet

Seriously damaged toilet PAGE 80

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Dirty water basin

Old dirt and filth on the floor of the sanitary area

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G3.1 (Alice House)

92 girls live in this U-shaped house. They are distributed across three dormitories which are separated from one another. The dormitories here have concrete floors which are obviously cleaned regularly. All dormitories make a neat impression. In addition, there is no air conditioning, just fans and open windows.

Cleaned floor

Floor cleaning

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There is dirt in the children’s cupboards. These are often old, damaged and overfilled and not tidied or cleaned.

Stuck-on dirt next to a cupboard

Old, broken cupboard

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The fans become dirty because of the open windows. They are not cleaned often enough, as can be seen from the thick dust on them. In addition, one fan is hanging torn out of the ceiling by its electric cable. It is still being used in this condition.

Broken fan

Dirty switches for the fans

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Sanitary area 3

The house has its own sanitary area. This includes toilets and a water basin. The cleanliness of the toilet area does not correspond to hygiene guidelines. The toilet areas and the floor are extremely dirty and there are also animals in the sanitary areas. Rubbish and old toilet brushes are lying in unused washbasins.

Rubbish and dirt in the sanitary area

Toilet cabin covered in algae

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Algae and mould in the doors and walls

Extremely dirty toilet

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Algae in the basin

Algae and mould form next to the basin

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The drinking water dispensers and taps are extremely dirty, covered in scale, mouldy and full of algae.

Taps dripping and covered in algae

Unhygienic drinking water dispenser

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The floor is also covered in algae

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G 4.2

Since 2014, 100 girls have lived in this living area distributed across two dormitories. These are above the canteen. Each dormitory has its own sanitary area which is divided into a toilet area and a washing area. There is no air conditioning, just fans and windows. The dormitories have concrete floors.

The dormitories do not make a cared-for impression. The floor is encrusted and the remains of old dirt can be found everywhere. There are leftovers all over the place which are infected with ants.

View of a dormitory

Dirty floor covered in rubbish

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Used plates with leftover food

The fans become dirty because of the open windows. There are not cleaned often enough, as can be seen from the thick layers of dust on them.

Dusty fan

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The cleanliness of the toilet area does not correspond to hygiene guidelines. The toilets and the floor are extremely dirty. The washing area is covered in algae due to leaking water and the water quality does not correspond to hygiene regulations.

Damaged toilet

Floor in toilet area

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Dirty basin

Dirty, leaking water

Algae in the water basin

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The stairwell is extremely dirty on all floors. This is not everyday dirt from shoes but encrusted, smeared surfaces. The girls’ shoe cupboards are old, dirty and seriously damaged. There is an increased danger of injury here. There is old food on top of the lockers.

Rubbish in the stairwell

Dirty stairs

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Damaged lockers

Mouldy food on the lockers

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3.4 Kitchen and canteen

Seven people cook for a total over 2,400 children in the kitchens. The kitchen is divided into two sections. Food is prepared in the first section. The floor in both kitchen sections is extremely well cared for and is obviously cleaned frequently. However, the washbasins fitted where the food is prepared are unfortunately not clean.

Filthy washbasin

View of the kitchen area

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The food is cooked in the second section. There are large rice cookers and gas cooking zones for other dishes.

Cooking area

Kitchen cooking zones

It is completely natural that all living creatures are entitled to find a place to live. However, dogs were seen in both kitchen areas which lie down to sleep there or seek shade in the kitchen. Dogs and cats at large must be prevented from running around or even entering the kitchen at all costs.

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There is space for all 2,446 children in the canteen separated into boys and girls and they are served breakfast, lunch and an evening meal.

The floor in this area should be cleaned especially every day, which cannot happen however because there is no suitable cleaning equipment. From a technical point of view the necessary cleaning is simply not possible. The floor is completely filthy after being used for just three months. Dogs also have unhindered access here and are even roaming around whilst food is being served.

View of the overall canteen area

Filthy floor

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Old dirt under the tables

There are four water dispensers where the children can obtain drinking water. These are not as dirty as the water dispensers in the children’s living quarters but they must also be cleaned more regularly (only in use for three moths so far)

Water dispenser in the canteen

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The washing up sinks in which the children have to wash up their own plates and cutlery after each meal are a better example of cleanliness. They are made of stainless steel and can be easily cleaned. Despite heavy use they exhibit no algae or mould.

Clean washing up sinks

The most astounding picture is to be found in the canteen’s toilets. There are a total of four toilets – two men’s toilets and two women’s toilets. The first two toilets are reserved exclusively for guests. They exhibit a high degree of cleanliness and hygiene.

Washbasins in guest toilets

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Guests’ toilets

Clean guests‘ toilets urinals

The children’s toilets are a stark contrast, however. The toilets are extremely dirty, the ceiling broken and there is even old vomit to be found in the toilets. It seems incomprehensible why the children’s toilets cannot be as clean as those for guests.

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Extremely dirty toilet

Old dirt on the wall

Dirt and vomit under the washbasins

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3.5 Summary

Living quarters With few exceptions the rooms in the living quarters are not cleaned properly. Some girls’ and boys’ rooms are not clean enough to be lived in.

Destroyed fittings are not repaired even when they are a danger to life and limb such as fans hanging down. Holes in the ceilings are also not closed again after work has been done.

Entrances and stairwells Neither the children nor the carer appear to feel responsible for open areas. These are cleaned even less than the rooms in the living quarters. In most cases these areas are also used as rubbish tips and as storage for cleaning equipment.

Sanitary areas The sanitary facilities are not cleaned either often enough or thoroughly enough both in the children’s living quarters and in the canteen. Both boys’ and girls’ sanitary areas are not clean enough to enable anyone to hygienically clean themselves in them.

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3.6 Conclusion

The state of the sanitary facilities and living areas suggest that either there are not enough carers to supervise cleaning in individual areas. Or the carers in individual houses are not qualified enough to co-ordinate and monitor cleaning. The hygienic training of the care staff is a major point for improving the cleanliness of the living and sanitary areas. Furthermore, there is no check in cleanliness. The children’s personal belongings are not checked by carers in any of the living areas. Children are not told to clean their cupboards and to remove the rubbish in them. The toilets are filthy, which is again attributable to the inadequate qualification and training of the carers.

Due to the absence of a clearly defined cleaning plan it is not possible for the children to adhere to guidelines. There is therefore no possibility to sanction children who do not follow requests.

Many children do not know what hygiene or cleanliness means as they receive no training in it. Lack of motivation to clean the living and washing areas also contribute to the accumulation of dirt in the entire facility (motivation can only originate from the carers)

No improvement can be achieved without clearly defined hygiene and cleaning guidelines. We will therefore make general recommendations on hygiene and cleaning in Point 4, and also discuss their implementation in individual areas in Point 5.

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4.0 Framework Hygiene Plan Recommendations of the Iceman Charity Volker Capito / Johannes Strasser Project hygiene & cleaning in Wat Sakeo

4.1 Introduction Community facilities for children and adolescents are of special hygienic and epidemiological significance due to the large number of persons living and working together. They therefore require a great deal of attention in order to ensure the wellbeing, health and education to hygienic behaviour – especially with regard to infectious diseases. Preventing transmittable diseases in people, recognising infections at an early stage and preventing them from spreading, is the aim of the HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the Iceman Charity. It is recommended that extensive standardisation of the new hygiene plans be striven for. This sample plan is intended to provide support in this. The hygiene measures listed are examples which need to be adapted to the situation in the individual establishment and supplemented with establishment-specific details and definitions. Measures to promote and maintain health are also to be spoken about in a hygiene plan which contributes to preventing non-transferrable diseases for the children being looked after and the staff. Any existing regional or state regulations are still to be developed and included by the establishment. The development of child and adolescent welfare is developing into modern establishments which are increasingly distancing themselves from the structure of a "classic" children’s home. Today, the establishments are mainly set up as autonomous, family-like residential groups, e.g. in the form of sheltered accommodation. The selfreliance of children and adolescents supervised is promoted whilst maintaining their individual sphere of individuality. The framework hygiene plan is intended to serve as a basis for these modern forms of living. For simplicity, the term home is used in the text which stands for all forms of living.

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4.2 Hygiene management The head of the facility is responsible for ensuring that hygienic requirements are met and fulfils his responsibilities by means of instruction and monitoring. He can appoint a hygiene officer or hygiene team to support him. The responsible person(s) are to be entered in the hygiene plan together with their availability. Hygiene management tasks include:    

Producing and updating the hygiene plan Monitoring compliance with the measures defined in the hygiene plan Performance of hygiene briefings Maintenance of contact to the health authorities

The hygiene plan is to be reviewed annually with regard to its topicality and modified as necessary. Compliance with the hygiene measures is monitored by Site inspections of the facility by the hygiene office or the hygiene team (normally at least annually and also as required). Necessary constructional maintenance, renovation or renewal measures should be recorded and included in the planning. The results are documented in writing. The hygiene plan must be accessible and available for all employees to inspect at all times. Employees are briefed at least once a year regarding the necessary hygiene measures. The briefing is to be documented in writing.

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4.3 Basic hygiene 4.3.1 Hygiene requirements of the site, building, rooms and equipment 

The construction of the rooms must fulfil Thai building requirements, accident prevention regulations (insofar as these already exist in Thailand) and also the fire protection regulations.

The following can be relevant to hygiene:

Location (noise, air quality and bio-climatic contamination, inherited pollution)

 Open areas/sports facilities (size, design, planting, poisonous plants, safety and maintenance of playground equipment, water and sand playgrounds)  Construction, surface design and equipment of individual rooms (enclosed living area with: group room, rooms for living and sleeping, sanitary rooms, kitchen, staffroom, storage facilities; rooms for the entire facility with: leisure and sports rooms, conference room etc.; specific rooms depending on the type and task of the facility.

Continuous planned constructional maintenance and renovation is an absolute requirement for effective cleaning and disinfection. This was not done ideally in the past and is one of the future and also main tasks of the cleaning and hygiene team. Surfaces and floor coverings which can be wiped down with a damp cloth are preferable. Infestations of mould and algae must be dealt with immediately.

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4.4

Cleaning and disinfection

SEITE 108

Thorough and regular cleaning, especially of hands and frequently used surfaces and objects is a major requirement for good hygiene status.

Targeted disinfection is necessary where germs can occur (e.g. contamination with vomit , blood, stool, urine) and where possibilities for contact to spread them exist .

Effective disinfection is only achieved if a suitable disinfectant in the prescribed concentration and application time is used for the intended disinfection task .

Disinfectants are to be selected in consultation with a specialist manufacturer. The current partner is KÄRCHER Thailand.

Cleaners and disinfectants must be kept out of the reach of children.

Cleaning and disinfection plans must be worked out in all facilities and displayed where they are conspicuously visible (see Appendix 1).

The plans should contain concrete definitions of cleaning and, if necessary, disinfection (what, when, with what, how, who) and also statements on monitoring/self-checking– especially if cleaning is awarded to external companies (contractual regulation with external companies).

If reportable or transmittable diseases occur or if there are grounds for suspecting their occurrence, special measures are necessary which are initiated by or co-ordinated with the local hospital and which do not form part of these remarks.

HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


4.4.1 Hand hygiene Hands are the main transmitter of infectious agents due to their frequent contact with their environment and other people. Washing and if necessary disinfecting hands are amongst the most important measures for preventing and fighting infections. This is currently done either inadequately or not at all. 

Washing hands reduces the number of germs on the hands.

New facilities for washing hand must be set up in certain establishments, especially in the vicinity of kitchens and canteens.

Liquid washing preparations and skin care product in dispensers are to be used.

Disposal towels or hand driers are to be used in common spaces (e.g. toilets). The use of collective towels is to be rejected.

Hygienic hand disinfection serves to kill off infectious agents.

Hands are to be disinfected as follows after contamination with infectious agents: •

Rub 3-5 ml of the preparation into dry hands paying special attention to fingertips, gaps between fingers, thumbs and nail bed grooves.

During the contact time prescribed by the manufacturer (generally ½ minute), hands must be kept damp by the disinfectant.

If hands subsequently need to be cleaned (washed) this may only be done after the disinfectant contact time has expired.

Visibly severe contamination (e.g. from excretions) must be removed with a disposable or cellulose cloth soaked in disinfectant.

The use of disposable gloves is recommended when contact with excretions and blood are foreseeable.

Staff: 

Hands should be cleaned thoroughly

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At the start of work,

After every contamination,

After using the toilet,

Before handling food,

Before and after eating,

After contact with children suffering from respiratory infections (coughs and colds)

-

and after contact with animals.

Hygienic hand disinfection is necessary •

After contact with blood, stool, urine, vomit and other bodily secretions (e.g. measures in connection with children using the toilet)

After contact with children who are suffering from diarrheal diseases, Before applying plasters, bandages, etc. (for the necessary hand cleaning the sequence here is: washing - drying - disinfecting

Residents:  Hands should be cleaned thoroughly •

After every contamination (if necessary also after playing)

After using the toilet / potty

After contact with animals

And before eating.

Staff must ensure that hand hygiene is complied with.

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4.4.2

Floors and other surfaces and objects 

Order in the establishment is the requirement for the cleaning of all relevant surfaces and objects as prescribed.

The following principles must be complied with during cleaning and disinfection measures: The adolescents (possibly also children) being looked after must clean their individual living area themselves.

Cleaning methods must be chosen that prevent dirt from being simply redistributed (for example the two-bucket method or the use of industrial cleaning equipment).

Suitable clothing (gloves, apron/overall) should be worn during disinfection measures.

All reusable cleaning utensils (mops, cleaning cloths...) are to be washed after use and stored dry until used again (preferably washing and steeping in a suitable disinfectant solution).

Cleaning and disinfecting equipment and materials must be kept securely out of the reach of unauthorised persons in a separate room.

Surfaces must not be wiped dry or clean before the contact time has expired.

Disinfection should be followed by ventilation.

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Cleaning intervals must be oriented towards the specific type and intensity of use. 

Visible contamination means cleaning is necessary immediately.

The following guide values apply for routine cleaning:

The floors of group and sanitary rooms used every day should be damp cleaned daily with a wet mop.

Fitments and articles of daily use should be cleaned weekly or immediately in case of contamination.

Removable covers on play and rest mats must be changed and washed weekly. Washable mats must be cleaned once a week.

Doors and door handles in the sanitary area must be cleaned every day.

Washbasins, toilet bowls and seats, pull handles or flushing buttons and faeces drains must be cleaned every day.

Toilet brushes must be cleaned daily (rinse out) and replaced as necessary.

Potties (used by individuals) must be cleaned after each use (flush away faeces) and stored dry.

Toothcleaning mugs and brushes, combs and hairbrushes are always to be used by the same person, cleaned weekly and replaced regularly. Toothbrushes must be rinsed after use and kept with the bristles upwards in the toothcleaning mug.

Textile coverings must be vacuumed once a week in regularly used common rooms, living rooms/bedrooms. Proper damp cleaning (spray – extraction method) should be done twice a year and immediately in case of contamination.

Thorough cleaning including lamps, windows, doors, pipes, cover panels, shelves etc. is to be done twice a year.

Immediate targeted disinfection of surfaces and objects is necessary in case of visible contamination with vomit, stool, urine, blood, etc.

If transmittable diseases occur, disinfectant measures must be carried out as targeted protective measures to prevent germs spreading in consultation with the local hospital.

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4.4.3

Clothing and laundry hygiene 

Staff must take care that children wear clothing suitable for the prevailing weather both within the facility and outside .

The frequency with which laundry is changed depends on the degree of contamination. Generally, dirty washing should be changed immediately. Beyond this, the following guide values can be used: Towels (personal)*

weekly

Nightclothes

weekly

Play mat covers

weekly

Bedclothes

every two weeks

Duvets

every three months

Mattresses, cushions etc.

every six months

Underwear (slips)

daily

*quick drying after use

Dirty and clean washing must be kept separate. Clean washing must not be dried and stored in the dirty washing area.

Towels, underwear, nightclothes etc. should be washed in a separate washing cycle for each resident at a minimum of 60°C (as far as washing machines are available– future investments).

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4.5

Handling food

In order to prevent food-related illnesses and an accumulation of illnesses in common rooms, especially stringent requirements must be complied with when handling food.

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Hands must be washed before preparing and serving food.

Gloves must be worn when handling food in case of hand injuries.

Staff with ulcerous wounds on their hands must not handle food.

Coughing or sneezing over food is prohibited.

Clean implements must be used for preparing and serving food.

All crockery and cutlery used must be cleaned after use

Tables and trays must be cleaned after eating.

Leftover food must be disposed of.

Storing food in accommodation spaces must be prohibited.

Food past its sell-by date must not be stored in the accommodation and only in enclosed packaging.

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4.6

4.6.1

4.6.2

Other hygiene requirements

Refuse disposal 

As far as possible, waste separation should be trained and performed.

Waste avoidance and separation measures must be defined.

Waste should be disposed of once a day in central refuse storage bins.

Waste disposal including kitchen waste should be performed in such a way that disruption, especially due to smells, insects and rodents are avoided.

Keeping animals

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Keeping animals in shared accommodation always represents a hygiene risk.

Buddhist faith and educational advantages must be weighed up carefully against health aspects (infections, animal hair allergies).

Responsibility for animal care must be clearly regulated. Staff must monitor this.

Animals should not be accommodated in group, d i n i n g , s l e e p i n g a nd o t h e r c o m m o n r o o m s .

Dogs, cats and birds should not be kept exclusively in enclosed rooms.

Rooms with animals must be regularly ventilated intensively. The room must have a floorcovering which can be wet mopped.

Food and care utensils (bedding, straw, cleaning equipment) must be stored separately.

Thorough hand hygiene must be practiced after handling animals.

Close contact with the responsible vet and health authority is urgently recommended when planning and implementing the keeping of animals.

HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


4.6.3

4.6.4

Preventive pest control and combatting 

Pest infestations can be preventing by preventing air and other access for pests, avoiding hiding places, the elimination of constructional defects and compliance with order and cleanliness in the establishment, in the kitchen area and in outdoor areas.

Regular infestation checks are to be performed and documented.

After the formulation of a risk analysis, control points are to be defined in the kitchen area which are to be monitored regularly (documentation). A visual check should be performed daily.

If pests are discovered the type of pest must be ascertained immediately.

In case of pest infestation a competent pest control technician is to be commissioned with pest control. The technician’s address and phone number should be added to the hygiene plan.

Avoiding hazards from poisonous plants

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Poisonous plants are trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants the ingredients of which can cause health disorders in humans.

Interior (houseplants) and outdoor spaces must be kept free of poisonous plants, especially such poisonous plants whose fruits are particularly attractive to children.

Existing plants with fruits/seeds must be known and definitely not poisonous. Information can be obtained from local nurseries and plant dealers.

The most frequent symptoms when poisonous plant parts are ingested: nausea, vomiting, increased saliva flow and, less frequently, diarrhoea.

Further symptoms (depending on the type of plant): dry oral mucosa, dilated pupils, restlessness, cold sweats, signs of paralysis, skin and mucous membrane reactions.

Always seek to identify the species following the inadvertent consumption of possibly poisonous plants even in the absence of symptoms (pharmacist or gardener).

If it is a poisonous plant, phone the doctor or a poison information centre immediately (describe symptoms, state the type of plant, state the quantity and time of consumption).

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First aid measures: •

Remove plant parts from the mouth (spitting out or rinsing with liquid).

Do not induce vomiting!

Then drink liquids (not milk!).

In case of poisons which irritate the skin, rinse them off the skin with warm water and soap.

Organise medical treatment.

HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


4.6.5

4.6.6

Drinking water 

The cold water used in the youth welfare establishments for human use (personal hygiene, cleaning objects which are designated to come into contact with food and cleaning objects which are designated to come into contact with the human body not just temporarily) should correspond to the fresh water supply.

Changes in the drinking water system must be observed closely. If algae form, thorough cleaning is necessary. No objects of any kind may be stored in water basins. Contaminated objects must be removed immediately.

Rainwater should not be for human use in youth welfare establishments as from 2018 (i.e. also not for personal hygiene and washing clothes). Investments should be made which permit water treatment.

Water playing and discovery areas

From the point of view of hygiene, water playing and discovery areas into which drinking water is rained or sprayed via paved areas (e.g. tiles or terrazzo) with a floor drain are unproblematic if the following principles are observed: 

When setting up mud playgrounds only fresh, flowing water must be used.

The soil used must be free of contamination (see play sand). Interim drying out of the sand protects against germs breeding.in case of serious contamination the sand must be replaced.

Water basins without continuous treatment and disinfection represent an increased hygiene risk. The basin must be filled daily with fresh water and emptied again in the evening to avoid germs accumulating in the water. After emptying, the basin must be thoroughly cleaned every day. The basin should be disinfected before filling. In case of contamination of the water (e.g. by faeces), the water must be replaced immediately and the basin thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.

4.6.7

Play sand

The following points should be observed in order to protect the sand against contamination: 

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Secure against unauthorised third-party use and against the approach of dogs and cats (fencing).

HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Cover the sandbox over at night and the weekend.

Frequent raking to clean and aerate the sand.

Daily visual checks for organic (animal excrement, food leftovers, refuse etc.) and anorganic contamination (e.g. glass). Contamination of all kinds is to be eliminated immediately.

Complete replacement of sand after approximately three years if the aforementioned points have been consistently adhered to, otherwise once a year.

In case of repeated contamination with dog, cat and bird‘s mess: change the sand at more frequent intervals.

4.6.8 First aid The director/supporting organisation of the home is to see to it that staff learn the basics of first aid both before taking up employment and thereafter at least once a year. A person trained in first aid must be available in the establishment. This person should definitely have hepatitis B immunisation. The first-aider must wear disposable gloves in case of potential contact with bodily fluids and excretions and disinfect their hands before and after giving first aid. Parallel to first aid the first aider must decide whether the injured person requires immediate medical assistance for further care. The following must be added to the hygiene plan: Emergency doctor’s phone number: Phone number of responsible emergency doctor: phone number of home’s doctor:

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Surfaces contaminated with blood or other excretions must be cleaned with a cloth soaked in disinfectant using disposable gloves and the surface affected subsequently again thoroughly disinfected. Suitable first aid material such as a first aid kit "C" in accordance with DIN 13157. The complete contents of the first aid kit should be checked regularly. In addition, the first aid kit must be equipped with an alcoholic disinfectant for hand disinfection in a firmly closable container. Used materials (e.g. disposal gloves or plasters) must be replaced immediately. Regular stock checks of the first aid kit must be performed. The use by date of the hand disinfectant and the medical products in particular should be checked. Out-of-date materials should be replaced as necessary.

4.6.9 Suggested infection measures

Health requirements Kitchen/food area staff Persons may not be employed in the kitchens and food areas of community facilities if they 

Have contracted or are suspected of having contracted typhus, paratyphus, cholera, bacillary dysentery, salmonellosis or any other infectious gastric disease or viral hepatitis A or E (infectious jaundice)



Have become ill from infected wounds or skin diseases where there is a possibility that their pathogens can be transmitted via food.

4.6.10 Nursing, educational and supervisory staff Persons who have contracted an infectious disease or who are suspected of having or are suffering from itch mites or lice may not undertake any teaching, supervisory or other activities in the common rooms by which they have contact to those being cared for there until medical opinion fears no retransmission of the illness or lice.

4.6.11 Children and adolescents The appropriate medical staff should be informed immediately of every case of illness or excretion which occurs. In specific cases, the aim of measures must be to isolate the patient within the facility as far as possible under the circumstances.

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5. New cleaning structures

The following report introduces new cleaning procedures based on international health and cleaning guidelines (see also point x Health & Cleanliness). The cleaning procedures consider the needs of the various age groups and the sex of the children to ensure that implementation is carried out consistently within each age group. Older children are given more responsibilities than younger children. The carers will be given clearly defined tasks based on the implementation of the new cleaning structures and also more control over cleanliness, as well as over the general condition of the residential buildings. The following rules explain the daily / weekly / monthly / yearly procedures involved in the cleaning processes. Clearly defined procedures not only help to ensure that the accommodation is clean, but also make the individual cleaning tasks simpler. Monitoring plans and inventory lists for cleaning equipment will be clearly displayed in each residential unit.

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5.1 Overview

Clean communal spaces and stairwells

Clean sanitary facilities and night toilets

Dispose of waste

Every 3

Thoroughly clean the sanitary facilities (using Kärcher equipment)

Months

Clean and tidy the cupboards both inside and out

Clean the drinking water dispenser (using Kärcher equipment)

Repair all electronic equipment in the building

Repair all damaged objects in the building

Repair walls and ceilings

Clean drains in all washing areas, using appropriate tools where

Daily

necessary 

Clean bed linen (blankets, pillows, mattresses).

Every 6

Thoroughly clean the bedrooms and stairwells

months

Clean windows and fly screens

Clean ventilators and lamps (maintenance and repair of lamps)

Thoroughly clean the outside areas and play areas

Clean sand in the play areas

Repair any damage to the building

Repair any damage to the outside areas and play equipment

Repair and maintain all sunshades over the washing areas

Repair and maintain all doors

Every 9 PAGE 122

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Repair and maintain all toilets and wash basins

Repair and maintain all ventilators

Every 12

Repair and maintain all windows and fly screens

months

Check all safety equipment (fire extinguishers, first aid, emergency

months

lighting, etc.)

Signs displaying the individual cleaning tasks will be installed in every building. These signs serve to instruct both the children and carers about the implementation of the cleaning concept. Adhesive labels will also be attached to all important areas with instructions explaining how they should be maintained and cleaned, and with information about what is forbidden (for example: No dogs allowed). These signs should also include an evacuation plan in case of emergency.

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Carers A carer must act responsibly and be capable of independently implementing the cleaning and maintenance tasks within their house or fields of responsibility. Each carer is authorised to instruct the children and is also permitted to hand out punishments or sanctions to individual children or groups where appropriate. The carers must adhere to the set cleaning plan. Any deviations from the plan must be discussed with the facility manager. Deviations from the set cleaning rota will not be permitted in the future. Carers must report any damage to fixtures and fittings to the facility manager.

Facility manager (to be appointed) The facility manager is in charge of the entire orphanage and is therefore responsible for all residential buildings, kitchens, and communal areas. He/she is required to check the cleanliness of the rooms and to inspect them for damage. The budget is yet to be determined, but the facility manager will be responsible for deciding upon and coordinating all repairs to fixtures and fittings and the building itself. He/she will be in charge of all internal and external cleaning personnel. He/she has authority over the carers and is therefore responsible for ensuring that the cleaning plan is adhered to. The facility manager reports to the committee and the monks. He/she will be advised and supported by consultants.

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5.1.2 Fields of responsibility for carers and the facility manager

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Each building must have a carer who is contractually bound to their responsibilities.

The carer takes responsibility for the cleanliness of their building and ensures that maintenance work is carried out.

The carer is responsible for assigning the children to a “Team 2 Clean” group.

The facility manager has authority over the carers and inspects the condition of each building, as well as general adherence to the mandatory cleaning plans.

Each carer is responsible for ensuring that the cleaning guidelines are adhered to in his/her building.

The carer checks that the mandatory cleaning duties are carried out on a daily basis and evaluates the cleanliness of the specific areas.

The carer is responsible for documenting their inspections on the mandatory forms.

The carer is responsible for ensuring that the correct cleaning equipment is available the amounts required in his/her building

The carer must ensure that waste is disposed of daily in the correct rubbish collections.

The facility manager is responsible for ensuring that that the rubbish gathered at the collection points is disposed of within an appropriate timeframe.

The distribution and allocation of cleaning agents will be carried out by the facility manager.

Each carer must have knowledge of basic first aid and should be trained in the basic principles of first aid.

The carer reports any damage in need of repair to the facility manager (see appendix x)

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The facility manager is responsible for ensuring that all safety equipment is in working order and that it is tested annually (fire extinguishers, emergency lighting, emergency exits, etc.)

The carer must ensure that any defective objects are promptly replaced or immediately removed.

The carer must ensure that no animals are kept in the residential buildings.

The facility manager must carry out pest control inspections on a regular basis.

The carer determines set times for watching TV based on general guidelines and checks that these are adhered to.

The carer is responsible for organizing the children’s daily routine, and in particular for checking that homework is completed after school.

The carer has a list of names of all the children resident in his/her building

Both the carers and the facility manager will be paid a premium based on their performance (basic salary + fulfilment of obligations).

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5.1.3 Duties of Team 2 Clean children (does not apply to nursery children) Each week a set number of children from each residential group will be incorporated into the daily cleaning processes. The number of children will depend on the size of the residential group. The children will be given general cleaning tasks, such as cleaning the floors in the bedrooms including all shelving units, cleaning and disinfecting the sanitary facilities and night toilets, cleaning the floor in the stairwell and disposing of rubbish. The teams are selected randomly and it is important that the children do not form teams of their own friends. This helps to improve team work within the residential group and also helps to avoid bad behaviour within a group of friends. The groups will be reselected randomly at the end of each quarter. The children in Team 2 Clean have a different daily routine. The cleaning processes take place at set times each day and the carer should be present during these times to check that all members of the group are present. After the daily cleaning processes have been completed, the carer evaluates the performance of the group.

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5.2 New organisation of the children’s daily routine This is an example of a daily timetable for children who are selected for Team 2 Clean for a week and children who have free time and are therefore not required to carry out any cleaning duties: Child who is not required

Time

Team 2 Clean

5 am

Wake up

Wake up

Morning toilet

Morning toilet

Tidy personal area

Tidy personal area

6 - 7 am

Breakfast

Breakfast

7.40 am

School starts

School starts

11.30 am-12 pm

Lunch

Lunch

12 - 3/3.30pm

Afternoon school

Afternoon school

3/3.30 - 4.30pm

Homework

Homework

4.30 - 5 pm

Free time

Free time

5 - 5.30 pm

Dinner time

Dinner time

5 - 6 am

Maximum 120 min 5.30 -6:30 pm

cleaning duties (incl. improvements)

6.30 - 7.30 pm

8.30 - 9 pm

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Cleaning duties

to clean

Free time Sport / Football

Free time (general jobs in temple where applicable)

Shower, laundry (if

Shower, laundry (if

necessary) and brushing

necessary) and brushing

teeth

teeth

Lights out in all rooms

Lights out in all rooms

HEALTH & CLEANLINESS CONCEPT (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


5.3 Reward or punishment in case of noncompliance with guidelines, damaging fixtures and fittings, or not adhering to the cleaning plan

In the future the individual cleaning groups (Team 2 Clean) will be evaluated for the general cleanliness of the entire residential building and for the performance of the carer. The group collects points for the performance of the group as a whole. Based on the results of the monthly evaluation, it is possible to determine which residential groups have adhered to the guidelines and which groups need to improve. Good performance will be rewarded in the future, while bad performance could be “punished”.

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5.3.1 Rewards What do you get rewarded for?

Individual rewards for exceptionally good performance

Group rewards for achieving set goals or exceptional performance

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What does the child receive?

Who issues the reward?

Day trip to the Aquadrom in Bangkok

Carer

Visit a sporting event, such as a football game in the stadium (football, kick-boxing)

Carer

Driving lessons for moped or car Carer

Cash reward

Carer

Investment in the furnishing for the best house

Abbit

Communal trip to BIC C with a free choice of goods to the value of a voucher

Abbit

Visit to a cultural event outside of the temple complex

Abbit

New clothes or shoes

Abbit

Investment in free time activities such as toys, playground equipment, cameras, etc.

Abbit

HEALTH & CLEANLINESS CONCEPT (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


5.3.2 Punishments What do you get punished for?

What are the consequences?

Who issues the punishment?

Daily cleaning procedures not carried out

Additional outside cleaning duties given

Carer

A child does not integrate well into the cleaning team

Special cleaning duties, for example cleaning public areas or temple vehicles

Carer

Kitchen duty

Abbit

Limiting television time and more time spent improving the cleaning procedures instead

Carer

Limiting free time activities and more time spent improving cleaning

Carer

Banned from watching TV, more Abbit time spent improving cleaning

Lights out one hour earlier

Cleaning procedures are evaluated as below “normal”

Cleaning “poor”

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5.4 Daily cleaning plan An example of the daily cleaning duties and the allocation of the Team 2 Clean group with evaluation scale:

(Bullet points in image: Image1: Sweep floors, mop floors, disinfect floors, dispose of rubbish, store cleaning equipment when it is dry Image 2: Sweep stairs, mop stairs, disinfect stairs, dispose of rubbish, store cleaning equipment when it is dry Image 3: Mop floor, clean toilet brush, clean and disinfect toilet, disinfect floor, store cleaning equipment when it is dry Image 4: Mop floor, clean sinks, dispose of rubbish and check drains, disinfect floors and sinks, store cleaning equipment when it is dry)

The cleaning plans are displayed on the white board or are otherwise clearly displayed.

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Each team will document the individual cleaning tasks. After cleaning has been completed, the teacher evaluates the quality of the work, confirms that the work has been checked, and records any additional remarks. If a team is unable to carry out the cleaning procedures for some reason, the carer must record this in the list and sign it.

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5.5 Weekly / monthly / yearly cleaning plans Every residential building has a cleaning log where the daily cleaning procedures and the less regular duties are recorded.

5.5.1 Weekly tasks 

Clean and wipe own mattress.

Clean area under mattress.

Beat and dust floor mats from both inside and outside.

Sweep area in front of house.

Dispose of rubbish gathered at the rubbish collection points and change bin bags.

Dust doors and windows with a cloth.

Wash hand towels and hang them out to dry.

Wash clothes and hang out to dry.

Clean mops and cleaning cloths, and hang them out to dry.

5.5.2 Monthly cleaning plan 

Completely clean out and tidy own cupboard and drawers.

Clean own cupboard inside and out.

Tidy and clean the shoe cupboard.

Wash and dry doormats.

Wash and dry all rugs and bedside carpets.

Pest control.

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5.5.3 Every two months 

Clean ventilators and windows, clean and dust lamps and check that they are functioning properly.

Clean ventilator regulators and light switches.

Check the safety fence around the playgrounds for damage and holes.

Rake all sandpits (especially in the nursery)

Vacuum clean mosquito screens and check for damage.

Check that cleaning equipment is functioning properly and renew if necessary.

Check that there are adequate supplies of cleaning agents.

5.5.4 Every four months (coinciding with the beginning of the school year in May) 

Clean floors in bedrooms with Kärcher cleaning equipment (hard cleaning).

Clean floors in the stairwells with Kärcher cleaning equipment (hard cleaning).

Clean floors in sanitary facilities with Kärcher cleaning equipment (hard cleaning).

Clean water basins, wash basins and toilets with Kärcher cleaning equipment (hard cleaning).

Clean and disinfect bins. Disinfect floors and walls around bins.

5.5.5 Once during the school year (at the end of the school year) 

Replace sand in the nursery play areas.

If necessary, replace cleaning equipment after a year of use.

Check the use-by dates of cleaning agents, soaps and first aid materials, and replace where necessary.

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5.5.6 Kitchen and canteen We recommend compiling a separate individual cleaning concept for the kitchen and canteen. Both areas were inspected by a reputed chef from the Anantara Hotel Group – Hans Peter Kaserer – on behalf of the Iceman Charity in April 2014. This inspection revealed serious deficiencies in terms of cleanliness and hygiene based on the relevant Thai regulations for canteens and large hotel kitchens. (These regulations do not yet apply to orphanages, schools or other private/public facilities) The canteen in particular lacks the necessary cleaning equipment and industrial cleaning/disinfecting agents. The tables were not disinfected or even wiped in accordance with recommended cleaning guidelines. The benches cannot be folded down and the areas under the tables were only provisionally cleaned once a day. There is no professional equipment for cleaning the almost 2,000 m² hall and these do not seem to be included in the investment plan We will include the necessary equipment in our investment plan. We will add an additional attachment to the general cleaning plan for the residential buildings, documenting any additional instructions in collaboration with Mr Kaserer.

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5.6 The six golden rules 5.6.1 SIX GOLDEN RULES FOR GENERAL CLEANING 

Read the labels on the cleaning products, follow this information (e.g. compatibility of materials), and dose products according to the manufacturers' instructions (take into account the yield of concentrated products – smaller amounts are needed if concentrated products are used!)

Always keep cleaning products in their original containers – this prevents confusion.

Generally use cold water for cleaning activities; use hot water only to remove greasy dirt.

Keep cleaning textiles separate for kitchen, bathroom and the various objects to be cleaned (e.g. sinks, floors, toilets, wash basins).

Do not use scrub sponges to clean plastic surfaces (e.g. shower cabins) or sensitive stainless steel surfaces (e.g. refrigerator doors)

Regularly remove strainers from water taps to remove lime scale. Use sink strainers to prevent clogging.

5.6.2 SIX GOLDEN RULES FOR CLEANING BATHROOMS AND TOILETS

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Dry showers and bath tubs after use with a cloth or a squeegee.

Do not throw waste, leftover food or personal hygiene articles into toilets.

Clean toilets regularly and thoroughly, e.g. also under the edges of toilet bowls.

Clean toilet brushes regularly (e.g. by soaking toilet brushes in siphon water).

It is not usually necessary to disinfect bathrooms and toilets.

Hang towels in airy space - to enable fast drying.

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5.6.3 SIX GOLDEN RULES FOR CLEANING THE KITCHENS

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Check the contents of refrigerators at least once a month and clean the refrigerators – also inside.

Immediately remove dirt on and around cooking stoves and baking ovens. Clean exhaust hoods regularly.

Regularly remove lime scale from water kettles and coffee machines.

Keep worktops free and clean.

Clean food cupboards at least twice a year, check them for pests, check the use-by dates on foods, and use food containers with tight seals.

Empty and clean waste bins regularly.

The ICEMAN CARITY’s

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5.7 Additional cleaning personnel We strongly recommend employing professional cleaners. (See business plan) The additional cleaning personnel is responsible for: 

Supporting the daily cleaning procedures in the nursery (An individual cleaning plan is needed for the nursery that envisions including the children in simple cleaning duties in order to aid their education).

Using the professional cleaning equipment from Kärcher (special cleaning plan in order to ensure that all buildings and sanitary facilities are thoroughly cleaned).

Special cleaning in the event of unforeseen contamination.

5.8 Voluntary personnel Unpaid work that can either be organised by our sponsors or undertaken by volunteers. The volunteers are required to help with basic cleaning duties in order to reduce staffing costs. Volunteers are required to help clean the residential buildings, particularly on predetermined weekends. These measures must be offered and marketed by the temple as “donations”. These groups can be organised by the facility manager and can support the contracted cleaning staff, who have been trained in using the professional Kärcher cleaning equipment. An alternative would be to collect funds from sponsors to pay for additional cleaning personnel. In Thailand, donation receipts can be issued for this purpose.

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6.0 Communication within the community One of the major tasks will be to restructure internal communication to avoid the current level of damage, improve motivation for taking part in cleaning activities, and to guarantee a clear reporting system. There are a number of factors within the community that facilitate successful implementation of orderly communication. To this end, the following groups need to be considered:

6.1 Children Everything revolves around the up to 2,000 children that live in this community. A survey of the residents revealed that friendships and trust among the children needed to be strengthened. The survey also highlighted the fact that, until now, the children have had very little say about what takes place, which in turn has also led to little desire to contribute to or participate in communal work. The children can be empowered by allowing them to vote their own 'group representative'. This will help to ensure that the children’s wishes and suggestions are considered, and also ensure their commitment to action that has been agreed. The group of 'five voices' should include 2 boys, 2 girls, and the oldest nursery child.

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6.2 Carers The carers must learn to communicate better with each other and also be included in decision making. Knowledge and information must also be shared between carers. It is currently the case that some (very few) carers take good care of the residential buildings with the equipment available to them, while others only do what is absolutely necessary. Surveys undertaken here also show that no knowledge is shared and that there is no mutual coaching. The carers and children must promote common interests in order to give decisionmakers and sponsors an incentive to develop a child-friendly environment.

6.3 Facility manager The facility manager is yet to be appointed but he/she must take a neutral and unbiased position. He/she is solely responsible for controlling the implementation of existing guidelines. He/she is the direct link in the communication between children + carers, and decision-makers + sponsors + the secular committee.

6.4 Secular committee (people) It is our understanding that there is a committee comprising secular representatives and school teachers. (During the course of our research we were not able to specifically define how this committee is put together).

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6.6 Sponsors / contributors Sponsors and contributors generally have little influence over daily life in the orphanage. Despite the fact that all donations are deployed in the interests of the patrons, funds often appear to be used without checking or ensuring that they are used sustainably (see also vandalism in the first year after investment). Sponsors should be integrated into discussions involving the sustainable implementation of their donations. In the past it was sometimes the case that funds were used more carefully (in terms of sustainability) when processes were explained to the sponsors.

6.7 Consultants More consideration to be paid to consultants (such as the Iceman Charity with its HEALTH & CLEANLINESS CONCEPT) when making decisions so that have a greater say in the decisions made. The consultants can use their experience gained from other projects to help avoiding mistakes when funds are invested. (Example: The new stainless steel seating elements in the dining area cannot be folded down, which makes cleaning the floor more difficult. A discussion with a canteen manager would have helped prevent this as he could have shared his experience.)

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To facilitate balanced communication throughout the entire community, a balanced relationship between the decision-makers and other parties should be established. Monks, sponsors and the committee are all involved in making decisions for the community to different degrees. These decisions have a fundamental influence on the motivation of both children and carers. We suggest that those lower down in the chain of command are also given more of a say in important decisions; but also that consultants have more influence, as they can hold the balance thanks to their experience and expertise. This will help to ensure that the children, carers, monks, sponsors and the committee are accepted as a community and that those lower down in the chain of command are more motivated to adhere to the rules and regulations.

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7.0 Damages (also as a result of poor cleaning) Newly installed fixtures and fittings were not correctly cleaned and maintained. Fixtures and fittings that become dirty quickly they lose their value and the desire to damage them decreases. Fixtures and fittings are not repaired when damaged. This significantly decreases their value and the children appear to no longer appreciate them.

7.1.1 Damage caused during play It is only natural that with such a large amount of children objects can become damaged during play. Damage can only be avoided by instructing the children on how to use the toys and other objects correctly.

Bent metal bed frame

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The ICEMAN CARITY’s

HEALTH & CLEANLINESS CONCEPT (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


7.1.2 Damage due to incorrect use Some fixtures and fittings are not used correctly which led to the destruction of various objects, fixtures and fittings. It is also striking that the carers are aware that the fixtures and fittings are being used incorrectly and that they know why objects are being used incorrectly; but fail to actively do anything about it. Damage is not reported to superiors and also not repaired. Because no suggestions are made to counteract the incorrect usage, the rapid destruction of valuable and new fixtures and fittings is simply accepted as fact. If the sponsors become aware of this, it is likely that they will reduce their sponsorship funds.

Example 1: Fitted cupboards New cupboards fitted March 2014‌

PAGE 145

The ICEMAN CARITY’s

8 months later

HEALTH & CLEANLINESS CONCEPT (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Example 2 Broken cupboard doors Due to the fact that there is no washing line in the room on which to hang towels or clothes, these are hung over the cupboard doors to dry. When the doors are closed this bends the door hinges. This repeated incorrect usage eventually breaks the door away from the hinges. Although the instructor from the Iceman Charity has been informed of this over the last few months, no alternative solution has been offered!

PAGE 146

The ICEMAN CARITY’s

HEALTH & CLEANLINESS CONCEPT (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Example 3 Homework table newly installed in April 2014

Image from October 2014 (6 months later)

The table still hadn’t been repaired at the time of documentation in April 2015. PAGE 147

The ICEMAN CARITY’s

HEALTH & CLEANLINESS CONCEPT (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


7.1.3 Deliberate damage / vandalism We define vandalism as causing deliberate damage to fixtures and fittings, such as toilet doors. In April 2015, the sanitary facilities in Boys’ House 1 were completely renovated and all toilets were fitted with new doors. In December 2015, all (!) the doors were damaged and most of the doors were lying as rubbish in a wash basin.

Damaged and missing doors after 8 months

PAGE 148

The ICEMAN CARITY’s

HEALTH & CLEANLINESS CONCEPT (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


7.2 Measurable extent of detected damage In the first quarter of 2014, the boys’ houses 1.2, 3.1 and 3.2 were renovated at a total cost of 6 million Thai Bath. 2.8 million THB was spent on fixtures and fittings, such as new cupboards, beds and bed accessories. 8 months later damage caused to fixtures and fittings amounted to 0.95 million THB, 30% of their total worth. This is entirely out of proportion when compared to international investments in similar residential facilities. In order to continue to find sponsors for the modernisation and renovation of residential areas, measures must be taken against such damage and destruction of fixtures and fittings!

7.3 Measures taken to prevent damage 

All carers must ensure that fixtures and fittings are used correctly. When fixtures and fittings – such as washing lines for drying towels – are missing, an adequate alternative solution must be found.

Valuable fixtures and fittings should be marked as such with a sign. Warning signs should also be used to prevent incorrect use; these can be attached directly to the fixtures and fittings in the form of labels.

Fixtures and fittings must be kept clean, so that their value is recognisable.

If a pupil sees another pupil deliberately damaging an object, it must be possible for them to report this anonymously to a carer.

The children must have a feel for the value and importance of the fixtures and fittings. This can be communicated by the carers and monks.

PAGE 149

The ICEMAN CARITY’s

HEALTH & CLEANLINESS CONCEPT (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Damage must be repaired promptly, in order to preserve the value of the objects.

The carers must set an example for the children. The staff room for the carers should therefore also set an example, so that it can be shown to the children as an example at any time.

Sanctions for children that deliberately damage or destroy fixtures and fittings.

Children who show destructive tendencies should be excluded from the orphanage. This would of course only take place after a number of warnings have been issued and the child has been spoken to personally about the problem.

Children that damage or defile objects, should be made to help clean the object or where applicable to help with its repair.

PAGE 150

The ICEMAN CARITY’s

HEALTH & CLEANLINESS CONCEPT (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


7.4 Communication prohibits damage and vandalism

PAGE 151

The ICEMAN CARITY’s

HEALTH & CLEANLINESS CONCEPT (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


8. Carers There are big discrepancies between the carers in terms of the quality of their work and their motivation. While some carers are dedicated and committed to cleaning and maintaining the residential buildings, there are others that take adequate care of the children but pay no attention to the state of the residences. This applies in particular to the nursery and the boys’ houses 1.1, 1.2 and 3.2. During cleaning this year, the nursery was excessively dirty. The windows, ventilators and floors had not been cleaned for over a year. The carers did not contribute to the basic cleaning tasks carried out this year in any way. The work was simply ignored. Even the children were not integrated into even the simplest cleaning work, although this would have been a good educational experience. The complete lack of interest shown by the carers resulted in the cleaning personnel giving up on the work and the second room was not cleaned. In boys’ house 1 it has been noticed that although the residential group on the ground floor is relatively clean and well organised, the residential group on the first floor has been rather neglected. The most damage due to vandalism and incorrect use of fixtures and fittings can be found here. There is no simple explanation as to why this is the case as both groups are cared for by the same staff. It appears that boys’ house 3 is not visited by the carers. Older boys live here, but the lack of care and their adolescent behaviour has led a complete lack of cleanliness and maintenance of the house. This room is like a rubbish tip. The room was included in the general cleaning procedures this year and was completely cleared out, cleaned and refurnished. In general, the care of the girls is better, although it has also been noticed that the carers appear to ignore the state of the sanitary facilities. These are located outside of the residential building and are often used by a number of residential units.

PAGE 152

The ICEMAN CARITY’s

HEALTH & CLEANLINESS CONCEPT (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


8.1 Possible solutions to problems:

8.1.1 Clear job definition

Monitoring the children’s homework

Monitoring and regulating how free time is organised

Monitoring and paying attention to fixed television times

Monitoring the morning cleaning procedures

Organising the daily cleaning schedule

Monitoring and carrying out the cleaning protocol

Reporting damage

8.1.2 Areas of responsibility 

Caring for the children (we will not go into further depth here)

Cleanliness of the residential areas

Cleanliness of the communal areas within the buildings

Cleanliness of the sanitary facilities and the night toilets and outside washing areas for each residential unit

Compliance with the fixed cleaning and hygiene regulations

Repairing and reducing any damage caused to fixtures and fittings

Maintenance of the assigned building

PAGE 153

The ICEMAN CARITY’s

HEALTH & CLEANLINESS CONCEPT (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


8.2 Sanctions The performance of the individual carers must be monitored and evaluated. The evaluation will be carried out by the facility manager. His/her unbiased position – similar to a caretaker – guarantees an emotionless and fair assessment of any professional misconduct and the evaluation of any damage. The evaluations should be discussed with all carers in a monthly meeting. Direct communication between the carers and the facility manager would help to improve the performance of individual carers. If carers fail to perform well, they must be sanctioned. If no improvement is made this would eventually lead to their dismissal and replacement. The children’s misbehaviour (particularly in terms of cleanliness and the destruction of objects) is largely due to the lack of interest by the carers! If the children are not better managed in the future, it is highly unlikely that any positive changes will be made.

8.2.1 Motivating carers It is important to promote the exchange of knowledge and information between the carers. In a first step, we consider it important that the carers organise a meeting with the children once a week in order to discuss any problems and find solutions. A full inspection of all the residential buildings will be carried out once a month and all carers should be involved in this. This will enable the carers to recognise the difference between the various accommodations and to directly discuss improvement strategies amongst themselves. The carers should receive one training day every quarter. These training days should be carried out by professional personnel from care organisations, hotels, canteen kitchens, schools, etc. The training days could be funded by sponsors. All carers should visit a similar facility twice a year in order to gain new insights and ideas and to recognise any differences to how they work. Through their evaluations, carers should be able to influence investment decisions for the house they are assigned to. Therefore, we recommend that the carers should organise a “Live Well” competition among the various residential groups. The outside areas must also be integrated into this competition. At the end of the school year a prize will be awarded for the nicest residential area and the best outside area. The children should be actively engaged in designing these areas.

PAGE 154

The ICEMAN CARITY’s

HEALTH & CLEANLINESS CONCEPT (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


9. Implementation of timeframe 9.1 Phase 1 (Immediate implementation with budget if necessary) 

New (or revision of) allocation of carers to the various residential groups

Introduction of cleaning plans

Introduction of monitoring plans

Distribution of labels and information notices to improve communication

Introduction of info boards in the individual residential areas

Regular meetings for carers

Monitoring and evaluation of performance

Sanctions and rewards for the children

Thorough cleaning carried out by external personnel (first round / 2 months)

Acquisition of cleaning equipment

Acquisition of professional cleaning agents

Acquisition of bins

Timeframe for implementation June to September 2015

9.2 Phase 2 Extended implementation (budget necessary) 

Regular training for carers

Regular training for the children

Acquisition of additional cleaning equipment for individual areas

Introduction of facility manager (new paid position)

Implementation of the new concept

Elimination of technical faults

Removal of graffiti and any traces of vandalism

Establish / improve storage areas for cleaning agents and equipment

Timeframe for implementation September to January 2016

PAGE 155

The ICEMAN CARITY’s

HEALTH & CLEANLINESS CONCEPT (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


9.3 Phase 3 Investment (budget is required here) 

Acquisition of cleaning equipment for the canteen and kitchen

Acquisition of cleaning equipment for residential areas

External cleaning personal for thorough cleaning (paid personnel)

Renovation of buildings

Acquisition of additional beds and cupboards

Timeframe for implementation beginning in February 2016, after acquisition of sponsorship funds. Acquisitions/purchases after a priority list has been drawn up.

9.4 Implementation with sponsors Phase 2 and phase 3 cannot be implemented without sponsors. Therefore, it is of paramount importance that sponsors are actively sought for the implementation of the cleaning concept. The sponsors can provide funds, contributions and advice. The individual arrangements will be announced in social networks and with flyers placed in the public area in the temple. The entire implementation of the various phases funded by sponsorship can be organised by the Iceman Charity as the leading organisation. 

Sponsorship funds could be used to buy Kärcher equipment, or sponsors could assume responsibility for purchasing predefined and specific appliances.

Manufacturers of cleaning products could be persuaded to make their products available free of charge.

Thai companies could employ cleaning personnel and make them available to the orphanage (they cover the employment costs)

Basic cleaning procedures could be carried out with help from volunteers. Cleaning days could be advertised and could also be carried out during the week with help from employees.

Sponsors could cover the costs of cleaning for a residential unit and fund this for an entire year.

PAGE 156

The ICEMAN CARITY’s

HEALTH & CLEANLINESS CONCEPT (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


In general, the organisation should set an official budget in order to ensure that basic cleaning procedures are carried out reliably and consistently.

9.5 Information signs Information signs and boards must be displayed in order to improve communication.

9.5.1 Information boards (blackboard) A blackboard will be displayed in each residential unit with the following information: 

General cleaning advice

Team 2 Clean allocation

Documentation that controls have been carried out

Group evaluation

Important emergency telephone numbers

General information

9.5.2 Information signs Information signs or labels will be introduced in the most important places. The labels should draw more attention to particular points and give the carers opportunities to show the children when they do not observe the rules. The labels will be displayed in both inside and outside areas. Example:

PAGE 157

The ICEMAN CARITY’s

HEALTH & CLEANLINESS CONCEPT (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


(See appendix for the list of information signs)

10. Appendix The relevant appendices needed to further explain the concept, as well as business and investment plans are attached.

Appendix 1.1.

Nursery floor plan

Appendix 1.2.

Boys’ area floor plan

Appendix 1.3.

Girls’ area floor plan

Appendix 1.4.

Canteen ground floor plan

Appendix 1.5.

Canteen first floor plan

Appendix 1.6.

Kitchen floor plan

Appendix 1.7.

Example of work and cleaning plan for Team 2 Clean

Appendix 1.8.

Example of monitoring documentation

Appendix 1.9.

Checklists for nursery and boys’ area

Appendix 1.10.

Checklists for girls’ area

Appendix 1.11.

Labels and information signs

Appendix 1.12.

Inventory lists

PAGE 158

The ICEMAN CARITY’s

HEALTH & CLEANLINESS CONCEPT (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Summary

In conclusion we would like to thank our sponsors and supporters for working on this concept. This concept has been developed by student Johannes Strasser (University of Passau) within the framework of his internship documentation and in collaboration with Thai employee Chartchai Thammikakun from the company Face and Crowd Asia Pacific Ltd. The assignments and translations were funded by Iceman Charity sponsors, in particular by Gern Reise in Munich, K채rcher Thailand and Face + Crowd Asia Pacific Ltd. All parties involved offer their continuing support in implementing the new concept; however, additional sponsors are needed to invest in further cleaning equipment.

Iceman Charity 20th April 2015


Kindergarten

Anlage 1.1

K Toilet Total: 17.25 sqm

6m

6,90m

K Washing Total: 41.4 sqm

6,90m

HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT

of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)

K 2 Total: 120.6 sqm 6m

6m

K 1 Total: 62.4 sqm

6m

20,10m

10,40m


Boys Area

Anlage 1.2 69,60m

32.86m

Boys House 2 Total: 1252,8 sqm B 2.1: 626,4 sqm B 2.2: 626,4 sqm

9m

Total: 325.97 sqm

9.92m

B Washing and Toilet

6,20m

8,60 m

Boys House 1 Total: 605,44 sqm B 1.2: 605,44 sqm 8,70m 70,40m HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT

of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)

31.75m

Total: 253.68 sqm

B Washing and Toilet

Boys House 4 Total: 199,6 sqm B 4.2: 199,6 sqm

32,20m

Boys House 3 Total: 1218 sqm B 3.1: 609 sqm B 3.2: 609 sqm

70m

7.99m


1. Grundreinigung und "hard cleaning" in den Schlafsälen sowie Treppenhäusern und Sanitärbereichen.

2. Schränke und Spinde müssen von innen und außen komplett gereinigt werden. 3. Reparatur aller elektronischen Geräte. 4. Reparatur aller beschädigten Gegenstände. 5. Schließen der Löcher in der Decke. 6. Reinigung der Abflüße in jedem Waschbereich. 7. Reinigung des Schlafmaterials (Decken, Kissen, Matratzen). 6 Month 1. Reinigung des Außenbereichs. 2. Reparatur aller schäden im Außenbereich. 3. Schließung aller Löcher im Außenbereich. 4. Reparatur und Instantsetzung aller Sonnendächer über den Waschbereichen. 5. Kompletter Wechsel des Sandes im Spielplatz des Kindergartens. 9 Month 1. Reparatur und Instantsetzung aller Türen. 2. Reparatur und Instantsetzung aller Toiletten. 3. Reparatur und Instantsetzung aller Ventilatoren. 1 Year 1. Reparatur und Instanntsetzung aller Fenster und Fliegengitter. 2. Reparatur aller Lampen (sowohl innen als auch außen).

HEALTH CLEANNESS CONCERT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)

G3

G2

G1.3

Girls Area 3 Month

G1.2

Anlge 1.10

G1.1

Checkliste Girls Area


Boys House 5

Anlage 1.2.1

Boys House 5 Total: 504 sqm B 5.1: 252 sqm B 5.2: 252 sqm B Washing and Toilet Total: 140 sqm

10 m

HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT

of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)

14m

9m

28m


5.28m

G Toilet: 32.7sqm

G Toilet: 32.7sqm

3 Total: 931.5 sqm G 3.1:931.5 sqm

9.90m

39,60m

11.50m

Girls House 1 Total: 2173.5 sqm G 1.1:724.5 sqm G 1.2:724.5 sqm G 1.3:724.5 sqm

3.90m

12.30m

G Washing and Toilet Total: 162.30 sqm

31.05m

63m

13.20m

G Washing Total: 245.7 sqm

63m HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT

6.20m

30m

Girls House 2 Total: 498.96 sqm G 2: 498.96 sqm

G Washing Total: 28.4 sqm

Total: 325.97 Girls House sqm

10.51m

Total: 129.70 sqm

12,60m

13.10m

8.90m G Washing and Toilet

4m

6.20m

Anlage 1.3 5.28m

7.10m

Girls Area

of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


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Grundriss Kantine 1.Stock

HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT

Anlage 1.5

of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)


Beispiel Arbeits- und Reinigungsplan Team 2 Clean

HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT

of the ICEMAN CARITY (Autor JOHANNES STRASSER)

Anlage 1.7


Anlage 1.8

Boys House 4.2

Date

Name/Team

March 2015

Morning

Evening

Supervisor

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

HEALTH & CLEANNESS CONCEPT of the ICEMAN CARITY (Autor JOHANNES STRASSER)

Remark


1. Grundreinigung und "hard cleaning" in den Schlafsälen sowie Treppenhäusern und Sanitärbereichen.

2. Schränke und Spinde müssen von innen und außen komplett gereinigt werden. 3. Reparatur aller elektronischen Geräte. 4. Reparatur aller beschädigten Gegenstände. 5. Schließen der Löcher in der Decke. 6. Reinigung der Abflüße in jedem Waschbereich. 7. Reinigung des Schlafmaterials (Decken, Kissen, Matratzen). 6 Month 1. Reinigung des Außenbereichs. 2. Reparatur aller schäden im Außenbereich. 3. Schließung aller Löcher im Außenbereich. 4. Reparatur und Instantsetzung aller Sonnendächer über den Waschbereichen. 5. Kompletter Wechsel des Sandes im Spielplatz des Kindergartens. 9 Month 1. Reparatur und Instantsetzung aller Türen. 2. Reparatur und Instantsetzung aller Toiletten. 3. Reparatur und Instantsetzung aller Ventilatoren. 1 Year 1. Reparatur und Instanntsetzung aller Fenster und Fliegengitter. 2. Reparatur aller Lampen (sowohl innen als auch außen).

HEALTH CLEANNESS CONCEPT

of the ICEMAN CARITY (Author JOHANNES STRASSER)

B5.2

B5.1

B4.2

B3.2

B3.1

B2.2

B2.1

Kindergarten/ Boy Area 3 Month

B1.2

Anlage 1.9

Kindergart en

Checkliste Kindergarten und Boys Area


32 cm

18.65 cm

16 cm

8 cm

9.325 cm

4.6 cm


Profile for Iceman Charity

Health & Cleanness Concept Wat Sakaeo (ENGL)  

The new Health and Cleanness concept for Wat Pho Orphanage

Health & Cleanness Concept Wat Sakaeo (ENGL)  

The new Health and Cleanness concept for Wat Pho Orphanage

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