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FITNESS | NUTRITION | HEALTH | MIND-BODY | FAMILY WELLNESS | COMMUNITY | FINANCIAL

COMPLIMENTARY

Camp Gladiator See page 6

INSIDE: Help Your Child Give It a “Tri!” The Dangers of Dehydration Ed Ferrin: The Man Behind the Lens

JULY–SEPTEMBER 2017

TXHWMagazines.com


bsghw a h w | TWA EB LL EL NO EF SCSO N T E N T S Nutrition

Benefits of Ancient Grains 8 A Deficient Thyroid or Low Progesterone? 11

Family Wellness Raising Awareness on Psychological Distress and Suicide Emotionally Focused Therapy: Strengthening Relationships 19 Dealing With Loss 20 The Dog Days Are Here! 21

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Kid’s Corner

The Dangers of Dehydration 22 Take Training to the Next Level 23 Bay Area Alliance 23

Community

JULY-SEPTEMBER 2017 s ghw | FITNESS

s ghw H EGladiator. A L TPhoto H by Ed Ferrin. Participants |in Camp On The Cover:

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Learn for Safety, Swim for Fun 4 | MIND & BODY Help Your Child Give It a “Tri!” 5 The “CG” Phenomenon 6

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My Dream Outweighs the Pain 12 The “PRO”s of Probiotics 13 Are All Dentists Created Equal? 14 The Heart Hero Within Us 15 Healing Hands 16 4 Ways Being Organized Benefits Your Health 17 Health Q&A 30

Community Photos 25 Ed Ferrin: The Man Behind the Lens 30 Days of Prayer: Ramadan 27 Clear Creek Community Church: Love and Serve 27

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Senior Focus Dementia Complicates Care Decisions 28

Departments Best of Bay Area Directory

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bs ghw a h w | FWR EO LML TNHEES ESD I T O R The Value of Print Both of my children are avid readers. From their very early years, books and reading have been a favorite pastime. On a recent trip to a local book store, my daughter informed that me she didn’t really like reading her books online. She shared with me her love of physical books: from the smell of a brand new book, to the excitement of touching and turning the pages while taking in every word of the story. For her, as with many of us, it is a sensory experience. As convenient as online resources can be, nothing quite takes the place of that tangible product to read and hold in your hands.

I remember clearly being a new resident in League City just three years ago. In becoming acquainted with our new home, I often picked up those “tangible” products introducing me to the area. Bay Area Health and Wellness was the one I saved. It was the one where I found local products and services that are now family staples. It is the one I shared with my husband so he could be aware of what was happening in his health care career. And, it is the one I wanted to seek to share my experience with in community education. The BAHW Magazine made a big impression on me and has now become a personal journey!

The same is true for Bay Area Health and Wellness. It is one of the main reasons we continue printing and delivering our magazine to you. Time and time again you remind us of the value of our magazine. Thank you!

I share that story because I am not alone. Join me in reading this issue as we are inspired and motivated for our workouts with Camp Gladiator, get valuable information on our gut health, find answers to those questions our parents have been asking about senior living, get tips for our dog days of summer AND so much more this issue!

Through your comments, we are reminded of the value of print. Comments telling us that you found the doctor you have been looking for through an article, the emails received asking to be a part of our magazine because “we see it in every doctor’s office,” the questions from neighbors asking for a few extra copies because they want to share it with a coworker, the health care executive telling us “this is my go to for quality information, I look for it on the shelves.” All of this reminds us of the value in what we do. We love bringing valuable resources from our community partners and helping you be the best you through health and wellness.

And, thank you for reminding me that it’s okay to be a book worm and hold that magazine in my hands! It is a privilege to work as partners bringing quality health and wellness to the Bay Area.

To Visit Us on Facebook:

To Visit Our Website:

Carrie Ermshar Editor

For information on advertising or other inquiries, visit our website at www.txhwmagazines.com or call us at 832.323.3020 Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | PO Box 1118 | Kemah, TX 77565 The publisher is not responsible for the accuracy of the articles in Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine. The information contained within has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Neither the Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | July-September 2017 publisher nor any other party assumes liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on this material. Appropriate professional advice should be sought before making decisions. ©Copyright 2017.

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Strong swimming skills are important for your child’s safety,

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for staying active, swimming can be so much more. That’s why, no matter your child’s current swim abilities, the YMCA offers a range | C U LT U R E of aquatics programs designed to foster a lifelong love for swimming and staying active through water activities. The |Y W is credited E L L NforE being S S first to develop a group swim instruction program in 1906, and has never stopped in its efforts to expand and improve swimming options for communities across the United States. Today’s aquatics programs have come a long way from that first group swim lesson. After extensive research, the Y has upgraded the model it uses to teach students how to swim. Lessons are now focused on a mastery of skills in a way that provides personalized attention and lets students set the pace of their lessons. And while improving water safety skills is a top priority at the YMCA, especially in Texas, where drowning is the second leading cause of death of children under age 14, YMCA swim lessons also build skills and confidence that encourage a lifetime of physical activity, prevent chronic disease, and increase social-emotional and cognitive well-being. With nearly year-round swimming weather, close proximity to the coast and many bodies of water, parents in Texas can especially appreciate the importance of providing their children with vital swim skills and water safety knowledge. Take Sordaya, a mother of two who came to the Y during the summer with her two daughters, Khloe, four, and Aubrey, six. Neither Sorayda nor her daughters knew how to swim. “The girls were afraid of jumping in the water,” she says. “They didn’t know how to swim at all. I was very uncomfortable and uneasy.” Her anxiety was justifiable, as she would not be able to help them in case of an accident. “I felt like their lives were at stake,” she says. With YMCA swim lessons, Khloe and Aubrey learned about water safety and how to swim. At the end of the summer, after taking daily lessons, Aubrey accidentally fell into the pool, and to her mother’s relief, was able to swim to the edge and get out by herself. The YMCA of Greater Houston also teaches adults how they can help prevent drowning. Parents and adults are advised to always watch children around water. Diligence is key – always designate a “water watcher.” Remember that any depth of water is dangerous, and drowning is quiet and quick. Additionally, adults should learn CPR and water rescue skills and place barriers around water. And, of course, children and adults alike should take formal swimming lessons. For more information on how your family can become water wise and to learn more about YMCA swim lessons, visit www.ymcahouston.org.

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Help Your Child Give It a By Erin Moeller

“Tri!”

Helping others reach their fitness goals has become a passion for local triathlete Scott Weinstein, of Pearland. Scott, a veteran triathlete, was drawn to train and compete in triathlons later in life. He recalls, “I decided in adulthood to get off the couch and do something for myself. I learned that training is a great way to stay fit so that I can keep up with my five kids.” It wasn’t until taking personal time off from his own training that he realized he was passionate about training others, especially youth. This came as no surprise, as he is also a trainer at his day job, where he teaches astronauts at Johnson Space Center. “I thought, if I can spend my days training the best of the best to reach their potential on orbit, I could teach others to reach theirs through triathlon.” Scott is now a USA Triathlon-certified Level 1 (adult), Youth and Junior coach. He believes that triathlon coaching is about encouragement and accountability. Coached training with a supportive group of athletes is one way to ensure positive reinforcement and support while working towards fitness goals. “A Triathlon is an individual sport, but there is a great deal of friendship and camaraderie to be had. Youth triathlons are notoriously positive and upbeat events that help build sportsmanship, confidence and independence.” Scott reminds us that your youth “doesn’t have to be a great swimmer, biker or runner to participate in a triathlon. They only need a positive mindset and the will to compete and finish. The first step is to turn off the screen!” His athletes are “Team Scottzilla,” who train with Powerhouse Racing in Webster. Training begins July 9th for the Kemah Youth Triathlon on October 7, 2017. Scott, who also coaches adult athletes year round, can be reached at scottzilla2014@gmail.com.

Powerhouse kids tri training is for everyone! As a father, I was passionate about running and knew that this was something my 10-year-old daughter and I could do as a family. While training, Ella has learned how to work and stick with doing something that is hard. I believe she has developed more confidence in herself and her body. I have found that some of the kids that she trains with are just looking to try a new sport, some wanted to compete competitively and some just wanted to have fun. Either way, they were excited to be coached by Scott and Powerhouse Racing. During training, the basics of staying safe were always followed and they worked with every kid as an individual to improve their skills. This was all accomplished while working out as a team with tons of positive energy. The skills learned by Ella and the other kids will carry on to other sports and, most importantly, other life lessons. We can’t wait for the next session! Keith and Ella Schreiter

Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | July-September 2017 5


Kim Cuello:

“ The

As well as being a mother of two, I’m a critical care RN who works long and stressful night shifts. My Ah-Ha moment, when I knew change had to happen, was when I started declining invitations to go out with friends and family; I didn’t feel good about how I looked; my clothes did not fit anymore. I was embarrassed and discouraged with my weight gain. After trying multiple workout videos and fad diets, I connected with a CG trainer who encouraged me to try Camp Gladiator. So I did, and loved it!! I reached my max goal weight in only 4 months, going from 31% body fat to 18%! Setting a healthy example for my family is very important to me. My husband is now working out with me 3-4 times a week and my children constantly ask, “When are we going to workout”? I am very excited that individually, with the help of my family, and CG trainers, I am succeeding at my fitness goals.

Phenomenon Tara Mayton:

I used to say, “When I get thinner, healthier and smaller, I’ll be able to eat whatever I want.” But I allowed myself to be lazy, sitting on the sidelines while life passed me by. I hit rock bottom when I realized that I was uncomfortable being around people due to my size. When tying my shoes became a chore, I knew I was in trouble. During my first experience at camp, I cried the whole time, as the reality of my health set in. I have been pushed out of my comfort zone and have begun to understand that my body is a machine and will change if I stick with the process, fuel it correctly and do the hard work. Currently, I have lost 50 lbs. and am on track to complete a 5K in less than 45 minutes. Camp Gladiator has become my lifestyle. My secret is to show up, stay accountable and remember that results in life come from hard work, not a quick fix. 6 www.txhwmagazines.com


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| hand H E selected A LT H genuine and from the heart. They are interviewed and for the job. The overall philosophy with the Camp Gladiator leadership is: “we benefit the most when we are connected to something bigger | FINANCIA than ourselves.” They are clearly motivated through their passions and their faith to honor God and serve others.

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What makes CG different? 1. Relationships! They truly look at the fitness journey as meeting F A on M your I LY you where you are and building a relationship| based personal goals. Through that, trust is earned from both the trainer and the camper. If you miss a few classes, you can | expect C U LtoThear URE from your trainer! Follow up and accountability in an inclusive atmosphere is encouraged to build that sense of accomplishment | WELLNESS and community. 2. Fun! They realize that it’s not only hard work and dedication that are required to push their campers out of their comfort zones. There must be some fun along the way. Workouts are combined with games and challenges to remind us to simply move and laugh. 3. Outside! This the main reason you may frequently spot campers in mid workout. Being outside is refreshing because we live inside too much. Even in the heat and humidity of our Gulf area, CG implements plenty of water with their workouts to ensure campers are staying healthy while getting fit outside. Not to mention the extra push and calories with increased sweat!

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By BAHW Magazine Staff The phenomenon buzzing in fitness circles throughout the Bay Area is commonly known by two letters: “CG.” You may see it on t-shirts, bumper stickers, Facebook posts, or even the exercise mats in your fitness class. You have likely seen some of their trainers working away in a local coffee shop. It is their innate ability to relate to all walks of life and a sense of work ethic that keeps them making the most of every minute, from building their business with their laptops at Starbucks to leading their daily “camps” with new levels of fitness. What exactly is Camp Gladiator? Formally, Camp Gladiator is a workout program that is revolution­ izing fitness by creating a fun and positive workout environment in an attempt to impact as many lives as possible. Informally, it has become a movement that changes lives through changing the overall lifestyle of each individual. The mantra of the trainers is to provide “the best 60 minutes of your day,” also known as “60 minutes of amazing.” Founded in 2008 by Ally and Jeff Davidson, Camp Gladiator was the result of Ally’s experience and championship on the reality TV show “American Gladiator.” Through that experience and their passion for fitness they were able to share this journey with others. What started as one training “camp” with a few individuals has now grown into numerous camps in multiple cities across the nation and over 200,000 lives impacted. South Houston, and specifically the Bay Area, are blessed with several camps, trainers, and leaders of the movement. In the Bay Area alone there are over 45 offerings of Camp Gladiator throughout a given day. Many “campers,” as the participants are referred to, rise before the sun to start their day while others choose to work out mid-morning, during their lunch hour, or after a long workday. Their intention is to provide small community settings to meet your fitness goals, while having fun and connecting with others. The trainers are not hired because of fitness excellence, but for their passion for community, helping others, and overall leadership. Meet any Camp Gladiator trainer and you will be almost overwhelmed with their innate ability to produce and perform with a sincerity that is

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The CG Phenomenon The CG phenomenon is contagious. Local campers are reaching close to the 2000 number for South Houston and 750 in just the Clear Lake and League City area. Stop and look around, you likely have seen a CG camper. They are the friend, neighbor, executive and everyone in between who share a common goal: to be the strongest and healthiest person they can be while having fun and making new friends. Be a part of the CG Phenomenon! Trainers, left to right: Andrew Contreras, Mo Cooper, Travis Vowell, Chase Williams (Regional Director), Jon Jeffrey.

Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | July-September 2017 7


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Ancient Grains

of s ghw | Benefits H E A LT H By Puja LD s ghw | Kapoor, M I NMS,DRD,&

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We hear a lot these days about whole wheat and whole grains; now we’re also hearing about ancient grains. Ancient grains are a group of grains that have remained closest to the original form | F A M I LY over time. This means they’ll have more fiber and protein compared to the refined grains because they’re less processed. The benefits of additional fiber and protein are vast, but to name a few, they | the CU LT U R E glucose levels and lead to increased satiety, which is a factor in healthy aid in regulation of blood weight management. The Dietary | W E L Guidelines L N E S Sfor Americans suggest that half of our daily intake of grains should be whole grains. Including ancient grains in your diet also gives you the opportunity to add a variety of whole grains to your meals. These grains come from all over the world—Ethiopia, Mexico, South America, Far East, India, Italy, and the Middle East! Including them in your diet will allow you to try a variety of spices, flavors, and cooking methods. These grains also work great for batch cooking and can be modified to fit into a variety of meals. Pair them with a side of fruits, vegetables, and protein, and you’re on your way to creating a balanced meal—you may even have enough for leftovers! The following table gives more details about the nutrition profile of each ancient grain. While you’re experimenting with these grains, remember to be conscious of your cooking method. If you’re monitoring your sodium intake, try to use garlic, oregano, or pepper for flavor instead of salt.

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About the Author As a native Houstonian, Puja Kapoor is very excited to serve as the H E B Houston Regional Dietitian. She completed her Bachelor of Science degree in Dietetics at The University of Texas at Austin, and furthered her education with a Master of Science degree in Nutrition at Texas A&M University at Kingsville. Puja enjoys experimenting with different foods and figuring out new ways to incorporate protein in her vegetarian diet. When she’s not cooking, eating, or educating, Puja enjoys spending time with family, friends, and her two adorable rescue dogs.

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Quinoa

• Excellent source of magnesium and iron

• High fiber

• Excellent source of protein, phosphorus, iron, and zinc

• Gluten-free

• Good source of fiber, calcium, zinc, and vitamin B6 • Can be used to thicken soups or stews, or served as its own side dish

• Gluten-free

• Excellent source of iron and magnesium

• Good source of folate, vitamin B6, and zinc

• High fiber

• Great substitute for rice or pasta

• Complete protein

• Versatile product—from burger patties to salad toppings

Millet

Sorghum

Spelt

• Gluten-free

• Contains 51 grams of whole grains per serving

• Good source of fiber and magnesium

• Gluten-free

• Complete protein

• Good source of fiber, protein and iron

• High fiber

• Excellent source of manganese and phosphorus

Farro

Kamut

Freekeh

• Excellent source of phosphorus and zinc

• Commonly said to have a nutty or buttery taste

• Mild, sweet flavor • Cooks quickly

• Easy to digest

• High fiber and protein

• Great substitute for rice or pasta

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• Good source of fiber

• Contains more nutrients than traditional wheat

• Recommend rinsing and soaking for eight hours prior to cooking

• Good source of fiber, magnesium, and phosphorus • Excellent source of manganese (mineral for optimal bone health)


THEIR SUMMER TO SHINE Summer Programs at the YMCA Y summer programs offer the perfect opportunity to make playing and learning a family goal. • Day Camp

• Swim Lessons

• Youth Sports

• Specialty Camps

Join and enjoy the member rate for your summer programs. Register today at ymcahouston.org.

YMCA Mission: To put Judeo-Christian principles into practice through programs that build healthy spirit, mind and body for all. Everyone is welcome.


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A Deficient Thyroid or Low Progesterone? By Dr. Serge Gregoire Did you know that low progesterone is often misdiagnosed as thyroid deficiency? Progesterone is one of the female sex hormones that is produced in the ovaries. It plays a critical part in menstruation and fertility. The symptoms of progesterone deficiency and hypothyroidism can be very similar. Typical symptoms of low progesterone are: • irregular menstrual cycles and periods • menstrual cramping, water retention before your period begins • heavy menstrual bleeding • migraines in the second half of the menstrual cycle • early miscarriage • infertility • breast tenderness • fatigue • weight gain • brain fog • depression Diagnosis When you don’t have enough progesterone, the amount of T4 and T3 that your thyroid gland produces decreases. Diagnosing low progesterone is challenging. It is natural for a women suffering with low thyroid like symptoms to have a thyroid blood test done. However, the progesterone deficiency will not cause the thyroid lab numbers to look abnormal. Unfortunately, testing TSH and T4 is insufficient, as the test will not detect progesterone as the problem. When a woman is not making sufficient progesterone for her needs, it may not necessarily be reflected in an abnormal T4 or T3 or TSH count. Recognizing this is as a hidden cause for low progesterone is definitely the key to accurate diagnosis. Thyroid, T3 and T4 The thyroid’s function is to convert iodine into the thyroid hormones T3 and T4. These two hormones work together to help regulate temperature, metabolism and heart rate. Without an adequate thyroid, women may become sluggish, clumsy, cold, anemic, and subject to infections, heart disease, headaches, cancer, and many other diseases and seem to be prematurely aged. Foods aren’t assimilated well, so even on a seemingly well-balanced diet, there is malnutrition. Hypothyroidism causes irregular periods and, often times, leads to

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Serge is aU clinical sghwDr. | CGregoire U LT RE nutritionist. He received his doctorate degree from McGill

sghwUniversity | WinECanada. LLNESS He completed a 7-year needless hysterectomies. Another classic manifestation of hypothyroidism is breast disease. The bottom line is, when insufficient amounts of progesterone are produced, the amount of T4 and T3 decreases.

postdoctoral training at Harvard Medical School, and holds an advance certification in Nutrition Response Testing from Ulan Nutritional Systems in Florida. Dr. Serge is a certified herbalist through the Australian College of Phytotherapy.

Estrogen The great majority of women have an excess of estrogen. This excess inhibits the release of thyroid hormone from the gland, leading to hypothyroidism over time. In this scenario, the key is to lower estrogen and increase progesterone production. On the other side, an adequate amount of thyroid hormone raises natural progesterone production and lowers estrogen. That makes it easy to see how thyroid hormone and progesterone can complement each other. What to Do About This Progesterone-Thyroid Problem? The good news is that there is a protocol that can help to correct a progesterone deficiency without the person needing to take natural progesterone. Natural progesterone refers to bioidentical hormone products that have a molecular structure identical to the hormones our bodies manufacture naturally. Today’s natural progesterone creams typically contain diosgenin from wild yam that grow in Mexico or from soybeans. Many people would prefer to take natural progesterone continuously rather than follow a strict natural treatment protocol. Besides not permanently correcting the problem, there are also potential risks with taking natural progesterone. Even though it is natural, it still is possible to overdose, and this has happened to many people. Although natural progesterone can help many people with a thyroid condition, it is important to keep in mind that many people with a progesterone deficiency don’t need to take natural progesterone, and by following a natural treatment protocol their body will eventually be able to produce progesterone on its own. Three things can be done to achieve this goal: 1. Lower the excess of estrogen by better supporting the liver function. 2. Increase the production of progesterone by the adrenals/ ovaries. 3. Handling nutritional deficiencies and optimize diet. Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | July-September 2017 11


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the s ghw | F A M I Outweighs LY By Claudia Martinez Walking desk, I s ghw | CupUtoL the T Uadmissions RE knew the routine. I stretched my arm out

for my hospital band identifying a name, a

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me during my many stays. It is simple: my brain is too large for my skull. Despite this fact, and brain surgery after brain surgery which has occupied my life for many years, I continue to have a dream. I am not willing to sacrifice and give up on my dream of becoming a medical doctor in the face of fighting Chiari Malformation. Here is my journey. What is Chiari Malformation? Chiari is, typically, a congenital mal­ formation of the brain where part of the cerebellum herniates out of the bottom of the skull into the spinal column, compressing the brainstem. Some individuals with the condition are completely asymptomatic, showing no symptoms, while others experience mild to severe headaches and motor and sensory problems. As for myself, what began as tolerable headaches soon escalated to severe pain, blackouts, seizures, sensory issues, numbness and tremors in my extremities, blurry vision, ataxia, vomiting, and weight loss due to difficulty swallowing.

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Initially, my doctors didn’t know what was wrong. It wasn’t until I met my neurosurgeon that my life changed. Within two weeks of meeting him I had my first brain surgery to prevent me from becoming paralyzed. Since 2011, I have undergone a total of 6 brain surgeries, 3 shunt surgeries, 1 feeding tube surgery, countless hospitalizations, and suffered 1 brainstem stroke, all while completing my undergraduate degree and now wrapping up my 2nd year at McGovern Medical School at UTHealth. Most recently, on February 6, 2017, I underwent my 6th brain surgery. During surgery I suffered a stroke to my brainstem, leaving me unable to function from the neck down. I was then transferred to TIRR Memorial Hermann Hospital for intensive neuro-rehabilitation. As an inpatient at TIRR Memorial Hermann Hospital, I’ve had to relearn how to walk, dress, feed, and bathe myself, sit up, eat, and I am still relearning how to use both my hands as I currently do not have any function in them. Lying in a hospital day after day, I always imagined myself on the other side of the bed as the doctor and not the patient. Ironically, I’m currently attending McGovern Medical School in the Texas Medical Center, affiliated with Memorial Hermann Hospital, the same hospital that has treated me all these years. Now many of the physicians who have and are taking care of me-- are now teaching me. No matter how difficult my journey has been I never allowed it to hinder my plan of becoming a doctor and I hope it shows others that it shouldn’t hinder theirs either. Yes, the journey toward your destination may be different than most and yes, it may be extremely difficult, but

an illness doesn’t have to be the end of your life, it can be the beginning. Many say I’m an inspiration, someone who needs to share their story with the world. But I’m just a girl who has a dream, a dream that far outweighs all the pain and sickness I have to endure. You can follow my journey on Instagram @ claudiaimartinez.


The

Of By Dr. Adivtya (Adi) Malhotra

Probiotic is a preparation containing live bacteria that is taken orally to restore beneficial bacteria to the body. A probiotic supplement is made of a “friendly” or “good” bacteria. They are ubiquitous (universal) and symbiotic throughout the gastrointestinal system, where they have an important and protective role. History of probiotics The credit for discovering probiotics or simply “good bacteria” goes to Russian scientist and Nobel Prize winner, Elie Metchnikoff of the Pasteur Institute in Paris. In 1907, working in Bulgaria, Metchnikoff was intrigued as to why certain inhabitants of the Bulgarian population lived much longer than others. His research led him to discover that the villagers living in the Caucasus Mountains were drinking a fermented yoghurt drink called “Kefir” on a daily basis. His studies found that a probiotic called Lactobacillus bulgaricus improved their health and may have helped the longevity of their lives. Metchnikoff ’s pioneering research prompted him and others to look further into probiotics, leading scientists to discover many types of probiotics, such as Lactobacillus acidophilus, Saccharomyces boulardii, and Bifidobacterium infantis, all of which have various properties and different beneficial effects on the body. How do probiotics help me? Probiotics are a mix of healthy bacteria, and studies have shown them to have beneficial effects on gastrointestinal health. Gastroenterologists routinely see patients reporting beneficial effects of probiotics for bloating, abdominal cramps, diarrhea and constipation. • Probiotics also aid in the digestion of food, manufacturing vitamins B-12 and Vitamin K. • Probiotics support our immune systems. They inhibit the action of disease-causing alkaline bacteria by maintaining an acidic environment in the gut. • Probiotics can also increase the nutritional value of some foods by augmenting the breakdown and absorption of nutrients. Some produce antibiotics and are anti-carcinogenic. • Some probiotics boost the immune system and help prevent urinary tract infections, vaginal infections, and inflammatory bowel disease. • There are numerous other claims that have yet to be proven scientifically, but existing research leaves no doubt that some probiotics do exert positive effects, especially on the intestinal tract.

Why do we need probiotics more in the 21st century than we did in the 20th century? There are multiple reasons why the use of probiotics is more helpful to us in the 21st century than the last century. We are living in the Era of Antibiotic; although they have been lifesaving, they have created some new problems, as their usage has risen exponentially. It is widely recognized that antibiotics cause imbalances in the protective flora of the gastrointestinal and vaginal tracts, leading to weakened immune systems and digestive problems. Taking probiotics helps to negate the detrimental effects of antibiotics. Other factors which lead to a depletion of healthy bacteria include the chlorination of water and the addition of pesticides in our food.

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About the Author

Dr. Adi Malhotra is a Board sghw | C U LT U R E Certified Gastroenterologist and Hepatologist in the Coastal Gastroenterology ELLN Assoc., located inW Webster. He moved to the U.S. in 2003. After a year of research training at Yale University, he moved to Texas where he completed a residency in Internal Medicine and a Fellowship in Gastroenterology at UTMB, Galveston, and MD Anderson Cancer Institute. He has been serving the greater Galveston community for the last 13 years. He is married and is blessed with a 7 year old son, and a 4 year old daughter.

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How do I know which probiotic to take? Choosing the right probiotic for you and/or your family can be overwhelming. With hundreds of different brands to choose from, how do you know which one is best for your needs? Very importantly, look for a probiotic that is delayed release. This allows the capsule to bypass the acid in the stomach and populate the bowels with the beneficial bacteria. A delayed release probiotic is designed to release in the digestive tract, where the probiotics need to be. Choose a probiotic with a high potency of live bacteria. This will ensure maximum effectiveness and a greater chance of survival to the cultures contained in the capsule. Vegetable capsules contain no milk, wheat or soy products, making that a valuable choice of probiotic. Remember to use shelf-stable probiotics; these are easy to store and the beneficial effects are guaranteed since the bacteria are freeze dried and variable when ingested.

Our Story

Over the last few years, the probiotic market has seen rapid growth. Dr. Adi Malhotra (Founder of Simply Biotic), a practicing gastroenterologist, realized that his patients are buying poor quality probiotics with low bacterial counts (measured in CFU). This is a disturbing national trend observed by his colleagues in other parts of the country, as well. In a quest to give the best probiotics to his patients, he formulated Simply Biotic and Simply Biotic plus. These probiotics are available in his office at 1015 Medical Center Blvd, Ste 1300, Webster 77598. Order online at www.simplybiotic.com or Call 800-471-2596. Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | July-September 2017 13

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Are all dentists created equal? Well the simple answer to that question is…….Yes & No! | F A M I LY Yes. All dentists have graduated from a four year | Cdental U L school T U Rand E all dentists are licensed by their State Boards. This education and license provides patients with WELLNESS minimum| care. AND No. The difference is found in each individual dentist’s desire to continue their education and expand their professional goals. Professional growth is achieved with additional education and the application of that education to each patient’s dental health. By continually increasing skills and understanding how the scientific research impacts dental health, the dentist can keep up with the latest technological advances that dentistry has to offer. It is the dentist’s commitment to lifelong learning that has a direct effect on the quality of dentistry that patients receive.

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What to look for when selecting a dentist Education: When selecting a dentist, education and professional qualifications should be a top priority. Dental offices can provide information about the dentist’s training. Consider asking questions to the office staff; think of it as an interview process and you are searching for the best candidate. Always make sure the dentist is licensed. Most dental boards have websites that provide this information. Since education is directly related to the quality of care that you will receive, it is important to have a dentist who is progressive, committed to education and using the latest technological advances. Trust and Comfort Level: Always consider whether or not you feel comfortable with the dentist. Does the dentist listen to your concerns? Do you feel like you can honestly talk with him/her about your dental needs? Communication and trust between the dentist and patient is important in receiving the care that you deserve and feeling comfortable with the dental procedures being done. This is why 14 www.txhwmagazines.com

finding the right type of practice is so important; relationships take time, and there must be time to talk with the Doctor. Type of Practice: All the education, preparation, and training by the dentist are for naught unless there is a relationship of trust. Trust is developed through careful and thorough exams, listening/ understanding, and developing a shared action plan for optimal oral health. Finding a dentist that will take the time to establish this trust and a treatment plan that is in your best interest will save you time, money, and discomfort in the long run.

About the Author

Dr. Chet Hawkins grew up in the Clear Lake area. He graduated from Clear Lake High School in 1974, Baylor University in 1978, and University of Texas Dental Branch in 1983. He was mentored by his father, Dr. Darrell V. Hawkins, who was the first dentist in Clear Lake City. Dr. Chet Hawkins prides himself in his continuing education. He is always expanding on his educational pedigree and has 1000s of hours of continuing training.

Meet Dr. Hawkins: Dr. Hawkins is among an elite group of dental professionals who have earned a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He first attended The Pankey Institute, completing a five year continuum where he first earned his Fellowship, followed by his Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. This required thousands of hours of study and hands-on work. Less than 1% of general dentists in the world have attained this status. The continuing education that Dr. Chet Hawkins has received continues to benefit his patients in many ways. A new patient is taken through an extensive new patient exam where he not only examines the patient’s teeth, but the condition of their gums, the condition of their bite, and how all of these conditions interrelate with overall health. By understanding how the chewing system impacts overall health, Dr. Hawkins can assist patients in creating a customized long-term dental master plan. To experience total patient care, don’t hesitate to call our office at 281-488-4242.

Dental Health Glossary

Abscess: an infection of a tooth, soft tissue or bone. Alveolar Bone: the bone surrounding the root of the tooth, anchoring it in place. Loss of this bone is a possible sign of periodontal or gum disease. Cyst: an abnormal sac containing gas, fluid, or a semisolid material. Decay: destruction of tooth structure caused by toxins produced by bacteria Gingivitis: inflamed, swollen, and reddish gum tissue that may bleed easily when touched or brushed. If not properly treated, may lead to tooth loss and destruction of the tissue that surrounds and supports the teeth. Leukoplakia: a white or gray patch that develops on the tongue or the inside of the cheek. is the mouth’s reaction to chronic irritation of the mucous membranes of the mouth. Periodontitis: an advanced stage of periodontal disease where the inner layer of the gums and bone pull away from the teeth. The alveolar bone is destroyed. Scaling and root planning: a deep-cleaning, nonsurgical procedure where plaque and tartar are scraped away and rough spots on the tooth are made smooth. Xerostomia: dry mouth or a decrease in the production of saliva in the mouth.

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The Heart Hero Within Us

Clear Creek ISD Youth, Teachers Pushing for Heart Health By Michelle Mason and Madeline Pena For many students within Clear Creek Independent School District, a heart hero is more than just a slogan: it’s a super power. Gilmore Elementary Heart Heroes Kaitlyn, Chase and Tristan’s, lives have changed because of the efforts of the American Heart Association. Three Heart Heroes: The Story of Kaitlyn, Chase and Tristan Kaitlyn Russell was diagnosed at birth with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome. The disease, which prevents the left side of the heart from developing, caused her to have a total of three heart surgeries before she reached age three. Now, she participates in dance, plays on the school volleyball team, and will soon start gymnastics. Chase Hendrickson was born with Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) and diagnosed when he was only two years old. ASD is a hole in the wall that separates the top two chambers of the heart. Doctors were unable to repair his heart because the hole was too large, so they had to wait until he was six years old. Fortunately, Chase’s second surgery attempt was successful and doctors could cover the hole with a mesh implant. Chase is now a very active eleven-year-old boy. Tristan Schumann was also diagnosed with ASD and, at seven years old, was told he needed open heart surgery. Despite the scary surgery, Tristan said he never cried, showing that he is a true super hero. It is because of the impact of Jump Rope for Heart and local research that these three students are alive today. Janel Wells, a Physical Education coach for Gilmore Elementary, says it’s important for the students in her class to know the stories of their peers so they can make a connection with the importance of Jump Rope for Heart. Brandi Vorse’s Story Brandi Vorse, a physical education coach at Mossman Elementary, agrees with the impact of Jump Rope for Heart and says she got involved after suffering two terrible losses in her family. “On April 20, 2011, my four-year-old nephew, Cade, passed away from Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy at soccer practice,” said Vorse. “He collapsed while running on the field.“ Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) can affect people of any age. It is a common cause of sudden cardiac arrest in young people, including young athletes. HCM occurs if the heart muscle cells enlarge and cause the ventricle walls of to thicken.

Cade’s death was so sudden that his parents immediately had their one-yearold daughter, Addison, tested for heart disease. A few weeks after testing Addison, they learned that she also suffered from HCM, and she was put on the heart transplant list. Sadly, Addison passed away before she could get a new heart. “When [they] passed away, I learned so much about the American Heart Association and all the things they do and the amazing things that can be done by helping to fund more research,” said Vorse. “When I switched to coaching P.E., I made the choice to participate in Jump Rope for Heart. My students know my story and why participating in Jump Rope for Heart is so important to me.”

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Michelle Mason is the Director of Communications for the American CHeart U LT U R E Association and a former reporter. Michelle’s work has been featured onW several E Llocal LNES news affiliates and national news including ABC News, CNN, Fox News, as well as the Houston Chronicle.

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Madeline Pena is the Director of Communications for the Youth Market Division of the American Heart Association and a former reporter. Madeline worked for KPRC Channel 2 News as a Multimedia Journalist and is an avid lifestyle blogger. You can check out her work at the looplyfe.com.

Kid-Related Research The national education and fundraising program, sponsored by the American Heart Association (AHA) and the Society of Health and Physical Education (SHAPE), raises money for children with Congenital Heart Defects through jumping rope, while teaching kids how to keep their own hearts healthy while helping other kids with special hearts through charitable giving. Over 1.3 million Americans alive today have some form of congenital heart defect. In the United States, about 40,000 children are born with a heart defect each year. At least 8 of every 1,000 infants born each year have a heart defect. While the causes of congenital heart defects are still under investigation, AHA funded scientists and physicians are making progress. Thanks to the AHA’s efforts, three years ago, a legislation was passed requiring all newborns to receive a mandatory Pulse Oximetry Screening to test for congenital heart defects. Over 83,000 babies born in the Greater Houston area will receive this screening this coming year due to continuous research funded through Jump Rope for Heart programs. To learn more about Jump Rope for Heart, visit www.heart.org and search Jump Rope for Heart. To get involved with a local Jump Rope for Heart Program, contact Samantha.Fewell@heart.org. Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | July-September 2017 15


Healing Hands

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The hands of our community are always outreached to those who are in need. We know there are many that take of their time, money, education and talents to better the lives of others. Meet three health care providers that are doing just that.

Dr. Nicholas Howland, MD Plastic & Reconstructive Surgeon In April, I was fortunate enough to go on a medical mission trip with the Austin Smiles group to San Salvador, El Salvador. We saw over 80 patients in 1 day and then performed surgery on more than 40 of them over the next 4 days. Surgeries ranged from cleft lip and cleft palate to cleft nasal reconstruction and complete midface/jaw reconstructions. The experience was so amazing. One that I will never forget. It was exciting, humbling, rewarding, sad...so many emotions all wrapped up into one week. I am looking forward to going back to El Salvador and on other medical mission trips as I transition from residency into private practice. Please check out the Austin Smiles Facebook page for more details on our El Salvador trip.

Stuart Cayer Director of Operations at Kelsey-Seybold Hope for Honduras is a not for profit organization that provides a church, daily feeding, Bible Kinder, Spanish school tutoring program, Bilingual school, medical clinic and other services for a community of over 100,000 living in extreme poverty. The work done is not to change the community’s culture, but to help its members develop a lasting and sustaining relationship with Jesus Christ. While Hope for Honduras has been active in the community of Mogote, since 2002, my wife, Sharon, and I became active three years ago. We are now sponsoring two Honduran children in Mogote and three more Honduran children through Compassion International. During our trip in June, we will package and deliver food to the poor, teach English and assist with other school activities, help erect a very small house for a family in need, play with the children and share the Gospel. Honduras is in our blood forever. We love the people and it’s hard to imagine not being part of a great organization and community.

Dr. Shahin Tavackoli Cardiologist and Clinical Assistant Professor at Baylor College of Medicine

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Operacion San Andres (OSA) is a Christian, faith-based, non-governmental organization with a mission concentrated on empowering the people of Collique, Peru through education, promotion of health and also improving their living conditions. My practice partner Dr. Luis A. Campos and his wife, Ruth Campos first started this project 13 years ago. I became involved in OSA as a physician who was/is eager to participate in charities in general, and in my partner’s endeavor (OSA) in particular. He typically takes a team of physicians and other healthcare providers, a team of construction workers (to help with the housing difficulties in Collique) and also educators, twice a year to Peru. I have travelled with him on two occasions and intend to go every April. We spend a week providing healthcare in the OSA clinic, which then continues its operation through telemedicine for the rest of the year. We provide free medicine and free medical advice and are thankful for the opportunity to be of service to the people of Collique.


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Have you ever considered how your environment affects your health? Research in the field of mind and body has shown that there are definite links between our surroundings and our wellbeing. A positive environment does more than just improve our mood, it can affect our immune system and physical health. As a Professional Organizer, I have seen first hand the immediate positive impact being organized can have.

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Benefits Your By Jasmin Barrantes

Less Stress and Depression A study published in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin found that people whose environments were cluttered and disorganized were more depressed, fatigued and had higher levels of the stress hormone Cortisol than those whose environments were in order. An organized environment can make you feel happier and more relaxed. Being surrounded by clutter and disorganization is like dragging heavy baggage around with you all day. Getting organized will help you to experience a sense of freedom and control. Better Sleep Recent studies on sleeping disorders showed that people who sleep in a cluttered room took longer to fall asleep and are more tired due to restless sleep. Experts warn that, as a result, they are more likely to suffer from memory loss, poor concentration and slow thinking, thereby compromising their cognition. In addition to affecting your mood, lack of sleep can impact your overall health and make you prone to serious medical conditions, such as obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. Eat Better and Lose Weight Psychology Journal found that when your kitchen is organized with healthy ingredients in easily accessible places, you will naturally make healthier choices. Clean kitchen counters will also make healthy meal preparation more likely, as it increases your creativity. According to WebMD, you will be more likely to choose to exercise as a result of extra energy.

About the Author Jasmin Barrantes is the owner of The Nest Organizer, a professional organizing company that serves the greater Bay Area. She has a degree in Sociology, over 20 years of real estate experience, and is a wife and mother. Jasmin has an affinity towards life and creating tranquil spaces. TheNestOrganizer.com. (409) 292-NEST (6378)

Better Relationships We are social creatures and relationships are important to our health and wellbeing. Benjamin Franklin once said, “For every minute spent organizing, an hour is earned.” When our surroundings are chaotic, we lose a lot of time looking for things. This takes away valuable time that could be spent with the people we love. Clutter can also cause tension and conflict with others. Further, the embarrassment of clutter or a messy home can keep us from seeing friends or being social. More importantly, clutter and disorganization could be keeping us from having a meaningful relationship with ourselves. Being disorganized takes away our self-esteem, feeling of being in control and joy, in general. Who knew that being organized was just another part of healthy living? Though I only listed 4 ways, the benefits are endless. Become organized today and start experiencing great changes in your health and life. In the words of the great mind of Deepak Chopra, “all great changes are preceded by chaos.” So don’t put off your good health and well being a minute longer. Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | July-September 2017 17


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With public figures like Prince William and Prince Harry, among other high profile F A Mout I LY celebrities,| speaking about mental health, the visibility and importance of addressing emotional/psychological warning signs seems | C U LT U R E to be rising in our collective consciousness. The national campaign “Change Direction” emphasizes the E importance | W L L N E of S Srecognizing five signs that someone is experiencing emotional or psychological distress. These signs include personality change, agitation, withdrawal, poor self-care, and isolation. More information and resources are available at www.changedirection.org. While not equivalent to mental illness, these signs can signal early warnings of further problems, including a mental illness and/or suicidal ideation. Early awareness and detection, along with adequate support and treatment, can help guide individuals toward hope and recovery.

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Suicide Unrecognized and untreated, psychological distress and mental health problems, especially depression, can lead to suicidal ideation and death by suicide. Suicide rates continue to climb across the country and are affecting many of our communities in staggering numbers. While always a tragedy, it is particularly troubling when suicide enters the lives of our teens and youth. Given the extent of this problem and the rising rates of suicide, the following are suggestions about what to look for and how to act if we see something that is concerning. In addition to the five signs of psychological distress, suicide has specific warning signs, which include, but are not limited to: 1. Threats of self-harm/suicide (75% of time) 2. Change in habits/personality/appearance 3. Giving away of prized possessions 4. Sudden change in mood, or prolonged sadness, despair 5.  Sudden calmness (sometimes the result of making a decision to end one’s life) 6. Sleep problems 7. Major life crisis 8. Setting affairs in order 9. Attempts or self-harm history

About the Author Dr. Mike Olson is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. He graduated with his Master’s degree from Brigham Young University and his Ph.D. from Kansas State University. Following his graduate studies, he completed a post-doctoral research and clinical fellowship in Behavioral Medicine from UTMB, Galveston. He served as the Director of Behavioral Medicine at both the University of Nebraska Medical Branch in Omaha and the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston.

What Can We Do? There are 7 things that can do when suicide is a concern for our loved one. 1. First, Be aware of the signs (both the 5 signs and specific signs of suicide). 2. Stop and talk. 3. Call crisis line (1-800-273-8255), 911, and stay with person until help arrives. 4. Express concern and support, listen without judgment, correction, or dismissal. 5. Ask directly about intent or thoughts to die by suicide. 6. If individual is in your home, remove firearms, medications, etc. that could pose a risk. 7. Finally, continue to be a support and make sure professional help is being provided to address underlying risk factors for suicide, including mental/emotional illness, substance/alcohol use/abuse, abuse and/or trauma. Step Forward into Those Lives around You In our Western culture, we often privilege others independence and autonomy and are reluctant to ask or get involved in others business. This can be particularly true in our state where “pull yourself up by the bootstraps” can often be the dominant mantra. The push nationally and the theme of many campaigns to raise awareness and to change direction is to fight through these initial impulses to step back and rather, step forward and into the lives of those around you. As a clinician, I’ve never experienced a patient staying angry at someone who stepped into their lives because they were concerned. There may be initial resistance or frustration, but usually, as the person gets help and feels better, they are grateful. You don’t have to be a professional to let someone know that you care for them and put them in touch with resources that can help.

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Emotionally Focused Therapy: By Jennifer Carlin

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Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists (LMFT) are uniquely trained to diagnose and provide therapy/treatment to individuals, couples, and families. A significant portion of this training is working with the complexities of systems (more than one person in the room) and relationships. While many therapists will advertise that they provide couple/family therapy, they are often not trained or competent to the extent that a LMFT would be. Given the importance of relationships in our lives, especially those closest to us in our families, it is critical to be educated about what the evidence tells us about how to best help couples and families heal and not dissolve into divorce, separation, etc. where it can be avoided. Within the couple/family approaches that have been studied in the research literature, Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) has been shown to be the most effective approach, considering long-term benefits and relapse rates. Communication and problem-solving (behavioral therapies) have strong evidence of success while in treatment, but poor outcomes when couples are measured 3, 6, and 12 months later. The EFT approach is a validating, nonblaming and empowering approach to therapy, particularly for men who often feel blamed and “beat up” in therapy offices. EFT was developed by Dr. Sue Johnson, a therapist/researcher who based this approach on 50 years of research, focusing on relational bonding. The goal of Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) is to

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create and maintain a powerful and lifelong | MIND & BODY secure connection within a relationship. Within each Emotionally Focused Therapeutic Session, the therapist will guide and support clients | FtoA MAbout I LY the Author have a deeper connection and relate in ways that Jennifer Carlin is a Licensed Marriage and promote healthy, safe attachment and bonding. Therapist | C U L TFamily UR E Associate Using a non-judgmental and supportive and Licensed Professional approach, EFT therapists create emotional Counselor Intern. Jennifer safety for both partners that allows emotional graduated | W E L L N Efrom S Sthe Marriage and psychological barriers to be brought down. and Family Therapy Program at University of Houston A main goal/focus of this approach is to identify Clear Lake. Jennifer is a the couple’s negative patterns and dance around Certified Facilitator in unhealthy attachment/security and to gently several premarital counseling direct them to a new way of relating to each programs and a Certified Mediator for the State of other that fosters trust, safety, and an ability Texas. Jennifer has extensive to meet each other’s needs in the relationship. training in Emotionally Throughout the process of Emotionally Focused Therapy, and is Focused therapy (EFT), the couple is able to currently training with an create, restructure and learn to maintain a true EFT supervisor working towards EFT Certification. partnership and connection. The goal is to move She currently works at the couples/families away from the therapist office South Shore Center For with a connection/bond that will sustain them Couples & Families. long-term.

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Lesson One: Loss Affects Us All The loss of a loved one is an inevitable part of life. The sadness and emptiness felt after a loss is something that may continue to surface for years and even through a lifetime. While grief is a normal reaction to loss, it can sometimes develop into other complications and even depression. Knowing what to expect and how to get help when needed can help individuals navigate through dark waters.

By Jill Roper I grew up in what would be called a perfect family. My immediate family consisted of my Dad, Mom, two older brothers and me. I had a wonderful relationship with my mom. I was the baby girl that she had waited years for. She gave me so much in life. Anything I wanted, I was given. Together we did everything; we traveled to Europe, ate at 5 star restaurants, and attended cultural events; she was my best friend. I was also blessed to have a close relationship with my extended family, especially my Aunt Sherlene, whom I loved dearly. Life in small town Oklahoma was simple and seemed, to me, to be perfect. It was on a beautiful fall day in October, I was only 20 years old, when my life was turned upside down. I was newly married to my high school sweetheart and studying at Texas State University. I had just finished midterms and was leaving class when my husband called and asked me to meet him immediately at the local Walmart parking lot. I thought this was odd, but met him there anyway. It was there that he explained to me my mother had been killed. My sweet mother, whom I had never lived without, whom I could NOT live without, was killed instantly in a car accident. I heard him saying the words, but disbelief set in. I could not understand and absolutely could not accept what he was saying. Through the pain, I was reminded that I would still have family, and especially my Aunt Sherlene, by my side. She promised me that “you will always have me.” These words brought peace to my heart, only to be grief stricken again a week later. She was diagnosed with stage 5 cancer one week after my mom passed away. She died three weeks later. I had lost two of the women who were dearest to my heart within a three week period. The grief did not end there, within the next 11 months, my uncle was diagnosed with and passed away from brain cancer. His death affected me in a different, yet no less profound, way. Through these deaths, as well as the death of other family members, I experienced overwhelming heartache, hurt, sorrow, sadness and GRIEF. The intense pain of losing loved ones has shaped me as a person, and now, as a Marriage and Family Therapist, I want to help others who are dealing with loss. Through my journey, I have learned two important lessons: 20 www.txhwmagazines.com

About the Author Jill earned her Master’s Degree in Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) at Texas A&M-Corpus Christi. Jill has worked with children, families and couples in all different types of settings including: volunteering, state agencies, private organizations and HOSPICE. She is currently working at the South Shore Center For Couples & Families.

Lesson Two: Grief Is A Journey There is no “right” pathway through grief. Grief is universal and people from all walks of life feel sorrow, pain, and mourn when someone they love passes on. While the path of grief and healing is individual, there are some common experiences that many people feel. Elisabeth Kubler Ross articulated these stages. People will experience different parts of these grief reactions at different times and sequences, and that is normal. The five stages of grief are: 1. Denial & Isolation: Denial is the first reaction, and our own defense against the painful reality of loss. 2. Anger: Our minds might understand the cause of death, but our hearts may feel betrayed that we have been left, making us feeling angry. 3. Bargaining: Because you can’t control the reality, often times, bargains are made in an attempt to change the situation. “I will do anything if only she does not die!” 4. Depression: Feelings of depression are a normal part of mourning. However, at times, grief/loss can develop into a clinical depression requiring professional help. 5. Acceptance: The ultimate goal is to come to terms with the death of a loved one. The longing that is felt to have that person back can be devastating. Sometimes, additional help is needed to navigate the process of grief and loss. Therapy and support groups can be a valuable resource and place to relate to others who have gone through similar painful experiences.

After losing someone to death remember: • Take one day at a time, maybe even one hour or one minute at a time. Give yourself time to heal.

• Concentrate or focus on all that is good. Be grateful and thankful for the time you had with the loved one.

• Do not become stuck in a place of feeling sorry for yourself. • After a death, you must continue with your own life, but at the same time accept the pain. • Cry if you need to.

• Talk to someone and share the feelings you are experiencing.

• Create a way to remember or honor the loved one.


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By Gerda Purdy The Dog Days Are Here! sghw | H E A LT H Life can be hectic and often times, stressful. Exercise plays an important role in reducing stress, strengthening our bodies and rejuvenating our minds. The same holds true for “man’s best friend.” The benefits of daily walking and playing for our dogs are endless. However, during the hot summer months, it takes a little more thought and creativity to fulfill your dog’s need for exercise and play. Consider the following ideas to help your dog get the exercise he/she needs. • Go swimming with your dog. If you don’t have a pool, your dog might still enjoy a plastic children’s pool or simply turn on the sprinklers. You might also check out “Rummy’s Beach Club”. • Get a “Flirt Pole” (for additional information, visit “Longoriahaus.com”). This game should be played in the early morning or late evening. It’s a very efficient way to wear out your dog without wearing out the human. A good rule of thumb is that a heat index above 84 degrees is too hot to put a dog through strenuous exercise.

• Go for a walk. In addition to observing the F I your N Ahand N ConIthe AL temperatures,|place pavement for five seconds. If it’s hot for you, it’s too hot for your dog’s pads as well. | MIND & BODY • Indoor activities might include a dog powered treadmill (a regular treadmill will work as well, however compact ones not, due to safety | FA Mwill I LY concerns). • Remote Food Dispensers are a wonderful way | Cearn U LhisTkibbles. U R EHave the dog to have your dog perform a task, then dispense a little food. • Tracking food/treats | W Ewill L Lchallenge N E S Syour dog’s sense of smell. Hiding treats throughout the house and sending your dog to find them is very entertaining and an activity any family member can participate in. • Last but not least: have fun! It is so important to have some meaningful interaction with your dog every day. Treat your dog like the friend that he/she is and build trust and relationship one day at a time.

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About the Author (Pictured Here) Gerda Purdy was born and raised in Bonn, Germany. Throughout her life, she realized that she enjoyed everything about having a dog and that they truly are the most beautiful companions and friends. In 2011, she and her husband adopted a German Shepherd, Markus. In the process of trying to train him, she reached out to Longoriahous Dog Training for support. Gerda has been the office assistant there since 2013. Learn more about Longoriahaus Dog Training at Longoriahaus Dog Training.com or call 281 978 6956 to set up an appointment.

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KIDS HEALTH: By Dr. Hanan Hussein As a mother of two active boys, and a family medicine physician, I understand the importance of keeping our children active and healthy throughout the year. This is trickier throughout the summer months because of the high humidity and heat. Becoming dehydrated can and will sabotage our children’s ability to stay healthy and strong. The Importance of Water: Never underestimate the body’s need for water. The perfect illustration of the importance of water is the analogy of a car. Everyone knows that a car without gas is useless. When your car needs fuel, you simply fill it with gasoline. The car then converts the gas into motion and you have a working vehicle. This is the case with water and our bodies. Water is critical in regulating everything--all cells, organs, and tissues. The Dangers of Dehydration: Our children cannot be healthy if they are dehydrated. Dehydration happens when more water leaves the body than is taken in. Simply, bodies do not have enough water to perform normal functions. It is important to know that kids lose water everyday by sweating, crying, peeing, breathing and through evaporation from the skin. When assessing if your child is dehydrated, it is important to know that your child might not feel thirsty and can still be dehydrated. Do not depend on your child’s indication of thirst to asses if your child is dehydrated. Instead, look for these warning signs:

1. dry sticky mouth 2. tiredness 3. dizziness 4. peeing less 5. dry skin 6. sunken eyes Staying Hydrated: A good rule of thumb when dealing with children is that they should be drinking every 20 minutes during a physical activity. It IS important what they drink…not all drinks are created equal. When choosing a drink for your child, please avoid sugary, caffeinated drinks. Sodas drinks are definitely a NO. If all you have is juice and flavored juice drinks, it is not the best option, but it is better than nothing. Water is the best!

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About the Author Dr. Hanan Hussein is a board certified family physician by the ABFM and a Fellow with the AAFP. She has been serving the Galveston County area for the last twelve years at UTMB, Galveston. She has received various awards such as the John P. McGovern Academy of Oslerian Medicine, Excellence in Clinical Teaching Award and UTMB Family Medicine Residency Program and Teacher of the Year Award in 2013 and 2016.

Composes 75% of Your Brain Helps Carry Nutrients and Oxygen to Your Cells

Makes Up 83% of Your Blood

Moistens Oxygen for Breathing

Removes Waste

Helps Convert Food to Energy

Composes 22% of Your Bones Protects and Cushions Your Vital Organs

Cushions Your Joints

Makes Up 75% of Your Muscles

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Helps Your Body Absorb Nutrients


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Take Training to the Next Level

By Reggie Rusk In a culture that is steeped in video games, movies, texting and all the conveniences of modern technology, it is hard to keep our children active. It is far easier to hand a child a device to keep them busy, but is it really in their best interest? As a former NFL player and a professional trainer, I know first hand how sports can change a child’s life. Participating in sports is not only the vehicle to health and fitness, it also teaches life lessons that kids need: lessons of confidence, self control and strength. Through sports training, a child learns how to cooperate and work along side of others. The most important benefit is to build a child’s self-confidence. I have worked with kids who lack in confidence because of weight issues or being bullied, for example. Once they start seeing themselves get stronger, notice physical change, and learn what they are capable of, they start to gain confidence. Research shows that children who are active have fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression. Athletic training also delays or prevents chronic diseases, such as heart disease, obesity, and diabetes.

About the Author

Why sports and athletic training? Children of all ages and backgrounds benefit from athletic and sports training. Training with a professional trainer will take the skill to the next level, especially if you are serious about playing sports in college or professionally. In addition to overall health, sports training focuses on improving specific skill sets that a child needs to be successful. These workouts are hand tailored for your child’s needs.

Reggie Rusk is a Texas City native. He played college football at CCSF in California and was awarded the MVP, All Conference and Outstanding Defensive Back, Juco All American and Defensive Back of the Year. He later transferred to University of Kentucky to play football, after which he was drafted by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. He played for five NFL seasons. He currently owns and operates the Next Level Sports Performance and is passionate about coaching. You can reach him at 281914-2351.

KID’S CORNER

Bay Area Alliance By Amanda McLauchlin

The Bay Area Alliance for Youth & Families is a unique organization with a mission to unite and mobilize a community to create an alcohol and drug-free future for our youth. Unlike a traditional non-profit, the Alliance is a community coalition – tasked with bringing in people from across the community together to implement meaningful change. Since September of 2010, the Alliance has been working on programs and initiatives to address the rising problems associated with prescription drug misuse and abuse. Since then, the Alliance has coordinated 14 Medication Take Back sites across the Bay Area, seen over 3,000 cars and collected over 14,000 pounds of medications. The Alliance also partnered with the City of Nassau Bay to install a permanent Medication Drop Box in the lobby of their City Hall and Police Station. In addition to Take Back efforts, the Alliance has also worked diligently to educate the community – both youth and adults – about the dangers of prescription drug use and abuse. Recently, the Alliance received an additional stipend from the Texas Health and Human Services Commission in the amount of $7,480 to install an additional permanent drop box and to purchase new disposal bags that will allow residents to dispose of their opioid medications in a safe and reliable manner at home. These bags change the chemical makeup of the drugs, making them safe for disposal. Users can dispose of pills, liquids, and patches through this process. The Alliance is excited about this opportunity because it will be user-friendly and enable users to immediately destroy medications rather than store them until they have an opportunity to participate in a Take Back or make it to a permanent drop off location. We anticipate these bags will be available by September 1, at the latest! For more information, you can call the Alliance at 281-284-0370. The Alliance meets monthly (except in June and July) and the community is invited to attend! The next meeting is scheduled for Thursday, August 24 from 11:30-12:30 at the Webster Civic Center. Lunch is provided and it’s a great way to find out more about the Alliance and how to get involved! You can RSVP to Jennifer at jlobaugh@ccisd.net. About the Author Amanda McLauchlin is the Coalition Manager for the Bay Area Alliance for Youth and Families that serves Clear Creek and Friendswood ISDs. She enjoys working for the Alliance because it enables her to serve a diverse cross section of the community while helping make the Bay Area a safer place for kids to grow up. In her spare time, Amanda has been a foster parent and is passionate about seeing positive changes to a system designed to protect our most vulnerable citizens. She also enjoys spending time with friends and family, exploring cultural opportunities in the greater Houston area, and playing with her 2 puppies, Ruby and Maisie. You can reach Amanda at amclauchlin@ccisd.net.

Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | July-September 2017 23


24 www.txhwmagazines.com


Photos

Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | July-September 2017 25


bahw |

COMMUNITY

Ed Ferrin

The Man Behind the Lens

I got close enough to this Immature Night Heron to get a close up shot of the wild feather on the top of its head.

This Great Egret was photographed at Brazos Bend State Park. White birds are hard to photograph and get good details in their feathers but I think this shot turned out perfect.

I was in the right spot at the right time when I got this photo of the Roseate Spoonbills coming in to land at the Rookery in High Island, TX. Love the pink coloring on these birds.

This shot of a Black-crowned Night Heron was taken in the rain. I love seeing the rain in the photo and the water beading up on the heron’s feathers. This nest with two recently born Great Egrets in it was taken at High Island, TX. Every Spring thousands of birds nest at the rookery in High Island providing visitors like myself a close up view of new born Herons, Egrets, Spoonbills, etc. 26 www.txhwmagazines.com

Since getting my first camera in 1971 at the age of 18, I have been an avid photographer. I have not only remained an avid photographer but I have also had the wonderful experience of having many of my photos professionally printed. I have many hanging on the walls in my home, have sold some and given many away to my friends. Photography, to me, is an opportunity to escape the pressures of life and work and to get off by myself and enjoy nature. I also enjoy the opportunity to be an artist and I share only the photos I feel express what I think is a work of art. I was born in Greely, Colorado, and loved living there until I was 19 years old, when I joined the Air Force. I served my country as a Military Policeman K-9 Handler for 4 years. Through my military and church service, I was able to see many parts of the world. After meeting my sweetheart in Washington D.C. in 1978, we were married and now have 4 children and 7 cute grandchildren. It was while living in Ohio that I became an amateur birder. That passion has only grown since moving to Galveston in 1998 to work for the American National Life Insurance Company as the National Sales Manager.


bahw | 30 Days of Prayer:

Ramadan By The Clear Lake Islamic Center

Celebrating, respecting and accepting our cultural diversity is fundamental in the success of our future. As Houstonians, we are fortunate to live in a place that is culturally, ethnically and religiously diverse. The Muslim community celebrates a sacred month consisting of fasting and prayer. This is called Ramadan. Ramadan is the 9th month of the Islamic year when fasting from food, liquid and sexual relations take place. This is done to keep eyes and hearts focused on the relationship with Allah (God). During Ramadan, it is a tradition that has existed since the time of the prophet Muhammad, to gather to listen to the Quran being recited from cover to cover. It is believed that the Quran was first revealed to Muhammad during the month of Ramadan. The name and meaning of Ramadan is taken from the Arabic word “ramida” or “ar-ramad.” This means “intense scorching heat and dryness.” Some say that it is called Ramadan because one scorches out the sin and badness from life, replacing it with good deeds and growth, just as the sun burns the ground.

Clear Creek Community Church:

Love and Serve

Dustin and Trina Duke felt stagnant in their faith. They had a good life: a nice house, a good income, healthy kids, and a great marriage. But they felt as if something was missing. Spiritually, they felt sluggish, and church was beginning to feel like a chore. Together, with their small group at church, they began looking for ways to love the people in their world in a God-honoring way. Selene, their house keeper, came to their attention. She and her kids, were struggling to get by, bills began to pile up, and their living conditions were worsening. The Duke’s had an idea and presented it to their church group: They would buy Selene a new home. After the house was purchased, the entire group helped deliver furniture, build a small porch, and ensure it was move-in ready.

COMMUNITY

Clear Creek Community Church started in 1993, meeting in a local

Selene and her family had no idea the magnitude of the gift she would be given by the Duke’s and the members of the church. She was touched by the number of people involved in helping the project come to fruition. It started with the Duke’s seeing a need, but it flourished into group effort. Many people, who had been strangers just weeks before, were now invested in the well-being of Selene and her family. Love and service is what Clear Creek Community Church is all about.

elementary school, until its first building was established in 2002.

Since opening the doors on their Egret Bay Blvd location, the church

has continued to grow. Rather than expanding their locations, Clear

Creek decided to plant new churches and new

campuses to better serve and reach more people

throughout the Bay Area. Clear Creek Community Church is excited to

launch its fifth campus: East 96 on September 10th 2017. Check out

more at: clearcreek.org Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | July-September 2017 27


bs ghw a h w | SWE EN LI OL RN FEOS CS U S

Dementia Complicates Care Decisions By Stephen Andriko Whenever dementia is involved, it complicates the senior care decision process dramatically. Dementia is the term used to describe the combinations of symptoms of debilitating brain health conditions, such as Alzheimer’s Disease, preventing a person from completing their activities of daily living without assistance. Memory loss and cognitive decline are the major deficiencies present. Since emotions tend to rule the thinking of the care recipient, the care giving task is dramatically escalated due to increased emotional stress on the caregiver. Many times the first line of fulfillment involves providing personal care. Often, this comes from a strong emotional commitment between the person needing care and the care provider. This emotional bind, while strong, may not last as long as care is a necessity due to a host of factors. Awareness of these challenges and an action plan to overcome obstacles become keys to success. Providing personal care for your loved one is an exhausting endeavor. It may also be even more challenging based on a number of factors that may not readily evident until the situation About the Author presents itself. The person receiving care is unaware that anything is wrong. When the time arrives for the younger Stephen Andriko, a Certified to care for the older, there may be some overt or subconscious reluctance to handle intimate issues that might be Dementia Practitioner, is the author of The Road Map involved, such as bathing and toileting assistance. Even if the situation involves one spouse caring for another, these to Senior Care, a book that highly personal events can create angst. While on the subject of spouses caring for other spouses, I would like to discusses the landscape of caution that statistics indicate that the person providing the care is likely to pass away before the spouse receiving the senior care. As a noted public care. Individual health issues that may exist prior to the beginning of the process are not factored in to these findings. speaker, Stephen routinely These cited challenges provide ample opportunity for traumatic events to intervene. The drain on the caregiver affects delivers presentations regarding senior care options. their personal physical and emotional health. Unfortunately, not by choice, they become less attentive, which may result Stephen has been a volunteer in a fall or other physical injury to the care recipient. The same conditions may even trigger similar physical injury to the with the Alzheimer’s caregiver. When dementia is present, one may be faced with unusual and even dangerous behavior issues. Abnormal Association Speakers Bureau sleep patterns that frequently appear dramatically affect the caregiver. Perhaps the care recipient brandishes weapons or for several years. He is also runs to the neighbor’s home wearing scant clothing screaming about “some intruder.” Worse, the wandering potential a member of the Alliance of Professional Health that never was apparent suddenly makes itself known in the middle of the night. These are all traumatic events which Advocates. often culminate when the caregiver throws their hands into the air and screams, “I can’t take it anymore!” Emotional stress rises exponentially. Be prepared by planning your next step NOW. What are the options? Should you evaluate professional in-home care? What about out-of-home placement? It is always best to evaluate that next step option before you reach the trauma level. If so inclined, one should interview professional care givers immediately. Visit assisted living communities while you still have your own mental stability; decision making is easier. Caregivers may want to consider respite care options to ease the burden. Many organizations provide part-time options for perhaps a few hours. Often, assisted living communities offer reasonably-priced extended options for perhaps a weekend or a whole week. When a spouse is caring for another spouse, it is advantageous to evaluate a move for both parties. Perhaps a Continuum of Care Retirement Community (CCRC) would fulfill the need. There, a person in need gets top-rate appropriate professional care while the former caregiver gets their life back and still resides in close proximity. If you are unsure how to get started, I suggest The Road Map to Senior Care. This is an easy to read book that requires less than an hour and paints the senior care landscape in a clear conversational fashion. Check the website: www. TheRoadMaptoSeniorCare.com for options to obtain your paperback or digital version. 28 www.txhwmagazines.com


Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | April-June 2017 29


:: HEALTH Q&A

bsghw a h w | SWE EN LI OL RN FEOS CS U S

Senior Living: What Are My Options? by Harold Ermshar

We are seeing “senior living” everywhere. What is it? And what is the difference between a nursing home and senior living? Yes, It is true that we are seeing the term “senior living” more in our everyday lives. Senior living communities are increasing because the aging population is increasing. Baby boomers are the largest population group and they have started to hit retirement age. We are also living longer, thanks to modern medicine, which increases the demand for living options and health care needs for senior adults. Senior living refers to ALL housing and living options for senior adults. Senior living communities are residential settings built specifically for senior adults ranging in age from 55 or 62 and older. These settings can be traditional retirement communities of small houses, villas or apartments. Senior living communities can also incorporate different levels of health care needs. No, senior living does not refer to nursing homes. Nursing homes can certainly be included as living needs for seniors, but nursing home care is often represented as long term care or short term rehab. If health care and nursing options are offered, it is typically licensed by the state and falls under assisted living or nursing home. What is the best senior living option for my loved one? That depends on the needs of your loved one. 1. I ndependent Living is exactly as it states - living independently. These are typically small homes or apartments designed to take away the headaches of home maintenance, while also offering retirement options for socialization, meals, events, and travel. 2. A  ssisted Living refers to apartment style living with support and supervision. This is a very popular option with senior adults who need increased support with daily activities and are not able to live independently. Memory support options are often offered with assisted living for those with Alzheimer’s and dementia that need specialized services. Nursing Home or Rehab Care is set up for short or long term medical need that extends from hospital care but prevents living in a private home. 3. Life  Care Communities are a unique option to senior living. They offer basically a one stop service -independent retirement living, assisted living, memory support, and rehab care in the same location.

Harold has over 20 years experience in long term care services and operations. He brought his expertise from Tennessee in 2013 to lead the opening of The Crossings, the premier life care community serving League City/Clear Lake and surrounding areas. For more information, call 281-525-4320.

What type of senior living is The Crossings? Why The Crossings? The Crossings is a Life Care Community that offers independent living options as well as assisted living, memory support and rehab care. This is beneficial because, as your needs change and evolve, you can stay in the same location. Life care communities, such as The Crossings, are also considered an investment in your future. With life care communities, as your health care needs change, you have a preferred option for care in the community at a set rate, so you don’t have to worry about where you will get care or the increased costs associated with paying for it. For more information and options for senior living, contact The Crossings at 281-525-4320 or visit us at 255 N. Egret Bay Blvd in League City.

What’s Your Question?

Do you have a question that needs to be answered? Ask our local experts and editorial board! Please submit your question to bahwmagazine@gmail.com. Please include your name and email address. Don’t worry, we will keep you anonymous in the magazine! 30 www.txhwmagazines.com


BEST OF BAY AREA DIRECTORY

The Crossings, MRC Healthy Living Community 255 N. Egret Bay Blvd., League City, Texas 77573 www.mrcthecrossings.org 866-835-2877 | 281-724-2345 Abe Zimmerman, Marketing Director | azimmerman@mrcaff.org

Rhonda Floyd Photography 612 Hwy 3 North, League City, TX 77573 www.rhondafloyd.com Rhonda@rhondafloyd.com 281-332-5490

e s t.

League City Family Clinic 1507 W. League City Pkwy, Suite 200, League City, TX 77573 www.leaguecityfamilyclinic.com info@leaguecityfamilyclinic.com 281-525-6290

19 7 3

Bay Area Audiology and Hearing Aids 17099 Texas Avenue, Suite 200, Webster, TX 77598 www.bayareaaudiology.com chandaabbott@bayareaaudiology.com 281-332-4575

South Shore Center For Couples & Families 1100 E. NASA Pkwy #101, Houston, TX 77058 Southshorefamilies.com info@couples-families.southshorefamilies.com 832-827-3288

BEST OF BAY AREA DIRECTORY 2017

The Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine recommends the trustworthy and highly respected business owners and clinics found in The Best of the Bay Area Directory. When doing business, don’t forget to mention that you saw their listing in the BAHW Magazine. If you are interested in having your business represented in the directory, please call us at 832-323-3020.

Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | July-September 2017 31


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Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine July-September 2017  

Welcome to our magazine, Bay Area Health & Wellness. This issue includes: Learn for Safety, Swim for Fun; The “CG” Phenomenon; Benefits of A...