Page 1

FITNESS | NUTRITION | HEALTH | Mind-Body | FAMILY WELLNESS | community | FINANCIAL

complimentary

Together We Are Stronger See page 12

INSIDE: The Psychobiology of Unity Nursing: A Labor of Love A Summer of Fun, a Lifetime of Memories

april–june 2017

TXHWMagazines.com


bs ghw a h w | TWa Eb Ll eL No Ef SCSo n t e n t s Family Wellness

The ABC’s of Autism 19 5 Things to Put in Your Coping Toolbox 20

Kid’s Corner

Love in Any Language 21 A Summer of Fun, a Lifetime of Memories 22 Bay Area’s Top Summer Camps

Nutrition Let Food Be Your Medicine and Family Be Your Comfort!

APRIL-JUNE 2017 s ghw | FITNESS On The Cover:

Back Row: Dulce Lilia Perez, Stuart Cayer, Lee Nguyen,

Reggie Rusk,|Milena s ghw H ELeben, A LHanan T HHussein. Front Row: Andrea Johnson, Waleed Basyouni, Tiffany Ravedutti. Courtesty of Rhonda Floyd Photography.

s ghw Fitness |

FINANCIAL Walk It Out 4 Stop Shouldering s ghw | M I NtheDPain! & 6B O D Y 10 Tips to Positively Impact Your Fitness and Life 8 | F A M I LY Ballet Mistress Ms. Milena Leben and her Ballet Jete’ Co. 9

s ghw

s ghw |

C U LT U R E

Mind-Body The Psychobiology of Unity Woven Threads of Diversity and Culture 12

10

11

23

Community

Unified In Trying Times 24 Community Partners Focused on Health & Unity 24 Nature is the Best Teacher 25 Community Photos 30

Senior Focus

Health Matters of the Heart: Kick Stress to the Curb 14 Targeting Tumors: Radiation Delivers Precise Treatments 15 Family Medicine 16 Nursing: A Labor of Love 18 Health Q&A 29

Age-Related Memory Loss: What’s Normal? What’s Not? Traumatic Events and Senior Care Decisions 28

Departments Best of Bay Area Directory

26

31

bs ghw a h w | fWr Eo LmL tNhEeS eSd i t o r Together We Are Stronger In the words of Helen Keller, “Alone we can do so little; together, we can do so much.” The power of community and partnership describes our vision for the Spring 2017 issue of Bay Area Health and Wellness. Regardless of our backgrounds, cultures, or individual circumstances, we have stories to share and differences to embrace. Together, we are stronger. That sense of community was the driver for our publication three years ago, and continues to be the force behind our success. Health and Wellness is defined in so many different ways to many different people, yet the idea consistently pushes us all to be the best we can be. That can be seen no better than from the stories and faces of those on the cover of this issue. Together, we are stronger. Each individual, each story told throughout this issue, contains a common thread, and that is a passion for bringing health and wellness to others, as well as themselves. From the programs for our children to the decisions on senior care, there is so much to learn from one another and share together. As you enjoy the following pages, it is our hope that you not only find information to

benefit you personally, but also to share with others in your circle of friendship. Together, we are stronger.

To Visit Us on Facebook:

Just as a tapestry is woven so carefully together, so is our community. We take pride in our diversity, we come together to honor and respect our differences and celebrate our similarities. As a magazine, we have joined forces through the power of partnership and collaboration to bring you the Best of Health and Wellness for the Bay Area. Together, we are stronger! We look forward to another beautiful season with you,

Carrie Ermshar Editor

To Visit Our Website:

Camille Olson Editor Emeritus

For information on advertising or other inquiries, visit our website at www.txhwmagazines.com or call us at 832.323.3020 Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | PO Box 1118 | Kemah, TX 77565 The publisher is not responsible for the accuracy of the articles in Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine. The information contained within has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Neither the Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | April-June 2017 publisher nor any other party assumes liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on this material. Appropriate professional advice should be sought before making decisions. ©Copyright 2017.

3


bsghw ahw |

FITNESS

sghw |

H E A LT H

sghw |

FINANCIAL

Walk It Out By Alyssa Baker

sghw | M you I Nsay D if you & went B OinDforYa visit with your primary care physician and came out with a prescription What would

for walking? Many studies are revealing the importance of not only physical activity, but specifically, walking. Walking has found to be a beneficial aspect of treatment and management for many chronic illnesses; such | Fbeen AM I LY as, Arthritis, chronic lower back pain, Hypertension, Diabetes, and Obesity.1

sghw

The Time is Now: sghw | C U LT U R E I’ve spent a lot of time in counseling sessions, and I would say that in the first session, most of my clients express the desire to exercise more often. When life seems overwhelming, fitting exercise into the daily routine seems like

sghw W Several ELLN E S are S brought up: general lack of time, energy, motivation, and finances. This is the a daunting| task. barriers

time in session where I want to say, “Well let’s go walk right now. Let’s stop sitting on this couch and in this chair and just get moving. The time is now!” So, now I do say this at times! The more I dive into the literature, the more I realize that traditional counseling is not always the most helpful, in and of itself. Counseling should not be a “one size fits all” treatment. I’ll never forget when a client commented to me, “When I’m in this office, I feel like I’m in the principal’s office.” Yikes! Traditional counseling will not work if this is the feeling and dynamic; however, take this client walking, and the flexibility, open-air, and movement makes all the difference.

Benefits: We have all heard about exercise causing a release of endorphins, but it’s even more than that. In fact, areas of the brain that regulate our mood, stress response, memory, and concentration are all impacted by increased blood circulation in the brain, which can be induced by walking.2 Walking has also been found to increase creativity, which is often lacking in a closed-in office space.1 Finding life-balance is all about getting creative. It’s about discovering your strengths and exploring how to apply these strengths in all areas of your life to build life-satisfaction and wellness. Exercise can create some of these positive effects, but some of us get caught up in thinking that we have to run three miles every day or join a bootcamp to reap the benefits, and then we do nothing! Walking has been specifically studied and discussed as it is one of the simplest forms of exercise. Walking can take place during a lunch break, a meeting with a colleague, or during your child’s baseball practice. All it takes are some walking shoes and a clear path. Evidence-based mental health treatments are vital in my approach, so why not also use evidence-based physical treatments? Everyone wants to get it right the first time; so, using collaborative approaches, such as combining physical and mental treatments, will help generate positive changes that actually stick. References 1 Berkeley Wellness. (2016, January 07). 8 Great Benefits of Walking. Retrieved from: http://www. berkeleywellness.com/fitness/ active-lifestyle/article/8-greatbenefits-walking. Sharma, A., Madaan, V., & Petty, F. D. (2006). Exercise for Mental Health. Primary Care Companion to The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 8(2), 106.

2

Here are some more convincing health benefits of walking: 1. Improved sleep

2. Increased interest in sex 3. Better endurance 4. Stress relief

5. Improvement in mood 4 www.txhwmagazines.com

6. Increased energy and stamina

7. Reduced tiredness that can increase mental alertness 8. Weight reduction

9. Reduced cholesterol and improved cardiovascular fitness (Sharma et al., 2016).

About the Author Alyssa Baker is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist Associate. Along with practicing at the South Shore Center for Couples and Families, she is practicing collaborative care within League City Family Clinic. Alyssa has experience working with individuals, couples, families, and groups with a variety of stressors including: coping with chronic illness, recovery from addiction, stress reduction, weight loss/lifestyle changes, LGBTQ support.


THEIR SUMMER TO SHINE Summer Programs at the YMCA Y summer programs offer the perfect opportunity to make playing and learning a family goal. • Day Camp

• Swim Lessons

• Youth Sports

• Specialty Camps

Join and enjoy the member rate for your summer programs. Register today at ymcahouston.org.

YMCA Mission: To put Judeo-Christian principles into practice through programs that build healthy spirit, mind and body for all. Everyone is welcome.

Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | April-June 2017 5


About the Author Gabe Moreno has worked for 15 years as a personal trainer and 12 years as a strength and conditioning coach in professional baseball (Rangers, Phillies, Reds and Astros). Gabe got his MA in Fitness and Human Performance from UHCL. He currently helps members of the South Shore Harbour Fitness Center look and feel their best with his personal training expertise.

Stop

Shouldering the Pain! By Gabe Moreno It’s that time of year when millions of Americans don their favorite baseball jerseys and head out to the ballpark. And what’s more fun than watching your favorite little leaguer pitch a “no hitter?” Perfect pitching takes a lot of practice, and as with anything, there is a fine line between over doing it and meeting or exceeding your goals. But baseball isn’t the only sport where athletes can suffer from shoulder injuries. The excessive, repetitive, overhead motions used in swimming, tennis, weightlifting, lacrosse and football, can also be hard on the shoulder. Then how do we protect the shoulder joint from overuse and ensure a lifetime of activity? The Anatomy of the Rotator Cuff: Let’s start by learning a little about the anatomy of the rotator cuff, or the muscles used for overhead motions, such as throwing. The four muscles that make up the rotator cuff are the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor and the subscapularis. These muscles originate on the scapula and connect to the head of the humerus (upper arm bone), forming a cuff at the shoulder joint. 6 www.txhwmagazines.com

The Purpose of the Rotator Cuff: • Stabilizes the head of the humerus during all shoulder movements. • Counteracts the upward pull of the deltoid during abduction and flexion of the humerus. • Decelerates the arm when throwing and swinging. • Performs the movements of abduction, internal rotation and external rotation of the shoulder. Common injuries to the rotator cuff that can result from overuse are: • Rotator cuff tear – tearing of a tendon due to injury or wear and tear. • Tendonitis – inflammation of one or more of the rotator cuff tendons. • Impingement – tendons of the rotator cuff are squeezed between the humerus and acromion. • Bursitis – inflammation of the small fluid sac (bursa) that cushions the rotator cuff from the acromion. Treatment: Treatments will vary depending on the type and severity of the injury to the rotator cuff. Some treatment options include: NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), cortisone injections or other anti-inflammatory steroid meds, physical therapy and, if worse comes to worse, surgery. Prevention is integral to avoiding injury to the rotator cuff. The following are some examples of great exercises to keep that shoulder in perfect pitching condition.


bsghw ahw |

Rotator Cuff Program

Suggested pitch counts, according to Steven Ellis, former pro pitcher

Directions: Choose light weight that you can lift with control 15 times (3-5lbs) Lift and return to starting position slowly with a pause at the top of the motion

52 sghw | 11-12 68

Arms down by sides with thumbs out at angle.

2

FINANCIA 2

76 sghw |

MIND & B

106 sghw |

F A2 M I LY

sghw |

C U LT U R E

97

17-18

Start position

End position

End position

sghw |

2

2

WELLNESS

Lay on side with towel roll under arm and shoulder blade retracted back towards spine.

Squeeze shoulder blades down and back. Lift up at 45 degree angle from back of room.

Squeeze shoulder blade down and back. Rotate arm up towards ceiling, pause at top.

Start position

Start position

End position

Hang arm off side of table.

End position

Hang arm off side of table.

Bring shoulder blade down and back towards spine. Bend elbow and bring towards ceiling, stop in line with body.

Bring shoulder blade down and back towards spine. With palm down, raise arm into “T” position.

Start position

Start position

End position

Bring shoulder blade down and back towards spine. With thumb up, raise arm into “Y” position

8-10

15-16

Start position

Hang arm off side of table.

Pitches sghw | H EGames A LT H per game per week

Age

13-14

Faults: Do not lift shoulders towards ears

FITNESS

End position

Hang arm off side of table. Bring shoulder blade down and back towards spine. Raise elbow out to side, up to shoulder height. Rotate hand up towards ceiling, stopping in line with body.

Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | April-June 2017 7


bsghw ahw |

FITNESS

sghw |

H E A LT H

sghw |

FINANCIAL

sghw |

MIND & BODY

sghw |

F A M I LY

sghw |

C U LT U R E

sghw |

WELLNESS

10

TIPS to Positively Impact Your Fitness and Life By Zach Stuckwisch

By Zach Stuckwisch

8 www.txhwmagazines.com

About the Author Zach Stuckwisch is an ACEcertified personal trainer with an M.S. in Exercise Physiology. He works to positively impact lives through fitness as a Partner Trainer with Camp Gladiator. You can connect with him at zacharystuckwisch@ campGladiator.com.

It’s no secret that fitness is a vital component of a healthy lifestyle. The benefits of regular exercise are countless and impact all aspects of well-being. But exercise is tough, and everyone who strives for fitness struggles sometimes! Here are some tried and true tips to help you overcome common challenges and successfully achieve your fitness goals: 1. Know your WHY - Take some time to reflect on what’s important to you and which of the many benefits of exercise are worth YOUR time and efforts. Make this your mission statement, and let it be your greatest source of motivation! 2. Write down your goals - Make specific, realistic goals for yourself, then write them down and put them where you’ll see them every day. Commit to your goals like a contract, and give yourself visual cues to take action. 3. Gather your support system - There is strength in numbers! Share your goals with friends and family and ask them to hold you accountable, or better yet, ask them to join you! Try joining a group, such as Camp Gladiator, where we embrace a “better together” mentality and achieve far more than we would alone. 4. Get expert advice - There’s an overwhelming amount of health and fitness-related information out there, and not all of it will be right for you and your goals. Connect with a certified trainer you can trust to take your unique circumstances into account and guide you to success. 5. Fuel your engine - It’s often been said that “you can’t outwork a bad diet,” so use a good diet to fuel your work instead! Again, expert advice is recommended to help find what’s right for you, but balancing your macronutrients and getting plenty of water is a good place to start. 6. Stick to a schedule - Make appointments (with yourself ) for your exercise sessions, and keep your appointments! Eventually it will become second nature and easier to maintain, but you’ll always want to plan ahead and be diligent about following your plan. 7. Track your progress - Find a meaningful way to measure progress toward your goal and check it at regular intervals. This will give you a huge boost whenever you reach a benchmark and let you know when it’s time for a change in order to keep moving forward. 8. Stay positive - Attitude is everything! Adopt a positive, solutions-oriented mindset and look for the good in every situation. Positivity is a key to finding long-term success not only in fitness, but in all walks of life! 9. Reward yourself - Living and feeling better is the natural reward for regular exercise, but it’s not always enough. Many people find extra, external rewards, such as new workout gear, or a celebratory social outing, to be a big motivator for achieving goals. 10. Have fun! - You’ll have to challenge yourself to change yourself, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy it! Look for ways to have fun while still getting effective exercise, and you’ll be much more likely to stick with it. At Camp Gladiator, we believe every workout should have a fun factor to help keep you going when the going gets tough! I hope these tips help you to achieve your goals. Our mission at Camp Gladiator is to positively impact the physical fitness, and ultimately, the lives of as many people as possible, and we would love for YOU to be one of them!


Determination, Dedication and Devotion:

Ballet Mistress Ms. Milena Leben and her Ballet Jete’ Co. By Kennedy Dance Theatre Ballet is like a beautiful butterfly that spends its time flittering so delicately and gracefully from one flower to the other. Its movements, which seem effortless, bring astonishment and awe to those watching. Kennedy Dance Theatre is privileged to have Milena Leben teaching the art of ballet to both girls and boys living in South Houston. As a Prima Ballerina, she has danced all over the world, and now, she is passing her love and passion for ballet on to her dance company, Ballet Jete’ Co. Ms. Milena and her company recently competed in an International Ballet Competition (YAGP) where all of her ballerinas received excellent scores, one of which will be going to New York for the Grand Finale. Determination: Ballet takes Determination. Milena said, “I moved to Houston with one and only one goal – to promote classical ballet. That is the more difficult way to learn to dance. Classical ballet gives you a very solid base, and requires hours of hard work. But, when you are doing what you love, then nothing is difficult.” “When I dance, I feel free. Dancing helps me relieve stress or feelings that I cannot otherwise express. Ms. Milena pushes me out of my comfort zone to work hard and become a better dancer. I hope to incorporate dance in my future.” – Jeremy Dedication: Out of respect for their Ballet Mistress, Ms. Milena, the Jete’ dancers make their dedication known by attending every scheduled class, even if that means giving up some time with friends. They show their passion by arriving to class on time, ready to work, and put forth their best effort every single minute of the class. This means dancing the same dance over and over until it is perfect. They know their efforts will pay off when the next performance looks effortless to the audience. “I am very thankful to be in Jete’. Through it, Milena has taught me teamwork and dedication. This is my third year in Jete’. I have had many opportunities to share my love of dance with the community. I dance to

About the Teacher

express my feelings and Milena has helped me discover them. I hope to dance and learn more for many years to come.” – Hanna

Milena starting dancing at a young age and continued to grow in the ballet community. She won many awards during her career as a ballerina. The next step would naturally be to turn to choreography, which brought her to the top of the list in Europe and USA. She is still sought after around the globe for her expertise.

Devotion: “I am trying to teach my students to work hard, enjoy dancing, respect their teacher, along with respecting ballet as a profession. It is so precious, over the years, to receive beautiful letters from my students who are thankful for not only introducing them to ballet, but for forming their characters as a human being. It is humbling to hear them tell me that I am like a mother to them. I somehow manage to be a teacher and a friend to them.” “The Jete’ Co. and Ms. Milena have taught me so much about myself and my love for dance. Ms. Milena has become such a huge role model in my life and, by being her assistant this year, I have learned about how much effort Ms. Milena has put into her work. There is so much more than just the student side.” – Sarah

Ms. Milena is an inspiration to everyone. At her age, she stays active in the dance community as a prima ballerina not only by teaching classical ballet, but as a choreographer who is well known around the world. Her influence has helped to mold all her young dancers not only in their ballet skills, but also into the lovely ladies and gentlemen they have grown up to be. They will always carry these values she has instilled in them, along with poise and grace, for the rest of their lives and surely will go on to pass these characteristics to their own children and to others, as Ms. Milena has taught them. Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | April-June 2017 9


Let

Food Family

Be Your Medicine

and

Be Your Comfort!

By Anisha Anand

We all love comfort food. But what is comfort food, exactly? The Oxford dictionary defines it is as “food that provides consolation or a feeling of well-being, typically having a high sugar or carbohydrate content and associated with childhood or home cooking.” We have all had the experience of food evoking memories associated with a celebration or a special occasion, the people we shared the meal with, or the person who cooked the food for us. So, it is normal for us to associate being comforted and happy with a particular food or dish and its aroma or texture. Sometimes, when we feel low or overwhelmed, we also feel a need for comfort. In this case, what are we really looking for? Is it emotional comfort or does our body really need fuel, energy and nutrients? This is the time we tend to reach for those sugary and processed food “treats.” The reasons for our comfort food cravings may be very complex, ranging from a need for more energy or low blood sugar, to our gut (gastrointestinal tract) microbes sending hunger signals to our brain, or even varying levels of various hormones and chemicals in our body, like serotonin or dopamine. (A very large percentage of serotonin is actually created in the gut.) We’re only beginning to understand the connection between gut microbes and the brain, but we already know that they may have an effect on the formation of our memories, our emotions, and even the way that we make decisions. Research is also telling us that various nutrients, or lack thereof, can impact our mood and the foods we crave. When we are feeling low, we actually need healthy and nutritious food even more. That old saying “You are what you eat.” is true. Everything we eat eventually determines our long-term health. While our gut health is a factor in our overall health, it also seems to help determine our mood and, in turn, possibly our food selections. In moderation, comfort food can sometimes be just what the doctor ordered, but habitually finding comfort in food can get us all in trouble. So, the next time you need comfort, ask yourself, “Am I hungry or do I want a hug?” If you really are hungry, try a healthier version of a favorite comfort food. With the right ingredients, pizza and chocolate can be nutritious too!

Gluten Free Pizza Ingredients: For the Crust 1/2 cup quinoa, soaked in 1" of water 1/4 cup water 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 heaping tablespoon Gluten Free flour 1/2 grated small zucchini (optional) 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 clove of garlic (optional) Black pepper to taste Optional toppings: 3/4 cup tomato sauce 1 cup shredded organic mozzarella or favorite vegan cheese Fresh herbs, such as basil Red pepper flakes Finely sliced zucchini, onions and roasted red peppers Roasted garlic Directions: •S  oak the quinoa in water overnight or for about 8 hours. •P  reheat oven to 425 degrees F. • L ine a 9-inch pie dish with high sides with parchment paper and drizzle one tablespoon of oil in the center. Spread around with your fingers or spatula until well coated. •R  inse the quinoa with fresh water, add quinoa and the 1/4 cup of water, baking powder, salt, grated and dried zucchini and remaining olive oil, and blend on high until smooth and creamy, with a texture similar to pancake batter. 10 www.txhwmagazines.com

About the Author As a Personal Wellness Chef, Anisha Anand strives to inspire and empower people to promote their health and wellness with food. She creates, cooks and teaches nutritious recipes and meals in your home. Her goal is to bring the power to reach your wellness goals back into your hands with food as medicine in your own kitchen. Anisha studied Nutrition for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention at UCSF, completed the Nutritional Leadership program with Dr. Joshua Axe, as well as the Culinary Rx program with Rouxbe cooking school in partnership with the Plantrician project. She is also a member of the United States Personal Chef Association (www.uspca.com).

•A  dd the herbs and garlic or you may sprinkle the herbs after next step. •A  djust the oven temperature now to 415 F. •P  our batter into prepared pie dish and bake for 12–15 minutes. The base should look well set now and will flip easily. If it seems soft on the top, cook another minute or so. Flip crust and return to oven baking for another 12–15 minutes until browned and crispy. •T  op crust with sauce, cheese and any other toppings you’d like. Then bake for 10–15 minutes until cheese has melted. •R  emove from the oven and enjoy!

Chocolate Smoothie Ingredients: 1 cup water 1 tablespoon chia seeds 1-2 handful fresh or frozen blueberries 1/2 cup ice, if using fresh fruit, to chill smoothie 2 tablespoons raw cacao 2-3 prunes or dates 1 soaked brazil nut 1 handful of fresh wheatgrass or 1 teaspoon wheatgrass powder 1/3 cup soaked walnuts 1/4 cup soaked almonds – you can also use 1/2 cup almond milk, leave out the water if using almond milk Blend all ingredients in a blender until smooth and enjoy!


The

bs ghw ahw |

FITNE SS Y MIND - BOD

s ghw |

H E A LT H

s ghw |

FINANCIAL

s ghw |

MIND & BOD

s ghw |

F A M I LY

s ghw |

C U LT U R E

s ghw |

WELLNESS

Psychobiology of

Unity

By Dr. Mike Olson Does it matter if we stand alone or with others to experience the challenges and pain that often accompany this mortal life? Research suggest the answer is “yes.” In the challenging socio-political environment we live, the importance of unity is paramount.

About the Author Dr. Mike Olson is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. He graduated with his Master’s degree from Brigham Young University and his Ph.D. from Kansas State University. Following his graduate studies, he completed a post-doctoral research and clinical fellowship in Behavioral Medicine from UTMB, Galveston. He served as the Director of Behavioral Medicine at both the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha and the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston.

The Science Behind Unity Two recent scientific studies suggest the importance of being connected to others and the difference this can make as we perceive and experience our world. The first measured an individual’s perception of the geographical slant of a hill standing alone and with a friend. In other words, if you are alone looking up the side of a mountain, how steep do you estimate it to be? How difficult will the climb be and are you capable of traversing it? The researchers found that, alone, we see the slope as steeper and the climb more difficult than when we stand together, with a friend, looking at the same incline (Schnall et al., 2012). Another fascinating study was conducted by James Coan, (2006), and his colleagues using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) (a way to image and measure real-time changes in the brain) to measure neural threat response when introduced to an electric shock. The subjects were exposed to a mild shock while alone in the fMRI machine and when holding the hand of someone they cared for and trusted. The results show “pervasive attenuation of activation in the neural systems” when holding the hand of someone they trusted. In other words, we perceive and experience less pain (actual) when with someone we care about.

Unity Does Matter In summary, we are really built or wired to be connected and social beings. We are more capable, powerful, and resilient when we are united than when we are divided. Our brains resist change and tend to quickly consolidate and short-cut our learning and experience. While helpful in many of life’s tasks (not having to learn and relearn to drive a car every time we turn the key, for example), it keep us from taking the time to engage with new, different, or challenging ideas – including engaging people of different cultural, religious, or faith backgrounds. We must work at challenging our implicit bias and other obstacles that may keep us from reaching out, being connected and unified with those around us, in our families, in our neighborhoods and communities. Doing so will bring a social and psychological connectedness and resiliency that we all need to navigate the complex and painful sociopolitical and environmental challenges we face today. Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | April-June 2017 11


Reggie Rusk

“I am a native Texan, born and raised in both La Marque and Texas City, only leaving long enough to get my degree from the University of Kentucky. My passion is helping today’s youth make and leave their mark on life. Throughout my life I have been blessed by incredible role models who mentored me and taught me the tools and motivation I needed to succeed. Now it is my honor and duty to teach those principles, my life experience and knowledge, to the youth that I work with. I love doing what I do because it changes lives. I want my daughter to know that her father made a difference not only in her life but in the lives of others, as well.”

Dulce Lilia Perez

“I was born in Mexico City to parents who originated from Colombia and Ecuador. My parents came to the U.S. from humble beginnings in order to find a better life and provide for their families back home, in which I am grateful for. I have battled, like many I work with, weight gain and weight loss. This has fueled my passion for health and wellness and made me a stronger, more understanding teacher and fitness instructor. I have learned that you should never allow yourself to be defeated just because you think you CAN’T. Our minds are powerful and we need to believe in ourselves in order to achieve an overall goal.”

Tiffany Ravedutti

“The values of culture and tradition run deep within my family. Working alongside my husband, a native of Brazil, we are committed to teaching our daughters and students the principles of health & wellness through martial arts. When we’re healthy spiritually, mentally and physically, we can focus on doing the things we were made to do and serve the people we need to serve. A mentor of mine once said about money, ‘It doesn’t buy happiness, but it sure prevents a lot of unhappiness!’ That’s true of our own health. We can find happiness in many things, but it’s hard to enjoy any of them if we’re struggling with our health.”

Stuart Cayer

“Currently, I am the Director of Operations at Kelsey-Seybold, and have been blessed with the opportunity to help a community of people, including our own physicians and staff. Being involved in healthcare allows me to see firsthand how choosing good habits directly affects your health. I believe health includes a spiritual side, as well. Volunteering at church and other opportunities, help me to stay grounded. My wife and I travel to Honduras every year for a mission trip, building houses, medical clinics and supporting children. Along with building a house and a medical clinic, we help support five children in Honduras, assisting with their education and spiritual needs.”

12 www.txhwmagazines.com


bs ghw ahw |

FITNE SS Y MIND - BOD

s ghw

The tapestry of our society is woven with colorful threads of A diversity | HE LT H

of Diversity

and

and culture. It has been said, “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.” In other words, a single strand standing by itself strong s ghw | FisInot NA N C or IAL necessarily beautiful. It is only upon the weaving together of multiple

Culture

s ghw

strands that an exquisite tapestry is created. The Bay | Area’s M I Ntapestry D & isB O D incredible, woven with multiple

threads of color, culture, with|the vibrant and diversity, and it continues tos grow ghw F healthy A M I LY community. Today, we share some of those strands that bring

s ghw |

C U LT U R E

s ghw |

WELLNESS

wellness and beauty to the Bay Area.

Andrea Johnson

“My passion for health and fitness stems from a very personal place. Throughout my own journey to health, I have realized that quality of life is heavily linked to physical and emotional wellness. Becoming my best self physically has allowed me to become my best self in all other areas of my life. As a mental health professional, I witness firsthand how clients transform their lives, and it is humbling to be a part of that growth experience. I feel privileged to be in the position to offer compassion and hope to those who need it most. From my vantage point, I am able to witness human goodness, courage, and vulnerability.”

Dr. Hanan Hussein

“I believe that Health and Wellness is not about meeting certain health criteria. It is taking what you have in your life, and making the best of it. As a daughter of a Palestinian refugee, I was taught that no matter what your circumstance is, it is your responsibility to help those in need. It is my parent’s examples and my religion that deeply inspires me to help others. As a physician, I am in a position to educate, reassure, and help facilitate in others the healing process. I am blessed to witness first hand the positive change that comes when all components of wellness work together, resulting in a healthy fulfilling life.”

Lee Nguyen

“Being healthy is a choice, and to promote that lifestyle we first have to start from the bottom and work our way up. Persistence is the key in all of this. Working as a nurse goes hand in hand with health and wellness. I strive to encourage my patients to eat healthy and add exercise to their daily regimen. I also encourage my family to go on jogs with me or sometimes we cook a healthy dinner together. Growing up as Asian Americans, my family and I were so used to cooking with a lot of salt and seasonings, which puts us at a risk for future health complications. It was a good thing we started to change our lifestyle for the better and be more conscience of what we’re putting into our body. Now we’re eating healthy and staying active together!”

Milena Leben

“I was invited to come to America, from Croatia, to work for a professional ballet company. After a successful career as a Prima Ballerina, it was my time for giving, inspiring and teaching. My dream was to work with youth serious about learning the art of ballet. I am filled with such joy watching the same fire and dream that I have in my students’ eyes. To be a ballerina, all elements of health and wellness must work together – both physical and mental strength. It brings such joy to observe my students dancing, rising up and becoming the serious dancers they want to be. Hard work, dedication, and a positive attitude are essential for success.”

Dr. Waleed Basyouni

“Life is a gift to us from God. Our time, our wealth, and our bodies are all gifts from God. Taking care of these gifts shows our love for God and our appreciation of what He has given us. In my worldview, it is the responsibility of every human to care for these gifts and use them in the wisest and most beneficial of ways. Our families and communities are also gifts for which we should be grateful. With this mindset, the health of the body, spirit, mind, and our relationships with family and community will thrive.”

Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | April-June 2017 13


bs ghw ahw |

F I T N EHS S HEALT

s ghw | H E A of L T Hthe Heart: Matters

Kick s ghw | F I N Stress ANCIAL

to the Curb

By Michelle Mason

s ghw |

MIND & BODY

Positive Eustress vs. Negative Distress

When| it Fmatters the heart, chronic s ghw A M ItoLY stress can cause crippling effects to our

overall health, and our heart health. CtoU Lthe T UAmerican RE Heart Association (AHA), stress sets off a chain of events by releasing a hormone called | WELLNESS adrenaline. Adrenaline temporarily causes your breathing and heart rate to speed up and your blood pressure to rise. “When we hear stress, we automatically think of something negative. I’d first like to distinguish between two types of stress: positive eustress and negative distress,” said Jenna Sneed, a Development Specialist at Texas Children’s Hospital. “Eustress is useful. Eustress focuses our energy, is perceived to be within our coping abilities, typically short-term, feels exciting and improves performance,” said Sneed. “Distress, on the other hand, causes anxiety or concern, can be short or long-term, feels unpleasant, decreases performance and can lead to mental and physical problems.” Sneed, a Bay Area native, said that prolonged periods of stress can facilitate the transition of someone who once took care of themselves and was in good health to a new normal where one fails to take care of themselves and experiences the effects of one or more chronic conditions. “Distress is associated with withdrawing from healthy behaviors, which creates a vicious cycle because these behaviors are typically the ones that help us relieve and manage stress in a positive way,” said Sneed. According to the AHA, physical reactions prepare you to deal with the situation by confronting it or by running away from it – the “fight or flight” response, which is the link between chronic or extreme stress.

s ghw According| s ghw

Stress and Heart Disease More research is needed to determine how stress contributes to heart disease – the leading killer of all Americans. However, Sneed, a survivor of heart failure who has had three pacemakers, said that stress can be detrimental in the recovery of a heart patient because it “places the heart at an increased risk for a multitude of factors related to heart disease.” 14 www.txhwmagazines.com

“Stress can aggravate pre-existing conditions or tip a risk factor into presenting, or flaring up, as a symptom. I often think of it as the thing that pushes a condition over the edge,” said About the Author Sneed. “Although I’m a survivor and know the importance of Michelle Mason is the Director of Communications self-care, I, too, can get swept up in the daily hustle of trying for the American Heart to manage work, a PhD program, and speaking engagements. Association and a former I curb this by being very intentional about my weekly routine. reporter. Michelle’s work I try to schedule each week in a way that aligns to my values has been featured on ABC News, CNN, Texas Monthly and goals.” Magazine, Fox News, and the One of the ways Sneed does this is by eating whole foods as Houston Chronicle. opposed to processed foods, she said. Every Sunday, Sneed and her husband meal prep for the upcoming work week. “We’re not always motivated to do this, but we know it’s an investment for the whole week. I also try to utilize activities that will meet multiple needs throughout the week,” said Sneed. “For instance, instead of going to happy hour, I schedule sweat dates with my husband, coworkers, or friends. We meet up and take a yoga or spin class, or walk and talk at the park.” Self Awareness According to the AHA, stress may affect behaviors and factors that increase heart disease risk, such as high blood pressure and cholesterol levels, smoking, physical inactivity and overeating. “Self-awareness is key. Ask yourself ‘what am I feeling?’ Put it into words. It’s important to call the feeling what it really is,” said Sneed. “For example, you may say to yourself, ‘I’m feeling stressed because I’m so busy.’ What you may really be feeling is, ‘I fear that if I say no to certain things, I will lose my significance at work or connection in my personal life.’” By calling the emotion what it is, Sneed said, you’ve provided yourself a starting point to decide and take action. “[Stress] closes our hearts to the universal human need to connect. Regardless of industry, failure to meaningfully connect and empathize dehumanizes us,” said Sneed. “Set goals, learn to say no, set up a regular cadence to check in with yourself and/or your spouse, ask for help, and know when and how to restore yourself. We live in a world that praises those Check. Change. Control The AHA has a focus on eliminating high blood pressure through its Check.Change. Control. program, an evidence-based hypertension management program that utilizes blood pressure self-monitoring to empower participants to take ownership of their cardiovascular health. To find out more about Check.Change. Control., visit www.ccctracker.com/aha, and visit www.heart.org to find out more about stress and burnout in correlation to heart health. Jeena Sneed is a Development Specialist at Texas Children’s Hospital and a PhD Candidate in Healthcare Management with a focus in Performance Management & Resiliency at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. She is a survivor of heart failure.


Targeting Tumors

Over the past decade, radiation therapy has advanced significantly, and continues to be one of the most sophisticated and ever changing aspects of cancer care. As new research is explored, new standards of treatment are discovered and adopted. The newest radiation technologies allow for a more accurate, targeted treatment, less damage to surrounding healthy tissue, and in some cases, fewer treatment sessions. Radiation therapy is one of the most common and effective cancer treatments available. It directly targets a tumor to eradicate the cancerous cells. To do that, radiation therapy uses specialized, high-tech equipment to deliver high doses of radiation to cancer cells, damaging their ability to grow and spread, hence stopping further development of the tumor. Radiation therapy is delivered by radiation oncologists – physicians who specialize in radiation therapy – along with a team of specialists. At Texas Oncology, our radiation oncologists use the most advanced treatment planning systems and radiation technology available today to fight cancer. Before a patient ever receives a radiation treatment, a customized treatment plan is developed based on the patient’s particular diagnosis. The plan includes determining the most effective type and amount of radiation treatment. Internal v. External Radiation Patients may be treated with radiation therapy alone or in combination with other treatments, such as chemotherapy and/ or surgery. Radiation can be delivered in two different ways to patients – externally or internally. External radiation therapy uses high-energy X-ray or electron beams delivered by a machine that is aimed at specific points on the patient’s body. The specific cancer type often dictates the type of radiation modality, such as intensity modulated radiation

F I T N EHS S HEALT

s ghw |

H E A LT H

s ghw |

FINANCI

s ghw |

MIND &

s ghw |

F A M I LY

s ghw |

C U LT U R E

About the Author s ghw | WELLNES Vivek Kavadi, M.D., is a

Radiation Delivers Precise Treatments By Vivek Kavadi, M.D., Texas Oncology–Deke Slaton Cancer Center

bs ghw ahw |

board certified radiation oncologist at Texas Oncology–Deke Slaton Cancer Center, 501 Medical Center Blvd. in Webster, Texas, and at Texas Oncology–Sugar Land. He has been in practice for more than 20 years and serves on the executive committees for Texas Oncology and The US Oncology Network. Dr. Kavadi graduated Summa Cum Laude from Rice University. He earned his medical doctorate from Harvard Medical School with honors in radiation therapy, surgery, psychiatry, ophthalmology, medical oncology, and pediatrics.

therapy or stereotactic radiosurgery. External radiation is non-invasive and treats a wide variety of cancers. Internal radiation therapy involves implanting radioactive material directly into the patient’s body. Examples of internal radiation therapy include a seed or surgical implant. Internal radiation is typically used to treat prostate, gynecological, breast, head and neck, and esophageal cancer. Advances in Radiation Therapy Today’s radiation therapy is designed to reduce side effects by more precisely targeting tumors, which allows for higher doses of radiation to be delivered to cancerous cells without damaging surrounding tissue. Significant advancements in radiation therapy include stereotactic radiosurgery, allowing radiation to safely target brain and head/neck tumors, and stereotactic body radiation therapy, which delivers extremely targeted, high doses of radiation to small, well-defined tumors, reduces the number of treatment sessions needed, and minimizes damage to surrounding tissue. Proton therapy, which uses proton beams instead of X-ray beams, is highly targeted, precise radiation therapy that is especially effective for tumors in sensitive areas. It is non-invasive and may reduce side effects, allowing patients to maintain their quality of life during and after treatment. Radiation oncology continues to evolve with the development of new technologies, improved equipment, and other medical breakthroughs discovered through clinical trials. Today more than ever, physicians have a wide array of sophisticated radiation options available so that treatment may be customized for each patient in order to deliver the best possible outcome. Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | April-June 2017 15


bs ghw ahw |

F I T N EHS S HEALT

Family Medicine

s ghw |

H E A LT H

s ghw |

FINANCIAL

Navigating the MIND & BODY Complex Landscape s ghw | F A M I LY of Specialized Medicine s ghw |

By Dr. Hanan Hussein

s ghw | C U LT U R E A Group of Blind Men A story originally attributed to the Indian subcontinent

s ghw W EofLblind L Nmen E Swho S are asked to examine an involves a|group

elephant and report what they find. Each one feels a different part, the tusk, the tail, the legs, etc. Afterward, these men come together to discuss what they were able to ascertain and find they are in complete disagreement. There are many ways this story has been interpreted. The connection for the sake of this article is not to compare specialists to “blind men,” rather to illustrate the importance of having one who can see the whole and not just the parts. Most medical specialties today have arisen due to the rapid advances in medical science and technology. This rapid specialization has brought about tremendous opportunity for the treatment of and recovery from a wide range of medical problems. There is certainly a time and a place for a medical specialist (radiologist, oncologist, podiatrist, endocrinologist, psychiatrist, etc.). Each of these physicians takes a narrow and specialized view of the problem they treat, often appropriately. The challenge is to access these specialized treatments at the right point in care. Family Medicine Family medicine was formally recognized as a discipline in the United States in 1969 (aafp.org) and was the first specialization to be based on a philosophy of care and not due to an advance in medical technology. Family doctors are trained to see the whole picture and how each of the parts fit together and complement each other. They stand with patients from “cradle to grave” and help guide and treat individuals and families through each of the important stages of life and development, through aging and end of life care.  Family physicians stand in a unique place to see not just the patient but his/her relationships, family, emotional, psychological and spiritual health and wellness. If you haven’t established care with a family physician and have found it difficult to navigate the complex and often challenging landscape of specialized medicine, I invite you to meet with me and start your journey toward better health together. League City Family Clinic 1507 W. League City Pkwy #200 281-525-6290

16 www.txhwmagazines.com

About the Author Dr. Hanan Hussein is a board certified family physician by the ABFM and a Fellow with the AAFP. She has been serving the Galveston County area for the last twelve years at UTMB, Galveston. She has received various awards such as the John P. McGovern Academy of Oslerian Medicine, Excellence in Clinical Teaching Award and UTMB Family Medicine Residency Program and Teacher of the Year Award in 2013 and 2016.


bs ghw ahw |

F I T N EHS S HEALT

s ghw |

H E A LT H

s ghw |

FINANCIAL

NursingA Labor of Love By BAHW Staff

s ghw |

MIND & BODY

In Texas alone, there are 232,258 Registered Nurses (RN) and 84,170 Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN). Nurses are an integral part of a complex system working from hospitals to F A Mrehab I LYcenters to nursing homes. The tasks they perform are vast and the outpatient| facilities, hours are long. The journey for each nurse is individual, but the desire to serve and care for those in need for all who are called to this profession. | CisUa common L T U Rdenominator E

s ghw s ghw

s ghw | WELLNESS Responding to the

Call for Help

Randy Griffith, Clear Lake Medical Regional Center Randy’s journey into the nursing field started unexpectantly, and later in life. The call for help, from his father, ultimately changed and shaped his professional career. In 2008, Randy’s parents lost their house in Hurricane Ike. As a result, he moved his parents into an assisted living facility. “My Dad called and said that Mom was becoming too much to handle. I told him to stay put, give me some time, and I would get back to him.” The remarkable part of Randy’s story is that without hesitation, he quit his auto mechanic job of 30 years and went to school to become a nurse technician, all with the intent of taking care of his parents. After finishing his certification, he made the phone call. “Dad, you and Mom can come and live with me. I will take care of you.” And that is exactly what he did. While caring for both his ailing parents, he continued his nursing education over the course of 2 1/2 years and received a certification in EKG and Phlebotomy. Since then, both of his parents have passed on, but his passion for nursing remains strong. Randy is still responding to the call for help and positively affecting lives in the Heart Tower at Clear Lake Regional Medical Center.

18 www.txhwmagazines.com

A Focus on Healing Faye Besser, Bay Area Regional Medical Center

After 50 years of nursing and caring for others, Faye Besser still loves every minute of her job helping patients at Bay Area Regional Medical Center. Faye comes from humble beginnings. Her father, a factory worker with a 7th grade education, taught her to work hard and never expect anything for free. Since she was 8 years old, Faye can recall being driven by two goals: a great desire to help other people and wanting to have two sons and two daughters. “God blessed me and that is exactly what happened,” said Faye. With her strong work ethic, she graduated high school at age 17 and went on to receive her MS in Nursing Administration. Faye explained, “I care for each patient as if they were my mother or grandmother, with empathy and compassion. It gives me so much satisfaction to do my best. It is the caring and giving back that empowers me as a nurse.”  She wants each patient to have the best opportunity for healing and sees how she can “make a positive impact on someone’s life.” It is through Faye’s kindness, compassion and focus on healing that she has indeed made a positive difference in many lives.

Lessons Learned

Anne Nance, University Texas, Medical Branch Anne’s journey began her senior year in high school, when she took an educational based class that placed her in the labor and delivery room at a local hospital. After witnessing 3 deliveries, she knew her profession would be in the medical field. In the throes of raising 4 active children, and for the better part of 16 years, she went to school and worked in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit at UTMB, eventually receiving her Masters of Nursing, Family Nurse Practioner, and Nursing Education post-graduate degree. Currently working in the Interventional Radiology Department, she reflects, “I am grateful my life has taken me this route. The nursing profession is hard work, progressive, the hours are long, life and death change people, respect is earned, and too often unappreciated, but more often rewarding. I love when treatments work and people get better. It makes it all worth it. What I learned as a nurse has changed and shaped my life.” Anne’s Lessons Learned: 1) Nurses are an absolutely integral and necessary part of a multidisciplinary team. The doctors cannot do it without us and we cannot do it without them. We rely on each other and develop trust; we advocate for the care of our patients as a team. 2) Education is power. A massive aspect of nursing is educating our patients and their families regarding their healthcare. 3) Effective communication is one of the best tools to avoid conflict, prevent issues and show respect to those we interact with daily. 4) Learning NEVER ENDS! There is so much to learn! As soon as I think I understand something, something else pops up and blows my mind. I love it. 5) Medicine is amazing. We have true healers among us. I am continually amazed at where we have come and continue to progress with treatments and procedures.


The

bsghw ahw |

F I T N EYS W S ELLNESS FAMIL

sghw |

H E A LT H

sghw |

FINANCIAL

sghw |

MIND & BODY

sghw |

F A M I LY

sghw | sghw |

OF

By Ashley Gillespie

A: Autism - What is it? When people refer to Autism, they are usually talking about Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). According to the Autism Science Foundation, Autism is a “brain-based disorder characterized by social-communication challenges and restricted repetitive behaviors, activities and interests.” B: Biological Factors - What are they? According to UC San Diego School of Medicine, “most but not all children with the disorder experience a sudden increase in brain size around their first birthday.” This relationship between the brain overgrowth and severity of symptoms is not completely clear, but is currently being researched. C: Common - How Common is Autism? Did you know that 1 out of 68 children in the United States have been identified with an Autism Spectrum Disorder?1 This is more prevalent than breast cancer or childhood diabetes!2 It is reported that Autism is 5 times more common in boys than girls. Children’s Oasis Foundation: I am excited for the next journey that I am taking in my life. Recently, I have created a non-profit organization called Children’s Oasis Foundation. We will offer Parenting and sibling support classes, counseling and respite care. We will use a comprehensive curriculum that focuses on social, communication and academic skills. I envision a partnership with local business in hopes of transiting the kids to community living. My main goal for the school is to empower our students to find their purpose and to be their best version of themselves. Please join us for our walk and family celebration on May 13th in League City. Find us on Facebook for more information or donate at @childrensoasisfoundation. Center for Disease Control’s Autism and developmental Disabilities Monitoring UC Sand Diego School of Medicine

2

Ashley Gillespie, B.S., C U LT URE Autism education advocate

WE

Autism

Since becoming an autism advocate, I have had the opportunity to see firsthand the daily struggles of, not only the kids affected by autism, but their families as well. Many parents don’t have the resources or the training necessary to help their kids reach their highest potential. Through my advocacy, I have noticed that there is a lack of specific educational programs for children with autism, which leaves some parents worried about their child’s future. My heart aches when I see families struggle because I know much more can be done. The first step is education. Do you recognize the ABC’s of Autism?

1

About the Author

and founder of the Children’s LOasis L more NFoundation. Einformation SS For please contact info@ childrensoasisfoundation.org. 

From a Mother’s Perspective We have learned that life with autism is like a giant sour candy. It is surrounded with sour until you realize the center is sweet. Autism changes your world, as you are immersed in a life of emotion, fluctuating between sadness and anger, at times despair. You experience challenges you never imagined would be yours. Through it all you gain a keen sense of awareness that your world with your Autistic child is certainly not typical – it is a different kind of normal. Parenting in a world of Autism is hard. It is not fair. It is painful and gut wrenching. (I suspect the same can be true for parenting in general.) But it is also magical. It keeps you going in ways you never thought you could. It is living for those moments of the hugs, kisses, milestones, and moments of knowing, regardless of the challenges, that there is love. Our village is just a different kind of normal. Wendi Sandell Shawn Kominek

Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | April-June 2017 19


bs ghw ahw |

F I T N EYS W S ELLNESS FAMIL

s ghw |

H E A LT H

s ghw |

FINANCIAL

s ghw |

MIND & BODY

s ghw |

F A M I LY

s ghw |

C U LT U R E

s ghw |

WELLNESS

About the Author

By Erika Labuzan-Lopez, LMFT, LPC When people think about what it most needed to maintain good mental health, coping skills are always at the top of the list. As a therapist, I’m always working with my clients on building their toolbox and filling it with strategies that will help them to deal with their upcoming problems, not just the problems of today. The challenge is to have a strong skillset in place so that when something hard happens, you can quickly find things you know are helpful to get you through that difficult time. There are no “one size fits all” coping toolboxes out there; different things work for different people. Coming up with better ways to deal with tough stuff is not a small or simple goal at all. I recommend exploring your coping skills on your own, with a support system, and preferably a good therapist. During emotionally heavy times or stressful situations, you won’t be able to sort through healthy and unhealthy ways of dealing with things, so it’s helpful to have good options readily available. Here’s a quick list to get you started. A List of People to Call – Choose 3-4 people you know will be emotionally supportive and write down their names and numbers. If you can’t get ahold of them, write down some of the important points that you wanted to talk about and save it until you can speak with them. I do not recommend texting or emailing because it is too ambiguous and may not lead to the support that you actually need. 20 www.txhwmagazines.com

Erika Labuzan-Lopez, LMFT, LPC is passionate about working with couples and families looking to understand how tough stuff plays out in interactions and learn how to move past the fighting. She specializes in couples therapy, infertility counseling, postpartum depression, and the transition to parenthood. Located at the South Shore Center for Couples & Families.

Coping Cards – You can create coping cards on paper, your phone, or you can get creative with it. Make cards outlining what to do when you are feeling “X emotion” and then write down three options that will help you deal with that emotion to avoid engaging in destructive behavior. Relaxing Audio or Meditation – You can find many meditations on the internet. Try out different styles and techniques until you find what works the best for you. Music can also be helpful for relaxation, but stay away from songs that “pump you up,” sad songs, or songs that remind you of a specific distressing event. The goal is to calm your nervous system, not amp you up. A Video from Someone You Love – Connection and seeing eyes and faces are very comforting in times of trouble. Ask someone that makes you feel safe to record a short video letting you know that you are ok, and that they are there to support you. Watching the video can quickly regulate emotions. Chewing Gum, Adult Coloring Books, Or… – You may wonder how chewing gum and adult coloring books are related? Anything that involves a repetitive motion produces serotonin in the brain, which has a calming effect and can make you more relaxed. If you’ve ever wondered why painting your guest room was so relaxing, now you know why!


bahw |

Rehan – Age 8

“I love Papa because he’s so cool and plays soccer with me!”

Zoha – Age 6

“I have the best Papa in the whole wide world!”

Armaan – Age 3

“I love mummy because she’s a great hugger!”

Gabriel – Age 10

“I love my dad because he plays with me; he makes time for me, and because he loves me.” “Amo a mi papa porque juega conmigo, toma tiempo para mi y porque me ama.”

K ID ’ S C ORNER

Mia – Age 8

“The reason why I love my daddy is because when I get hurt, he loves me so much and I love him.” La raison que j’aime mon papa est lorsque je suis triste, il m’aime toujours et je l’aime beacoup.

Henrique – Age 10

“I love my mother because she gave me life. She cooks for me; she takes me to the movies; she keeps me company while I sleep. I love my mother because she is everything to me.” “Amo minha mãe por que ela me deu a vida. Ela cozinha pra mim, ela me leva para o cinema, ele me faz compania enquanto eu durmo. Amo minha mãe por que ela é tudo pra mim”

Ava – Age 11

Michelle – Age 17

“I love my mom because she’s one of the most hard working people I know. She commits to finishing her work and almost never procrastinates. My mom dedicated her life to raising my sisters and me and I couldn’t be more thankful for her. I’ve always enjoyed learning about my mom’s Japanese culture and hearing stories of when my mom grew up in Japan.”

“I love my mom. She is always full of energy. She makes time for people and has a big caring heart for everyone. She makes time for tea and has a great sense of humor.”

Darian – Age 7

“I love my mom. She makes the best Persian food. She is caring and playful.”

Antonia – Age 11

“There are many wonderful reasons why I love my dad. When he comes home from a long day’s work, he never fails to bring a treat for my sisters and I. I know that he thinks about us even when he’s working and taking care of his patients.” “May maraming dahilan kung bakit mahal ko ang aking ama. Tuwing umuuwi sya galing sa mahabang araw sa trabaho, palagi siyang may baong pasalubong para sa akin at sa aking mga kapatid. Sya ay dakila at tapat sa kanyang pamilya.”

e g a u g n a L y n A in

Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | April-June 2017 21


bahw |

Summer

K ID ’ S C ORNER

of

A

Fun, a Lifetime of Memories

By Megan Hoffman The summer months are coming faster than we realize. Soon, kids will be out of school with hours of free time. This period of time during the summer can be especially detrimental for kids. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) students who are not involved in programs during the summer lose, on average, about a month of academic gains. In addition, students who participate in extracurricular physical activities, like sports, have higher grades, are less likely to drop out, and deal with fewer disciplinary problems (CDC). But where do you start? Finding a program for your kids can be overwhelming. That’s why the Y makes it our concern to step in and guide you along this uncertain journey. Youth development is one of our three main focuses, and with so many demands on today’s families, we understand that you need all the help you can get. That’s why our summer programs are about more than looking after kids. They are about nurturing their development by providing a safe place to learn foundational skills, develop healthy, trusting relationships and build self-reliance through the Y values of caring, honesty, respect, responsibility and faith. We partner with you, reinforcing the values you teach at home. 22 www.txhwmagazines.com

Overnight Camp Sending your kids off to overnight camp can be one of the best things you can do for them. Kids at overnight camp grow their self-confidence, independence and creativity in a safe, exciting and memorable environment. From zipping down zip lines to riding horses and water sports, kids at YMCA Camp Cullen get to choose what they want to do each day. These enriching outdoor experiences give them the chance to discover new talents, create lifelong memories, learn core values and make forever friends. It’s where kids go to grow.

About the Author Megan Hoffman is a Regional

Marketing Manager for the Day Camp YMCA of Greater Houston. YMCA Summer Day Camp offers youth a fun and safe She helps manage marketing atmosphere where they may enjoy their summer break. To deliver for centers in the Houston area on the Y’s commitment to nurture the potential of every child, as well as for chronic disease prevention and YMCA Camp our program helps campers discover what they are passionate Cullen. about, form healthy relationships, and obtain a sense of belonging. Activities allow kids to create arts and crafts, explore science and technology, swim, participate in summer reading and literacy, enjoy field trips, and appreciate nature.

Youth Sports Youth sports at the Y focus on building confidence and character in kids to encourage them to embrace new experiences. Whether a child is playing soccer for the first time, or a returning athlete seeking to build confidence and skills, the Y is there to encourage them to give it their best shot. Plus, the Y continues to encourage positive role models through volunteer coaches. Swimming Lessons Summer may be known as swim season, but water safety is important all year. That’s why YMCAs across Houston offer swim lessons throughout the year that focus on a mastery of skills, personalized attention and guide with praise and encouragement. Amid the summer programs, make some time to take care of yourself this summer. Join your local Y and gain access to our state-of-the-art gyms across Houston so you can work out while we watch your kids for up to two hours, free of charge. Plus, save on all summer programs when you become a Y member. Learn more at ymcahouston.org.


bahw |

B a y A r e a’ s To p

K ID ’ S C ORNER

Next Level Sports 281-914-2351 www.thenextlevel25.com email: thenextlevel25@gmail.com

YMCA Camp Cullen 936-594-2274 www.ymcacampcullen.org Kelly.reffett@ymcahouston.org

Summer camps for ages 6-17 to focus on speed and conditioning with sports and fitness. We offer strength training, and endurance to heat acclamation in the hot summer months for all fitness levels. The core of our program is providing leaders and mentors to help your child grow in physical, mental, and emotional confidence. Registration: https://camscui.active.com/TXFBULLC

Nestled among the tall pine trees on 530 acres along the shores of Lake Livingston, YMCA Camp Cullen is located just 90 miles north of Houston. Kids age 7-17 can discover new talents, create lifelong memories, learn core values, and make forever friends. Camp provides your child with an enriching outdoor experience that includes dozens of activities and specialty tracks for children and teens to select their own activities, including horseback riding and water sports. It’s where kids go to grow.

Bay Area Racquet Club 281-488-7026 www.BayAreaRacquetClub.com email: BayAreaRacquetClub@yahoo.com Full fun filled day camps are offered from 9am-4pm for ages 5-13. Included with the day camps are weekly field trips and water days in a family friendly environment. Tennis Camp - ages 5-14. am and pm options are available. Camps are designed for all levels of players from introductory to tournament. Campers are grouped by age and ability. Academy Training Camp - Designed for current tournament players and school team participants. M-Th 10 am-2 pm. Bay Oaks Country Club Summer Camp 281-244-3825 www.bayoakscountryclub.com warren.rohmfeld@clubcorp.com Bay Oaks offers the ultimate summer camp experience for ages 5-14. Campers can expect a wide variety of daily activities including tennis, golf, swimming, field sports, arts and crafts, yoga, and fitness challenges. Campers grow and thrive with experienced and mentoring staff. City of Webster 281-316-4137 www.cityofwebster.com The City of Webster Ultimate Slammin Summer Day Camp Program is perfect for your child age 6-12 years old! Our exciting program will provide opportunities for your child to expand his/her knowledge, creativity, and social skills. Come join the fun with any four 2-week sessions: “Just Ballin’,” “Fun in the Sun,” “A Ticket to Boardwalk,” or “Just Puttin’ Around”. Registration begins April 1st for Webster Residents and Non Resident May 2nd at 101 Pennsylvania Ave, Webster. It is first come first serve, so don’t miss out! For more information please call Bryan P. Morgan at 281-316-4137 or go to the City of Webster website.

Bay Area Equestrian Center 281-996-1515 www.baectx.com During this 2 day camp, riders ages 6 and older will learn skills and riding techniques, make crafts and horse treats, play horse games, make new friends, and have a horse show off on the second day of camp. Camps are offered on 2 select days from 8 am-2 pm. Registration by phone or online. Campers receive a free t-shirt. Leaders 4 Life 281-535-1500 www.leadersforlifema.com email: leaders4lifetx@gmail.com Leaders for Life Martial Arts offer four summer camps that will keep your child moving and active all summer long. The weekly theme camps include: Minecraft (June 5-9), Nerf (July 10-14), Movie Star (July 31-August 4), and Water Wars (August 14-18). Each camp enjoys a field trip to the pool and a t-shirt. For ages 3-12. Main Event Summer Fun Camps The Main Event, Webster 281-332-4500 www.mainevent.com/book/funcamps email: Brandy.mandigo@mainevent.com Summer FUN camps are the ultimate fun experience with all the activities, food and games kids love. Weekly half-day camps for ages 8-15 are offered from 8:30 am-1:00 pm. Kids learn fundamentals of fun and games, including bowling and laser tag. Lunch is included with camp t-shirt. Registration available online.

Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | April-June 2017 23


bahw |

C OMM U NI T Y

Unified In Trying Times

Clear Lake Islamic Center Extends Support By Dr. Waleed Basyouni Fellow faith leaders, We offer these words of support to the Jewish community in Houston who have seen a rise in anti-Semitism through bomb threats, vandalism, and hate speech in our country, and most notably, a bomb threat at the JCC of Houston. These despicable acts do not represent the fabric of our city, state or that of our nation. We stand next to you saddened and shocked by the actions of those who have not had a chance to learn about you, your families, and your faith. As the Jewish and Muslim communities, along with all other minorities face a growing wave of dissent because of the political winds, know that the Muslim community continues to, and will always stand with you and your families against antiSemitism. We will not allow the seeds of hate to sprout in our city without fierce resistance. Know this day, and know this always, an attack on a person of Jewish faith is an attack on all of us. We will always stand together.

Community Partners Focused on Health & Unity Leaders4Life Martial Arts Cesar and Tiffany Ravedutti www.leadersforlifema.com

“The gifts of discipline, confidence, respect, and focus are our passion through the skill of martial arts. While we realize that we all come from different walks of life with different experiences, we know that every person that enters our door has the potential to be a leader. It is our deepest desire to meet every student where they are and empower them with the gifts of health, wellness, and leadership.”

Youth Sports Training Reggie Rusk www.thenextlevel25.com

“We have a passion to not only train physically, but mentally and emotionally, as well. Our goal is simple: to change lives of athletes while achieving their highest level of performance. We do so by coaching physical health as well as mentoring for the mental and emotional aspects of success. Through my NFL career I have developed a personal mission to help others live out their dreams.”

24 www.txhwmagazines.com

Friendswood Center for Couples and Families Saudia Turney and Andrea Johnson www.friendswoodfamilies.com

“As a group of professional therapists, we believe in tapping into our strengths and working together to develop ways we can enjoy life more fully. We are passionate about implementing a holistic and systemic approach to client care and have many areas of interest. Some of these include working with body image, self-esteem, depression, anxiety, trauma, blended families, divorce and coping issues.”

Kennedy Dance Theatre Mary Lee Kennedy and Milena Leben www.kennedydance.com

“Our mission is not only to provide prestigious learning opportunities for dance, theatre, and the arts to our students, but also give the gift of the arts to our community. We provide professional dance instruction with a Christian emphasis and encourage our students and families to ‘Dance Hard and Dream Big.’”

League City Family Clinic

Dr. Hanan Hussein www.leaguecityfamilyclinic.com

“We have a mission to provide exceptional patient centered care that is efficient and accessible. We do so in a warm, friendly environment for the entire family. Health and wellness is not only healing of the sick, it is also providing opportunity for proactive care in a fun and loving manner. Dr. Hussein lives life with a passion for learning and wellness to help others be the best they were meant to be.”


bahw |

Nature is the Best Teacher By Amanda Rinehart In the quiet mornings on Galveston Island, when the sun is rising in its array of colors, we can hear the waves crashing and the shrimping boats preparing for the day. We can smell the salty humid air and see the birds and wildlife hustling about their business. At moments like this, we realize that we live in one of the most remarkable and beautiful places on earth. This beauty is one of many reasons we live in South Houston. It is no secret that Southerners love sneaking in trips to Galveston Island and the Gulf of Mexico for much needed sun and relaxation. There is nothing like the beauty of the coastal prairie, marshes, wetlands and bayous. “These areas give people a peaceful sanctuary where they can enjoy and learn about nature and our coastal habitat.” Karla Klay, Executive Director at Artist Boat. What is Artist Boat? Artist Boat is a non-profit organization that is doing all it can to preserve the wild spaces on Galveston Island that we all have grown to love. Its mission and goal is to promote awareness and preservation of the coastal margins and marine environment through science and art. Fact: “Artist Boat recently secured $1.4 million in federal, state and local funds and in-kind matches to acquire and conserve approximately 65 acres of coastal habitat on Galveston Island’s West End. The property is part of the 285-acre proposed Anchor Bay canal subdivision. The acquisition will expand Artist Boat’s Coastal Heritage Preserve conservation area to approximately 665 acres. They are also striving to preserve and restore 1,400 contiguous acres from beach to bay, growing the Coastal Heritage Preserve to the scale of Galveston Island State Park, with just over 2,000 acres.” How can we support Artist Boat? Simple…Come, Learn and Enjoy the many programs that are offered by Artist Boat. Did you know that Artist Boat offers a unique eco-art kayak adventure program that gives participants 4 hours of hands-on, place-based, and experiential learning about the Texas Coast? Whether you are 60 or 13 years old, paddling a kayak through the marsh is one of the best ways to experience the beauty and tranquility of the ecosystem. Artist Boat has a public kayak adventure program, which serves learners on the weekends until the summer then 6 days per week during the summer. In particular, the youth adventure program provides much needed outdoor experiences for students (12 yrs – college), especially those living in the innercity. Urban students have less access to natural places because their communities are concentrated with infrastructure and housing. Safety concerns also limit children’s ability and freedom to explore the great outdoors. The lack of

C OMM U NI T Y

About the Author

interaction with natural places leads to higher stress levels, reduced health, and reduced satisfaction with life in general (Kaplan and Kaplan, 1989). Furthermore, childhood experiences in natural places are likely to lead to greater activism as adults (Chawla, 1999). The Eco-Art Adventure therefore benefits students by inspiring them to enjoy being outdoors and provides an experience that could lead to greater activism.

Amanda Rinehart graduated from Texas A&M University at Galveston with a B.S. in Marine Biology and Texas A&M University with a M.S. in Oceanography. Following the completion of her MS, she moved to Fairbanks Alaska to do a PhD at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Her research focused on processing and transport of carbon through Arctic and sub-Arctic rivers and streams to better understand how climate change will alter regional carbon budgets. She has a passion for educating people of all ages about the importance of protecting our coastal ecosystems so that everyone will steward these unique, productive, and beautiful spaces for future generations.

What makes the programs offered at Artist Boat so valuable? The Eco-Art Adventure via kayak is a powerful learning platform because the participant feels the wind on their face and the splash of the water. They can smell the salt air and marsh sediment, and can see the fish swimming below and birds flying overhead. Because of this sensory experience, each person is highly engaged in the experience. The kayak adventure is a transformative experience for most students because they integrate their knowledge with their experience and begin to think critically about how the ecosystem is connected.

Artist Boat has several adventure programs available year round. Check them out at artistboat.org! • Guided Eco-Art and Eco-Tour Adventures via kayak on Galveston Island and in Galveston Bay •Y  outh Eco-Art workshops and Adventures, with more than 30,000 students participating to date, combine arts and sciences for exploration and appreciation of coastal habitats • Project SIT (Seawall Interpretive Trail), a beautification project to transform 70 Galveston Seawall benches into coastal-themed educational works of art • Sea Citizen volunteer leadership team leading volunteer work at the Coastal Heritage Preserve • The Bucket Brigade, free interpretive tours of the Galveston beach ecosystem allowing ocean-lovers of all ages to explore the features and creatures that make Galveston beaches special

Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | April-June 2017 25


W E L L N FO E S CS U S bs ghw a h w | SENIOR

Age-Related Memory Loss: What’s Normal? What’s Not? By Ubi Uskovich, senior living counselor, The Crossings Retirement Community

Have you ever walked into a room and forgotten what you came for? Ever stumble when trying to remember the name or author of a book you read recently? Do these memory lapses indicate you have a memory loss problem? It depends. If you occasionally forget where you left things, or forget the names of acquaintances, don’t go rushing to the local neurologist just yet. Memory Loss vs. Dementia: The primary difference between age-related memory loss and dementia is simple. One is disabling and the other is not. Forgetting where you placed your keys may make you late for an appointment – a minor problem on a single day – but forgetting to pay bills or take medicine every day can create major problems. When memory loss becomes so pervasive and severe that it disrupts daily living activities, social activities and family relationships, you may be seeing the warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease, or other disorders that can cause dementia. Symptoms: The early symptoms that indicate a more severe form of memory loss often go unnoticed by loved ones. The loss of memory typically begins several months, or even years, before it becomes a disabling decline. Changes can include subtle shifts in personality, such as increased or unusual irritability. Other changes can include getting lost or disoriented in familiar places, or a growing inability to follow directions. Words may be forgotten, misused, or garbled. Loved ones may begin hearing the same phrases and stories in the same conversation, or the repetition of a question answered only moments before.

26 www.txhwmagazines.com

As the loss progresses, you may have difficulty making decisions, begin showing poor judgement and acting in socially inappropriate ways. Loved About the Author Ubi Uskovich is The Senior ones may begin to see reminder notes Living Counselor for The littering the house, or stacks of unopened Crossings, a healthy living mail, or increasingly poor hygiene and community with Methodist housekeeping. Retirement Communities. The course of memory loss is hard Ubi works within the Bay Area advising on senior to recognize and even harder to predict, living options after a long and caring for someone with memory standing career in real estate. loss impacts every aspect of a caregiver’s Her passion is building life. As the loved one loses one ability relationships with senior after another, a caregiver faces tests of adults while assisting them with best living options. For stamina, problem solving and resiliency. more information on memory Maintaining emotional and physical loss or senior living, contact fitness is crucial, not just for the caregiver, Ubi at uuskovich@mrcaff.org but for the person being cared for. or 281-525-4320. Experts advise caregivers to be willing to ask for help. Whether it’s respite care, home care, placement in a care center, or just asking a friend or family member to take over for one hour, it’s vital to take regular breaks from caregiving. If you or a loved one feels that memory loss is or has become a problem, make a point to investigate the caregiving resources in your area. Recognizing the symptoms is the first step to dealing with the consequences of memory loss.


W E L L N FO E S CS U S bs ghw a h w | SENIOR

Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | April-June 2017 27


W E L L N FO E S CS U S bs ghw a h w | SENIOR

Traumatic Events and Senior Care Decisions By Stephen Andriko

Senior Care considerations produce a great deal of stress and anxiety for those involved. That is because they involve sizeable sums of money, produce significant emotional responses, and often involve several family members. I strongly suggest that one not complicate or increase that condition by allowing a traumatic event to affect that decision process. Let’s examine some of the more common events that meet the “trauma” specification. The most serious event is death itself. Yes, it will happen to us all. However, when prior arrangements have not been planned or even discussed, it adds to an already emotionally charged situation. The extent of planning can be overwhelming, and it will definitely cost more if arranged after passing. Might I suggest that, in the midst of tears, you avoid the family discussion topic, “Did Dad want to be buried or cremated?” Indeed, that is a great starting question for a dialog with loved ones well before it is eminent. Another common situation involves those missing elderly alerts posted on the highways, “Silver Alert.” That is a very serious trauma for those families involved. The missing elder often is not found alive (see the previous paragraph). Moreover, to be featured on the billboard, someone normally had to be placed in a data-base for those identified as “at risk.” One could therefore conclude, “They just aren’t that bad.” Who is regretting that assumption now? Yes, dementia care is difficult and very expensive, but most families agree that evaluating such after the Silver Alert may not be the ideal time to address those care needs. Finally, health and mobility issues weigh into the traumatic events category. Many seniors fall and injure themselves. After an acute hospital stay, surgical or otherwise, patients transition to in-patient rehabilitation therapy. This care is subject to Medicare guidelines, since that is the payment source. Once Medicare determines that a patient has achieved all the therapy impacting recovery, they want to the patient to be discharged. I have seen families consulting with discharge planners and other rehabilitation community authority figures on a Thursday afternoon with the daunting task presented, “Your mother cannot live alone and requires 24-hour care. You must decide what to do, and we are discharging her on Monday.” Time requirements have now compounded the stress level. These situations are not all of the traumatic pitfalls that exist. However, they should provide food for thought. If you are unsure how to get started, I suggest The Road Map to Senior Care. This is an easy to read book that requires less than an hour and paints the senior care landscape in a clear conversational fashion. It is a great tool to share among family members to orient everyone with a basic level of the options available.

28 www.txhwmagazines.com

About the Author Stephen Andriko, a Certified Dementia Practitioner, is the author of The Road Map to Senior Care, a book that discusses the landscape of senior care. As a noted public speaker, Stephen routinely delivers presentations regarding senior care options. Stephen has been a volunteer with the Alzheimer’s Association Speakers Bureau for several years. He is also a member of the Alliance of Professional Health Advocates.


:: HEALTH Q&A

W E L L N FO E S CS U S bs ghw a h w | SENIOR

Common Questions About Therapy by Andrea Johnson, MA, LMFT

Often times, I encounter individuals who are curious about the therapy process, but they haven’t yet taken the active step of reaching out for professional help. Some may not be sure their struggles warrant professional help. Others may experience fear of the therapy process. Perhaps some are overwhelmed by the thought of change. In efforts to answer some of the unknowns about therapy, this article will cover some of the commonly asked questions. When is it time to seek professional help? While therapy can be beneficial to almost anyone, anytime, there are some signs to look out for when trying to decipher when you should reach out to a professional. 1. Are you feeling sadness, anxiety, or anger, or perhaps just feeling “off?” 2. Are you withdrawing from loved ones? 3. Have you lost someone important to you? 4. Have you experienced something traumatic, like abuse, chronic illness, or an accident? 5. Have you stopped partaking in activities you enjoy? 6. Are you using a substance to cope? What is Marriage and Family Therapy? Marriage and Family Therapists (MFTs) broaden the traditional emphasis on the individual and they attend to the significant role of primary relationships, such as spouses and family. Because individuals are highly influenced by family’s behavioral patterns, MFTs incorporate the family unit into the treatment plan. Although MFTs work from a systemic framework, it is very common for MFTs to treat individuals.

Andrea’s passion revolves around working with those who struggle with body image and self-esteem issues. Andrea has a background in competitive fitness and she enjoys How do I know which professional to choose? incorporating her understanding Different therapists will be a better fit for different individuals. A positive therapeutic relationship is a and love for physical health into her great predictor of a successful therapy experience, so it’s important to find a therapist with whom you fit well. work as a therapist and coach. In addition, Andrea enjoys working For example, if your spirituality plays a large role in your everyday life, you may want to find a therapist who with couples. She strives to help them incorporates this aspect into his/her work. break negative cycles of interaction and find new, healthier ones. Andrea Will therapy work for me, and how do I know if it’s working? is recently married and she and her If you are open to learning, growing, and making changes within yourself, it is likely therapy will benefit new husband enjoy living a healthy, you. To monitor progress, you and your therapist will work together to set goals, and you will evaluate whether active lifestyle together.

or not you are advancing toward your goals.

Do I have to tell my therapist everything? What you share with your therapist is completely up to you. Allowing your story to naturally unfold over time will help the therapeutic relationship become safe and trusting. With that being said, honesty is a must, so if you are not ready to share details about a certain subject, communicating that boundary to your therapist is okay and encouraged.

What’s Your Question?

Do you have a question that needs to be answered? Ask our local experts and editorial board! Please submit your question to bahwmagazine@gmail.com. Please include your name and email address. Don’t worry, we will keep you anonymous in the magazine! Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | April-June 2017 29


Photos

30 www.txhwmagazines.com


BEST OF BAY AREA DIRECTORY

The Crossings, MRC Healthy Living Community 255 N. Egret Bay Blvd., League City, Texas 77573 www.mrcthecrossings.org 866-835-2877 | 281-724-2345 Abe Zimmerman, Marketing Director | azimmerman@mrcaff.org

Rhonda Floyd Photography 612 Hwy 3 North, League City, TX 77573 www.rhondafloyd.com Rhonda@rhondafloyd.com 281-332-5490

e s t.

League City Family Clinic 1507 W. League City Pkwy, Suite 200, League City, TX 77573 www.leaguecityfamilyclinic.com info@leaguecityfamilyclinic.com 281-525-6290

19 7 3

Bay Area Audiology and Hearing Aids 17099 Texas Avenue, Suite 200, Webster, TX 77598 www.bayareaaudiology.com chandaabbott@bayareaaudiology.com 281-332-4575

South Shore Center For Couples & Families 1100 E. NASA Pkwy #101, Houston, TX 77058 Southshorefamilies.com info@couples-families.southshorefamilies.com 832-827-3288

BEST OF BAY AREA DIRECTORY 2017

The Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine recommends the trustworthy and highly respected business owners and clinics found in The Best of the Bay Area Directory. When doing business, don’t forget to mention that you saw their listing in the BAHW Magazine. If you are interested in having your business represented in the directory, please call us at 832-323-3020.

Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine | April-June 2017 31


Recapture Beauty Call for our

Spring

Specials!

Elena G. Geppert, M.D.

Board Certified Plastic Surgeon 32 www.txhwmagazines.com

MODEL

. Breast Augmentation/ Lift www.harbourplasticsurgery.com www.drgeppert.com . Breast Reconstruction . Tummy Tuck . Liposuction / Body Sculpting . Face Lifting . Eyelid Surgery . Rhinoplasty . Labiaplasty . Lasers (Face, Hair, Veins) Two Harbour Square (next to Imagio) 3033 Marina Bay Drive, Suite 110 . Botox / Dysport . Restylane, Juvederm, Radiesse League City, Texas, 77573 . Sculptra ® New Natural Filler 281.334.FACE (3223) 281.334.BODY (2639) Member ®

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF PLASTIC SURGEONS

® M EMBER OF THE A MERICAN SOCIETY FOR A ESTHETIC PLASTIC SURGERY

Consultations Complimentary

Bay Area Health & Wellness Magazine April-June 2017  

Welcome to our magazine, Bay Area Health & Wellness. This issue includes: Walk It Out; Stop Shouldering the Pain; Ballet Mistress Ms. Milena...