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HEALTHCARE

• The GP may also suggest treatment with medication such as anti-depressants or refer you to a psychologist or psychiatrist for more specialised mental health treatment. • Treatment by your GP or mental health nurse is fully covered by your basic health insurance. Cost of more specialised treatment is also covered, but payable by you to the maximum of your annual excess. PREVENTIVE HEALTHCARE • The Netherlands has good nation-wide preventive health programs. These programs are available at different stages in an individual’s development and most are free of charge. • There are screening options available for people at risk for certain diseases such as cardiovascular, pulmonary or sexually transmitted diseases. • The flu vaccination is offered free of charge to people having a higher risk of becoming seriously ill if they get flu. This is done by the GP. • There are screening programs during pregnancy and several after a child is born such as developmental check-ups and a preventative vaccination program. These are administered by Youth Healthcare (‘Jeugd gezondheidszorg’) at the Baby Health Clinic (‘Consultatie Bureau’). • There are also population screening programs later in life for diseases such as breast, cervical and colon cancer. You’ll be invited for these and they are executed at your GP’s office or at a Public Health facility. With the invitation you will receive information about the purpose and process of the screening. Ask your GP what screenings apply to you. • Participation is on a voluntary basis. If you do not wish to participate, you can return the invitation to the laboratory indicating you do not wish the screening. TRAVEL SERVICES AND VACCINATIONS • If you travel to countries in Africa, South and Central America, Asia and the former Eastern Bloc nations you can contact your GP or Public Health Services (‘GGD’) for advice and preventive vaccination. More information about Dutch healthcare: www.h4i.nl/healthcare HEALTH INSURANCE • It is mandatory for everyone living in the Netherlands to purchase a basic level of health insurance (basisverzekering) from a Dutch insurance provider (zorgverzekeraar). • You have to take out Health insurance (zorgverzekering) from a Dutch insurer within four months of arrival or start of work for a Dutch employer. You will be insured as of the day of arrival and will also have to pay premiums from that date. • Certain students, employees and work arrangements can be exempt from this requirement, but you should check carefully whether your situation qualifies. • If you don’t take out insurance while you are required to do so, you risk a fine.

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• Children under 18 are included in their parents’ insurance at no additional cost, unless the child begins working. • A Dutch insurance company cannot refuse to cover you for the basic package, regardless of your age or state of health. • The standard coverage is set by the government, although providers vary in cost and how they deliver these requirements. If your income is under a fixed minimum level, you can apply for a healthcare allowance (zorgtoeslag) from the tax authorities. • You can get free advice from the independent organisation www.zorgverzekeringslijn.nl. • Find a list of insurers (zorgverzekeraars) at www.zn.nl, or compare insurance policy costs at www.zorgwijzer.nl/zorgvergelijker/english BASIC INSURANCE • Cost is about EUR 110 a month. • The basic insurance covers general medical care (visits to the doctor, for example), hospital stays, ambulance services, IVF, the midwife and maternity care, dental care for children up to age 18, most prescription medicine, and various appliances. • You can take out supplementary insurance (aanvullend pakket) for anything the government considers your responsibility, like adult dental care and physiotherapy. This can be from a separate insurance company, though not all insurers will accept you if you don’t take out the Basic insurance. • Check if your healthcare supplier is registered with your insurer before starting treatments. • If you work at a company, it is worth checking whether there is a collective scheme that provides health insurance at a discount. • The standard insurance package includes a mandatory excess or deductible (eigen risico - 2019: € 385) that you must pay towards your insurance claims. For some services you also have to pay a personal contribution (eigen bijdrage). • Insurers generally pay in full for family doctor (GP or ‘huisarts’) visits, obstetric and postnatal care, national screening programmes, flu vaccinations and some chronic illness treatments. • In addition to your premium your employer will also contribute a percentage of your income to cover the costs of healthcare. If you are self-employed you will have to pay this contribution directly to the tax authorities. • Coverage, premiums and excess may change every 1 January. At this date you can switch to another provider or policy. More information about Health insurance: http://www.h4i.nl/insurance

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Expat Survival Guide 2020 - The Netherlands  

The Expat Survival Guide assists your first essential steps: finding a home and job, organising permits, setting up finances and healthcare,...

Expat Survival Guide 2020 - The Netherlands  

The Expat Survival Guide assists your first essential steps: finding a home and job, organising permits, setting up finances and healthcare,...

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