Page 1

MENTORS WANTED

Managing Editor Maria James helps Big Brothers Big Sisters of America recruit mentors in Hyattsville. P. 2

COLORFUL ROUTE 1 New business group hopes to draw more downtown. P. 3

Maryland hosts groundbreaking ceremony for Purple Line

GOING TO MARKET

Webmaster Lindsay Myers explains how to find fresh produce in the fall. P. 4

Life&Times

By Matthew Gallant

On Aug. 28, state and local politicians gathered to celebrate the longawaited Purple Line, a light rail line north of the nation’s capital. “This multi-billion dollar infrastructure project is a big win for the State of Maryland, and will be a major benefit to the National Capital Region,” Gov. Larry Hogan said in a press release. “It is a shining example of what can be accomplished when our federal, state, county, and private sector partners work together.” The Purple Line was first proposed in 2001 by Gov. Parris Glen-

Vol. 14 No. 9

Hyattsville’s Community Newspaper

September 2017

BACK TO SCHOOL

PURPLE LINE continued on page 12

New fine dining option now open from Franklins team Old Maryland Grill one of five restaurants in College Park hotel By Allan Walters

Ten years ago, if a Hyattsville resident wanted to celebrate by going out to a fine dining restaurant, options would have been going into DC or heading off to Silver Spring or Annapolis. Recent years have brought more options to our doorstep, and with the opening of The Hotel at the University of Maryland, the next evolution in the local dining scene will take place. There will be five new dining options available in The Hotel, headlined by Mike Isabella’s Greek restaurant Kapnos Taverna and the RESTAURANT continued on page 11

KERRY-ANN HAMILTON Local high school students exit their school bus to begin the 2017-2018 academic year. See more back to school photos at Hyattsvillelife.com

Ready to rock (and roll) at first Hyattsville PorchFest By Heather Wright

Hanging out on a porch, you can watch the life of your neighborhood: kids biking, people walking dogs, teenagers talking to one another and into their phones. And the community can watch you. And listen. On Satur-

day, Sept. 16, from 2 to 6 p.m. the Hyattsville community can listen to approximately 30 entertainers performing on 13 Hyattsville porches during its first PorchFest. Hyattsville Preservation Association (HPA) board member Katherine Somok said she had recently enjoyed the University Park Porchfest

and proposed a similar event to the HPA board. Somok said, “Given that’s it’s Hyattsville and we’re an arts-focused community, it just seemed like a really good fit.” Within 48 hours of posting a late-July request PORCHFEST continued on page 6

CENTER SECTION: SEPT. 12, 2017 ISSUE OF THE HYATTSVILLE REPORTER — IN ESPANOL TOO! HYATTSVILLE MD PERMIT NO. 1383

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Page 2

Hyattsville Life & Times | September 2017

FromTheEditor

Big Brothers Big Sisters hope to fill need By Maria D. James

In the May edition of the Hyattsville Life & Times, I openly shared my challenge with finding my identity as a single adult who is childless and lives in our familyoriented community. I received many positive and encouraging messages from others who are living the single, childless life in our city. One comment, in particular, encouraged me to identify what I love doing and not let my status

keep me from attending events or meetings. I recently contacted Big Brothers Big Sisters of the National Capital Area (BBBSNCA) hoping to become involved, and I was excited to learn the organization is seeking mentors to help youth in Hyattsville. I may have found my fit! According to their website, Big Brothers Big Sisters of America is the nation’s largest donor- and volunteer-supported mentoring network. The organization matches adult volunteers (“Bigs”) and children and youth

(“Littles”), ages 6 through 18, in communities across the country. Sydney Cross, a bilingual program coordinator with BBBSNCA, is on a mission to match 35 young people with mentors. “Recruitment of mentors and mentees must happen first, followed by matching and supporting them to grow and succeed. This program will build the capacity of low-income families in a way that, over time, will mitigate poverty,” Cross explained. Cross will hold a volunteer orientation on Sept. 19 from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

A community newspaper chronicling the life and times of Hyattsville Mailing address: PO Box 132, Hyattsville, MD 20781 http://HyattsvilleLife.com http://facebook.com/HyattsvilleLife http://twitter.com/HvilleTimes Hyattsville Life & Times is published monthly by Hyattsville Community Newspaper, Inc., a 501c(3) nonprofit corporation. Editors welcome reader input, tips, articles, letters, opinion pieces and photographs, which may be submitted using the mailing address above or the email addresses below. Managing Editor Maria D. James maria@hyattsvillelife.com Associate Editor Heather Wright heather@hyattsvillelife.com Digital Editor Krissi Humbard krissi@hyattsvillelife.com Webmaster Lindsay Myers lindsay@hyattsvillelife.com Layout & Design Editor Ashley Perks Copy Editor Nancy Welch Advertising advertising@hyattsvillelife.com 301.531.5234 Writers & Contributors Matthew Gallant, Kerry-Ann Hamilton, Fred Seitz, Allan Walters Board of Directors Joseph Gigliotti — President and General Counsel Chris Currie — Vice President Caroline Selle — Secretary Emily Strab — Secretary Rosanna Landis Weaver, Gretchen Brodtman, Debra Franklin, T. Carter Ross Maria D. James and Krissi Humbard — Ex Officios Circulation: Copies are distributed monthly by U.S. mail to every address in Hyattsville. Additional copies are distributed to libraries, selected businesses, community centers and churches in the city. Total circulation is 9,300. HL&T is a member of the National Newspaper Association.

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at the organization’s Lanham office. I hope to help her exceed her goal, which is really about more than just meeting numbers. Cross is hoping to build a network of mentor relationships that support youth in our Hyattsville community. Cross, whose brother, Matthew, is a police officer for the Hyattsville City Police Department, says this is her labor of love. Based on data from the AmeriCorps VISTA, 13 percent of the city’s residents live below the poverty line. The seven public schools within city limits serve 6,800 students who live in the city and in the greater community beyond city limits. Some 5,250 students are receiving free and reduced-cost meals, demonstrating that, in fact, at least 76 percent of local youth have significant financial needs. Cross also stated that Hyattsville has frequently heard calls for mentorship. “These requests come from the elementary schools, where students need assistance with reading and self-esteem, as

well as the middle schools and high schools, where students are increasingly being recruited into gangs and violence as well as becoming pregnant,” said Cross. Mentors and students will be matched at these schools: Hyattsville Elementary, Edward M. Felegy Elementary, Rosa L.Parks Elementary, University Park Elementary, Hyattsville Middle School, Nicholas Orem Middle School and Northwestern High School. Regardless of my marital or parental status, I proudly embrace Hyattsville as my community, and I want to take positive steps to get out of my comfort zone and find my place. This requires welcoming those pangs of momentary discomfort I feel in my stomach when I enter a room or attend an event where no one knows me. I encourage you to step out of your comfort zone, too. If you’re interested in mentoring youth in our city and want to attend the orientation, Cross asks that you email her at scross@bbbsnca.org. I will be at the Sept. 19 orientation; maybe I will see you there!

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KRISSI HUMBARD The SoHy Collective is responsible for repainting the H-shaped planters in Centennial Park. See more photos of the updates online.

New business group works to fight blight, draw businesses to area By Krissi Humbard

You may have noticed that Route 1 in downtown Hyattsville is a little more colorful these days. New art is popping up in the Arts District, thanks to a group of local business owners. The group is in its infancy, but has big plans for the area. Business members currently include Tanglewood Works, Three Little Birds Sewing Co., Vigilante Coffee Company, Pyramid Atlantic Art Center, Franklins Restaurant, Brewery, and General Store, Retrograde Vintage, Green Owl Design, and Artist & Craftsman Supply. Bronwyn King, the curator for Studio SoHy, is also involved. Called the SoHy Collective, the group’s mission is focused on developing a visual and commercial identity which promotes and supports small businesses and nonprofits in the SoHy district of Hyattsville. “Our purpose is to support the businesses and the business district,� said Sue Mondeel, owner of Tanglewood Works. Realizing there was no official business association for Hyattsville, Mondeel said she decided to gather local business owners to discuss what resources were already available and what they wanted to do to increase the visibility of Hyattsville as a retail and dining destination. “Those of us who met soon realized that our strength was in creating visual interest and experiences, so we have made that our focus,� she said. The group is responsible for the newly painted H-shaped planters in Centennial Park and the new paint job on the Tanglewood

Works building. Green Owl Design is also creating a mural on the building behind its storefront. Each business is working on their individual projects, while consulting with the group to create a cohesive branding. Erica Riggio, co-founder of Green Owl Design, said the Hs lacked appeal. Working to “fight the blight,� her team paired with Artist & Craftsman Supply to develop a design and repaint the planters, which came from H Street in DC about 10 years ago. “These Hs are one small step in branding and creating a sense of place,� Riggio said. “The primary focus of the SoHy Collective is to increase local economic development by making Hyattsville an attractive, artistic and fun place to visit,� Riggio added. “We can do this by banding together and offering creative assistance to the city, developers, etc., and taking on projects like the Hs.� Riggio said she asked Assistant City Administrator Jim Chandler if her team could “spruce up� the Hs, and he told them to go for it. “Jim has always been great to work with, and we appreciate his trust in our abilities,� she said. Chandler noted it has been helpful to have a collective business group to work with. The group has “great energy — and we need that,� he said. Chandler said the projects that the group has taken on help build a sense of ownership. The business owners are putting their “blood, sweat and tears� into the area, he observed, which is different than if BUSINESS continued on page 6

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Hyattsville Life & Times | September 2017

GoingToMarket

Yes, you can still find fresh produce during sweater weather By Lindsay Myers

After another lazy summer of meandering through local markets, dropping cucumbers into Mason jars full of salty brine and sucking every last drop of juice from the fresh peaches at McCleaf’s on Thursday afternoons in Riverdale, I’m ready to transition my pantry into the heartier, nuttier flavors of fall and winter. Don’t let the cooler weather keep you from visiting your local markets this fall. Autumn has “tuned his jolly voice,” and the harvest is abundant. In this season finale edition of Going to Market, I’ll let you know where you can buy fresh produce this fall, what you can buy, and even suggest a couple of recipes that you can access via the web version of this article. Happy Harvesting! Apples: You might prefer pumpkins, but the Myers family thinks that apples should be crowned king of fall. Apples are harvested from late summer through early fall and are coveted for their affordability and variety. This autumn, try your hand at two or three of the many sweet and savory dishes we put together during apple season. Grab an apple or two and let it cook down in your cast iron skillet with some butter and white onion to make a rich sauce for bone-in pork chops. Or pop a few in the slow cooker with some oranges, cinnamon sticks, sugar and cloves

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MARKETS Open through October: Cheverly Community Market Cheverly Community Center parking lot 6401 Forest Road, Cheverly Every other Saturday, 8 a.m. to noon Final market: October 21 Open through November: Greenbelt Farmers Market Greenbelt Municipal Building parking lot 25 Crescent Road, Greenbelt Sundays,10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Final market: November 19 College Park Farmers Market Herbert Wells Ice Rink parking lot 5211 Paint Branch Parkway, College Park Saturdays, 7 a.m. to noon Downtown College Park Farmers Market City Hall parking lot 4500 Knox Road, College Park Sundays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Open through January and year-round: Riverdale Park Farmers Market MARC Rail Station Parking lot through November Riverdale Park Town Center Market in December and January Thursdays, 3 to 7 p.m. Takoma Park Farmers Market 6900 Block of Laurel Avenue, Takoma Park Sundays year-round, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

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to make the best apple cider ever. Or come find me in Hyattsville, and maybe, just maybe, I’ll give up the secret to my (literally) awardwinning apple pie. Beets: The beet gets a bad rap since it’s so often served on salad bars drenched in vinegar. A wellprepared beet, however, has a subtle, earthy taste with just a hint of sweetness. Beets are also a great fall/winter staple because they are in season through early November and can last for several weeks if stored properly (try a sealed plastic bag in the fridge). If you’re new to beets, try them boiled first. The skin pops right off, and they make the perfect side dish, salad topping, or even secret ingredient in a smoothie. Once you’ve been converted, get a little crazier in the kitchen. Try them sauteed in beer with red cabbage and onion — the perfect topping for bratwurst during Oktoberfest — or turn up your brunch game with a crispy beets and potatoes hash. Brussels Sprouts: Since the internet realized that Brussels sprouts can be caramelized in brown sugar and bacon, this formerly neglected veggie has found new footing on the menus of many DC eateries. The Brussels sprout, however, can be prepared in many ways sans the bacon, and the flavor is nutty and savory — perfect with a roasted chicken on a chilly evening, whipped into an au gratin concoction or even on a pizza. Look for Brussels sprouts at your local markets from September through March. Butternut Squash: Like Brussels sprouts, butternut squash is fresh in the market during our coldest months — October through Feb-

ruary. It can keep for several months depending on your storage situation. Although butternut squash can be difficult to cut because of its thick skin, the creamy sweetness of the fruit makes it worth the extra effort. Butternut squash is also low in fat and rich in potassium and fiber. When fresh produce can be hard to find in the colder months, this shapely beauty can deliver just the punch of nutrients that your body craves. Try it in a thick winter soup paired with roasted tomatoes or even with a little curry for an extra kick. Pears: Craving fresh fruit when the frost kicks in? You’re in luck. Pears peak from September through November, and are often available during December. Pears can be tricky to purchase because their appearance doesn’t necessarily reveal whether they’ve been harvested and handled properly. Most foodies agree that pears should be bought in season and locally, when possible, to minimize the damage done in mass transit. When buying pears from your local market, give the fruit a squeeze and go for the firmer pieces. Pears are better when they’re picked unripe. You can test them for softness and smell after a few days of rest on your kitchen counter. While you’re waiting, prep your pantry for a couple of pear-themed dishes. A warm bowl of chai-spiced baked oatmeal with poached pears is perfect on special occasion mornings. On days when I need to impress guests, I serve sliced pears (and apples) with a creamy ginger dip made with cream cheese, ginger, yogurt and honey. The dip has to chill, but your guests’ enthusiasm for it won’t. Thanks for reading this summer, and see you at the market next May. I’ll be the one gobbling down strawberries. To try the above recipes at home, visit Lindsay’s column at Hyattsvillelife. com. Write her at Lindsay@Hyattsvillelife.com if you like any recipes from her list or have your own to share.

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Hyattsville Life & Times | September 2017

PORCHFEST

continued from page 1

for hosts and musicians on the H.O.P.E. (Hyattsville Organization for a Positive Environment) listserv, Somok was inundated with responses and had signed up enough hosts. PorchFest venues spread from Crittenden Street up to Queensbury Road, and from Route 1 to Queens Chapel Road. Most are concentrated along, and east and west of, 42nd Avenue. Entertainers and their reasons for performing are as varied as the instruments they’ll be playing. Adam Watson will perform on Oliver Street with a brass quintet. “This city has provided an incredible sense of community since my wife and I moved here seven years ago — it’s nice to give a little bit back,” Watson said. Nani Lowery has played the ukelele for more than 50 years. She and her husband Keith’s performance on 40th Avenue will feature Hawaiian and pop music. She said that her music honors her Hawaiian heritage and expresses “gratitude for the Portuguese people who introduced the fun instrument to the Hawaiians.” She said she wants to share her love for the ukulele and hopes to encourage others to play the easy-to-learn and portable instrument.

Although most of the performers are adults, there will be a family act that includes young children, too. Musician Kit Slack said, “We have four fiddlers in our household, ages 4, 6, 7 and 39. My husband Jared [Marx] plays banjo and keys.” She said she likes to think of her family as the kind that plays music together on the porch, but that it’s usually hard to find the time. Slack said she is happy to have PorchFest “as an incentive to get us to work up our best numbers.” Those involved see it as an opportunity to strengthen community ties. Dale Crowell, of Jefferson Street, said he and his wife, Sharon, had discussed hosting some porch concerts on their own when they read the listserv posting. “This is a great opportunity to open our home to the community, listen to some good music and get to know our neighbors,” Crowell said. Amy Patten, of Queensbury Road, agreed: “We hope to meet new neighbors and also to appeal to folks walking down the street, who may be down to take a moment and enjoy some local music and raise a glass to this incredible village we all call home.” Flavia Favali owns a rental property on Oliver Street that she offered for PorchFest. Since moving to Hyattsville in 2001 with her six children, Favali has seen Hyatts-

ville “grow and thrive.” She added, “I think this is a wonderful idea to bring [the] community together.” Those involved with PorchFest are eager for it to become an annual community event. Watson said, “I hope it indeed becomes a regular occurrence. ... Events like these contribute greatly to stronger, more vibrant ties within the city.” Somok hopes the event continues, and she already has some goals for future PorchFests, including make the event more diverse, geographically and performancewise. She said she’d like to see more representation “closer to the northwestern area” as well as from West Hyattsville. Somok would also like to involve more children as performers and broaden the program to include dancing and other performance arts. Based on the enthusiasm she’s encountered with hosts and performers, Somok believes that there will more PorchFests. “We’ve had a great response, so I anticipate we’ll be doing more in the future.” Hosts and performers would raise a glass to that. For a complete listing of addresses, performers and times, visit HPA’s website (www.preservehyattsville.org) or Facebook page. PorchFest attendees are encouraged to bring their own chairs, beverages and food, as hosts are only asked to provide porches.

BUSINESS

continued from page 3

the city were to come in and paint something. “They’re building sweat equity,” he said, adding that he “absolutely” thinks the efforts will draw new businesses. Mondeel says that, in addition to beautifying an area that has been neglected for some time, the group sees themselves as the welcome committee for new businesses that are opening in the area. “I was really, really happy to move here,” Mondeel said, “but I had to figure it all out [on my own] … those of us who have been here awhile and have figured it out want to help the new wave of people who come in.” The group’s efforts and enthusiasm are already drawing new businesses. Retrograde Vintage, one of the pop-up shops that is currently selling in Tanglewood Works, is working out details to lease a space on the strip. Mondeel says the SoHy Collective is just getting started. They have been working with the city on some “vibrant and interesting” signage for Route 1 and the SoHy district. That project was spearheaded by SoHy Collective, but is being implemented by Green Owl Design and Artist & Craftsman Supply. “They are taking it to the next level,” and making it happen, Mondeel said.

The SoHy Collective is also working with the city to bring some holiday cheer to the downtown Route 1 area. The group has big plans for Small Business Saturday in November, when they’ll stage an event

The group’s efforts and enthusiasm are already drawing new businesses. Retrograde Vintage is working out details to lease a space on the strip. they’re calling “Light it Up.” The individual businesses will decorate their window displays, and the collective is working with the owners of vacant businesses to create fun, festive displays and “get the whole corridor lit up,” Mondeel said. Mondeel stressed that the business owners in the collective are joining forces on this because they love Hyattsville, and they want to keep their businesses here. Riggio agreed, saying, “We envision a thriving business community in which residents and non-residents are able to enjoy an enhanced artistic and visually appealing experience.”

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Hyattsville Reporter No. 354 • September 12, 2017

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Free Clothing, Toys and More

The HY-SWAP is a community exchange of free infant, children’s and maternity clothing, toys and gear organized by Hyattsville residents. Donations are collected over several weeks, sorted, and then a pop-up boutique is set up in the City Building where anyone is welcome to “shop the swap,” and entry and everything is free. The next HY-SWAP is October 14, 11 am – 3 pm at 4310 Gallatin Street. Doors open at 11 a.m. for Hyattsville families and friends, and the general public is welcome starting at 1 p.m. The goal is to share and circulate items in good condition within the community, providing savings for local families and reducing waste. Cash donations are appreciated to help cover costs. For more information, check out www.hy-swap.com or email Emily Palus at hyswap@gmail.com.

Calling All Volunteers

Volunteer drivers are needed for up to five days a week, typically from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., to deliver meals to seniors and people with disabilities. Volunteers can be reimbursed for mileage up to $25 per month. To help meet this need, please call (301) 985-5057 or send an email to caistis@hyattsville.org.

Mentors Needed

Park(ing) Day

Join the City for its second annual Park(ing) Day on Friday, September 15. On-street parking spaces will be transformed into temporary pop-up parks. See a video and more details at www.hyattsville.org/parkingday, or just come visit us: 7 am – Queens Chapel Town Center 1 pm – The Shoppes at Arts District 6:30 pm – City Municipal Building (and Summer Jam)

Summer Jam

Join us at 4310 Gallatin Street on Friday, September 15, 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m., to finish this year’s Summer Jam Series on a high note! There’ll be live blues-fiddle music from The Roustabouts and delicious food from the Healthy Fool food truck—plus BBQ, our moonbounce, and kids’ activities with Mandy the Clown! See you there!

Community Cleanup

Join friends and neighbors at 3400 Stanford Street on Saturday, September 16, for the summer’s final Community Cleanup of University Hills Park and Lane Manor Park, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. Supplies will be provided, so just bring the fun with you and your friends! If you have any questions, please contact Ward Three Councilmember Thomas Wright at (301) 422-1506.

Pop-up Bookstore

Duende District, a bookstore by and for people of color, has partnered with the City of Hyattsville to open a popup location Sept. 19-30 at 5412 Queens Chapel Road. Their hours, events and activities will be posted at www. duendedistrict.com.

Public Meeting: City Transportation Study

The City is launching a study to develop the Hyattsville Transportation Plan. The plan will help us improve existing transportation infrastructure, carry out new projects, and determine priorities for the next 20 years. Join us for a Public Meeting on Wednesday, September 20, 7 p.m. at the City Building (4310 Gallatin Street) to let us know what your priorities are in transportation.

Police Conversations

Join the City of Hyattsville’s Police Department, Hyattsville’s faith leaders, and your friends and neighbors

as we continue to build a stronger community. The next Community Conversation with our police will be on Thursday, September 21, 7 p.m. – 8:30 p.m., at the First Baptist Church of Hyattsville (5701 42nd Avenue). For more information, please contact Chief Douglas Holland at dholland@hyattsville.org or (301) 985-5084.

Sunset Movie Series

Come out to Heurich Park on Friday, September 22, at 7:30 p.m. for the next film in our Sunset Movie Series, “Sing.” Bring your blankets or chairs and enjoy a FREE movie in the park!

Language Exchange Cooking Classes

The City of Hyattsville is partnering with Prince George’s Community College’s Adult Education Program to offer a language exchange and baking class for adult English language learners. The ESL class will be hosted by Hyattsville Mennonite Church, which has ample space and ovens! Adults who are English language learners—but already know a little bit—are encouraged to enroll in this ESL class. It will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30 am - 12:30 pm, from September 26th to December 12th. In addition, we are also looking for proficient English speakers who are willing to volunteer for a class or two to share a recipe with a student. There will be an opportunity towards the end of the class to learn how to prepare a dish or two from the students’ home countries. Space is limited, so if you’re interested in learning English or in volunteering, please call the PGCC office at University Town Center (301) 546-8350.

Cyclocross

The annual Hyattsville Cyclocross bike race, sponsored by the Route 1 Velo cycling team, will take place on October 1. This off-road bicycle race through Magruder Park and Woods benefits the Special Olympics of Prince George’s County. Learn more at www.hyattsville.org/ cyclocross.

Hyattsville Elementary 5K

The fundraising fun run of the Hyattsville Elementary School PTA is October 14. Join your community for some good ol’ fashioned exercise while raising money for a good cause. To register or get more information, visit http://hyattsvillees-pta.org/zombierun. Also, organizers are seeking volunteers to help on race day. Visit the website to sign up.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of the National Capital Area is partnering with the City of Hyattsville to build a local mentorship network. We welcome all volunteers, and have a high demand for Big Brothers. All mentors will participate in an orientation and training, and undergo a background check. If you’re interested in serving as a mentor to a Hyattsville youth, please contact Sydney Cross at (301)-794-9170 ext. 15 or scross@bbbsnca.org for more information.

What’s Happenin’ Hyattsville?

Are you in the know? Sign up for email and text notifications from the City of Hyattsville at www.hyattsville. org/notifyme. You can also visit www.speakuphvl.com to find out what’s going on in the community, as well as make your voice heard in discussions and surveys. And be sure to follow the City of Hyattsville on Facebook and Instagram (@cityofhyattsville), Twitter (@HyattsvilleMD), and at vimeo.com/cityofhyattsville!

Farmers Market

This is the last month you can get the best in fresh, local produce at the Hyattsville Farmers Market. We’ll be at 3799 East West Highway every Tuesday, 3 p.m. – 7 p.m., until the end of September. Our vendors accept SNAP, WIC, and FMNP—and if you take a nutritional tour of the market, you’ll get a free shopping voucher. What’s not to love?!

Magruder Park Teen Club

The Magruder Park Teen Club continues each Friday, 6 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., during the school year! Teens ages 13 to 18 from Hyattsville and the surrounding area, as well as Northwestern students, can join us at Magruder Park for good food, new friends, and lots of fun! Remember: You’ll need your ID, proof of age, parent/guardian signature, and emergency contact information when you register. Northwestern students must also bring their school ID.

Ageless Grace

Our seated exercise class is back each Wednesday and Friday, 10 a.m. – 11 a.m., until June of next year! Join us at 4310 Gallatin Street and get your groove on!

Creative Minds

The Fall Session of the program for toddlers and their parents will take place at the Magruder Park Recreation Building Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m., from September 12 until December 14. The Fall Session costs $50 for the first child and $30 for each child you enroll after that—what a deal! For more information and to register, please contact Saarah Abdul-Rauf at (301) 985-5065 or visit www.hyattsville.org/creativeminds.


Hyattsville Life & Times | September 2017

Page HR2

el

Reportero de

Hyattsville

No. 354 • 12 de Septiembre, 2017

www.hyattsville.org • 301-985-5000

Park(ing) Day

Únase a la Ciudad para el Segundo Park(ing) Day anual el viernes, 15 de agosto. ¡Espacios de estacionarse se convertirán temporalmente en parques! Vea el video y encuentre mas detalles a www.hyattsville.org/parkingday, o visitanos: 7 am – Queens Chapel Town Center 1 pm – The Shoppes at Arts District 6:30 pm – City Municipal Building (and Summer Jam)

Summer Jam

¡Únase a nosotros en 4310 Calle Gallatin el viernes, 15 de septiembre, 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m., para concluir la Serie de Summer Jam en un punto alto! Habrá música blues en vivo de The Roustabouts y comida rica de la troca Healthy Fool—¡más BBQ, nuestra brinca brinca y actividades para niños con Mandy la Payasa! ¡Nos vemos ahí!

Limpieza de la Comunidad

Únase a sus amigos y vecinos en 3400 Calle Stanford sábado, el 16 de septiembre, para la última limpieza comunitaria de este verano en Parque University Hills y Parque Lane Manor de 11 a.m. a 1 p.m. Serán proveídos los suministros, ¡pues solamente tiene que traer la diversión con sí mismo y con sus amigos! Cualquier consulta, por favor contacte a Thomas Wright, Concejal de Distrito Tres, al (301) 422-1506.

Tienda de Libros “Pop-up”

Duende District, una tienda de libros de y para personas de color, en coordinación con la Ciudad de Hyattsville, abrirá un lugar “pop-up” 19 a 30 de septiembre en 5412 Queens Chapel Road. Sus horas, eventos y actividades estarán en www.duendedistrict.com.

Reunión Abierta: Estudio de Transportación de la Ciudad

La Ciudad de Hyattsville está lanzando un estudio de transportación para ayudar a desarrollar el Plan de Transportación de la Ciudad de Hyattsville. Este plan ayudará la Ciudad en mejorar la infraestructura de transportación ya existente, realizar nuevos proyectos y determinar prioridades para los próximos 20 años. Únase a nosotros para una Reunión Publica el miércoles, 20 de septiembre, a las 7 p.m. en el Edificio Municipal (4310 Calle Gallatin) para compartir cuales prioridades en la transportación son las suyas.

Conversaciones con la Policía

Únase al Departamento de Policía de la Ciudad de Hyattsville, a líderes de fe y a sus amigos y vecinos mientras seguimos fortaleciendo nuestra comunidad. La próxima Conversación Comunitaria con nuestra policía tendrá lugar jueves, el 21 de septiembre, 7 p.m. – 8:30 p.m., en el First Baptist Church of Hyattsville (5701 Avenida 42). Para más información, por favor contacte a Jefe de Policía Douglas Holland en dholland@hyattsville.org o al (301) 985-5084.

Serie de Películas al Atardecer

Venga al Parque Heurich viernes, el 22 de septiembre, 7:30 p.m., para la próxima película en nuestra Serie de Películas al Atardecer, “Sing.” ¡Lleve sus mantas y sillas y disfrútese de una película GRATIS en el parque!

Intercambio de Idiomas en Clases de Cocina

La Ciudad de Hyattsville está trabajando con el Programa de Educación para Adultos de Prince George’s Community College para ofrecer clases de cocina para estudiantes intermedios de inglés. ¡Esta clase de ESL tendrá lugar en Hyattsville Mennonite Church, lo que tiene espacio y hornos abundantes! Se alienta que se inscriban en esta clase los adultos que ya saben un poco de inglés y quieren seguir aprendiéndolo. Se reunirá los martes y los jueves, 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., desde el 26 de septiembre hasta el 12 de diciembre. Además, buscamos voluntarios proficientes en inglés que puedan venir a una o dos clases para compartir una receta con los estudiantes. Habrá una oportunidad al fin del curso para aprender cómo preparar comida de los países de los estudiantes. El espacio

está limitado, así que ellos al que les interese ser estudiante o voluntario deberían llamar la oficina de PGCC en University Town Center al (301) 546-8350.

como herman@ mayor con un joven de Hyattsville, por favor contacte a Sydney Cross a (301)-794-9170 ext. 15 o scross@bbbsnca.org para mas información.

Ciclocrós

¿Qué Onda Hyattsville?

Ciclocrós, la carretera de bicis anual patrocinada por el equipo de ciclismo Route 1 Velo, tendrá lugar el 1 de octubre. Esta carrera sin camino por el Parque y la Bosque Magruder beneficia a las Olimpiadas Especiales del Condado de Prince George. Aprenda más en www.hyattsville. org/cyclocross.

Hyattsville Elementary 5K

Esta carrera divertidísima del PTA de Hyattsville Elementary para recaudar fondos ha sido cambiado del 30 de septiembre al 14 de octubre. Únase a su comunidad para ejercerse cómo nunca antes además de recaudar fondos para una causa muy buena. Aprenda mas por visitar a www.hyattsville.org/5K. Tambien, los organizadores están buscando voluntarios para el día del evento. Visite el sitio de web para registrarse a ayudar.

Ropa, Juguetes y Más, Gratis!

El HY-SWAP es un intercambio de ropa, juguetes y cosas para bebés, niños, y mujeres embarazadas organizdo por residentes de Hyattsville. Donaciones están recolectado durante varias semanas, organizado, y después disponible en una tienda “pop-up” en el Edificio Municipal donde cualquier persona puede “comprar” y la entrada y todas las cosas son gratis. El próximo HY-SWAP es 14 de octobure, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. a 4310 Calle Gallatin. Puertas abren a las 11 a.m. para familias y amigos de Hyattsville y al publico a la 1 p.m. La meta es compartir y circular cosas en buena condición entre la comunidad, apoyando familias locales y disminuendo basura. Donaciones de efectivo están bienvenido para cubrir los costos del evento. Para más información, visite www.hy-swap.com o escriba a Emily Palus a hyswap@gmail.com.

Atención Voluntarios

Se necesita voluntarios para hasta cinco días semanalmente, típicamente entre las horas de 10:30 a.m. y 12:30 p.m., para llevar comida a mayores y a personas con discapacidades. Voluntarios pueden recibir un reembolso para cubrir la distancia de hasta $25 cada mes. Para ayudarnos, llame al (301) 985-5057 o mande un correo a caistis@hyattsville.org.

Buscando Hermanos Mayores

Los Big Brothers Big Sisters of the National Capital Area, en coordinación con la Ciudad de Hyattsville, está creando un red local de mentoría. Buscamos todos voluntarios, y tenemos mucha demanda para hombres. Todos los voluntarios participarán en una orientación, entrenamiento y reviso de historia criminal. Si está interesado en servir

¿Quiere mantenerse informado? Inscríbase para recibir notificaciones por correos electrónicos y mensajes de texto de la Ciudad de Hyattsville en www.hyattsville.org/notifyme. También se puede visitar a www.speakuphvl.com para averiguar lo que pasa en la comunidad, además de hacer que su voz esté escuchada por participar en conversaciones y encuestas. ¡Y asegúrese de seguir la Ciudad de Hyattsville en Facebook e Instagram (@cityofhyattsville), Twitter (@HyattsvilleMD) y en vimeo.com/cityofhyattsville!

Mercado Agrícola

¡Sólo queda un mes más de lo mejor en productos frescos y locales! Venga al Mercado Agrícola de Hyattsville (3799 East West Highway) cada martes, 3 p.m. – 7 p.m., hasta los fines de septiembre. Nuestros vendedores aceptan SNAP, WIC y FMNP—y si usted hace el recorrido nutricional del mercado, ¡recibirá un cupón gratis! ¡¿Cómo no le va a encantar?!

Club de Adolescentes En Parque Magruder

¡El Club de Adolescentes en Parque Magruder seguirá cada viernes, 6 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., durante el año académico! Adolescentes entre 13 y 18 años de edad en Hyattsville y sus alrededores, además de estudiantes de Northwestern, pueden unirse a nosotros en Parque Magruder para comida rica, nuevos amigos y mucha diversión. Recuerde: Traiga su identificación, prueba de edad, firma de padre y/o guardián legal, e información de contacto en caso de emergencia cuando venga para registrarse. Estudiantes de Northwestern deben traer también su identificación escolar.

Gracia Eterna

Nuestra clase de ejercicio sentado comienza de nuevo el 6 de septiembre y tiene lugar cada miércoles y viernes, 10 a.m. – 11 a.m., hasta el junio de 2018. ¡Venga a 4310 Gallatin y encienda su ritmo!

Mentes Creativos

La Sesión del Otoño de este programa para niños pequeños y sus padres tendrá lugar en el Edificio Recreacional de Parque Magruder los martes y jueves, de las 10 a.m. a las 12 p.m., desde el 12 de septiembre hasta el 14 de diciembre. La Sesión de Otoño sale $50 por su primer niño y $30 por cada niño adicional que se registre—¡qué gran oferta! Para más información y para registrar a su niño, por favor llame al (301) 985-5065 o visite a www. hyattsville.org/creativeminds.


Page 8

Hyattsville Life & Times | September 2017

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September 14

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Open Mic Night. An array of professional spoken word performers, open mic rookies and musicians perform. $5 suggested donation. 9 to 11 p.m. Busboys and Poets, 5331 Baltimore Ave. RSVP online: www. busboysandpoets.com/events/ info/get-tickets

September 16

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October 14

Home Decorating Workshop. Sponsored by the Hyattsville Preservation Association. 10:30 a.m. to noon. Pyramid Art Center, 4318 Gallatin St. hpahyattsville@hotmail.com. 301.699.5440

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October 1

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Hyattsville Branch Independent Film Series. Film series season begins with the romantic comedy “Meet the Patels.” Refreshments will be served. Free. 7 p.m. University Christian Church, 6800 Adelphi Rd. susan.misleh@pgcmls.info

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HPA PorchFest. First annual family-friendly community music event, appropriate for all ages. Free. 2 to 6 p.m. Performances spread from Crittenden St. up to Queensbury Rd., and from Route 1 to Queens Chapel Rd. katherinesomok@ gmail.com

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NEED MORE CALL 30

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Hyattsville Life & Times | September 2017

Page 9

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Page 10

Hyattsville Life & Times | September 2017

NatureNearby

The fungus among us By Fred Seitz

The extensive rain in the past few months has raised the visibility of one of the most adaptive, diverse and mysterious organisms: fungus. A walk in the woods will reveal fungi from familiar toadstools to various shelf-type fungi on trees and logs and some brilliant, orange-colored tubular types along paths. Moisture is one of the key contributors to the growth of this unusual and still not well understood organism that some consider the dominant form of life on Earth. Consider the extremely wide range that fungi inhabit — from tropics to poles, to say nothing of our homes and our bodies (don’t forget athlete’s foot). While the fruiting body of the fungus is the most frequently noticed part, the underground “wires,” or rhizomes, can be extensive in their length — even several miles long — and are vital to helping the fungus absorb nitrogen into its roots. Fungi diverged from

other life forms over 1.5 billion years ago and preceded (some say helped) plants in colonizing land. Despite their early colonization of the continents, fungi were misunderstood by humans and were considered a type of plant. Now they are recognized as a separate kingdom and actually as more like animals than plants, having properties such as communication with other fungi and perhaps with other life forms. The designation of fungi as its own kingdom has been facilitated by DNA analysis. The recognition that different fungi reproduce both asexually and sexually has also helped define their classification in a separate kingdom. Their original inclusion in the plant kingdom was attributed in part to their apparent lack of movement, but their spread by spores and a variety of insects and other animals helped distinguish them. While their diversity and unusual lifestyle can make them

seem both creepy and wondrous to their human co-inhabitants of the planet, they provide benefits that we should not dismiss. Our fungal friends give us edible toadstools, yeast to make bread and brews, and important medicines, such as penicillin and anticancer medication. For some, they also provide spiritual and mind-altering substances. However, some species of fungi can be very toxic, and even fatal, to humans. While some are important food for animals and insects, others are used in pesticides against insects. Fungi are a diverse and adaptable co-inhabitant. Some fungi even help decompose other fungi. Indeed, one of their most obvious and beneficial functions for humans is the major role that fungi play in breaking down debris (notice their busy work on fallen wood in the park). In recent years, we have also begun to recognize and make use of fungi’s ability to destroy toxic materials. Understanding fungi will re-

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Hyattsville Life & Times | September 2017

RESTAURANT

continued from page 1

Old Maryland Grill, a new restaurant from Mike Franklin, owner of Franklins Restaurant, Brewery and General Store. Old Maryland Grill held a soft open on Sept. 8 and is now fully open. Franklin summed up the difference between the two restaurants, saying, “Franklins is family night; the Old Maryland Grill will be date night,” and added, “The area needed a more quiet, upscale dining experience, similar to what you can find downtown.” In an interview conducted prior to the opening, Chef Mark Heckrotte, who leads the kitchens in both restaurants, said that the Old Maryland Grill is a “complement to Franklins and will provide a different kind of dining experience.” “Franklins was intended as a neighborhood joint, a place to be a little loud and take the kids,” Heckrotte said. “The Old Maryland Grill will also be a place that you can take the family, but the food experience will be different. We are going to source food locally from Maryland companies such as beef from Roseda Farm [and] crab from G.W. Hall & Son, and will serve several farm-raised Chesapeake oyster varieties that will be available year round.” One of the restaurant’s missions is to preserve traditional Maryland recipes that are dying out. “We are going to serve Saint Mary’s County ham, a corned ham stuffed with a mixture of leeks, cabbage, kale and hot peppers,” said Heckrotte. “We felt part of the reason the owners came to us to bring a restaurant to the hotel was both because of our local presence and our focus on Maryland cuisine.”

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Page 11

But the Old Maryland Grill will have more than traditional food. Franklin describes the cuisine as a “mix of classic and contemporary” that will also include dishes inspired by more recent immigrant arrivals to Prince George’s County, such as “beet kitfo,” a riff on the classic Ethiopian dish of minced raw beef. Franklin and team had been in search of a place to expand for a few years, but the right opportunity had not presented itself. “We looked at a few different options but none were the right fit,” said Heckrotte, “and we wanted to make sure that Franklins remained solid since it was so important to the community. One day representatives from Southern Management Corporation, the hotel operator, showed up at Franklins, and a few hours later we had an agreement.” According to Heckrotte, another big difference between Franklins and the Old Maryland Grill will be the scope and complexity of running the restaurant. “The Old Maryland Grill will be the hotel restaurant responsible for room service and serving three meals a day and brunch on weekends. There will be 260 seats inside and a patio that can expand seating to over 300 people at a time.” The Old Maryland Grill is located on the ground floor of The Hotel at the University of Maryland at 7777 Baltimore Avenue, directly across from the main campus.

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Helping Sell Hyattsville

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UNDER CONTRACT

4210 Jefferson St., Hyattsville Absolutely classic 1920’s Bungalow with 3BRs, 2 Baths. Listed for $375,000

5639 45th Ave., Hyattsville Gorgeous 4 level townhome with 3 BRs + office, 3 1/2 baths and a roof deck! Bamboo floors & nice upgrades throughout. Listed for $450,000

SOLD 5601 44th Avenue, Hyattsville Arts District - Corner townhome Listed for $478,000 Sold for $484,000!

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6213 42nd Ave., Hyattsville Classic 1940’s colonial with 3 BRs, 1 bath. Gorgeous new kitchen with granite counters, wood cabinets & stainless steel appliances. Beautiful refinished wood floors. Listed for $370,000

5707 31st Place, Hyattsville 3BR, 2 Bath Cape Listed for $285,000 Sold for $290,500 4004 Buchanan, Hyattsville 3BR, 2 Bath Cape Cod.Listed and sold for $350,000!

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Page 12

Hyattsville Life & Times | September 2017

PURPLE LINE

continued from page 1

dening, who favored light rail over heavy rail because it would be more cost effective and make less of an impact on the environment. In 2009, Gov. Martin O’Malley said he favored the light rail idea, but the project was put on the back burner until 2013, when O’Malley included it in a list of projects that could be covered by a $4.4 billion surplus from raising the gasoline tax. Fast-forward to the next — and current — governor, Hogan, who in 2014 said that the project was too expensive and sidelined it. In early 2015, Hogan decided to invest in the light rail, but with cost reductions. Hogan and U.S. Department of Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao eventually signed the funding bill that releases $325 million for the project and commits the government to an additional $900 million toward the $2.2 billion budget.

The 16-mile light rail will connect Montgomery and Prince George’s Counties with 21 stops between Bethesda and New Carrollton, including connections to Metro’s Red, Orange and Green lines, the Marc and Amtrak trains and bus routes. The closest stops to Hyattsville will be in College Park and Riverdale Park. Chao, Hogan, Sen. Chris Van Hollen, Maryland Congressman Anthony Brown, Montgomery County Executive Ike Leggett, and Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker III all spoke at the groundbreaking event. Baker’s remarks focused on the huge opportunity that the new line represents for the region. “This project will create thousands of new construction jobs connecting two of Maryland’s most robust economic corridors for smart and sustainable growth.” He said that it will not just be a new public transit system that moves people between points, but a major boost that will decrease traffic, improve

the environment and shuttle people to revitalized areas, including arts districts, businesses and recreation spots. Added Chao, “This is an example of what Americans can do when they work together.” She was referring to the decades-long process of proposals and designs and the challenges the Purple Line has faced, as well as to the projected creation of 52,000 new jobs including construction and maintenance and to the future economic development. Chao stated that this project could be a model for the rest of

the nation because of its unique public-private partnership (P3) contract. Such a partnership enables infrastructure projects to dip into enormous private reserves that wouldn’t otherwise be available. This project is the largest P3 undertaken in U.S. history, according to Hogan. Also present at the ceremony were representatives from CASA de Maryland, a local nonprofit that seeks to improve the quality of life in low-income immigrant communities. Bedecked in maroon CASA T-shirts, the hundred or so members arrived in vans “to make sure

that Maryland residents, especially those who live in our communities, are hired for the construction, and of course, [are hired again] once the project is complete,” said Lindolfo Carballo, director of community development for CASA. At the conclusion of the speeches, Hogan and Chao signed the funding bill, and then the governor climbed the hill behind some loaders to begin construction — or rather destruction — as he manned the controls of a large excavator and began to demolish a prefabricated metal building, tearing down the old to make way for the new.

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Hyattsville Life & Times | September 2017

Page 13

MissFloribunda Dear Miss Floribunda, About a year ago, I noticed funguslike growth on my azalea bushes (see photo to the right). It’s slowly been getting worse, and some of the branches have died. What’s going on here, and what should I do about it? I’ve had these shrubs for a long time and don’t want to lose them. They border the steps going up from the street to my door, and what I love about them is that even when they’re not in bloom they are handsome and provide curb appeal. Frustrated and Anxious on 42nd Avenue Dear Frustrated and Anxious, What you have on your azaleas is lichen. In itself lichen doesn’t harm plants, but it is a symptom that the plant isn’t doing well. As you know, Aunt Sioux and I made

a house call to examine your ailing azaleas. Noticing that your steps were made of concrete, we called in our soil expert, Dr. Agronomosky. He confirmed our suspicion that the probable cause of your azaleas’ poor health is that lime leaching from the concrete has changed the naturally acidic pH of your soil to alkaline. Azaleas require quite acidic soil to thrive. Although almost all gardeners are aware of pH, just as we are all

aware of electricity in our homes, few of us really understand much more than what we see when we flick a switch, or when we add lime or sulfur to change soil pH. PH, or “potential hydrogen,” concerns the level at which a plant can absorb hydrogen, an element vital to plants. Without hydrogen, the ions of which are absorbed from the soil through water, a plant cannot take in any other nutrients. The concept was introduced in 1909 by the Danish chemist Søren Peder Lauritz Sørensen, who was working at the Carlsberg Laboratory studying ion concentration on proteins. He invented the pH scale based on electrons. The level of pH is measured from 0 to 14, with 0 indicating highest acidity and 14 highest alkalinity. Soil with a rating of 7 pH is neutral and is acceptable to most plants. It’s important to be aware that the amount of hydrogen needed by specific plants dif-

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fer, and soil that is too acidic might not attract enough hydrogen for one plant, while soil too alkaline would attract too much hydrogen for another. No plant likes either extreme. Azaleas and most other evergreens generally like soil with a pH as low as 4.5 but no higher than 6. In general, soils with high alkalinity have a large component of limestone in them — as does the concrete forming your steps. You can add sulfur, peat moss or iron sulfate to your soil to acidify it, but Dr. Agronomosky advises getting your soil tested professionally before you make any such decision. You can find information on labs that test soil at the University of Maryland Home and Garden website: extension.umd.edu/hgic, or you can call their Agricultural Nutrient Management Program at 301.405.1319. Dr. Agronomosky doesn’t recommend the purchase of a home soil testing kit because considerable expertise is needed to interpret results. It usually costs from $5.50 to $27 to have testing done by experienced technicians. There is another solution to your

problem. Late next February, or very early March — before your azaleas wake from their winter dormancy — you can dig them up and move them to a part of your garden away from those steps. (Almost any area where you haven’t added lime or bone meal would be fine. Unamended garden soil in our area is generally acidic enough for azaleas.) In their place you could plant something that actually likes an alkaline, or “sweet” soil. I suspect from your appreciation of the way azaleas stay attractive when out of bloom that only a similar evergreen shrub would do. The only evergreen shrub I can think of that would tolerate alkaline soil is boxwood, but this could be researched further for another column. In the meantime, please come to the Hyattsville Horticultural Society’s autumn plant exchange on Saturday, Oct. 21, after a brief meeting at 10 a.m. It will take place at the home of Joe Buriel and Dave Roeder on 3909 Longfellow Street. There will be many gardeners there who can advise you on possible choices.

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Hyattsville Life & Times | September 2017

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September 2017 Hyattsville Life & Times  

Purple Line groundbreaking; first Hyattsville PorchFest; Old Maryland Grill opens; new Rte. 1 business group, SoHy Collective; fall farmers...

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