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BY AND FOR THE STUDENTS OF HOBART AND WILLIAM SMITH COLLEGES

the

HERALD December 7, 2001

ISSUE 11

This Week: News 3 Chinese Poet Speaks to Campus

Op-Ed

4

Dave Deals With Hair Loss

6

A&E

Radiohead & Mick Jagger CD Reviews

Sports

8

WS Basketball is Still on a Roll

Index News

1

Student Life

3

Opinion/ Editorial

4

Arts & Entertainment

5-6

Sports

7-8

Keyes Opens Door to Understanding 9-11 maintains our challenge is, “to make sure we are still here [and] all of us are free.” He directed our attention towards government action, asking, “How do we judge which measurements are essential and which are not?” Keyes stated, “We have burdened ourselves with a huge defense system to be ready for all attacks,” underlining the, “failure of a system on which we have expended billions of dollars.” He asserted, “We [Americans]…have to make an assessment about what went wrong,” believing we deserve this knowledge of “integrity” to be able to judge appropriate action. Keyes exposes the hundreds of low paid workers fired subsequent to the attacks, maintaining, “…those above them, in powerful positions photo by Dave Gordon are still getting paid when Alan Keyes’ electrifying speaking style entranced the crowd at the President’s questions need to be Forum Lecture last Thursday night. asked.” Keyes affirmed, “If Dina Paulson Keyes stated that Americans are we have any other standard, we will News Contributor “forgetting who we are,” and hopes not survive,” explaining, “survival is hursday evening, November that the strong patriotism being ex- not about choice; it’s what you do 29 - US Presidential Candi emplified is “real” and not “superfi- to live.” Moving onto current issues, date, Statesman, Intellectual, cial.” He stressed one must, “never surrender [one’s] liberty,” and asked, Keyes expressed clear disapproval and Moral Conservative Alan Keys “What are of military tribuspoke in Albright Auditorium amidst we securnals and stem a crowded HWS and Geneva audiing if we cell research. He ence. don’t have feels the former Keyes began the evening with l i b e r t y ? ” violates US govthe terrorist attacks, stating, “My Keyes worernment prefriends, [on Sept 11] we returned to r i e s cepts, claiming, the real world.” Citing WWI, WWII, America is “…the premises Nazism, the Holocaust, and Totalibecoming consumed with the, “short is separation of power…[when you tarianism as the, “worst displays term,” and is failing to see the, “long place] executive and judicial powers we’ve ever witnessed towards humanity,” Keyes pointed out that, “All term commitment.” He views Ameri- in the same hand, you better use it September 11th did was shock us out cans as accepting anything to lighten carefully,” calling this line of reasonof the belief that we were invulner- our fears. He asked us to, “look real ing a “no brainer.” In regard to stem closely,” at what is going on and able to evil.” CONTINUED ON PAGE 3

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“What are we securing if we don’t have liberty?” Alan Keyes

VOLUME CXXV

Gearan Named to National Board on Service Dane Miller Op-Ed Editor

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ommunity service and ser vice learning became a cor nerstone of the Hobart and William Smith community the moment Mark D. Gearan was inaugurated as President of this institution. His role in integrating Hobart and William Smith students into the Geneva community and his continual commitment to this role has been broadened to an appointment to the National Board of Governors. Gearan is one of nine college presidents to be appointed. The National Board of Governors for The Partnership for Public Service, a non-partisan Washington D.C based organization aimed at revitalizing public service by encouraging men and women to consider pursuing a career in federal service. The role of the National Board of Governors, funded by Sam Heymond a wealthy philanthropist, is to revitalize public service by encouraging young people to pursue federal service careers. “The critical question for us will be how do we get young people to think about careers in federal government service?” commented Gearan, “we have a critical window here especially after 9/11. The magnitude of heroism in service became very real to so many young people. This is a great opportunity to allow young people a fresh look at government service; CONTINUED ON PAGE 3


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December 7, 2001

Did You Know? 89% of athletes at HWS never miss or perform poorly in athletic events as a result of drinking during the academic year. Source: 2000 Spring survey of a representative cross-section of HWS students with 327 respondents.


HERALD PICK OF THE WEEK

Student Life

Hobartones Sunday, 8:00, Wasey Room

Service Subject of National Panel CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

for them to really see the honor and privilege,” added Gearan. The board plans to carryout its mission through an aggressive campaign of public and private collaborations, focused Gearan joins an impressive Advisory Board of Governors that consists of eight other college presidents from Stanford, Duke, Cornell, and Yale; chief executive officers from corporations like Lockheed Martin, AOL/Time Warner, Walt Disney; high level executives representing agencies like The MacArthur Foundation, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and The David and Lucile Packard Foun-

dation. Government officials include former Senator Bill Bradley, Senator Joseph Lieberman, Senator Fred Thompson, and Senator George Voinovich. “This is a great opportunity to work with some very impressive, diverse, and influential people in an effort to show young people all the fascinating and wonderful things our government is involved with on a daily basis,” remarked Gearan, “I would love to hear the voice of college students on this campus; this is a great opportunity for their voice to have an impact on the way our government works.”

9-11, Stem Cells Subjects of Keyes Lecture CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

cell research, he alleges, “Do you know where this is leading us – to a hell hole of human degradation,” and adds, “We have not cured the canker of our mental sickness.” Keyes states our attitudes towards, “killing embryos, doing research [yet claiming] we are not the evil,” as hypocritical to our approach on the terrorism war. Those involved on the “opposite” side will suffer by us; here, there are no displacements of blame nor ‘semi’ involvement considered. Keyes offers the explanation however, that terrorism is “different”, employing action which “disregards” the norm. Keyes maintains American government always “chugged along,” serving as the “most remarkable” thing about the U.S. He stated, “it fell to an ineffectual whisper [at times] but [was] never completely silent.” Stating initially he “hated” America upon learning of slavery, Keys

amended his feelings upon realizing, “we understand what we did…we condemn our actions.” He asserted America, “never forgot the good was possible [and] we never let the abuse be taken for righteousness.” Keyes sees America as currently, “in danger of letting this slip,” and adds, “I pray to God we never give up these truths.” He declared, “We are better than we used to be but not better than we can be.” Keys concluded, “As we embark on this war, we have to confront these moral challenges…[and] renew our allegiances to moral principles.” He continued, “If we can show that integrity, we will come out still free, the way we should be…[as] an example of how human beings can live together peacefully in [a] community of heart and conscience.” More than anything, Keys stressed, “We stand on the long common ground of human hope…every human has dignity and no one should disregard that.”

Chinese Poet Reads Work to HWS Audience Ian Schlanger News Editor

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onday, December 3 – A crowded Geneva room was charged with energy, as faculty, students and community members alike waited for the entrance of a revolutionary. In walked Bei Dao, clad in a tweed sports coat, cauderoy pants, and glasses Dao showed all that revolutions begin in the mind. Professor Deborah Tall of the English Department began the n i g h t ’s poetry reading by introducing Bei Dao. Dao was born in Beijing, China and came of age during the revolutionary times of the late sixties. During the late seventies and through out the eighties Dao was a member of the Misty Poets, a group of writers whose belief in the individual mind, stood in opposition to the Chinese government. In 1989 Dao was linked to the uprisings of Tieneman Square, and forced into exile where he has been on the move continuing with his work. Dao was in town visiting an old friend of his, a Yi Ping, who is also an exiled writer and is currently residing in Ithaca as part of the Ithaca City of Asylum Project. The Asylum project provides a safe haven for those writers whose works have been banned, whose lives have been threatened and who are in need of

protection and shelter. Yi Ping, who like Bei Dao was exiled from China for his involvement in democratic activism, lives with his family in Ithaca as part of a two-year program. The Asylum project, working in conjunction with Cornell University, provides Yi Ping with a stipend, allowing him to write, teach, and translate in a safe environment. Dao stood at the podium and recited a number of his poems, and short essays all in their original Chi-

The crowd was entranced by Dao’s musical voice, and the pure beauty contained within the poem’s original Chinese. nese. Prof. Deborah Tall, Prof. David Weiss, and Prof. Jim Crenner each took turns reciting the translated versions of his selected works. The crowd was entranced by Dao’s musical voice, and the pure beauty contained within the poem’s original Chinese. “I really enjoyed the reading,” noted one William Smith Senior, “It was really powerful to hear his poetry recited in its original language.” As the night wore on Dao answered questions and later signed copies of his various works, for a crowd truly awed by his presence. Perhaps in the end Bei Dao’s poetry is proof that wars aren’t won by military might and tactical strategy, but for the words of one echoing in the minds of thousands.

WANTED: Writers, Artists, and people interested in helping with Layout for Spring Semester 2002.

Work for the Herald!

Ten Websites to Waste Time on Instead of Studying for Finals (courtesy of the Herald Staff) 1) Emode.com- hundreds of tests that tell you about yourself. Our personal pick? The “What’s Your Superpower?” Test! 2) Popcap.com- java games that will absorb your life. Try Alchemy by yourself of Psyochobabble with a bunch of your friends! 3) Bored.com- The ultimate. More ways to waste time cannot be found on the web. 4) Smarterchild- ok, so it’s not a website. Put it on your buddy list IM with a hello, and find out how close we’ve come to AI. (Try to make it angry. It’s funny. We promise.) 5) thespark.com- not just a timewaster, this site also has booknotes and homework-help type stuff in addition to fun quizzes. The Purity Test is a classic! 6) dictionaraoke.com- Definition: Audio clips from online dictionaries sing the hits of yesterday and today. The fun of karaoke meets the word power of the dictionary. Our Favorite? Bohemian Rhapsody. 7)http://homepage.ntlworld. com/mil.millington/ things.html- visit this to read about a relationship more tortured than yours could ever be. Hilarious. 8) furnitureporn.com- Different from your usual porn site, these chairs take it to the limit. Not for the truly horny. 9) snopes2.com- Every urban legend you can possibly imagine and many you can’t. Read them for hours. 10) livejournal.com- Warning: only go to this page if you’re in a very good mood. Otherwise, the sheer misery contained within these online journals will make you cry. And remember, if all else fails, there’s always www.hws.edu.


THE HERALD Established 1879 By and for the students of Hobart and William Smith Colleges Melissa Roberts ‘02 Editor-in-Chief Dane Miller ‘03 Opinion/Editorial Editor Ally Gualtieri ‘03 Layout Editor Ian Schlanger ‘02 News Editor Benjamin Kenna ‘03 Sports Editor Carl Morgan ‘03 Arts & Entertainment Editor Dave Gordon ‘02 Photo Editor Michael Cabot ‘02 Advertising Editor

CONTRIBUTORS David Diehl ‘05, Op-Ed Dina Paulson ‘04 News Chris Connors ‘03, Sports Jonathan Widmark ‘02, A&E

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES It is the policy of The Herald as a student-run publication to inform the community of Hobart and William Smith Colleges. In keeping with this policy, the Editorial Board wishes to encourage constructive participation by any member of the Colleges' community. The Editorial Board reserves the right to omit, edit or reject any material. Deadline for all articles is 5 p.m., Monday evening preceding the issue. No exceptions will be made without prior consultation with the Editor-in-Chief. Deadline for all advertising is the Tuesday afternoon prior to publication. The Herald’s office complex is located in the basement of Scandling Center on the campus of Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, New York 14456. Address correspondence to Box SF-92. Letters to the Editor are subject to editing for clarity and libel by the Editorial Board. Letters may be submitted anonymously ONLY after consultation with the Editorin-Chief. Letters do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Editorial Board. Suggested length is 400 words

Opinion/Editorial A Hobart Man’s Body Project: The Prevention of A Receding Ego I want to put hair back on my head. Seriously. But how can I go about doing that? You can’t glue it, you can’t use adhesive tape, and you definitely can’t lick the end, stick it back on, and expect it to stay. My hair is important to me and my self-esteem; I’d hate to have to say goodbye to it. Maybe I’m just being selfconscious, I do have a pretty full head of hair. It’s hard in our society; they expect the hunks and chick-magnets to have hair. I’m getting scared. Scared, because my grandfather is bald, very bald; He wears a toupee’. Who wants to wear a rug? So the other choices are: wear a hat, grow a beard, or…. Be bald. I want my hair! I definitely don’t want to go bald. In our society, why can’t bald be ‘beautiful’? Luckily, my father still has his hair, though it’s kind of thinning. It may be gone soon so, I’m worried for the both of us. Every time I see a strand of hair on the shoulder of my sweater, I want to pick

it up and staple it back on. My body project is totally rooted in personal image and self-esteem. I need to be happy with the way I look in order to, “…win popularity and status in school”. I feel the way you look is an important factor at our age. I am desperate to keep hair on my head. How am I going to accomplish this? A lot of deep thought, and scientific study was put into this question. So, I’ve come up with a few preservation ritu-

dies massage my head. Hopefully, it will keep my scalp happy, and no hairs will want to leave. It would be like an incentive plan. (4) Try to hold out on using so much gel and hairspray. I can work the natural look sometimes, and the wet look is cool, but variety is golden. (5) When driving, try not to crash, hairs could, possibly, be broken or injured. Tragedies do happen, we need to accept this and keep it in the back of our minds. This is my “Five-Step Program” for keeping healthy, happy, and handsome hair; more importantly, hair that is there. Ego and self-esteem are both greatly affected by the way you feel about your appearance. “Image is Identity”. Everyone has Body Projects; parts of their body that they would love to improve. For some, it is a clear complexion, a tighter tummy, or whiter teeth. For others, it is a sweeter smell, a bigger chest, or buns of steel. My body project may be a dead end street; but I will stick to my “Five Step Program” as my most important body ritual until that sad and tragic day comes. When the hair starts to recede, so does the confidence, the image, and the identity.

Every time I see a strand of hair on the shoulder of my sweater, I want to pick it up and staple it back on. My body project is totally rooted in personal image and self-esteem. als of my own. (1) Try not to wear hats. It smothers the hair. Suffocates it. I’ve come to realize, you need to let hair breathe. (2) In my daily shower, only wash my hair with shampoo half of the time. I read this in some magazine it’s some kind of home remedy. So, I do it…hey, it can’t hurt. (3) Have some la-

Editor Says Good-Bye for Semester Dear Herald Readers, I regret to inform you that this will be my last Herald, for I will be in Vietnam next semester. Know that for three years the Herald has been a labor of love for me, and I will miss it terribly. I hope that the articles in this section have made you angry, think, laugh, and cry throughout the semester. Moreover, I want to thank all of those that continually submitted articles each week through thick and thin; without you all there would be no paper. I realize that we do not always say this, but you really are the foundation that makes this paper strong. To Chirs Vredenbugh, you have no idea how wonderfully intelligent and

remarkably beautiful you truly are. If you were to transfer, this school will have lost one of its most valuable students, and I will have lost someone whose honesty I truly admire. To Dave Diehl, you always made me laugh, even on my darkest days when I feel like I cannot smile. Your humor is a great gift to us all. This last paragraph goes out to the editorial board. I have been in this school for three years and I have never been continually inspired more by anything or anyone; your friendship has been my inspiration and I will remain eternally grateful. To the board member who are graduating, Melly, Ian, and Dave, congratulations! To Melly, you cannot imagine the strength your love has given me. I cannot think of a more decent human being;

it is an honor to be your friend. To Ian, your smile brightens the darkest of rooms, and the power of your caring heart lifts me. There are no words to express to you how much your friendship has meant to me. To Dave, you have so much to offer the world, I just wish you could see what I do then you would understand why we all care so much about you. Contrary to what you might believe; you are irreplaceable. It has been an honor and a pleasure to be part of your lives; I thank you. Sincerely, Dane Miller Op-Ed Editor


Arts & Entertainment Radiohead’s I Might Be Wrong, Turns Out to be Just Right Christina Taranto A&E Editor

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adiohead’s new release I Might Be Wrong: Live Re cording, came out on November 13, 2001. Walking into area records I had no idea to get. Then the man behind the counter mentioned that Radiohead just came out with a new CD, and that is when my face lit up and walked out of the store with this CD. I Might Be Wrong is the greatest thing to hit my stereo in years. Listening to this CD is like being transported to their concerts. Their album is done in such a serene manner that the cheering does not drown out Thom Yorke lyrics. In other words when you put the CD on you are not listening to cheering

for five minutes straight like you would if you downloaded an NSYNC live version, and the teen boppers over power the entire CD.

Listening to this CD is like being transported to their concerts.

This album consists of songs from Kid A: “The National Anthem,” “Morning Bell” which is also from Amnesiac, “Everything in Its Right Place”, “Idioteque,” and from Amnesiac: “I Might Be Wrong,” “Like

Spinning Plates,” “Dollars and Cents”. The album also contains a new treat from Radiohead, “True Love Waits.” Brad Cawn from CDNOW said, “Here the quintet rages against his own machine: Openers ‘The National Anthem’ and ‘I Might Be Wrong’ are fuzzy maelstroms that undercut the solemnity of the versions.” Although Mr. Cawn describes the new album as a storm, I would say it is more of a quiet ocean. The lyrics just flow right through you. It calms me down, when I need sleep I do not know about anyone else though. I would give this album four stars, if I gave out stars but since we do not do that here, I will just tell you all that if you just want a CD to relax to go out and spend the money on this album.

HERALD FLICK OF THE WEEK

Soul Surviors Friday Flix, 10 pm, Geneva Room

Model Behavior Makes Stars Out of Students Melissa Roberts Theater Enthusiast

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WS theater shined again when the student theater troupe performed “Model Behavior” last week in the Barn. “Model Behavior” told the story of a Manhattan magazine writer living in a celebrity-starved world. Connor McKnight, played by senior Quincy Perkins, strives to stay afloat and maintain a failing relationship with his svelte blonde model girlfriend, played by senior (and theater newcomer) Katie Wilson, while keeping his boss, family, and friends happy. The story follows Connor’s attempt to write a profile of Matt Damon, interspersed between hilarious interludes with his best friend, author and basketcase Jeremy (played by an always sparkling Tim Mele). Connor’s relationship with his sister (played by director Kristen Rawluszki), sister (played by Tristan Tanner), and therapist (played by Kelly Burke) also elicited lots laughter. The play’s more risqué scenes featured inspired performances by Becca Green and Kristen Schramm in particular, who played brunette beauty and exotic dancer, Pallas. Kudos to these girls who were will-

ing to get down to their skivvies in the name of artistic expression! Kudos also to the quality supporting roles played by Green and Laura Desrochers. Brava! Also amusing were the scenes with Connor’s lively mother and father, played by Burke and Mele. Burke’s take on motherhood was hysterical, in that she was able to capture the stereotypical doting maternal figure without losing the wackiness only Connor McKnight’s

The most uprorious performance, however, came from Tristan Tanner’s spirited gang member and Connor’s biggest fan, Jenny Rodriguez. Tanner’s final monologue inspired so many laughs from the audience that she had to pause several times before finishing!

parents could have. The most uprorious performance, however, came from Tristan Tanner’s spirited gang member and Connor’s biggest fan, Jenny Rodriguez. Tanner’s final monologue inspired so many laughs from the audience that she had to pause several times before finishing! Her performance was enough to keep the audience and her reviewer in stitches. Directed by Rawluszki and adapted for the stage by Perkins, this play is a perfect example of student theater at its best. Bravissimo!

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The Herald

A&E

December 7, 2001

Mick Jagger Minus the Rolling Stones, Can it Be? Bono Vox of U2 fame. The two harmonize so well together that the otherwise mediocre song is elevated to new levels. Add Pete Townsend’s guitar playing to the equation and you’ve got something to pay attention to. The hard rocking “God Gave Me Everything” is co-written with Lenny Kravitz. The latter’s roaring guitar opens the track with that heavy distortional sound that has become trademark for Kravitz. “Hide Away” produced by Wyclef Jean offers Jagger an opportunity to expand his musical repertoire and try his hand at a more funky hip-hop style song. Goddess in the Doorway is most notable for giving Jagger the opportunity to spread his wings and try his hand at everything from house to rock, to funk, right on back to the ballad. The really great jewels on the album seem to be the ballads. “Don’t Call Me Up” is a sentimental song, tempered with the brilliant drumming of Jim Keltner, it seems to come more alive with each passing verse. Goddess in the Doorway may not be the new Exile on Main Street, but then again, it was never intended to be. Mick Jagger takes the opportunity to assure his fans in these twelve songs that he hasn’t missed a beat, so don’t write him off just yet. Give the album a try; it is full of surprises that might give you an all-new respect for rocks favorite front man!

Jonathan Widmark A&E Contributor

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fter eight years Mick Jagger is back with his latest solo release, Goddess in the Doorway. The fifty-eight year old Rolling Stones front man proves in his latest public offering that even though he is a few years older he hasn’t lost his stuff. Jagger recruited a star-studded group to help him bring together this latest album. Pete Townsend, Bono, Lenny Kravitz, Rob Thomas, and Joe Perry are a few to lend a helping hand to rock and rolls greatest front man. Contemplating a Jagger solo album one can’t help but be a bit apprehensive. Is it possible to live up to the Rolling Stones catalog, should he try? After all, can anything ever beat Let it Bleed, Sticky Fingers, or Exile on Main Street? Does Jagger still have the

vocal range to pull off tunes of the quality or majesty of “Wild Horses,” “Satisfaction,” or “Sympathy for the Devil?” Rolling Stone magazine gives Goddess in the Doorway five stars, arguing there is little to disappoint diehard fans in Jagger’s latest work. The Stones have not released any new material since 1997’s Bridges to Babylon, but you may have caught Jagger and long time band mate Keith Richards kicking it into high gear at last months Concert for New York City. Goddess in the Doorway offers Jagger an opportunity to experiment with new sounds and ideas that he may otherwise have been unable to do while working with the Rolling Stones. Although this album lacks the foot-tapping guitar licks synonymous with the Jagger/ Richards writing collaboration, it makes up for the absence in spades. Jagger sings a duet on “Joy” with

It Might Be Funny: Here for all of your procrastination needs! Take a break from not studying for your finals and laugh with us. Or at us. Sunday at 7:00p.m. Location TBA.

THE HERALD Now Open Sundays 12-4!


The Herald

SPORTS

December 7, 2001

SANTA’S WEEK 13 PICKS Chicago 13 Green Bay 12 St. Louis 399 San Francisco 398 Detroit Forfeit (not enough Tampa Bay players) New York Jets 17 Pittsburgh 16

Twas the last issue before break of the Herald, And all through the office and email, Not a sports article was stirring.... Make your New Year’s Resolution to write for Herald Sports! Email us (herald@hws.edu), or Stop by the Office in the basement of the Scandling Center. Or you can email the editor, that chump Ben Kenna (kenna@hws.edu). Went to a game? Have an opinion? Want to take pictures? Send us your thoughts. Have a great break, and be safe over the Holidays

MVP FACTOIDS *Athletes most typically sleep 7 hours per night. *One third of athletes spend at least one hour per week talking with faculty outside of class. *Two thirds of all senior athletes participate in volunteer activities each week with one third contributing at least three hours each week. *Three quarters of the incoming class in 2001 had participated in a JV or varsity sport during their final year in high school — 84% of men and 69% of women. *The majority of athletes drink alcohol once a week or less often. *Three quarters of senior athletes, when thinking about a career, say “leadership potential” is very important or essential. *Half of all athletes spend three or more hours in paid employment per week. *Two thirds of athletes participate in campus organizations other than their sport. *Half of all senior athletes plan to attend graduate or professional school. (Brief facts about HWS athletes reported by Professors Wesley Perkins and David Craig.) Sources: Data for Item 1 were drawn from an August, 2001 survey of entering students (N=541) at HWS. Data for Items 2, 4, 8 and 9 were drawn from all intercollegiate athletes (N=72) participating in a Spring 2001 survey of graduating seniors. Data for Items 3, 6 and 7 were drawn from all intercollegiate athletes (N=83) participating in a Spring 1998 survey of students in courses and athletic groups representing all academic divisions and class years. Data for Item 5 were drawn from all intercollegiate athletes (N=99) participating in a Spring 2000 mail survey of a representative cross-section of HWS students.

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HERALD GAME OF THE WEEK

Sports

Hobart Hockey vs. Buffalo St. December 7th 7 PM

Masters of Their Domain; Heron Basketball Sweep Weekend Series

COVERED IN SNOW WHEN WE GET BACK...

Ben Kenna Santa’s Elf

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Hobart Tumbles to Hot-Shooting RIT Ben Kenna Grinch

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he Hobart Basketball team welcomed the RIT Tigers to Bristol Gym this past Saturday in a ruthless non-conference battle with all the makings of a classic. The Statesmen were on a high after winning their home opener by 13 over Ithaca College back on the 29th of November. The team needed another big game from their guards, to set up their potent inside attack of juniors Davidek Herron and Joe Corbett. The first half was a highoctane offensive onslaught by both teams, as they both squads shot lights out from the field (RIT at a blistering 69%, with the Statesmen hitting 52%). The Statesmen and Tigers played even ball for the first nine minutes of the half, before a Brian Schiele three put ‘Bart up 2320. Schiele would score 6 points on the day, while dishing out 6 assists, notching 2 steals, and picking up numerous charges by the out of control Tigers. The three point lead would be the biggest of the day, unfortunately, for the Statesmen, as the Tigers pulled ahead at 26-25, and used a 10-5 run, capped by a miracle three-pointer by Brandon Redmond to close out the first half leading by 9, 51-42. In the second half, Hobart came out of the gates hitting on all cylinders, as a Michael Gambino 3-point bomb capped an impressive 10-2 run, dwindling the RIT lead to 3, 55-52.

The Tigers would not relinquish their lead, however, as they pushed the margin to double digits in the waning minutes of the second half. Hobart was unable to come within 11 points after the twelve-minute mark, and the game ended in a disappointing 90-76 loss. Brandon Redmond’s 20 points, and a scorching 64% field goal percentage led RIT. The Tigers bench also outscored Hobart’s by a staggering 47-0 margin. The Statesmen were lead by 23 points from Gambino. The senior co-captain shot 7-12 from the field, including 5-9 from beyond the 3-point arc. With those 23 points, Mike moved from 16th to 12th on Hobart’s all-time scoring list with 1,046 total points and counting. Corbett, hounded all game by dirty RIT defenders, managed to score a valiant 22 points, hitting 7-10 field goals, along with 10-13 from the charity stripe. Herron chipped in for the Statesmen in with a double double (15 points, 10 rebounds). Point guard Timmy Lomot, who was on the floor for 39 of the games 40 minutes, dished out 4 assists, while scoring 10 points in the loss. The team falls to 2-3, as they head to the road for a tough 4 game stretch. Catch more exciting home games after Christmas break. Check the award-winning Herald Sports Section for dates and times. The team will begin their quest for back-to-back UCAA titles when they take on Vassar College on January 11th, back at Bristol Gym.

illiam Smith basketball is unbeatable at home. Pe riod. The team has won 90 of their last 93 home games, including a stretch of 80 that ended back two seasons ago. Needless to say, the team accepted the challenge of back-to-back home games against the Eagles of Brockport, and the Knights of Mount St. Mary’s this past weekend in Geneva. On Friday, the Herons used impenetrable defense to force 28 turnovers in a 83-71 victory. Brockport, despite shooting 53% from the floor, and 60% on 3’s could not solve the Herons tenacious D. The Eagles kept things close in the first half, but the Herons scored in bunches due to numerous steals and easy inside buckets. With the score tied at 24, but a Heather Easter layup (11 pts, 5 assists) put the team up for good, as they took a 40-32 lead at the half. In the second half, the Eagles played determined ball, but that’s when junior Laura Hadwin took charge, scoring the first 7 points of a 10-0 run that put the game out of reach. Hadwin led the way with 21 points and 11 rebounds for the Herons. Despite Brockport’s best efforts to keep things close, the ladies

closed out the game by hitting 10-14 free throws in the final two minutes. First-year guard Maria Atti also tallied a double-double for the team, scoring 12 points, grabbing 10 boards, and narrowly attaining a triple-double with 9 assists. She also was a thief, with 5 steals. Kaleen Goodman, Leah Cornwell and Jeanne Vinchiarello combined to score 36 points. The Herons returned to the courts the next day, this time in a more heated contest. Mount St. Mary’s looked to upend their foes on the strong play of their starting five. After the Herons scored the first hoop of the contest, the Knights toughened up their aggressiveness, taking a big lead for most of the half thanks to a 14-5 run. The lead was 13 at 31-18 with 5 minutes to play in the half, but the team closed out nicely with a 9-4 run. Down by 8 at the half, the players needed their trademark defense to step, and begin forcing turnover after turnover. Coming out of the gates strongly, the Herons scratched and clawed their way back, and a Heather Easter lay-up put them up by 1, 46-45. Laura Hadwin gave the team their biggest lead of the day at 7 (57-50), with a strong lay-up, but the Knights dug deep, reeling off 5 consecutive

points. This day would belong to William Smith, as they scored the final 5 points of the game, giving the lovely ladies a great 62-55 victory. Leah Cornwell and Hadwin registered double-doubles for the winners, with 21-10, and 10-11 respectively. Vinchiarello and Easter both scored in double figures for the Herons as well. The team remained undefeated on the season, at 5-0, 4-0 at home (told you so).

01-02 LEADERS SCORING Laura Hadwin 19.4 Leah Cornwell 13.6 J. Vinchiarello 12.0 REBOUNDING Hadwin 7.2 Heather Easter 7.2 Maria Atti 6.8 Shooting Percentage Hadwin 61% Vinchiarello 54% Kaleen Goodman 46% *The team, in 5 victories is averaging 79 points per game

Hobart and William Smith Colleges are ranked 13th in the first set of Division III Sears Director’s Cup standings with 110 points. The Colleges’ are the highest ranked Upstate Collegiate Athletic Association member.


Dec. 7, 2001