Page 1

WINTER 2014 Non profit org. U.S. Postage PAID Rochester, New York Permit No. 357

HOBART AND WILLIAM SMITH COLLEGES 300 Pulteney Street Geneva, New York 14456 This publication was printed using FSC Certified paper which enables the environmental savings equivalent to the following: 205 trees preserved for the future 591 lbs waterborne waste not created 83,964 gallons wastewater flow saved 9,622 lbs solid waste not generated 18,946 lbs net greenhouse gases prevented 145,011,615 BTUs energy not consumed

Jud Hartmann ’70

Andrew Hellmund ’14

His series of bronze sculptures, “The Woodland Tribes of the Northeast,” represent one of the most comprehensive explorations of eastern native peoples ever undertaken. One commission, a pair of seven and a half foot tall Iroquois lacrosse players, is installed in front of the Lacrosse Hall of Fame Museum in Baltimore, Md. His work can be found in private and corporate collections internationally.

1. Donatello or Michelangelo, who dominates in 3-D? Michelangelo

1. Donatello or Michelangelo, who dominates in 3-D? Donatello

2. What fires the imagination and inspires a new piece? Historical research of the Woodland Tribes of the Northeast inspires me, fires my imagination!

2. What fires the imagination and inspires a new piece? Meeting with other creatives and designers, as well as the different forms of the metal and recycled metal shapes themselves.

3. What is challenging to sculpt or convey through your pieces? The greatest challenge and the goal is to capture the soul, bring them to life.

3. What is challenging to sculpt or convey through your pieces? To show relationships among different styles and modes of exploration. 4. Where do you see your work displayed in your wildest dreams? Storm King Art Center, Mountainville, N.Y.

4. Where do you see your work displayed in your wildest dreams? Monumental work in public spaces and in the great museums (I have some in each). 5. What music gets you out of bed and going in the morning? Classical music of the baroque era. 6. What is your ideal artist’s work environment? A peaceful, serene environment – close to nature. 7. Your HWS “Ah ha moment”? I was a student during the Vietnam War era, so those years at Hobart helped absolutely to shape who I am: liberal, progressive and passionately an environmentalist. 8. Favorite HWS faculty member and why? Alva Kelly, my squash coach, a warm and sensitive human being who I loved very much.

5. What music gets you out of bed and going in the morning? ’80s Rock 6. What is your ideal artist’s work environment? A large space with a crane 7. Your HWS “Ah ha moment”? A rocking architectural studies dept. and access to a place to create sculpture. 8. Favorite HWS faculty member and why?  Several faculty members have had a profound impact during the last few years.  Currently I am working most closely with my advisor Ted Aub, who has been someone to bounce ideas off, get critiques from, and who has provided the encouragement and access to space to do sculpture from the get go (not to mention he has a great sense of humor).

9. Are you more likely to take to the outdoors or have pictures of it? I’m virtually always outside. I’m a Nordic ski racer (marathons – 50 Km races) so that is a year-around commitment.

9. Are you more likely to take to the outdoors or have pictures of it? Outdoor adventures provide for an inner calm.

10. If you could spend a month anywhere in the world, where would it be? Tahiti, Tuscany, the British Isles

10. If you could spend a month anywhere in the world, where would it be? Backpacking around the Andes with a group of friends.

12. Was there a turning point in your career (professional/ academic) where you committed to art over something else? About six months after graduating, I was living on an island in the Caribbean when I struck a chisel with a mallet into a piece of mahogany. In that moment, the path I was to follow was revealed to me. I’ve been following it ever since.

Herons Win Soccer National Championship!

The architecture major was among only 20 artists whose work was included in the 2012 Biennial Sculpture Invitational at the Krasl Arts Center in St. Joseph, Mich. A 2013 Julius G. Blocker Fellow, he was awarded the 2012 Technos International Fellowship to Japan. He is a member of the Genocide Symposium Board, peer ministry and the architecture society.

PARALLELS PARALLELS

• • • • • •

12. Was there a turning point in your career (professional/academic) where you committed to art over something else? I had to choose between spending more time with sculpture/architecture/art or continue rowing. The lessons learned in rowing were exponential, but it was right to dedicate more time to my studies.

Inside: National Regional Network Launches • Tommy the Traveler • Update on Performing Arts Center


Associate Professor of English and American Studies Eric Patterson’s On Brokeback Mountain: Meditations about Masculinity, Fear, and Love in the Story and the Film (2008) examines the film in relation to the cultural construction of masculinity, attitudes toward gay men, attitudes toward homosexuality, and the impact of homophobia on men who love men.

As the sun sets, the Hobart rowing team practices on the Cayuga-Seneca Canal. Photo by GREGORY SEARLES ’13

Written by William F. Scandling ’49, LL.D.’67, The Saga of SAGA: The Life and Death of an American Dream (1994) chronicles the history of SAGA Corporation from its humble start in a campus cafeteria at HWS to its rise as a multimillion-dollar food services empire. As one of SAGA’s founders, Scandling, who served as chair of the HWS Board of Trustees, shares his entrepreneurial vision for SAGA and firsthand business experiences in this candid memoir.

Dr. Jeremy Cushman ’96 and Professor of Biology Jim Ryan teamed up to publish iAnatomy (2013), an eBook comprised of 20 case-based, interactive exercises that reinforce human anatomy and physiology concepts. While engaging readers with the clinical relevance of anatomical details, iAnatomy complements traditional human anatomy texts by bridging the gap between anatomical concepts and clinical applications.

Written by Christie Lowrance ’65, Nature’s Ambassador: The Legacy of Thornton W. Burgess (2013), presents an in depth overview of one of the most beloved children’s authors and conservationists of all time. Through engaging text and historical pictures, the biography explores Burgess’s life and legacy, from his Cape Cod childhood to the present.

Released by Lynne Rienner Publishers, one of the foremost publishers on African studies and African politics, Inside African Politics (2013) introduces readers to a rich exploration of contemporary politics in Africa. This is the sixth book from Associate Professor of Political Science Kevin Dunn.

In her first novel, To Whom Much is Given (2013), lawyer and author Cecila Capers ’92 explores the price of success. Avery Benjamin, a young corporate attorney in New York City, is confronted with her desire to once again pursue her dreams when her relationship with her significant other is challenged by the reappearance of an old flame. With a support system of dynamic, multicultural women, Avery must learn to confront her past and decide her own destiny.

HOBART AND WILLIAM SMITH COLLEGES

81


Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014 Catherine Williams EDITOR, VICE PRESIDENT FOR COMMUNICATIONS

Contents 6

Peggy Kowalik ART DIRECTOR/DESIGNER Jessica Evangelista Balduzzi ’05 ASSISTANT EDITOR Jessica Evangelista Balduzzi ’05, Steven Bodnar, Joshua Brown, Ken DeBolt, Mary LeClair, Cynthia McVey, Paige Mullin, Margaret Popper, Sarah Tompkins ’10, Andrew Wickenden ’09, and Catherine Williams CONTRIBUTING WRITERS/EDITORS Katherine Collins ’09, Kevin Colton, Andrew Markham ’10, Gregory Searles ’13 CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

12

Jessica Evangelista Balduzzi ’05, Rebecca Frank, Mary K. LeClair, Betty Merkle, Kathy Killius Regan ’82, P’13, Jared Weeden ’91 CLASSNOTES EDITORS

24

Mark D. Gearan PRESIDENT Maureen Collins Zupan ’72, P’09 CHAIR OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES Andrew G. McMaster Jr. ’74, P’09 VICE CHAIR OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES Robert B. O’Connor VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADVANCEMENT Kathy Killius Regan ’82, P’13 ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT, ALUMNAE RELATIONS AND NATIONAL REGIONAL NETWORK Jared Weeden ’91 ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT, ALUMNI RELATIONS AND ANNUAL GIVING William Smith Alumnae Association Officers: Chris Bennett-West ’94, President; Aloysee Heredia Jarmoszuk ’98, Vice President; Susan Flanders Cushman ’98, Immediate Past President; Kate Strouse Canada ’98, Historian Hobart Alumni Association Officers: James B. Robinson ’96, President; Jeremy Cushman ’96, Vice President; Edward R. Cooper ’86, P’16, Immediate Past President; Rafael A. Rodriguez ’07, Historian VOLUME XLI, NUMBER THREE THE PULTENEY STREET SURVEY is published by the Office of Communications, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 639 S. Main Street, Geneva, New York 14456-3397, (315) 781-3700. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Pulteney Street Survey, c/o Alumni House Records, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 300 Pulteney St., Geneva, New York 14456-3397. Opinions expressed in The Pulteney Street Survey are those of the individuals expressing them, not of Hobart and William Smith Colleges or any other individual or group. The Colleges do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, marital status, national origin, age, disability, veteran’s status, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression or any other protected status. Printed on 100% post-consumer fiber paper.

2 Lakeviews 6 Festive Fall 8 Perfor ming Ar ts Center Update 10 The Elizabeth Blackwell Aw ard 12 The Radical Who Wasn’ t 24

National Regional Network Launches

46

Spor ts

48

Classnotes

80

Bookshelf

ON THE COVER: The doors of St. John’s Chapel. Photo by Gregory Searles ’13. For questions and comments about the magazine or to submit a story idea, please e-mail Catherine Williams at cwilliams@hws.edu.

Gas resulting from the decomposition of landfill waste used in place of fossil fuels to produce paper.

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

1


Lakeviews

Dear Friends,

E

photo by kevin colton

very student has a unique life story that enriches the Hobart and William Smith community. It is a privilege to see these stories unfold as our students graduate, and to know that the Colleges have influenced the lives they create. At HWS, students are not alone as they embark on paths of intellectual discovery. They are embraced by a community that supports and empowers them, establishing meaningful connections that endure for life.    Julia James ’04, the first William Smith Rhodes Scholar, recently shared her story in a piece she wrote for The Guardian. Julia describes her experience at HWS as a firstgeneration college student and of the support she received as an undergraduate, beginning with enrollment through the completion of her chemistry degree.    “I opted to attend the only college for which a dean met me at the bus station, Hobart and William Smith Colleges,” Julia writes. “This personal touch set the tone for my experience at HWS, which culminated in my selection as a Rhodes Scholar in 2003.” In her piece, Julia notes that she received care packages from Lillian Collins, a longtime and valued member of the Advancement staff. “That kind of individual attention was key to my success in college and prepared me well for Oxford and beyond.”    Julia’s story exemplifies the spirit of support and inclusion that the HWS community provides its students. Extending that support to the nearly 20,000 alumni and alumnae throughout the country and across the globe is a challenge but the rewards are significant. As part of the HWS 2015 strategic plan, for the past several years the Colleges and President Mark D. Gearan a network of volunteers have been working directly on this issue. Their solution is the National Regional Network, which divides the country into nine regions, each one overseen by a team of volunteers tasked with engaging alums and parents in activities that support career services, admissions and advancement. I urge everyone to learn more about the National Regional Network described in detail on the pages of this magazine and online (www.hws.edu/regional). Attend one of the many events being held around the country in 2014, mentor students as they explore careers, host events or participate in college fairs in support of admissions, return to campus to advise students or attend Reunion, and make a gift to the Annual Fund. Working together, we can translate the innovation and optimism at the heart of the National Regional Network into an exponential increase in the capacity of the Colleges. With your help, we can attract and retain high quality students from around the world, engage them in meaningful intellectual work while here on campus, and give them the tools and experiences they need to lead lives of consequence. Finally, this issue of the magazine includes a fascinating retrospective of what is known in the lore of the Colleges as the “Tommy the Traveler” incident. Written by Hobart alumnus Andrew Wickenden ’09, the story pieces together first-person accounts, historical documents, and news articles in an attempt to better understand what happened on campus four decades ago. We invite you to join the conversation by submitting your reflections online. It’s just one of the many ways you can connect with Hobart and William Smith. With every best wish, I remain, Sincerely,

Mark D. Gearan President

2 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014


First Blackwell Award Recipient | ca.1958

WAVELENGTHS

Gwendolyn Grant Mellon On Sept. 27, 1958, Gwendolyn Grant Mellon, medical missionary and founder of Hôpital Albert Schweitzer Haiti, became the first recipient of the Elizabeth Blackwell Award. At the ceremony held on the 50th anniversary Convocation of William Smith College, Mellon was joined by (left to right) Chair of the Board of Trustees Merle Gulick ‘30, President Louis Melbourne Hirshson and historian Warren Hunting Smith. This year the Colleges presented the Award to its 39th recipient, the Most Reverend Doctor Katharine Jefferts Schori.

Top Daily Update Stories

4

Festive Fall Perfor ming Ar ts Center Update

6 8

Blackwell Aw ard

10

The Radical Who Wasn’ t

12

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

3


TOP Daily Update Stories

1

HWS HILLEL RANKED SMALL AND MIGHTY

HWS was named to the “Top 20 Small and Mighty Campuses of Excellence,” a list published by Reform Judaism in partnership with Hillel: The Foundation for Jewish Campus Life. The publishers note that Hillel selects campuses that have “Innovative Jewish programming, a growing Jewish population, a dedicated professional leader, demonstrated university support, and a commitment to serve Jews of all backgrounds.”

4

COLLEGES LGBT INCLUSIVITY RECOGNIZED

Campus Pride’s Campus Climate Index has again recognized HWS as a leader for LGBT-inclusive policies, programs and practices. The Index awarded HWS an excellent score based on a self-assessment that focused on eight LGBT-friendly factors such as housing, academic life, institutional commitment and campus safety.

7

FLOWERS RECEIVES GENEVA ATHENA AWARD

Director of the Center for Community Engagement and Service Learning Katie Flowers was honored this fall as the first person to receive the ATHENA Geneva Young Professional Leadership Award. The award calls for nominees who “serve as a role model for young women personally and professionally.” Flowers leads students and community partners in creating sustained, engaged relationships that promote positive change and enhanced learning.

4 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

2

“PAWS AND REFLECT” WINS VIDEO COMPETITION

Andrew Mason ’14 and John Connor Widenmeyer ’14 were selected as the winners of the Centennial Center for Leadership’s campus-wide video competition which challenged students to create a video on the theme of justice and leadership. Their video, “Paws & Reflect,” documents domestic animal abuse and negligence, specifically focusing on the pressure put on animal shelters to take care of these animals.

5

DINÉ PHOTOGRAPHER WILL WILSON AT HWS

3

SPECTOR RECEIVES FQXI PHYSICS GRANT

Professor of Physics Donald Spector was awarded a grant by the Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi) in its competition for grants on the physics of information. Deemed “one of the most original” proposals received by FQXi, Spector plans to combine ideas from set theory with ideas from physics to address longstanding limitations in the mathematical theory of information.

6

HWS DOMINATES SIMON BUSINESS SCHOOL COMPETITION

In October, the Colleges welcomed renowned Diné photographer Will Wilson for an exhibition of his acclaimed work addressing issues of genocide, sovereignty, resistance, identity and the continued colonization of Native Americans. Wilson gave a talk in the Davis Gallery at Houghton House and presented a workshop on the wet-plate/ tintype technique.

For the second year running, teams with HWS members placed first, second and third at the Early Leaders Case Competition at University of Rochester’s Simon Business School. The competition brings together students to compete in a competition designed to simulate decisions faced by business leaders across the globe. Ten HWS students participated in the competition, three of whom – Julie-Anne Baghajian ’15, Britney DeHond ’15 and Matthew McPartlon ’15 – finished on the top three teams, respectively.

8

9

TRIAS WELCOMES SOMMER

The HWS community has welcomed award-winning poet Piotr Sommer as the 2013-2014 Trias Writer-in-Residence. Sommer is the author of more than a dozen poetry books and has held prestigious fellowships, including at Yale’s Whitney Humanities Center. Now in its third year, the Trias residency previously hosted authors Mary Gaitskill and Tom Piazza, who through their appointments enriched the dialogue about writing and literature taking place at HWS.

HWS AWARDED NSF RESEARCH GRANT

The National Science Foundation awarded HWS a grant to join a collaborative research project for the study of lake-effect snowstorms in New Laird York’s Finger Lakes and Lake Ontario regions. Submitted by Associate Professor of Geoscience Neil Laird and Assistant Professor of Geoscience Nicholas METZ Metz, their proposal is part of a $1.5 million research effort involving teams from around the country, as well as HWS student researchers.


WAVELENGTHS

Overheard “It takes one person’s curiosity to bring to life a story that otherwise, I think, would have gone away…. It’s wonderful.” The Daily Show’s Jon Stewart expresses his appreciation to Monique Brinson Demery ’98, whose book, Finding the Dragon Lady, profiles Vietnam’s Madame Nhu. Demery visited Vietnam as a William Smith student.

“M

aking your kids happy is the most rewarding thing you can have as a dad, right?”

Paul McCarthy ’88 on the CBS Evening News explaining why he chose to use a 3-D printer to create a prosthetic hand for his son, Leon

“A growing number of academics see communityengaged teaching and research as a pathway to high quality teaching and research.” President Mark D. Gearan in an op-ed in The Huffington Post

“I did it. I made Tom Hiddleston cry on the Thor red carpet last night!” MTV After Hours star Josh Horowitz ’98 on bringing the prolific British actor to tears at the Thor film premiere

HWS is “... one of the hottest small colleges in the country.” Al Hunt, Bloomberg News

“I’m constantly reminded of how happy I am I chose to attend HWS a year ago.” A tweet from Sarah Friedman ’16 upon receiving a hand-written birthday card from the William Smith Deans

“It’s only taken me one day to fall in love with the City of Geneva.”

First-year student Lauren Carr ’17 via Twitter reflecting on her Day of Service in Geneva during Orientation

“We are just getting warmed up!” American Horror Story co-creator, writer and director Brad Falchuk ’93 on Twitter after more than five million viewers tuned in to watch the premiere of American Horror Story: Coven

“Oh Saga, how I’ve missed you.” Praise tweeted by Tyler Walter Steving ’15 on the first day of the fall semester

“Back in D.C. and I can barely keep my eyes open. I’m so tired...but definitely worth it. HWS, you never disappoint.” A happy and sleep-deprived Caleb Campbell ’11 via Twitter following a rousing Homecoming and Family Weekend 2013

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

5


Members of the HWS community attend the Colleges’ annual Convocation ceremony held on Stern Lawn.

PHOTOS BY Kevin colton and GREGORY SEARLES ’13.

Festive Fall

Colleges Celebrate Convocation and Homecoming and Family Weekend By Sarah Tompkins ’10

A Assistant Vice President for Alumnae Relations Kathy Killius Regan ’82, P’13 smiles at Wendy P. Ettinger ’78 during Convocation. Regan presented Ettinger with the Alumna Achievement Award on behalf of the William Smith Alumnae Association.

Alumna Achievement Award

6 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

s the sun set on the second day of classes, students, faculty, staff and honored alums gathered on Stern Lawn for the annual Convocation Ceremony, which marks the beginning of the academic year. Joining President Mark D. Gearan on stage were actor Christopher McDonald ’77, L.H.D.’13, who delivered the keynote address, Provost and Dean of Faculty Titi Ufomata, Faculty Speaker and Associate Professor of History Laura Free, and student trustees Abby Evans ’14 and Greg Mathieu ’14 (all speeches can be read online at www.hws.edu/news/transcripts). During the ceremony, filmmaker Wendy Ettinger ’78 was honored with the William Smith Alumnae Association’s highest honor, the Alumna Achievement Award. As a documentarian, Ettinger has devoted her career to social justice through the arts. “It means the world to me to have all of my efforts and work acknowledged by the Colleges, especially as they work toward establishing a new Performing Arts Center on campus and having shown such a strong commitment to social justice over the years,” Ettinger remarked. McDonald, who was also commended for his work and dedication After being conferred an honorary degree, Actor Christopher to the performing arts, was awarded McDonald ’77, L.H.D.’13 delivers the Convocation Address, sharing his journey at HWS with the student body. an honorary degree. Due to previous


WAVELENGTHS

1

2

HOMECOMING & FAMILYWEEKEND

2013

obligations on Broadway, McDonald was unable to attend Commencement in May, the ceremony at which honorary degrees are traditionally conferred. At Convocation, McDonald spoke of his time at the Colleges, and attributed much of his success to reaching outside of his “comfort zone,” when he decided to audition for an oncampus theatre production. “Your life - that big, nameless, nebulous future - will be strongly influenced by the choices you make now,” said McDonald. “You’ve already made an excellent choice in deciding to attend Hobart and William Smith. This is a place where you can take advantage of every opportunity where you can make smart choices - where you can expand the boundaries of what you dreamed possible - where you can change the course of your life.” Just weeks after the Convocation Ceremony heralded the opening of the year, alums, friends and families returned to campus to celebrate the much-anticipated Homecoming and Family Weekend. Three days honoring the traditions of the Colleges, the event included fireworks and a Quad-a-Palooza Barbecue, MiniCollege classes with favorite professors, an exciting football victory for the Statesmen, and Heron Field Hockey Head Coach Sally Scatton’s 400th career victory. In addition to annual activities such as campus open houses, the Barn Burner pre-game dinner and Hillel’s Bagel Brunch, several new events highlighted the vibrancy of recent graduates with a Young Alum panel and a lunch specifically designed for Graduates of the Last Decade. With a record number of attendees this year, next year’s Homecoming promises to bring even more HWS spirit and community. ●

3

4

5

6

Photos: 1) HWS pennants line the steps of Coxe Hall. 2) Running back Steven Webb ’14 crosses the first down line. Webb had two touchdowns during the Statesmen’s winning game against the Utica College Pioneers. 3) Bampton House stands proudly bedecked in green, orange, purple and white for this year’s Spirit Week decorating contest. 4) Eric Cohler ’81, one of the leading and most soughtafter interior designers in the country, gives a talk for students in Professor of Art and Architecture Ted Aub’s class in Houghton House on Friday afternoon. 5) As part of Homecoming and Family Weekend’s Quad-a-Palooza, held on the Quad Friday evening, Danny Cabrera ’16 competes in the dunk challenge on a jump house. 6) During the Quad-a-Palooza on Friday, Alyssa Biagini ’14, her parents, Robert and Cynthia Biagini P’14, and Sheridan French ’14 enjoy dinner.

Participants in this year’s Fall Nationals soapbox derby await the start of the race. Because of inclement weather during Homecoming Weekend, Fall Nationals was postponed to Oct. 19. William Smith Congress’ car finished first in an impressive win.

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

7


The new Performing Arts Center will be located on Pulteney Street across from the Scandling Campus Center.

Performing Arts Center Update Breaking Ground n Spring 2014, the Colleges will host a public groundbreaking ceremony for the Performing Arts Center project. Architects from Gund Partnership and principles from Welliver, the Finger Lakes-based firm selected as the construction manager, are refining the final design specifications for this transformational academic center that will be built at the heart of campus across the street from the Scandling Campus Center. The Office of Advancement will release a schedule for the groundbreaking celebration in early 2014. To learn more about the Performing Arts Center, the current design plans and funding opportunities, please contact Bob O’Connor, vice president for advancement, at (315) 781-3535 or oconnor@hws.edu.

8 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

A cross-section of the Performing Arts building which will include academic space for theatre, music and dance as well as a film screening room.


WAVELENGTHS

A Gift Nearly 80 Years in the Making By Margaret Popper

A

Lucile Holtby Harford ’34

The Wheeler Society

t her Commencement ceremony in 1934, Lucile Holtby Harford ’34 walked up to receive her diploma along with her William Smith classmates. While this may not be remarkable on the surface, a closer look reveals great character and what became a lifelong commitment to her alma mater, her community and those with disabilities. Throughout her life, Lucile suffered as a result of childhood polio. When she received her diploma from William Smith, it was due to her own determination and the love of a father who, the night before the ceremony, erected a ramp with a railing to make her independence at that triumphant moment possible. During the years that followed, Lucile worked for the Cornell Agricultural Experiment Station and was active in the Geneva community and her church. Amazingly, in the 1960s – 30 years before the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act – Lucile convinced the mayor of Geneva to establish a committee for aid to the handicapped. Chaired by Lucile for 16 years, the committee addressed issues of access to churches, schools, restaurants, shops and public Class of 1934 buildings for those with disabilities. It was at this time that she married a local businessman, Richard J. Harford. Later in life, the Harfords moved to Florida and Lucile relished regular visits from members of the HWS and Geneva communities. After Richard’s death, she formed a strong bond with the family of President Mark D. Gearan, and loved telling stories of her days at the Colleges while hearing of news from campus. Lucile, a loyal donor and early member of The Wheeler Society, spoke often of her intention to leave money to the Colleges to assist with issues of disability. Lucile Holtby Harford, a dedicated and remarkable alumna, passed away on March 29, 2012, less than a year shy of her 100th birthday. Not long ago, during the settlement of Harford’s estate, the Colleges were notified of her bequest. The resulting funds – realized nearly 80 years after her courageous walk up the ramp to receive her William Smith diploma – will provide the resources to support a newly established global disability initiative led by HWS faculty. In addition, her thoughtful planning will assist in providing accessibility features within the new Performing Arts Center. “Lucile, through all of her own hardships, found ways to make life better and brighter for others,” recalls Gearan. “Her bequest is an example of how important planned giving is for the future of Hobart and William Smith, and we honor her life and her commitment to the Geneva and HWS communities.” ● At the end of 2014, the Colleges will celebrate the 25th anniversary of The Wheeler Society, a recognition society for those whose planned gifts reaffirm their dedication to Hobart and William Smith Colleges. To learn more about planned giving and membership in The Wheeler Society, contact Leila Rice, associate vice president for advancement, at (315) 781-3545 or rice@hws.edu.

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

9


Elizabeth Blackwell Award

Honor goes to first woman to serve as presiding bishop of Episcopal Church By Sarah Tompkins ’10

I

n November, the Elizabeth Blackwell Award for outstanding service to humanity was presented to the Most Reverend Doctor Katharine Jefferts Schori. The oceanographer, pilot, professor, pastor and bishop is the 39th woman to receive the honor.   Breaking a 500-year gender barrier, Jefferts Schori is the first woman to serve as Presiding Bishop, and the first female Primate in the Anglican Communion. “I stand here only because of the difficult work done by so many women and men before me. A lot of women have tried and failed to gain entry to many different vocations and opportunities,” said Jefferts Schori. “We remember those who prevailed in the face of prejudice and doubt, but none of those named trailblazers have made entries wholly on their own. At the same time, the remembered ones have continued to inspire others to try.” Prior to pursuing a career in the priesthood to which she was ordained in 1994, Jefferts Schori was an oceanographer with the U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service in Seattle. She holds a B.S. in biology from Stanford University, an M.S. and Ph.D. in oceanography from Oregon State University, a M.Div. from Church Divinity School of the Pacific, and several honorary doctoral degrees. “Bishop Jefferts Schori has had a fascinating career trajectory, one that bridges science and religion, and one that can serve as a powerful example to our students of a life of consequence,” remarked President Mark D. Gearan at the ceremony. “In her career as an oceanographer and today as the Episcopal Church’s presiding bishop, she has shown a remarkable dedication to the stewardship of the environment and to the betterment of humankind. Her work to boost people from poverty and to move the Episcopal Church to a more inclusive status has aided individuals throughout the world and will help preserve the earth for future generations.”   In presenting the Blackwell Award to Jefferts Schori, Chair of the Board of Trustees Maureen Collins Zupan ’72, P’09 said: “It is this worldview, one that is inclusive and expansive, that honors the dignity of all living things and that seeks to improve the human condition through faith and science, which defines her ministry.”   Following a brief talk, Jefferts Schori was joined by a panel of faculty and staff members including President Mark D. Gearan, William Smith Dean and Professor of History Suzanne McNally, Professor of Religious Studies Michael Dobkowski, Associate Professor of Geoscience Nan Crystal Arens and Chaplain Lesley Adams.   The Elizabeth Blackwell Award is given to women whose lives exemplify outstanding service to humankind. It is named for Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman in modern times to receive the Doctor of Medicine degree. Blackwell earned her degree in 1849 from Geneva Medical College, Hobart College’s precursor. The Colleges confer the Elizabeth Blackwell Award whenever a candidate of sufficient stature and appropriate qualifications is identified. The first award was given in 1958; it was presented most recently in 2011 when Eunice Kennedy Shriver was posthumously honored as the 38th recipient. Other notable recipients include Nobel Peace Prize laureate Dr. Wangari Maathai, P’94, P’96, Sc.D.’94, Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, and anthropologist and author Margaret Mead. ● PHOTO BY GREGORY SEARLES ’13

10 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014


Protests | ca.1972

FEATURE

Student Banners

Tommy the Traveler : The Radical Who Wasn’ t

12

Outside Coxe Hall, students demonstrate against President Richard Nixon’s order, announced May 8, 1972, to activate naval mines in the major North Vietnamese ports, “to prevent access to these ports and North Vietnamese naval operations from these ports.” The banner reads: “WE’RE NOT GONNA TAKE IT NO MORE.”

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

11


PHOTO ILLUSTRATION OF TOMMY TONGYAI, 1970 [TOMMY THE TRAVELER] BY GREGORY SEARLES ’13.

12 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014


FEATURE

[Tommy the Traveler: A Retrospective of Campus During Wartime]

The Radical Who Wasn’t By Andrew Wickenden ’09

In 1966,

Hobart men worked as white-gloved waiters serving William Smith women in the Comstock Dining Hall. “We wore beanies during orientation and were told that we couldn’t walk on the grass,” recalls Bob Gilman ’70. Gilman ventures that between the matriculation and graduation of the Classes of 1970, campus “saw more social change than any other four year period in the modern history of Hobart and William Smith.”    In 1966, William Smith women had curfews. Eleven p.m. on Bob Gilman ’70 weekdays, 12:30 a.m. on Fridays, and 1:30 on Saturdays. They wore— were required to wear—skirts to dinner and whenever they ventured off campus. The idea of men and women in each other’s dorms “was completely out of the question,” says Christine Wardell ’70. “There had been all sorts of demonstrations the year before about an issue they called ‘booze Christine Wardell ’70 and broads’ - whether men could have women in their dorm rooms and whether you could serve alcohol at dorm parties. It had been a pretty conservative campus. We had tea every Wednesday afternoon at 4:30. You trudged up the hill in January in the near dark and you hit the Comstock dining room, with fireplaces glowing, the sterling tea service—I thought it was fabulous. Absolutely delightful. This was the atmosphere.”

APRIL 30, 1970: Richard M. Nixon during a press conference on Vietnam and Cambodia

1970

April 30, . Before Kent State and Jackson State. Before the student strikes. Tonight, President Nixon delivers his address on Cambodia, in which he lays out his plan to eliminate “communist sanctuaries” along the VietnameseCambodian border, “to protect our men…in Vietnam and to guarantee the continued success of our withdrawal and Vietnamization programs.” The “war” won’t officially “end” for another five years. Nixon, flanked by flags, stern and resolved before the blue backdrop, tells

the American public unironically that “we live in an age of anarchy, both abroad and at home. We see mindless attacks on all the great institutions which have been created by free civilizations in the last 500 years. Even here in the United States, great universities are being systematically destroyed.” -------About two and a half years before the Cambodian Incursion, with the antiwar movement on the rise, a serious, outspoken, sometimes-histrionic young

--------

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

13


walter Cronkite show

HE WAS KNOWN AS TOM. OR TOMMY. OR TOM THOMAS. OR TOM TRAVIS. OR TOM TRAVELER. OR, MOST INFAMOUSLY, TOMMY THE TRAVELER. man was making himself known among the colleges of Central and Western New York. A two-button tweed blazer, black tie, wild eyes and a serious crease in his forehead, beneath a thick swoop of black hair. He was young, but too old to pass as a student and claimed to be traveling under the auspices of his job as a salesman. However, his true mission, he said, was as an anti-war organizer with Students for a Democratic Society (S.D.S.). He was known as Tom. Or Tommy. Or Tom Thomas. Or Tom Travis. Or Tom Traveler. Or, most infamously, Tommy the Traveler. “CBS called him Tommy the Traveler when they chose to make it national news on the Cronkite show,” says Steve Bromberg ’72. “But we all knew the ‘the’ didn’t belong there.” According to the Scranton Commission Report on Campus Unrest, which Nixon established after the Kent State massacre, Tommy spent: [t]he years from 1964 to May 1969… going from job to job. In August 1967, he started work for Shearing [sic] Corporation, a veterinary drug company in Northern New Jersey as a salesman. Following this [Tommy] Tongyai, his wife and his three-year old son, moved to upstate New York near the town of Penn Yan….It is reported that Tongyai possessed unusually strong patriotic feelings for the United States.

According to Frank Donner’s essay in Civil Liberties, Tommy indeed relocated Upstate with his wife and child in 1967— only to lose his job later that year. It was then that Tommy began working as an undercover “security informant” for the FBI. One of his first appearances as a “radical” was at the then all-women’s Keuka College in Penn Yan. In the fall of 1967, Tommy visited with an organization called the Peace Group, “which consisted of about ten women,” whose protest, Donner writes, “usually took the form of picketing.” Tommy urged them to take more aggressive action, a move that would become his calling card. Tommy did not respond to numerous requests for an interview for this story. --------

1968

April 30, , less than a month after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. It’s the seventh day of protests at Columbia University, Morningside Heights. Protests against Columbia’s plans to build a gymnasium (dubbed “Gym Crow” by protesters) with a separate “community” entrance. Protests against Vietnam, specifically Columbia’s affiliation with a weapons research think-tank. It’s the seventh day and now the protesters have protesters. The 1968 Chicago riots NYPD moves in with teargas. More than 700 protesters are arrested. Four faculty members, 12 police officers, and more than 100 students are injured. A student jumps from a second story window and lands on 34 year-old police officer Frank Gucciardi; the fall breaks Gucciardi’s back, disabling him for life. After the Columbia protests and the violence on other campuses in the subsequent months, FBI field offices are given the following instructions: The most recent outbreak of violence represents a direct challenge to law and order and a substantial threat to the stability of society in general. The Bureau has an urgent and pressing responsibility to keep the intelligence community informed of plans of new left groups and student activists to engage in acts of lawlessness

1. From the U.S. Senate’s Church Committee Report (1975-76), which, following the Watergate scandal, probed the “formation, operation, and abuses of U.S. intelligence agencies [like the NSA, the CIA, and the FBI].”

14 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

on the campus. We can only fulfill this responsibility through the development of high quality informants who are in a position to report on the plans of student activists to engage in disruptive activities on the campus.1 In 1970, in one of the few interviews Tommy granted, he said that the “best cover for an undercover agent who wanted to get on to the campus was portraying the part of a radical extremist, which I did. That way you are so far from what they would expect a law enforcement officer to be, you can pretty well get in and start moving around.” -------Democratic National Convention, Chicago, August 1968. Anti-war activist Jerry Rubin and the Yippies nominate Pigasus—a 145-pound hog—for President of the United States and are soon after arrested.   Then the teargas, the riot sticks, the babyblue police helmets. The beatings in Grant Park. The National Guard and tanks in the streets.   Wardell, who was in Chicago at the time visiting friends, saw it firsthand. “We didn’t have any precedent,” she says. “The idea that you would see tanks in your own streets, at a protest—you wondered what would happen, how far it would go.” “We were all subject to the draft and the Vietnam War was ramping up,” says Gilman. “For many being a student in good standing was the only thing preventing them from getting drafted and almost assuredly going to Vietnam.” “The War was coming into people’s living rooms every night,” says Bruce Davis ’72. “There was a draft. Political leaders were being killed and urban areas were boiling over with injustice. At the same time the ‘free love, BRUCE DAVIS ’72 make peace’ inner revolution was taking place. The world is a very different place now.”


That fall, the fall of 1968, Tommy the Traveler first appeared in Geneva in the company of Cornell University S.D.S. leaders, presumably in the hopes of organizing an HWS chapter. During one of the first meetings of the Hobart Student Movement—an HWS student coalition against the Vietnam War—Tommy “tried to make himself a political mentor of the new group, urging it to adopt more militant tactics,” Donner writes. “We weren’t taking him seriously,” Wardell says. “He told us he was an S.D.S. organizer, wanted to start a chapter on campus. That didn’t go over well. Having discussed it, our general feeling was, we may organize around our own issues and oppose the war, but we didn’t imagine ourselves ‘true revolutionaries.’” “Tommy was always telling us that we were not political enough,” says Clarence Youngs ’72, “that we should do something that would really get the administration’s attention. Take over a building, blow up something. As president of the United Black Students at Hobart, I told him that that was not our agenda and we had our own plans.” “From the start, I simply did not trust him and made it a point to stay away from him,” says Sean Campbell ’70. “He SEAN CAMPBELL ’70 approached me on several occasions, with differing stories of who he was and what he was doing there. None of what he said made any sense and I just dismissed him as a wanna-be.” In an interview from the 1971 short documentary “The Revolutionary Was A Cop” (directed by Marc Weiss ’70), one student says that several times Tommy claimed to be a Keuka College professor, and when confronted about his lie, Tommy replied that that story had been a guise; that he was actually “a member of the royal family of Thailand…exiled from his country…and over here working against the government.” According to the Associated Press story that ran July 13, 1970, he in fact is distantly related to Thai royalty. …born Momluang Singkata Thomas Tongyai N’Ayudhya on Jan 14, 1944, in Anniston, Ala. His father, a native of Bangkok, Thailand, was serving in the Army at the time.   The title N’Ayudhya designates royalty, but seven or eight generations removed.

Tongyai would use this distant royal connection many times in contacts with student revolutionaries, saying he wanted to lead a revolution of his own people.

By 1968, Tommy was known around the Cornell and Syracuse University campuses through the Peace and Freedom Party and the local chapters of the S.D.S., as an unofficial regional organizer. He turned up at Alfred, Wells, Corning. In “The Revolutionary Was a Cop,” an Auburn Community College student says that one afternoon on the Auburn campus, Tommy entered an emptying classroom, flashed a card and said, “I’m Tom Thomas from the FBI.” The student “freaked and [Tommy] laughed a lot and gave me a cigarette and said he was just kidding and that he was the regional traveler from Buffalo for S.D.S.” Tommy told other students he was with the Cornell chapter. Whichever chapter he was initially affiliated with—if any—he was eventually elected to the S.D.S. steering committee at the University of Rochester. --------

In 1956, the FBI launched the Counter Intelligence Program, COINTELPRO, “a series of covert action programs directed against domestic groups,” which remained in effect until 1971, when it was disbanded under the threat of public exposure. From the Church Committee Reports, Book III: In these programs, the Bureau went beyond the collection of intelligence to secret action designed to “disrupt” and “neutralize” target groups and individuals. The techniques were adopted wholesale from wartime counterintelligence, and ranged from the trivial (mailing reprints of Reader’s Digest articles to college administrators) to the degrading (sending anonymous poison-pen letters intended to break up marriages) and the dangerous (encouraging gang warfare and falsely labeling members of a violent group as informers)….Many of the techniques used would be intolerable in a democratic society even if all of the targets had been involved in violent activity… The unexpressed major premise of the programs was that a law enforcement agency has the duty to do whatever is necessary to combat perceived threats to the existing social and political order.

In a 1970 interview with the Geneva Times, Tommy said he’d “always had very strong feelings for this country and for its government. I would do anything to uphold its security…I feel some people on the Hobart and William Smith campus present a very real threat to the security of the United States.” --------

“...I WOULD DO ANYTHING TO UPHOLD ITS SECURITY…I FEEL SOME PEOPLE ON THE HOBART AND WILLIAM SMITH CAMPUS PRESENT A VERY REAL THREAT TO THE SECURITY OF THE UNITED STATES.”

1969

Days of Rage, . Chicago—again Chicago—just a year and change removed from the violence of the Democratic Convention. “Bring the War Home!” say the Weathermen. “Whatever it takes, we’ll do!” “An outrage against the community,” says Mayor Richard J. Daley. Protesters in football helmets. Pipes, chains, slingshots, baseball bats. Bank windows smashed, smoke and teargas billowing on the Gold Coast, blood in streets in the Loop, while on the West side, factions of the S.D.S, the Black Panthers, and the Young Lords march peacefully, side-by-side through the city’s working class neighborhoods. A few weeks earlier, during an “orientation meeting at [HWS] in early September, 1969,” Donner writes, Tommy distributed “thousands of pamphlets

ANTI-WAR PROTESTERS

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

15


announcing the ‘Days of Rage’…offer[ing] to provide students with transportation to Chicago….After the [‘Days of Rage’], according to one student, ‘Tommy came up to me and told me how much fun he had kicking ass in Chicago.’”

interviewed in “The Revolutionary Was a Cop,” the idea was dismissed as “absolutely absurd,” so Tommy suggested instead holding the congressman and the audience hostage by chaining the auditorium doors shut. Tommy said he would provide the chains.

--------

--------

1970

In the spring of , Professor Joseph DiGangi was teaching “Law and Society,” and because it was spring in Geneva, he would occasionally, when the weather cooperated, hold class on the Quad. When he opened course enrollment beyond the class roster, “so we could discuss the constitutionality of the war, 150 students or more showed up,” DiGangi says, recalling the crowd on the steps in front of Coxe Hall. “Everyone was concerned.” “There was tremendous intellectual and political foment,” Wardell says. “Students were questioning the relevance of required professor jOE DIGANGI courses. In addition to the war, there were a number of other issues that blew up with regard to the urgency about the changing world and the possibility that young men would be sent off to die. The war and the draft were absolutely fundamental in getting young people to think about all these things. A blossoming of student questioning and inquiry: How should we live? What’s the best way to get educated? Who are you to tell me how to live?” It was this intellectual, political, and social charge that prompted sit-ins, walkins, debates, and speeches. But to Tommy, that kind of action wasn’t action. David Dellinger, a pacifist anti-war activist and one of the Chicago Seven indicted for rioting during the Democratic Convention, had come to speak on the HWS campus earlier that year. On the walk from Sherrill Hall to Dellinger’s speech, Tommy suggested to Wardell, Davis, and Peter Keenan ’72 that bombing the ROTC office would reproach Dellinger’s pacifism and prove the superiority of a violent revolution. They laughed, brushed him off, and went to hear Dellinger’s speech. When hawkish New York Congressman Samuel Stratton was scheduled to visit campus that January, Tommy had proposed kidnapping him. According to a student

Tommy worked undercover for the FBI, keeping “his eye on radical movements,” until at least the spring of 1970, when he was deputized by the Ontario County Sheriff’s Office, “strictly as an undercover man and what we call a ‘narco’—narcotics officer,” Sheriff Ray O. Morrow said in a story that ran in The Miami News later that year.2 “I asked [Morrow] for a job as a regular deputy on road patrol,” Tommy said in his Grand Jury testimony. “He said he couldn’t fit me in, but he would put me on as an undercover agent.” On March 3, 1970, likely Tommy’s first day of employment with Morrow’s office, he shoe-horned his way into “a student meeting… called to decide if a…‘walk-in’ on a closed faculty meeting would take place. About 400 students…in Albright Auditorium were split as to the appropriate action,” according to the Scranton Commission Report. Because he wasn’t a student, Tommy was denied a vote. But at 4 p.m., he “walked into the faculty meeting with the rest of the students.” DiGangi remembers seeing Tommy in the Student Union around this time: “I was sitting with a student who recognized Tommy a couple tables away, in his suit, very trim, not student-like at all. He said [of Tommy], ‘Look out for this guy. He’s trouble. He’s getting the confidence of the freshmen. I hope they stay away.’” In April, during a three-day sit-in, Tommy appeared at Sherrill Hall with walkie-talkies and a Viet Cong flag, even while “the Hobart Student Association passed a motion to keep all outsiders, with Tongyai’s name mentioned specifically, out of the sit-in and other [HWS] affairs,” according to the Scranton Commission Report. But Tommy, “intent on staying, approached Al Beretta, director of student activities, in request of a press pass.” [Beretta] told Tongyai that Al Learned of the Colleges’ News Bureau was the only person who could issue such a pass. A student accompanied Tongyai when he went to the News Bureau. Learned has reported having a very strange conversation with Tongyai. A conversation which was immediatedly [sic]

2. This earlier statement conflicts slightly with the testimony Morrow later gave to the Grand Jury: “I was interested only in the drug situation,” Morrow said. “And the radical department was [Geneva FBI agent Jerome] O’Hanlon’s department?” lawyer Willard Myers asked. “That’s exactly right,” the sheriff replied.

16 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

TOMMY WORKED UNDERCOVER FOR THE FBI, KEEPING “HIS EYE ON RADICAL MOVEMENTS,” UNTIL AT LEAST THE SPRING OF 1970, WHEN HE WAS DEPUTIZED BY THE ONTARIO COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE, “STRICTLY AS AN UNDERCOVER MAN AND WHAT WE CALL A ‘NARCO’—NARCOTICS OFFICER.” reported to the FBI and college officials. In any case Tongyai was refused the pass, but he informed students at the sit-in that Beretta had given him permission to stay and that he was a member of the press. “During the meetings I attended, he was asked to leave, since he had no business there,” says Campbell. “Students were frustrated with the war and looking for anything that they could do to make a statement. Many issues were discussed including removing ROTC from campus, but to most students it was a matter of forcing the administration to eliminate the program.” Which was indeed accomplished by the end of the sit-in: students, HWS President Dr. Beverley D. Causey, Jr. and the administration had reached an agreement that would abolish the Hobart ROTC program by July 1971. -------At the April sit-ins, Tommy made the acquaintance of several Hobart freshmen, also discontented with simply sitting in. On Sunday, April 26, Tommy and five students met in a Sherrill dorm room to discuss, as an unnamed student put it in his Grand Jury testimony, more or less non-violent harassment, such as, the continual phoning of ROTC offices on the intercampus phone…tying up their work with the phone constantly ringing. And I remember…Tommy, specifically Tommy mentioning breaking into the ROTC offices and stealing their files…taking them out, burning them, throwing them into the lake or just scattering them in some desolate field and then from there talk turned to possible fire bombing. I have no idea—it just happened. According to Tommy’s testimony regarding the same meeting, he said that


when he arrived, “Jeff”3 was talking about “stepping [up] the ROTC thing and they have to abolish it from campus and Jeff was talking about the fire bombs.” Tommy said that in an attempt to “divert” a bombing, he tried to steer the students first toward vandalizing ROTC files, then, when “talk came back and went into firebombing again,” toward black powder. If the bombing were delayed long enough, Tommy said, the powder “usually dies out.” Tommy said: Molotov cocktails are very easy, they are easy bombs to make evidently and this is what most of the radical students are bombing buildings with. You see, you have to try to talk them into using something else that they won’t have access to, but yet they will try to depend on you to get it, but you never get it for them. In Weiss’s film, however, one of the students interviewed says that during the meeting, “before anybody actually suggested the use of firebombs or black powder [Tommy] just blurted out…‘Which would you rather use…firebombs or black powder?’” Another student testified to the Grand Jury that when the hour-long meeting concluded, there was “an understanding that there [would] be [another] meeting on Tuesday night [April 28], but also ‘Jeff’ and Tommy said that they were going in some field…around Keuka.” The next afternoon, Tommy and “Jeff” drove to a gravel pit in the Guyanoga Valley near Yates, N.Y., to “experiment with bombs and gasoline.” Tommy, according to his testimony, “was a little shook up because actually I didn’t know how to make a Molotov cocktail yet and I was supposed to be a big militant.” However, in “The Revolutionary Was A Cop,” one student states that on a different, presumably earlier occasion, Tommy had brought into a dorm room some gasoline and a Coke bottle, and he said, “Let’s go out and throw a Molotov cocktail…in front of Superdorm4.” And I said, “You’re crazy.” [Tommy] said, “Well, come on, it’ll make a nice big boom and get the residents stirred up. Throw a little scare into them. Show them what we can do.”

--------

these ‘long-haired hippie freaks’ protesting the war, it April 30, . Nixon says: would create a good deal of “During my campaign for the support for the war in the rest Presidency, I pledged to bring of the U.S.” Maureen COLLINS Americans home from Vietnam. At the time of the zupan ’72, P’09 They are coming home. I promised bombing, Tommy was allegedly to end this war. I shall keep that in Connecticut, for the trial promise. I promised to win a just peace. I of the New Haven Nine, though he had shall keep that promise. We shall avoid a notified the FBI of the plan to bomb the wider war. But we are also determined to put ROTC. “I reported to the FBI that they [some an end to this war…It is not our power but students] planned to make it [the bombing] our will and character that is being tested occur on such-and-such a date,” Tommy tonight.” said. “It happened before they had planned.” A few hours later, on the Hobart and William Smith campus, three Molotov -------cocktails crash through the window of the Air Force ROTC, setting ablaze the Sherrill Hall May 1, the morning of the bombing, activist basement. The fire alarms in Sherrill Hall are and student leader Rafael Martinez ’70 was disabled, but miraculously, enough students taken into custody for questioning. At the are awake to warn those who aren’t and all evacuate the building. No one is injured. Sherrill does not sustain significant damage.

1970

-------According to the Scranton Commission Report, “[a]t 7 a.m., FBI agent Jerry O’Hanlon arrived at the scene of the bombing,” only a few hours after it had happened. “That morning all five freshmen present in the Tongyai meetings were called in for questioning along with some other students.” Ultimately, Hobart students Gary Bennett and ROTC OFFICE IN SHERRIL HALL DAMAGED BY MOLOTOV COCKTAILS. APRIL 30, 1970. Francis Gregory Sheppard were arrested on arson charges, and everyone began to wonder, “How did the police find police station, Martinez recognized Tommy, them quite so quickly?” says Wardell. “And who was supposed to be in New Haven, and then there began to be a number of rumors when Martinez spotted him, Tommy ducked about Tommy. About how he had taken these into a restaurant. kids out in a field somewhere and taught Less than a week later, Tommy them how to make the bombs.” reappeared on campus, though by then he “There’s one story,” says Maureen was banned. Martinez informed Assistant Collins Zupan ’72, P’09, “that Tommy Dean John “Ted” Theismeyer that Tommy was part of Nixon’s C.I.A. operation5 to was back. An argument followed when create chaos on college campuses with the Martinez and Theismeyer confronted Tommy Machiavellian idea that if there were all outside. When Martinez accused Tommy of

3. In the Geneva Times’ reprint of the Grand Jury testimony, “true names of individuals mentioned in the actual Grand Jury testimony have been changed to insure [sic] that this report contains no matter critical of an identified or identifiable person.” 4. Now known as Jackson, Potter and Rees Halls or “JPR.” 5. The CIA’s Project RESISTANCE, much like the FBI’s COINTELPRO, was implemented as “a broad effort to obtain general background information for predicting violence which might create threats to CIA installations, recruiters or contractors and for security evaluation of CIA applicants. From 1967 until 1973, the program compiled information about radical groups around the country, particularly on campuses. Much of the reporting to headquarters by field offices was from open sources such as newspapers. But additional information was obtained from cooperating police departments, campus officials and other local authorities, some of whom, in turn, were using more active collection techniques such as informants.” In Tommy’s Grand Jury testimony, however, when asked if either of the drug firms he worked for were investigative branches of the CIA, Tommy said, “No, sir.”

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

17


being a police agent, Tommy in sculpture, in the The students arrested on said, “I’m going to kill you, middle of the Quad drug charges were escorted you pig,” and then struck on campus,” says out the Pulteney Street Martinez. Christine Wardell. side of the dorm and taken That afternoon Martinez Meanwhile, there downtown. The students and Theismeyer went to the were “huge meetings arrested on harassment police station and swore in Bristol Gym to charges were taken out of the out a John Doe warrant for discuss the curriculum building on the parking lot rafael martinez ’70 the arrest of Tommy the and to debate how side, into an unmarked car. Traveler (they knew him only the Colleges should Word spread fast in by his aliases). According to the Scranton educate its students, Superdorm. Drug bust. Commission Report, “the warrant was followed by these small, very Tommy. Narc. not acted upon for another month, even intense breakout discussions “I was walking down after Martinez reported to the police he that were professor- and the hill from Beta Sigma had seen [Tommy] lurking outside his student-organized to [fraternity] and walked right apartment and had provided them with evaluate curriculum changes, into it,” says Dunne. “People ASSISTANT PROFESSOR ALVIN SHER [Tommy’s] license plate number.” education generally, and the were leaning out of windows social rules of the school. and yelling that it was a drug -------Simultaneously, a group of bust and the police were coming—telling students were organizing a strike.” everyone to dump their dope. A couple of May 4, . The National Guard    “It was tense,” says Shirley Napolitano people saw Tommy and knew he was the advances on the Kent State campus, Banker ’72. “The issues were big, the informer and started yelling about him.” ordered by Ohio Governor Jim Rhodes to struggles were huge. Sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ It was supposed to be a drug raid, quell a student protest against roll happened, but “but was widely perceived as a political the Cambodian Incursion. as a reaction to the action, instigated by information provided by Gotta get down to it… social issues. None Tommy,” says Campbell. Should’ve been done long ago…. of us could vote. Tommy, who hadn’t been seen on The Scranton Commission Here we all were, campus since his altercation with Martinez, would later find that “[e]ven if working to get an still had an outstanding warrant against him. the guardsmen faced danger, education, working When Tommy and Detective William Simon it was not a danger that called on the social and got back into the car, students mobbed it and for lethal force. The 61 shots political problems, blocked the exit, demanding the police serve by 28 guardsmen certainly and meanwhile we the warrant against Tommy and release the SHIRLEY NAPOLITANO BANKER ’72 cannot be justified. Apparently, couldn’t even vote.” students. no order to fire was given… When Wardell arrived, “Tommy was [This] tragedy must mark the last time that, -------sitting in a [police] car, barricaded by as a matter of course, loaded rifles are students, sitting in the passenger seat issued to guardsmen confronting student One a.m., June 5, . It’s exam holding his gun on his lap with his finger on demonstrators.” week. Graduation is 10 days away. Tommy the trigger.” Coupled with “the outrage over What if you knew her and found her dead and about 40 uniformed and plainclothes student arrests and the shock of the intrusion on the ground? How can you run when you police officers raid two dorm rooms on the by police onto campus,” Tommy’s attitude know? first floor of Superdorm (Rees Hall). only stoked the uneasiness in the air. “It was impossible to be a student on According to the Scranton Commission “I remember my neighbor in Jackson a U.S. campus during that period and not Report: smearing ketchup on the windshield of be touched by politics and the war,” says Tommy’s getaway car to impede the escape,” Joanne Lyons Dunne ’73, who, along with Ontario County Sheriffs Department came says Mark Jones several other students, spent all afternoon onto the Hobart campus to make arrests for ’72, P’14, associate and evening “on the phone in Houghton… narcotics possession on information provided professor of art. with [Kent State] students after the by Thomas Tongyai. In the process of the “Where he got the shooting.” arrests two other students were picked up ketchup remains a Bob Gilman recalls that the anti-war on harassment charges, one who yelled, mystery.” “bust,” and the other for yelling, “Pig,” at protests “began during our sophomore “People kept Tommy. During the apprehension of these year [1967] and expanded, culminating showing up,” says five students, no person offered resistance or in the moratorium after Kent State, where Bill Ryder ’71, P’07. attempted obstruction of the officers. College classes were cancelled for a week and “Students were piling Mark JOnes ’72, P’14 officials had not been notified in advance many of us went to Washington for the up rocks like we were of the warrants and the arresting officers anti-war march.” going to fight it out if appeared on campus out of uniform and in Alvin Sher, then assistant professor of it came to that.” unmarked cars. art, “worked with a bunch of students to “Someone was tapping on the windshield recreate the famous photo of Kent State with a coat hanger,” says Banker. “A couple

1970

1970

18 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014


people were going around Causey said, THEN KRAUSE “REMOVED THE trying to make sure we “Jack, Jack—your DISTRIBUTOR CAP ON THE ENGINE, were calm, handing out career!” and Krause SO THE CAR COULDN’T MOVE— wet rags in case there was said, “Fuck my PREVENTING STUDENTS FROM tear gas. We were staking career!” our claim till the kids Then Krause GETTING HURT,” DIGANGI SAYS. who were arrested were “removed the “THE POLICE SAID HE WAS ACTING released.” distributor cap on TO IMPEDE JUSTICE, BUT HE Meanwhile, several the engine, so the dozen police had lined car couldn’t move— WAS ACTING IN THE INTEREST OF up along St. Clair Street, preventing students STUDENT SAFETY.” “from Pulteney to South from getting hurt,” Main, all brandishing DiGangi says. “The 4-foot riot sticks,” says police said he was An announcement was made to the Bromberg. “I asked a acting to impede crowd outside the dorm. The arrested cop what kind of wood justice, but he was students—both in the cars and at the they were and he replied, acting in the interest station—would soon be released. The police ‘Hickory.’ And he smiled. of student safety.” cruisers, which had suffered minor damage, He was dying to crack Tommy, still in TOMMY IN THE POLICE CAR would be allowed passage. Tommy would be some heads.” the car, “seemed to escorted away by another patrol car. “We were in Sill be in a trance,” says On behalf of the Colleges, Causey House and we crept Steve Bromberg. “He expressed his gratitude to the police for behind the fraternity next door and literally didn’t move, he didn’t blink. He just sat there, avoiding violence, though he emphasized parted the bushes and looked down alone, in the passenger seat—the driver had that the situation had been exacerbated South Main and saw these riot police long since left the car—and every now and by Tommy, “an informer who had been a coming down the street,” recalls Zupan. “I then, he would pull out the side of his sports frequent and unwanted visitor on remember being terrified.” jacket—I somehow remember that it was our campus in the past few months, But Ryder sensed “some dissention green—to show us that he had a gun in his and the cause of much trouble.”7 among the local cops about Tommy the shoulder holster.” The police were mostly Traveler. They probably didn’t know him Meanwhile, Dean John R. McKean dispersed, but a crowd of students well. I remember talking to a cop and explained to Detective Simon that the milled around the parking lot, telling him this isn’t right. The people students were: waiting in a brief rainstorm, until, you’ve arrested aren’t involved in anything. with the sun rising over the lake, This guy, Tommy, has been around campus upset not because there had been a DiGangi and Berretta returned with for a long time trying to get people involved narcotics raid, but because Tommy the the students who’d been taken in all kinds of stuff. This is ridiculous. And Traveler, an adamant advocate of violence downtown, and on cue, a rainbow they were listening, amazed by all the against agencies of the United States materialized over campus. For a people there.” government, had been working with the moment, everyone breathed easy. President Causey, Instructor of sheriff’s department. In addition students Political Science Jack Krause, DiGangi, and could not understand why Tommy had -------other faculty had been downtown at Cosie’s not been arrested on harassment charges Bar at the time of the raid. By the time [stemming from the warrant Martinez swore Less than a week later, warrants they arrived back on campus and began to a month earlier].6 were issued, and Krause, Davis, negotiate with Morrow and the police, there INSTRUCTOR OF POLITICAL SCIENCE Campbell and Martinez, as well as were 300 students, maybe 500, Jefferson Now hours into the standoff, McKean, JACK KRAUSE Clarence Youngs, Gilbert Dillon ’70, Airplane blaring from a dorm window—look Causey, Berretta, DiGangi, Morrow, and and Keuka College student Melanie what’s happening out in the streets, got a Geneva Police Chief Thomas McLaughlin Wallace, were arrested on charges revolution, got to revolution—and Tommy, met with several student leaders in a Sherrill ranging from second degree riot to still in the car. Hall dorm room, where, just before dawn, an obstructing governmental procedures. “The police, using bullhorns, and amnesty agreement was reached on behalf of The arrests came in the early backed by nightstick- and gun-wielding the arrested students. morning, “in a way that could only ‘riot police’ were insisting that everyone “We talked for a while, and have been scripted by a TV cop show,” disperse, which given the climate was the sheriff signed a statement that Campbell says. “Riot police pushed unlikely to happen without violence,” says said the students in jail would be their way into my apartment, shoved Sean Campbell, who tried “to get students released if police cars were let go,” me to the floor and handcuffed me. to sit down, and thereby reduce the chances says DiGangi, who, for the next They then told me to get dressed, of a violent clash between the two groups.” week, would hold “for safe-keeping which caused much debate between As Wardell remembers it, Krause the written agreement to release the gilbert dillon ’70 the police since I was on the floor opened the hood of the car Tommy was in. students from jail.”

6. From the Scranton Commission Report. 7. From Donner, “The Agent Provocateur as Folk Hero.”

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

19


constituting the offense of coercion [against the sheriff, Tommy and local law enforcement].”    On December 18, 1970, HWS was officially indicted on coercion charges in what Dr. Allan Kuusisto P’78, who succeeded Causey as HWS President in late 1970, called “a landmark case for higher education;” the While Campbell, Keuka College student Melanie indictment marked the Davis and Wallace and Clarence Youngs ’72 first time that “a college Martinez were has been charged with having their hair criminal activities relating to a campus cut and faces shaved in jail, a police disorder.” officer stood next to them, threatening “Our initial reaction,” Kuusisto said them that they were “going to get a at the time, “is one of shock, surprise and bullet between the eyes” if they “acted discouragement that our neighbors on the up.”…[They] were offered no food of jury have chosen to take this unusual course any kind, even though they were in jail of action.” during the noon hour when meals are fed to all other prisoners. -------Hobart Student Council Treasurer Tim On July 31, , Tommy was arrested Yolen ’72 “was given the run-around from Geneva to Canandaigua and back,” for defrauding the state of unemployment according to the Scranton Commission pay benefits, a total of $1,105 he’d received Report, but eventually posted “the between mid-January and mid-May of 1970, unusually high bail of $6,000” for during which time he was employed by the Campbell, Davis and Martinez. Ontario County Sheriff’s Office. Campbell is sure they were “singled Frank Pullano P’84, former president out and identified as the of the Geneva Chamber of Commerce and a ring leaders of the riot, long-time friend of the Colleges, never knew which is ironic since we Tommy himself, but he recalls the day that in fact acted to prevent summer that Joe Hessney, former Geneva violence from occurring.” police commissioner, “walked into my In July 1970, after office and said, ‘This guy [Tommy] is a Tommy’s role as an good guy. He wants to be a policeman— undercover agent was made that’s why he did this. Can you help me public, Governor Nelson bail him out?’” Rockefeller convened a This was an opinion shared by much TIM YOLEN ’72 special Grand Jury, which, of the city at the time. In her letter to in an unprecedented the city’s newspaper, Geneva resident turn, alleged that “through two of its Catherine C. Blood wrote in support highest managerial agents [Causey of Tommy, “a most polite, gracious, and McKean],” Hobart and William respectable young man [who] hunts, Smith Colleges—the school itself—had fishes, golfs and skis with the many “recklessly tolerated certain conduct friends he has made among several of the very best young family men in our city.” Tommy’s wife, Margaret Lynn, taught “A LANDMARK CASE FOR Pullano’s son, David ’84, first grade at St. HIGHER EDUCATION;” THE Stephen’s in Geneva. INDICTMENT MARKED THE FIRST Tommy’s bail cost Pullano and TIME THAT “A COLLEGE HAS Hessney about “two or three hundred bucks apiece,” Pullano says, but Hessney BEEN CHARGED WITH CRIMINAL told Pullano that Tommy “was the type of ACTIVITIES RELATING TO A guy who’s honest. You’ll probably get your CAMPUS DISORDER.” money back.” handcuffed, and could not comply.” According to the Scranton Commission Report, Campbell, Davis and Martinez were “transferred from the Geneva jail to the Canandaigua jail by a patrol car traveling at speeds in excess of 90 m.p.h.”

1970

20 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

Tommy would eventually plead guilty to accepting unemployment benefits while he was working for the sheriff’s department. His sentence was a year of probation and a directive to repay the money he’d unlawfully collected. “About two or three years later,” Pullano says, “Joe and I each got a check in the mail from Tommy for his bail paid in full.” --------

1971

By early January , Bennett and Sheppard were sentenced to eight and six months in jail, respectively, for their roles in the ROTC firebombing. Tommy, meanwhile, had been acquitted of “conspiracy to commit arson, criminal solicitation and criminal facilitation in the fire-bombing,” as well as the harassment charge brought against him by Martinez. Not long after, under the direction of State Supreme Court Justice Fredrick M. Marshall, the jury acquitted the Colleges of all charges. The charges of rioting and obstruction brought against the students and Krause were also dropped. “Suffice it to say, the Judge’s directions conveyed a thorough repudiation of the kind of thinking that had gone into the Grand Jury’s deliberations,” wrote Kuusisto in the 1970-71 Annual Report to the HWS Trustees. “Now that the Colleges have been vindicated, we can look back on the whole affair as a difficult incident but one which served…in reminding us what precious commodities our

Francis Gregory Sheppard and Gary Bennett, May 2, 1970


integrity and independence are and how easily they are threatened.” Tommy, who was PRESIDENT KUUSISTO P’78 suspended from duty after the raid in June, was officially dismissed by Sheriff Morrow in February of 1971 and, soon after, accused of neglect by the Grand Jury, which recommended that the “appropriate public body or official take disciplinary action” based on the following findings: 1. On or about April 25, 1970, Deputy Tongyai learned…that certain persons were conspiring to commit the crime of arson, first degree, in the City of Geneva. Deputy Tongyai did not report his knowledge of this conspiracy to his superior [Morrow]…but reported the same to a member of another investigative body whose action to avert the proposed arson was unsuccessful. This grand jury finds that the failure of Deputy Tongyai to report his knowledge directly and immediately to his superior law officer constitutes neglect in office. 2. On June 5, 1970…[w]hile the search [of the rooms in Superdorm] was being conducted, Deputy Tongyai left the search area without permission of his superior… and made two arrests on minor charges. This grand jury finds that Deputy Tongyai’s failure to participate in his assigned duty and his diverting himself to non-related activities constituted neglect in office. -------But Tommy, who had been a student in police science at the Finger Lakes Community College in Canandaigua, wouldn’t remain unemployed for long. As the Cortland Standard reported in July of 1971, Tommy “returned to Bucks County, Pa., where he grew up. He was selected from a field of nine to fill a vacancy on the New Britain Township police force.” “He’s very enthused about law enforcement,” said Police Chief Dallas E. Flowers, Tommy’s new boss at the time, “and this enthusiasm was one of the reasons he was chosen for the job.” Tommy’s enthusiasm is perhaps tied to his sense of pride in family history. Tommy’s father, Singkata Tongyai, received his bachelor’s in police administration from Michigan State University, “for the purpose of setting up an agency in Thailand simular

[sic] to the FBI in the USA,” according to Singkata Tongyai’s obituary, written by Tommy. After M.R. Singkata Tongyai graduated from Michigan State….[he] went into training with the United States Government Office of Strategic Services where he was trained in secret intelligence and operations. He excelled on OSS training….After the war…Tongyai went into Conducting Investigations of Sabotage, Espionage and Subversive Activities in which Military and Civilian [sic] were involved. He Conducted Investigations, Collected Evidence, Procured Information on Individuals, Questioned witnesses and made arrests.

Tommy’s family history may in fact have been precisely what recommended him to the FBI. “I can’t tell you anything about recruitment or training. That’s classified. My father worked for counter intelligence in the Army. I sort of grew up with it. You can take it from there,” Tommy said in a 1975 interview. By then, Tommy had divorced, remarried and cut his policing back to part-time, while working as a blacksmith and horseman in rural Pennsylvania, where he lived “a half-mile from the nearest paved road, with an unlisted telephone number and no mailbox to advertise his whereabouts,” according to the Citizen-Advertiser. He drives a blue pickup truck outfitted as a mobile blacksmith shop. And for a rare visitor Tommy reaches for his wine skin and offers a squirt of his 150-proof imported rum. “It’s 18th century rum,” he says in an interview in which he partly discussed the past. “I’m a freak for the 18th century. That’s why I live here. I guess that’s why I’m a blacksmith.” In the 1980s, Tommy—who dropped out of high school in 1963 and spent six months touring with a rodeo8—would fulfill his lifelong fascination with horses when he opened a ranch in the mid-west. According to the ranch’s website: As an individual Tommy will most likely be the most unique character that you will ever meet, but when visiting with him you will hear the passion in his voice for his love and understanding of the genetic [sic] involved in breeding, persevering [sic] and

“...WE CAN LOOK BACK ON THE WHOLE AFFAIR AS A DIFFICULT INCIDENT BUT ONE WHICH SERVED…IN REMINDING US WHAT PRECIOUS COMMODITIES OUR INTEGRITY AND INDEPENDENCE ARE AND HOW EASILY THEY ARE THREATENED.” developing superior horses that follow this family tradition….The Cavalier horse was developed by my family starting with my Grandfather’s ideas over a hundred years ago. Major General Prince Tongtikyu Tongyai, as an officer in Czar Nicholas’ Horse Guards, formented [sic] his evaluation of the ultimate cavalry mount. Passing his criteria through my father to me. An avid (if self-styled) historian, Tommy is reportedly also a Civil War re-enactor, 4th U.S. Cavalry, Company I. -------Of the incidents at HWS, Tommy said in the same 1975 interview that the “whole thing was crazy. But I can’t say I regret it. I was serving my country….They called me a provocateur. They said I was giving bombs to innocent kids, showing them how to use guns. You don’t understand it, but that’s the art of the undercover psychology. I showed people how a bomb would go off. But I never handled explosives that the radicals could have got hold of.” However, Tommy’s motives and rationales are less convincing to some. “Tommy sought to identify who these new thinkers might be and find a way to eliminate them,” Gilman says, convinced that Tommy “was a henchman for a group of desperate people who felt that their lives were indeed endangered by our generation.” “I think Tommy totally embraced his role as agent provocateur, ferreting out people who were a ‘threat to the country,’” Wardell says. “I think he believed that. Why? Partly the histrionic nature of the way he played the radical. Partly the simplistic way he played the radical. Partly the smile on his face as he held that gun. There was a certain pride. A certain pleasure.” Nevertheless, the “Tommy the Traveler” incident “became a bonding experience for my class (’72), and I’m sure for the classes of ’70, ’71 and ’73,” says

8. From Donner, “The Agent Provocateur as Fold Hero.” Hobart and William Smith Colleges

21


THE STUDENTS AND ADMINISTRATION REACHED AN AGREEMENT THAT THE CURRENT CURRICULUM, AS KUUSISTO PUT IT, “NO LONGER WAS IN TUNE WITH THE NEEDS OF TODAY’S STUDENTS AND TOMORROW’S.” INCOMING STUDENTS WOULD ENCOUNTER A “REFRESHING NEW INTELLECTUAL CHALLENGE… DISTINGUISH[ING] INITIAL COLLEGE EXPERIENCES MORE CLEARLY FROM…SECONDARY SCHOOL [EXPERIENCE].” Bromberg. “It is a focus of discussion at every reunion I attend. It also was a rallying point for the two years more that I attended Hobart. Not a day went by that it wasn’t remembered. It was with us always. We experienced this as a group. We were there.” In the months and years that followed, a new curriculum was implemented on campus as a result not only of the “Tommy the Traveler” incident but the social and political awakening across the country. The students and administration STEVE BROMBERG ’72 reached an agreement that the current curriculum, as Kuusisto put it, “no longer was in tune with the needs of today’s students and tomorrow’s.” Incoming students would encounter a “refreshing new intellectual challenge… distinguish[ing] initial college experiences more clearly from…secondary school [experience].” “There were major changes following the spring of 1970,” says DiGangi. The Colleges enacted a “far more liberal curriculum and those in power in the

administration welcomed it because it made the Colleges a better place.” Perhaps the most profound effects, however, were in the students who lived through these events, who were forced “to come to grips with very adult things on the cusp of adulthood. It completely shaped the way we live our lives, our sense of civic responsibility,” says Wardell. “It made us responsible and curious—it made us people who engage with our world.” ●

References

Where are they now?

Associated Press. “‘Tommy the traveler’ a blacksmith now.” The Citizen-Advertiser [Auburn, N.Y.] 5 Feb. 1975: 17. FultonHistory.com. Web. 5 Oct. 2013.

Shirley Napolitano Banker ’72 is a high school teacher living just outside New York City.

Associated Press. “His Riot Incitements Seemed Sterling Until Real Role Bared.” Sarasota Journal 13 July 1970, 4B sec.: n. pag. Google News. Google. Web. 5 Oct. 2013. Associated Press. “Thomas Tongyai Is Now Rookie Policeman In Pennsylvania.” Cortland Standard. 26 July 1971: 7. FultonHistory.com. Web. 5 Oct. 2013. Associated Press. “‘Tommy’ cleared; faces state probe.” The Citizen-Advertiser [Auburn, N.Y.] 30 July 1970: 2. FultonHistory.com. Web. 5 Oct. 2013.

Blood, Catherine C. Letter. Geneva Times 23 June 1970: 8. FultonHistory.com. Web. 15 Oct. 2013.

Steve Bromberg ’72 is a journalist and editorial consultant working out of the New York City metropolitan area.

Dominus, Susan. “Disabled During ’68 Columbia Melee, a Former Officer Feels Pain, Not Rage.” New York Times. 25 April 2008. Web. 19 Oct. 2013.

Sean Campbell ’70 is the owner of Campbell Maritime in Corona Del Mar, California.

Donner, Frank J. “The Agent Provocateur as Folk Hero.” Civil Liberties Sept. 1971: 5-8. The Harold Weisberg Archive. Hood College. Web. 5 Oct. 2013.

Bruce Davis ’72 owns and operates Silent Stay Retreat Home and Hermitage in Napa, California and Assisi, Italy. He is the author of several books including The Calling of Joy.   Joe DiGangi is emeritus professor of political science at HWS and now resides in the Washington D.C. area. Joanne Lyons Dunne ’73 is president of  The Lyons Consulting Group, a nonprofit and association consulting firm. She’s been in the Washington D.C. area since graduation working in the nonprofit sector.  Bob Gilman ’70, M.D., D.M.D., is a plastic surgeon and a member of the HWS Board of Trustees. He holds the position of clinical lecturer and is a member of the full time plastic surgery faculty in the Section of Plastic Surgery at the University of Michigan. Mark Jones ’72 is an associate professor of art at HWS where he has been teaching photography and painting since 1985. Frank Pullano P’84 is a long-time Geneva resident, former president of the Geneva Chamber of Commerce and a founding member of the Geneva Scholarship Associates.   Bill Ryder ’71, P’07 is an attorney working as the legislative and regulatory counsel for the Massachusetts Medical Society.   Christine Wardell ’70 is a retired antitrust lawyer living in San Francisco.   Clarence Youngs ’72 is an administrator for the New York City Department of Education.   Maureen Collins Zupan ’72, P’09 is chair of the HWS Board of Trustees and owner of a financial planning group based in Syracuse, N.Y.

The Colleges are gathering recollections and comments for a future webpage dedicated to the “Tommy the Traveler” incident. To participate, e-mail Catherine Williams at cwilliams@hws.edu.

22 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

Associated Press. “All Charges Dropped Against N.Y. College. The Cornell Daily Sun 9 Feb. 1971, 1: Cornell Daily Sun. Cornell University. Web. 5 Oct. 2013.

Farrell, William E. “Suits and Trials—Including That of Hobart College for Coercion—Have Followed Tommy the Traveler.” New York Times 8 Feb. 1971. The Harold Weisberg Archive. Hood College. Web. 5 Oct. 2013. “from the Scranton Report...Investigation: Who Is ‘Tommy the Traveler’?” Albany Student Press [Albany, N.Y.] 17 Feb. 1971: 2. State University of New York at Albany. State University of New York at Albany. Web. 5 Oct. 2013. “Grand Jury releases a portion of Tommy the Traveler testimony.” The Geneva Times 24 Feb. 1971. Print. McFadden, Robert D. “Remembering Columbia, 1968.” New York Times. 25 April 2008. Web. 17 Oct. 2013. Morrissey, William. “‘Activist’ Agent Ends His Trip.” The Milwaukee Journal 13 July 1970: 12. Google News. Google. Web. 5 Oct. 2013. Morrissey, William. “Tale of ‘Tommy the Traveler,’ a revolutionary for the police.” The Miami News 14 July 1970: 14A. Google News. Google. Web. 5 Oct. 2013. Powers, Lloyd. “…Tongyai of Neglect.” The Geneva Daily Times 5 Mar. 1971. FultonHistory.com. Web. 5 Oct. 2013 Richard Nixon: “Address to the Nation on the Situation in Southeast Asia.” April 30, 1970. Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project. “Stratton Kidnap Project Is Told in Hobart Trial.” The Daily Messenger [Canandaigua, N.Y.] 17 Nov. 1971: 1+. Newspaperarchive.com. Newspaper Archive. Web. 5 Oct. 2013. Tambers, Michael. “Many drug users—Undercover man talks about Hobart issue.” The Geneva Times 11 June 1970: 5. Print. The Revolutionary Was a Cop. Dir. Marc N. Weiss. Youtube.com. N.p., 26 Sept. 2013. Web. 5 Oct. 2013. “Two sentenced to jail for Hobart fire bombing.” The Geneva Times 6 Jan. 1971: 5. Print. United Press International. “‘Traveler’ Admits Jobless Pay Fraud.” Union-Sun and Journal [Lockport, N.Y.] 18 Feb. 1971: 3. Web. 12 Oct. 2013. United States. United States Senate. Select Committee to Study Governmental Operations with Respect to Intelligence Activities. Church Committee Report. N.p.: n.p., n.d. AARCLibrary.org. Assassination Archives and Research Center. Web. 6 Oct. 2013.


Coxe Hall Steps | ca.1972

FEATURE

Social Networking In 1972, students gathered on the steps in front of Coxe Hall to enjoy the sun and exchange ideas.

The National Re gional Network Launches

24

 

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

23


National Regional Network Launches West Mountain

By Jessica Evangelista Balduzzi ’05

W

hen students graduate from Hobart and William Smith, they join a vast network of nearly 20,000 alumni and alumnae scattered across the world and living in nearly every state and country on the planet. Pockets of density in urban areas like New York City, Boston, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, San Francisco and Chicago, have traditionally offered opportunities for the Colleges to translate the sense of community that students feel on campus to life as alumni and alumnae. But in places where there is a more modest population of alums and parents, and in an effort to engage all volunteers in important and meaningful work on behalf of the Colleges, a new idea was needed. Then came a monumental breakfast in the fall of 2009 at the Ramada Inn on Seneca Lake. Attending were the then presidents of the Alumni and Alumnae Associations (now trustees) – Bob Gilman ’70 and Kate MacKinnon ’77, as well as the directors of the offices of alumni and alumnae relations – Jared Weeden ’91 and Kathy Killius Regan ’82, P’13. “We wanted to create a structure that “W would really engage our alums and give

Southwest

them something meaty, something that was of consequence and something that allowed them to give back to the Colleges in a very real and important way,” recalls MacKinnon. “We spoke for over two hours and it seemed like only a minute had flashed by.” “This was a very exciting time for the alum associations,” says Gilman. “That cooperative effort is, I believe, the real legacy of that time.” “By the end of the breakfast we had an idea of how we wanted to tap into the depth and

Check out your Region by visiting the National Regional Network Online! www.hws.edu/regional

Regional pages are updated frequently so check back often to stay connected. • • • • • • • • •

Links to regional HWS Facebook and LinkedIn pages Up-to-the minute information on regional events Regional photo galleries Online volunteer form Regional statistics Bios and photos of regional volunteer leadership and campus staff Online alum directory links Bios and photos of regional volunteer leadership Profiles of alumni, alumnae, parents and current students by region

24 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

Midwest

On the following pages you’ll get a glimpse of what the website holds.

Southeast

breadth of experiences of the alum and parent population,” says MacKinnon. That idea was the beginning of the National Regional Network. Presented to both Councils and the Board of Trustees, the idea was adopted as one of the key recommendations of the Colleges’ Strategic Plan, HWS 2015. The National Regional Network divides the country into nine regions, each one overseen by a team of volunteers tasked with engaging alums and parents in activities in support of admissions, career services, and development that will capitalize on the Colleges’ momentum and propel Hobart and William Smith into the future. “Through the creation of the National Regional Network, the Colleges are able to be more proactive and effective in tapping the talents and commitment of our volunteers,” says Regan, who is managing the Network. “We hope to deepen the sense of affiliation that alumni, alumnae and parents have with Hobart and William Smith, consolidate the management of volunteers to allow for more efficient support of their work, and establish a wider, more consistent HWS presence throughout the country.”


S

REGION

“The power of this whole concept, in my view and the view of the Hobart Council, is that this will better engage our alums where they live, which will, in turn, broaden and deepen their connection to the Colleges,” says James (JB) Robinson ’96, president of the Hobart Alumni Association. “We talk a lot about how the relationship with the Colleges should be for life — and the National Regional Network helps facilitate that.” “We have a long tradition of alums and “W parents who are ready and willing to serve the Colleges,” says Chrissy Bennett-West ’94, president of the William Smith Alumnae Association. “The Network has the potential to dramatically increase the number of opportunities for our alumni, alumnae and parents to make meaningful contributions of time, talent and resources toward the betterment of the Colleges, both on campus and across the country in our communities. By actively engaging alums through the National Regional Network model, the Hobart and William Smith Associations are better poised to support and strengthen the mission of the Colleges in all of its communications, programs and initiatives.” “It is a thrilling experience to see the spark of an idea manifest into something beyond anything we could have imagined possible that morning at the Ramada Inn,” says Weeden. ●

The National Regional Network The country has been divided into nine geographic regions: Upstate New York Includes all of New York State except metro New York City

Mid-Atlantic DC, DE, MD, Southwest NJ, PA, VA

Tri-State Includes metro New York City, northern and central New Jersey, and Fairfield County, CT. New England MA, ME, NH, RI, VT, CT (except Fairfield County)

West Mountain CO, ID, MT, NV, UT, WY Southwest AZ, NM, OK, TX

Southeast AR, AL, FL, GA, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN

West Coast AK, CA, HI, OR, WA

Midwest IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, MI, MN, MO, NE, ND, OH, SD, WV, WI

Did you know?

2012-2013 Data ALL ALUMS

20,317

Hobart Alums 11,232 William Smith Alums 9,085 Graduates of the Last Decade1 4,255 50th PLUS2 2,125 Current Students 2,308

Class Agents

96

1. Graduates from the Classes of 2003-2012. 2. HWS living graduates from the Classes of 1962 and earlier.

Current Legacy Parents All Regions

All Donors

7,438

135

National Regional Network Volunteer Structure Each region has a volunteer leadership team consisting of: REGIONAL VICE PRESIDENTS (RVP): One Hobart and one William Smith volunteer leader, the RVPs serve a two-year, renewable term and are responsible for managing and communicating with Association officers, campus staff managers, regional coordinators and volunteers.

Admissions Applicants

3,988

All Volunteers

Admissions Enrolls

4,758

631

REGIONAL COORDINATORS: Representing each of the major volunteer areas: Admissions, Regional Events, Career Services, Development (Graduates of the Last Decade and class agents), Parents and Trustees, the Regional Coordinators work with the RVPs and, as a group, make up a Regional Steering Committee. REGIONAL VOLUNTEERS: Under each set of Regional Coordinators are volunteers who perform specific tasks related to specific functions (e.g. admissions interviews, career event hosts, etc.) CAMPUS STAFF MANAGERS: Representing Admissions, Alumni and Alumnae Relations, Career Services, Parent Relations, President’s Office and Trustees, the campus staff managers meet regularly on campus to collaborate.

ALL REGIONS Regional Events

Internships Completed

642

41

Regional Event Attendance

2,196

HOBART AND WILLIAM SMITH COLLEGES

25


Upstate New York Includes all of New York State except metro New York City

Admissions Applicants

953

Admissions Enrolls

170

2012-2013 Statistics ALL ALUMS

3,778

Hobart Alums William Smith Alums Graduates of the Last Decade1 50th PLUS2 Current Students from Region Legacy Alums3

Most Popular Majors of Upstate New York Alums

2,011 1,767 976 462 704 370

History

281

Biology

309

English

410

Psychology

421

Economics

433

Age Range 22 35 45 55 65

to 34 to 44 to 54 to 64 and Over

32% 16% 15% 16% 21%

65+

22-34

Donors

55-64

45-54

35-44

4

First Time Donors5 Past 5 Year Donors6 Ever Donors7

30%

3% 53% 82%

Wheeler Members8

134

Dr. Harry W. Coover Jr. ’41 P’66 While supervising a group of Kodak chemists Regional in Rochester, N.Y., investigating heat-resistant polymers for jet-plane Connection canopies, the late Coover discovered cyanoacrylate monomers. Though they were too sticky to be useful on planes, they required neither heat nor pressure to bond, unique properties at the time. He eventually developed the chemical, now more commonly known as SuperGlue or Krazy Glue, for commercial use. Besides its household use, this chemical saved thousands of lives during the Vietnam War and is now commonly used as a medical adhesive in both human and veterinarian procedures. Coover received the Hobart Medal of Excellence in 2010.

26 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

Top 5 Professions of Upstate New York Alums

1. Higher Education Education 2. Healthcar Healthcare e 3. Secondar Secondary y Education 4. Le Legal gal 5. Manuf Manufacturing acturing

Alums who Studied Abroad

717


Regional Network Spotlight Nancy Nowak Rutherford ’71 Class Agents

Upstate New York Regional Vice President Rochester, New York

12

• Retired English Teacher

256

Internships Completed in the Region

Volunteers Current Parents HWS Alum Athletes

892

671 1,492

Interesting Jobs Held by Alums in Upstate New York… • Customs and Border Protection Officer

• Coast Resources Specialist

• Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator

• Homesteader

• Switchgear Specialist • Director of Medicolegal Investigations

Events

are being planned in your Region!

www.hws.edu/ regional

• Winemaker

• • • •

Major/minor: English/Education Why did you choose Hobart and William Smith Colleges? My mother, who never went to college, used to go to dances at the Colleges during WWI. She thought it was beautiful and encouraged me to apply. Once I saw it and took a tour with an enthusiastic guide, I never looked at another college. My heart was set on William Smith. How do you stay connected to the Colleges? I try to attend all of the local William Smith Chapter events. I have helped organize my class reunions for many years, and I was president of the William Smith Alumnae Association. What makes the Colleges special? The size. It is such an intimate place that I was able to get to know most of my classmates and my professors, who, in those years, lived right near campus. Why do you give back to HWS? I feel that I ‘owe’ them. I received a wonderful education and made some of the best friends I’ll ever have. I am enriched in some way each time I visit the Colleges. What are your goals as a Regional Network volunteer? To get more alumni and alumnae to realize how invaluable their education was and still can be with continued involvement with the Colleges.

• Ceremony Celebrant

Dr. Lowell J. Levine ’59

• Forest Ranger

Upstate New York Career Services Coordinator Albany, New York • Director of Forensic Operations, New York   State Department of Police   • Temple Club • Science Club • The Herald • WEOS

• Chef de Cuisine

2012-2013 Regional Events

9

Regional Event Attendance

• Hobart Regional Vice President, Kevin Martin ’81, P’12, Clinton, N.Y. • William Smith Regional Vice President, Nancy Nowak Rutherford ’71, Rochester, N.Y. • Admissions Coordinator, Kaitlin Roth ’10, Webster, N.Y. • Career Services Coordinator, Lowell Levine ’59, Albany, N.Y. • Development Coordinator, Chris Biehn ’87, Ithaca, N.Y. • Graduates of the Last Decade Coordinator, Jordan Printup ’13, Geneva, N.Y. • Regional Programming Coordinator, Melissa Golen ’96, Cheektowga, N.Y. • Parent Coordinators, Tom and Erin Roth P’10, Webster, N.Y. • Trustee, Roy Dexheimer ’55, P’86, LL.D.’80, Ithaca, N.Y.

Major/Minor: Biology/Chemistry

445

Upstate New York Leadership

William Smith Congress Hirshson House President Club Volleyball Club Lacrosse

Why did you choose Hobart and William Smith Colleges? I chose HWS because it was a small, liberal arts college away from home. How do you stay connected to the Colleges? I organized “The Real CSI” with multiple forensic scientists presenting what they do. Prior to that I organized another Forensic Sciences based seminar that highlighted the Kennedy Assassination Investigation, Josef Mengele and the Romanoff Investigation. I also help those who think they are interested in a career in Forensic Sciences.  What makes the Colleges special? The faculty and administration treat students as if they are very important family members. They care! Why do you give back to HWS? I give back because HWS gave to me when I needed it as a student. They cared even over 50 years ago. What are your goals as a Regional Network volunteer? To help the wonderful young undergrads as they near career choices to find something they think will fulfill their aspirations. 

Data key: All data from 2012-2013 1. Graduates from the Classes of 2003-2012. 2. HWS living graduates from the Classes of 1962 and earlier. 3. Alums who have a child and/or parent who also attended HWS. 4. Percentage of regional alums and parents who made a gift. 5. Alums and parents who made their first gift to HWS in 2012-2013 fiscal year. 6. Alums and parents who made any gift to HWS in the last five years. 7. Alums and parents who have ever made a gift to HWS. 8. Wheeler Society members who have included HWS in their estate plans.

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

27


Tri-State Includes metro New York City, northern and central New Jersey, and Fairfield County, CT.

Admissions College Fairs

54

Admissions Volunteers

106

2012-2013 Statistics ALL ALUMS

4,586

Hobart Alums William Smith Alums Graduates of the Last Decade1 50th PLUS2 Current Students from Region Legacy Alums3

Age Range 22 35 45 55 65

to 34 to 44 to 54 to 64 and Over

30% 20% 22% 14% 14%

Most Popular Majors of Tri-State Alums

2,533 2,053 1,123 384 601 297

65+

344

Psychology

365

Political Science

402

Economics

625

English

686

22-34

55-64 55

45-54

History

Donors

35-44

4

First Time Donors5 Past 5 Year Donors6 Ever Donors7

29% 3% 51% 82%

Wheeler Members8

77

Bishop John Henry Hobart

Born in Philadelphia on September 14, Regional 1775, John Henry Hobart Connection received his education at the Universities of Pennsylvania and Princeton, graduating from the latter in 1791. In 1816, he was named diocesan bishop and rector of Trinity Church in New York City. Within his first four years as bishop, Hobart doubled the number of clergy and quadrupled the number of missionaries in his diocese. By his death, he had established a church in almost every major town in New York. In addition to founding Geneva College, the precursor to Hobart College, he was one of the founders of the General Theological Seminary in New York City. Hobart was indefatigable as a bishop. His diocese of New York covered nearly 50,000 square miles with most of the area west and north of Albany a virtual wilderness that he frequently traveled. Trinity Church on Wall Street, where Hobart is interred, also includes a monument in his memory. Trinity Church in Geneva, N.Y., and Trinity Hall on the HWS campus are named in honor of Hobart’s home church. 28 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

Top 5 Professions of Tri-State Alums

1.

Finance/Banking

2.

Legal Le gal

3.

Healthcare Healthcar e

4.

Higher Education Education

5.

Publishing Pub lishing

Career Volunteers

1,003

Alums with Advanced Degrees

1,211


Regional Network Spotlight Laura E. Strickler ’94 Class Agents

30 162

Internships Completed in the Region

Volunteers Current Parents HWS Alum Athletes

1,143

588 1,588

Interesting Jobs Held by Alums in the Tri-State area…. • Owner of a Prop House • “David Letterman Show” Announcer • Organic Cattle Farmer • Meat Industry Consultant

Tri-State Regional Vice President Lawrenceville, New Jersey • Associate Director for Administration, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, Princeton University   • William Smith Congress • Assistant Director, Admissions (post-graduation)

• Violin Maker • Curator of Rare Books

Majors: English and Art History Why did you choose Hobart and William Smith Colleges? William Smith chose me, to be honest. I was wait-listed at my first choice, which in the end should never have been my first choice. Also, I was encouraged by a family friend, the late Ellen Arnold Groff ’67. She was an amazing champion when it came to HWS. How do you stay connected to the Colleges? I love getting the e-newsletter. In the past I have also acted as a regional club president, an admissions volunteer, a class agent, a reunion committee member, and a member of the William Smith Alumnae Council. Whatever I have been asked to do, I try to do.    What makes the Colleges special? The Colleges are a place where one can investigate any topic of interest, and with the help of faculty, craft that into a meaningful academic project, whether an individual major, honors topic, independent study, or simply a gratifying experience. I like to think that this empowers students to seek paths for their careers, graduate work, or general life fulfillment. It creates inquisitive, thoughtful, appreciative alumni and alumnae who feel connected and want to give back to a place that gave them so many opportunities.

• Art Restorer • Dog Trainer • Brewery Representative • Sugar Trader

Joshua Leach ’01 Tri-State Programming Coordinator New York, New York      • Contract Paralegal, Lexolution

Events

are being planned in your Region!

www.hws.edu/ regional

2012-2013 Regional Events

6

• • • • •

Hobart Cross Country Team Student Life and Leadership Sankofa Secretary, Black Student Union PRIDE Alliance

Major/minor: English/Africana Studies

Regional Event Attendance

540

Tri-State Leadership • Hobart Regional Vice President, Sean McCooey ’78, P’08, P’12, Garden City, N.Y. • William Smith Regional Vice President, Laura Strickler ’94, Lawrenceville, N.J. • Admissions Coordinator, Kiersten Hamilton ’12, New York, N.Y. • Career Services Coordinator, Sandy Gross ’85, Greenwich, Conn. • Development Coordinator, Courtney ArcherBuckmire ’04, Brooklyn, N.Y. • Graduates of the Last Decade Coordinator, Derrick Moore ’05, New York, N.Y. • Regional Programming Coordinator, Joshua Leach ’01, New York, N.Y. • Regional Parent Coordinators, Christine and Scott Hill P’13, Chappaqua, N.Y. • Trustee, Aileen Diviney Gleason ’85, Manhasset, N.Y.

Why did you choose Hobart and William Smith Colleges? It was hard not to fall in love with the campus upon my first visit. HWS offered the right environment, programs and course selection. So much so, that I applied early decision. How do you stay connected to the Colleges? I attend regional events, keep up with alums in my area and maintain contact with Alumni House. What makes the Colleges special? There are too many to list, but here are a few of the more meaningful: the one-on-one relationships that are developed between professors, administration and fellow students; the impressive list of study abroad programs and opportunities; and the variety of leadership programs and opportunities. Why do you give back to HWS? I gained so much from my four years at HWS. The benefits are evident daily. As such, I give to ensure that others receive the same quality experience at HWS that I was able to enjoy.

Data key: All data from 2012-2013 1. Graduates from the Classes of 2003-2012. 2. HWS living graduates from the Classes of 1962 and earlier. 3. Alums who have a child and/or parent who also attended HWS. 4. Percentage of regional alums and parents who made a gift. 5. Alums and parents who made their first gift to HWS in 2012-2013 fiscal year. 6. Alums and parents who made any gift to HWS in the last five years. 7. Alums and parents who have ever made a gift to HWS. 8. Wheeler Society members who have included HWS in their estate plans.

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

29


New England MA, ME, NH, RI, VT, CT (except Fairfield County)

Admissions High School Visits

2012-2013 Statistics ALL ALUMS

22 35 45 55 65

to 34 to 44 to 54 to 64 and Over

29% 21% 20% 16% 14%

192

Most Popular Majors of New England Alums

4,255

Hobart Alums William Smith Alums Graduates of the Last Decade1 50th PLUS2 Current Students from Region Legacy Alums3

Age Range

Admissions Enrolls

184

2,249 2.006 1,024 260 587 316

65+

309

History

355

Psychology

392

Economics

470

English

546

22-34

Donors4

55-64

45-54

Political Science

First Time Donors5 Past 5 Year Donors6 Ever Donors7

35-44

30%

Wheeler Members8

2% 54% 86%

74

Dr. Lydia M. Gibson Dawes ’18 Eighty years after Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell earned her medical degree, Lydia M. Gibson Dawes graduated from Regional Yale University of Connection Medicine, in New Haven, Conn. – one of the first four women to do so. She went on to study with Anna Freud, Sigmund Freud’s daughter, and, in 1960 was named clinical associate in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. She later became the first child analyst and child psychiatrist at Children’s Hospital in Boston, where she was appointed as a senior child psychiatrist in 1968. Sigmund Freud

30 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

Current Parents Current Legacy Parents Parents of HWS Grads

Top 5 Professions of New England Alums

1.

Healthcare Healthcar e

2.

Higher Education Education

3.

Secondary Secondar y Education

4.

Finance/Banking

5.

Legal Le gal

543 61 688


Regional Network Spotlight Jay Flower ’98 Class Agents

New England Regional Vice President Freeport, Maine

18

• VP Portfolio Manager, IMCG

114

Internships Completed in the Region

Alums who Studied Abroad HWS Alum Athletes

Volunteers

955

1,667

1,059

Interesting Jobs Held by Alums in New England…. • Sail Designer • Luthier • Hydrogeologist • Vegetable Farmer • Importer of Tribal and Decorative Rugs • Mystery Writer

Events

are being planned in your Region!

www.hws.edu/ regional

• Island Supervisor for Project Puffin

• Hobart Tennis Team • Club Hockey • Statesmen Athletic Association • Kappa Alpha Society Major: European History Why did you choose Hobart and William Smith Colleges? I only looked at small liberal arts schools and Hobart stood out above all the others. The student body seemed to be extremely active and engaged, the faculty and curriculum were excellent and the campus was beautiful. What makes the Colleges special? The friendships that you make at HWS are incredible and the faculty is exceptional. The sense of community is tremendous, not only as a student on campus but as an alumnus. How do you stay connected to the Colleges? My wife, Julie Limbocker Flower ’99, and I have been on the host committee for several alumni/ae functions held in Portland over the last eight years or so. What are your goals as a Regional Network volunteer? To help provide more opportunities for local alums and parents of alums to gather with one another to share their experiences and to keep informed and connected to the Colleges.

• Professional Surfer • Invertebrate Paleontologist • Endangered Species Biologist

2012-2013 Regional Events

6

Regional Event Attendance

444

New England Leadership • Hobart Regional Vice President, Jay Flower ’98, Freeport, Maine • William Smith Regional Vice President, Adele Schlotzhauer ’83, Chelsea, Mass. • Admissions Coordinator, Libby Greene ’10, Boston, Mass. • Career Services Coordinator, Will Corkhill ’87, Wellesley, Mass. • Development Coordinator, Todd Rosenthal ’71, P’11, West Hartford, Conn. • Graduates of the Last Decade Coordinator, Katelyn Miller ’07, Portland, Maine • Programming Coordinator, Gail Palmer ’91, Weston, Mass. • Parent Coordinators, Paul and Marilyn Glover P’15, West Hartford, Conn. • Trustee, Craig Stevens ’85, Boylston, Mass.

Libby Greene ’10 New England Admissions Coordinator Boston, Massachusetts • Behavioral Youth Counselor, Youth Villages Germaine Lawrence Campus • • • • • •

William Smith Soccer Team 3 Miles Lost Laurel Society Hai Timiai Student Athlete Advisory Committee Student Athlete Health Awareness Peer Educator

Majors: Psychology, Women’s Studies and Religious Studies How do you stay connected to the Colleges? I follow William Smith Soccer (Go Herons!), I keep in contact with professors and friends from HWS, and I make use of resources available through the Salisbury Center for Career Services and Professional Development. I also stay connected by giving back to the Colleges through the Annual Fund and the Heron Society. What makes the Colleges special? At HWS, students have access to world-class scholarships, cutting-edge pedagogy, and meaningful relationships with professors who are invested in their students. Beyond the classroom, the Colleges are nationally recognized for study abroad programs and community engagement, and Hobart and William Smith athletics are some of the most competitive in Division III. Finally, the campus’ rolling hills and Seneca Lake view make for an absolutely gorgeous place to go to school.  Why do you give back to HWS? I give back in gratitude and with the hope that my gifts will help current and future students enjoy the kind of opportunities I did while at HWS.

Data key: All data from 2012-2013 1. Graduates from the Classes of 2003-2012. 2. HWS living graduates from the Classes of 1962 and earlier. 3. Alums who have a child and/or parent who also attended HWS. 4. Percentage of regional alums and parents who made a gift. 5. Alums and parents who made their first gift to HWS in 2012-2013 fiscal year. 6. Alums and parents who made any gift to HWS in the last five years. 7. Alums and parents who have ever made a gift to HWS. 8. Wheeler Society members who have included HWS in their estate plans.

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

31


Mid-Atlantic DC, DE, MD, Southwest NJ, PA, VA

Admissions College Fairs

67

25

2012-2013 Statistics ALL ALUMS

Admissions Volunteers

Most Popular Majors of Mid-Atlantic Alums

2,414

Hobart Alums William Smith Alums Graduates of the Last Decade1 50th PLUS2 Current Students from Region Legacy Alums3

1,387 1,027 479 205 200 179

Psychology

176

History

231

Political Science

258

English

286

Economics

289

Age Range 22 35 45 55 65

to 34 to 44 to 54 to 64 and Over

25% 19% 20% 16% 20%

65+

22-34

Donors

4

First Time Donors5 Past 5 Year Donors6 Ever Donors7

55-64 35-44

33% 1% 55% 87%

45-54

Dr. Wangari Maathai Sc.D. ’94, P’94, P’96

Regional Connection

Wangari Gardens is a 2.7 acre public garden park in Washington, D.C., designed, created and sustained by the community for the non-profit benefit of the community. Named in honor of Elizabeth Blackwell recipient, the late Dr. Wangari Maathai Sc.D. ’94, P’94, P’96, Wangari Gardens is inspired by the life work of Maathai who started the Green Belt Movement and was the first African woman and the first environmentalist to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. The garden offers a variety of educational, recreational, therapeutic, environmental and agricultural programs free to the public. 32 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

Current Parents 193 Top 5 Professions of Mid-Atlantic Alums

1.

Healthcare Healthcar e

2.

Legal Le gal

3.

Higher Education Education

4.

Government Go vernment

5.

Manufacturing Manuf acturing

Wheeler Members8

58


Regional Network Spotlight Karin Richards Moore ’89 Class Agents

Mid-Atlantic Regional Vice President

15

Alexandria, Va.

70

Internships Completed in the Region

597

Volunteers

818 940

• VP & General Counsel, Grocery Manufacturers Association • SAGA Student Worker • Resident Adviser, Blackwell • Little Theater Major/minor: Economics/English and History

Alums with Advanced Degrees

Why did you choose Hobart and William Smith Colleges? The Quad made a lasting impression on me during a prospect visit.

HWS Alum Athletes

How do you stay connected to the Colleges? I stay connected by mentoring current students and alumni and alumnae, keeping in touch with my favorite professors, attending regional club events and reunions, and checking out TWIP when I can!

Interesting Jobs Held by Alums in the Mid-Atlantic…. • Director of Air Force History • Secret Service Agent

• Animal Keeper at Smithsonian National Zoological Park • Paleontologist

What makes the Colleges special? The people. The campus. The lake. The alums. Why do you give back to HWS? HWS will always be a magnificent part of my life and giving back of my time and money is my way of giving the same wonderful opportunity to someone else who might also be a scholarship recipient.

• Mechanical Engineer for NASA

• Brewer

Susan deMuth P’14

• Pediatric Sports Specialist

• TV Producer/Writer for National Geographic

Mid-Atlantic Parent Coordinator Baltimore, Md.

• Exhibit Planner for the National Park Service

• Historic Preservation Consultant

Events

are being planned in your Region!

www.hws.edu/ regional

2012-2013 Regional Events

7

Regional Event Attendance

277

Mid-Atlantic Leadership • Hobart Regional Vice President, Joe Mechem ’64, P’91, Philadelphia, Pa. • William Smith Regional Vice President, Karin Richards Moore ’89, Alexandria, Va. • Admissions Coordinator, Caroline Spruill ’12, Arlington, Va. • Career Services Coordinator, Peyton Craighill ’94, Arlington, Va. • Development Coordinator, Hans Kaiser ’80, Annapolis, Md. • Graduates of the Last Decade Coordinator, Phil Recchio ’06, Silver Spring, Md. • Programming Coordinator, Hadley Sosnoff ’06, Washington, D.C. • Parent Coordinators, Susan and Murray deMuth P’14, Baltimore, Md. • Trustee, Tim Eden ’79, Chevy Chase, Md.

• Executive Director, Office of Alumni Relations, The Johns Hopkins University Why did your child choose Hobart and William Smith Colleges? Initially the interest was because Ellie ’14 was recruited to play tennis. She met with the team during her recruitment visit and enjoyed the girls and felt extremely comfortable. However, the one-on-one ability to connect with faculty and the strong sciences had a great deal to do with her decision. How do you stay connected to the Colleges? I stay connected via text, Facebook, emails, through my daughter, and the Parents’ Executive Committee.  What makes the Colleges special? The Colleges create a community where individual excellence is encouraged and supported while promoting the larger community: the local, national and global community. Why do you give back to HWS? HWS is committed to each and every student and to individual experiences and growth. What are your goals as a Regional Network volunteer? To promote HWS to those interested.

Data key: All data from 2012-2013 1. Graduates from the Classes of 2003-2012. 2. HWS living graduates from the Classes of 1962 and earlier. 3. Alums who have a child and/or parent who also attended HWS. 4. Percentage of regional alums and parents who made a gift. 5. Alums and parents who made their first gift to HWS in 2012-2013 fiscal year. 6. Alums and parents who made any gift to HWS in the last five years. 7. Alums and parents who have ever made a gift to HWS. 8. Wheeler Society members who have included HWS in their estate plans.

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

33


Southeast AR, AL, FL, GA, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN

Most Popular Majors of Southeast Alums

2012-2013 Statistics

1,705

ALL ALUMS

Hobart Alums William Smith Alums Graduates aduates of the Last Decade1 50th PLUS2 Current Students from Region Legacy Alums3

Age Range 22 35 45 55 65

to 34 to 44 to 54 to 64 and Over

11% 17% 16% 16% 40%

1,050 655 151 401 43 99

Biology

139

Psychology

146

English

183

Economics

249

180

Top 5 Professions of Southeast Alums 35-44

45-54 55-64

Regional Connection

124

Studied Abroad

22-34 65+

Political Science

1.

Healthcare Healthcar e

2.

Higher Education Education

3.

Manufacturing Manuf acturing

4.

Finance/Banking

5.

Legal Le gal

Evelyn Tooley Hunt ’26, P’50, GP ’76 The originator of the American style of Haiku, poet Evelyn Tooley Hunt’s most wellknown and influential poem, “Taught Me Purple,” deals with a child’s view of poverty, pride and hope. Written while she was living in Florida, it was the inspiration for the book The Color Purple by Alice Walker, which was later made into the 1985 movie directed by Steven Spielberg. “My Mother Taught Me Purple” My mother taught me purple Although she never wore it. Wash-gray was her circle, The tenement her orbit. My mother taught me golden And held me up to see it, Above the broken molding, Beyond the filthy street. My mother reached for beauty And for its lack she died, Who knew so much of duty She could not teach me pride.

34 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

Donors

4

First Time Donors5 Past 5 Year Donors6 Ever Donors7

29% 1% 45% 86%

Wheeler Members8

70


Regional Network Spotlight Jessica Indingaro ’99

Volunteers

Southeast Regional Vice President Memphis, Tenn.

287

• Attorney

571 106

Alums with Advanced Degrees Alums with Latin Praise

Career Volunteers HWS Alum Athletes

269

• Residential Adviser and Head RA • Program Director, WEOS • William Smith Representative, Fraternity Accreditation Review Board Major: History Why did you choose Hobart and William Smith Colleges? My decision was a financial one. I didn’t get a chance to visit campus during the admissions process, and didn’t set foot in Geneva until after I’d sent in my commitment to attend. The financial aid offer was the most generous offer I received and I would not have been able to attend without it.

667

How do you stay connected to the Colleges? I am back on campus at least once a year, and love to see the social media updates from the folks on campus. My friends from college remain among my closest, and we’re looking forward to our 15th reunion this summer!

Interesting Jobs Held by Alums in the Southeast…. • Composer

• Portrait Artist

• Plant Physiologist

• Crossword Puzzle Creator

• Director of Infectious Diseases

• Border Patrol Agent

• Prison Chaplain

• Horse Trainer

• Licensed Yacht Broker

• Idea Engineer

What makes the Colleges special? The Colleges are special because they took a chance on me, and I’ve continued to feel very supported as I take chances in my life and my career. Why do you give back to HWS? I received a lot from HWS that I didn’t pay for, and I give because I got so much. I was the beneficiary of an endowed scholarship in memory of Sylvia Witmer Bissell ’68 and in honor of her mother Marian Costello Witmer ’32, among other financial aid grants. I give with the expectation and understanding that my small financial gifts contribute to making those larger experiences possible for the students who come after me.

Horace D. Allen ’85 Southeast Admissions Coordinator Matthews, N.C.

Events

are being planned in your Region!

www.hws.edu/ regional

2012-2013 Regional Events

4

Regional Event Attendance

134

Southeast Leadership • Hobart Regional Vice President, Michael Mills ’96, Atlanta, Ga. • William Smith Regional Vice President, Jessica Indingaro ’99, Memphis, Tenn. • Admissions Coordinator, Horace Allen ’85, Matthews, N.C. • Career Services Coordinator, James Baker ’96, Winter Park, Fla. • Development Coordinator, Liz McFarlane ’89, Kittrell, N.C. • Graduates of the Last Decade Coordinator, Evan Brown ’08, Charlotte, N.C. • Programming Coordinator, Megan Flood Bornstein ’96, Daniel Island, S.C. • Parent Coordinator, Betsy Mitchell P’14, Sarasota, Fla. • Trustee, Bill Green ’83, Charlotte, N.C.

• • • •

Founder and CEO, LegacyCreators Head Resident Adviser Black Student Union Hobart Football Team

Major/minors: Economics/Sociology and Religion Why did you choose Hobart and William Smith Colleges? Great education and great athletics. How do you stay connected to the Colleges? The Pulteney Street Survey. Why do you give back to HWS? I give back because the Colleges created the foundation for my personal and professional success. What are your goals as a Regional Network volunteer? My goals are to help build the brand and marketing reach for the Colleges.

Data key: All data from 2012-2013 1. Graduates from the Classes of 2003-2012. 2. HWS living graduates from the Classes of 1962 and earlier. 3. Alums who have a child and/or parent who also attended HWS. 4. Percentage of regional alums and parents who made a gift. 5. Alums and parents who made their first gift to HWS in 2012-2013 fiscal year. 6. Alums and parents who made any gift to HWS in the last five years. 7. Alums and parents who have ever made a gift to HWS. 8. Wheeler Society members who have included HWS in their estate plans.

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

35


Midwest IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, MI, MN, MO, NE, ND, OH, SD, WV, WI

Admissions High School Visits

43

2012-2013 Statistics ALL ALUMS

Most Popular Majors of Midwest Alums

1,084

Hobart Alums William Smith Alums Graduates of the Last Decade1 50th PLUS2 Current Students from Region Legacy Alums3

619 465 183 119 98 61

22 35 45 55 65

to 34 to 44 to 54 to 64 and Over

22% 20% 18% 17% 23%

74

Psychology

80

Biology

22-34

136

English

140

of Midwest Alums

35-44 44

55-64 45-54

Regional Connection

1.

Higher Education Education

2.

Healthcare Healthcar e

3.

Manufacturing Manuf acturing

4.

Legal Le gal

5.

Secondary Secondar y Education

Colonel Albert James Myer 1847 The ability to accurately track major weather systems and create precise storm warnings saves lives, especially in the Midwest which includes portions of Tornado Alley. Today’s National Weather Service was started by Hobart alum Colonel Albert James Myer from the Class of 1847. Though he began his career with the N.Y. Telegraph Company and as an Army doctor, Myer was inspired to devise a system of signaling across long distances using simple codes and lightweight materials, a system he began as a student at Hobart. In 1869, a House of Representatives resolution charged the Army with the responsibility of tracking and reporting the weather, and the task fell to Myer. Under Myer, the reach of the National Weather Service was expansive with offices from coast to coast whose sole objective was to keep Washington and the Army well-informed with meteorological data. 36 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

86

Economics

Top 5 Professions

Age Range 65+

Political Science

HWS Alum Athletes

Donors

4

First Time Donors5 Past 5 Year Donors6 Ever Donors7

411 34%

Wheeler Members8

35

2% 53% 86%


Regional Network Spotlight Frank C. Schroeder III ’65 Class Agents

Midwest Regional Vice President Chicago, Ill.

9

Alums with Advanced Degrees

243

Volunteers Career Volunteers Admissions Volunteers

403

225

Why did you choose Hobart and William Smith Colleges? Happily, HWS accepted me. Beyond that, I wanted a small liberal arts college with a small student to faculty ratio.

18

How do you stay connected to the Colleges? I participate in annual giving, attend reunions, and maintain contact with classmates.

• Pilot for the UPS

• Wilderness Guide

• VP of the American Motorcycle Association

• Personal Chef

• Habitat Conservationist

• Rush Chairman and President, Sigma Chi Fraternity • Sophomore and Senior Class Secretary, Hobart Student Government • Intra-Fraternity Council Major: Economics

Interesting Jobs Held by Alums in the Midwest….

• Transplant Surgeon

• Principal and Co-Founder, Campus2Career Transition Services, LLC.

What makes the Colleges special? During President Gearan’s tenure and with obvious support from enlightened Boards, the resurgence of HWS as a superior national liberal arts school allows the Colleges to offer a wonderful, broad educational experience to young people from many walks of life. Why do you give back to HWS? Our children need the higher education liberal arts option offered by HWS.

• Immigration Attorney • Rabbi • Acupuncturist • Professional Hockey Player

Maddie Brooks ’08 Midwest Graduates of the Last Decade Coordinator Bloomington, Ind. • Senior Client Manager, Bank of America Merrill Lynch

Events

are being planned in your Region!

www.hws.edu/ regional

2012-2013 Regional Events

4

Regional Event Attendance

169

Midwest Leadership • Hobart Regional Vice President, Frank Schroeder ’65, Chicago, Ill. • William Smith Regional Vice President, Lynne Friedlander ’80, P’10, Naperville, Ill. • Admissions Coordinator, Kaity Sliger ’10, Chicago, Ill. • Career Services Coordinator, Chris Coffin ’83, Columbus, Ohio • Development Coordinator, Mary Collins ’78, Wilmette, Ill. • Graduates of the Last Decade Coordinator, Maddie Brooks ’08, Bloomington, Ind. • Programming Coordinator, Leo Rhodes ’01, Eden Prairie, Minn. • Parent Coordinators, Bruce and Linda Aikens P’14, P’15, West Bloomfield, Mich. • Trustee, Steve Cohen ’67, Eden Prairie, Minn.

• William Smith Squash Team • William Smith Golf Team • Heron Society Major/minors: Economics/Political Science and American Studies Why did you choose Hobart and William Smith Colleges? I chose William Smith for the size and opportunities. How do you stay connected to the Colleges? I stay connected to the Colleges through my friends and different alumni and alumnae groups. What makes the Colleges special? The quality of the opportunities. Why do you give back to HWS? To ensure future students have the same opportunities I did. What are your goals as a Regional Network volunteer? To help support the Colleges’ initiative to have a more involved alumni/ae base.

Data key: All data from 2012-2013 1. Graduates from the Classes of 2003-2012. 2. HWS living graduates from the Classes of 1962 and earlier. 3. Alums who have a child and/or parent who also attended HWS. 4. Percentage of regional alums and parents who made a gift. 5. Alums and parents who made their first gift to HWS in 2012-2013 fiscal year. 6. Alums and parents who made any gift to HWS in the last five years. 7. Alums and parents who have ever made a gift to HWS. 8. Wheeler Society members who have included HWS in their estate plans.

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

37


West Mountain CO, ID, MT, NV, UT, WY

Donors

2012-2013 Statistics

Hobart Alums William Smith Alums Graduates of the Last Decade1 50th PLUS2 Current Students from Region Legacy Alums3

Age Range to 34 to 44 to 54 to 64 and Over

19% 28% 23% 14% 16%

23%

Wheeler Members8

2% 42% 84%

7

584

ALL ALUMS

22 35 45 55 65

4

First Time Donors5 Past 5 Year Donors6 Ever Donors7

65+

326 258 75 32 10 30

HWS Alum Athletes

22-34

261

Most Popular Majors of West Mountain Alums

55-64 35-44 45-54

History

46

Political Science

48

Economics

51

Psychology

61

English

86

Regional Connection Dorothy Wickenden ’76 In the summer of 1916, Dorothy Woodruff and Rosamond Underwood left their home in Auburn, N.Y., for the wilds of northwestern Colorado. Disenchanted with the rounds of society luncheons and charity work, the pair took the new railroad over the Continental Divide and made their way by spring wagon to the tiny settlement of Elkhead, Colo., where they taught in a remote mountaintop schoolhouse. Nearly 100 years later, New Yorker Executive Editor Dorothy Wickenden ’76, the granddaughter of Dorothy Woodruff, found her grandmother’s letters home and authored Nothing Daunted, a book that traces the westward journey of the young women. A New York Times bestseller, Nothing Daunted was voted one of the best nonfiction books of the year by the Boston Globe, the Washington Post, Entertainment Weekly, and the Atlantic. 38 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

Interesting Jobs Held by Alums in West Mountain…. • Hydrologist • Fly Fishing Guide • Environmental Planner for Forest Service F • Golf Course Superintendent • Snow Sports Instructor • Cabinetmaker • CEO of US Volleyball Association • Police Officer • Actress


Regional Network Spotlight Amy Brennan McCarthy ’94

Volunteers

West Mountain Regional Vice President Jackson, Wyo.

137

5 181

Internships Completed in the Region Alums with Advanced Degrees

106 130

• • • •

William Smith Congress William Smith Swimming Team William Smith Cross Country Team Resident Adviser

Majors: Economics and Environmental Studies Why did you choose Hobart and William Smith Colleges? Out on a college tour, accompanied by my mother and grandmother, we decided to swing by the Colleges. It was an early winter evening, with snow falling softly, when we drove up to the circle and I stepped inside Blackwell House. I don’t know quite how to describe it, but from that very brief encounter came a knowledge that I would be back. Fortuitously, I was assigned to Blackwell House as a first-year student and returned to serve as an R.A. there as a junior.

Alums who Studied Abroad

Career Volunteers

• Executive Director, Teton Raptor Center

What makes the Colleges special? What truly makes the Colleges special is the people – the community of professors, students, alumnae, alumni and collegiate supporters who collectively give the place a spirit of curiosity and engagement.

Top 5 Professions

Why do you give back to HWS? My days on the HWS campus were transformative, powerful, meaningful, inspiring and foundational. They were a gift, and it is important to me to assure that future generations of students, who work hard, who care about contributing something meaningful to the world, and who desire to create positive change on this planet are also able to experience the gift of an HWS education.

of West Mountain Alums

1. Healthcare 2. Legal 3. Architecture

Brian Jay Parks ’00 West Mountain Development Coordinator Englewood, Colo.

4. Higher Education 5. Business to Business Consulting

• Associate Vice President, NSU Hospitality

Events

2012-2013 Regional Events

www.hws.edu/ regional

Regional Event Attendance

are being planned in your Region!

2

• Hobart Student Government (Secretary, Vice President, President) • Orange Key Society • Sigma Chi Fraternity • Hobart Rowing Team

60

Major/minor: Media & Society/Sociology Why did you choose Hobart and William Smith Colleges? I chose Hobart because of the small class sizes and the campus feeling. I toured the campus in February after a snow storm, and I just felt at home while walking around.

West Mountain Leadership

How do you stay connected to the Colleges? I have been a part of fundraising committees since graduating and I have hosted and attended alumni and alumnae functions in New York and Colorado.

• Hobart Regional Vice President, Sean Fox ’84, Boulder, Colo. • William Smith Regional Vice President, Amy Brennan McCarthy ’94, Jackson, Wyo. • Admissions Coordinator, Liz Brownold Moretz ’99, Sandy, Utah • Career Services Coordinator, Yemisi Abogan ’06, Salt Lake City, Utah • Development Coordinator, Brian Parks ’00, Englewood, Colo. • Graduates of the Last Decade Coordinator, Katie Harrington ’10, Jackson, Wyo. • Programming Coordinator, Scott O’Sullivan ’91, Denver, Colo. • Parent Coordinators, Kathie and Phil Harrington P’10, Jackson, Wyo. • Trustee, Lang Cook, P’99, P’05, Oak Creek, Colo.

What makes the Colleges special? The Colleges are special because they help you grow as a person. The Colleges helped me to learn independence, responsibility, and leadership. The professors are always approachable when in need or just for a good conversation. The community and culture on campus is inclusive and diverse. Why do you give back to HWS? I give back to HWS because it is a part of my history, and I want to give back to the place that helped shape who I am today. I also give back because I want to make sure HWS can be the best far into the future.  Data key: All data from 2012-2013 1. Graduates from the Classes of 2003-2012. 2. HWS living graduates from the Classes of 1962 and earlier. 3. Alums who have a child and/or parent who also attended HWS. 4. Percentage of regional alums and parents who made a gift. 5. Alums and parents who made their first gift to HWS in 2012-2013 fiscal year. 6. Alums and parents who made any gift to HWS in the last five years. 7. Alums and parents who have ever made a gift to HWS. 8. Wheeler Society members who have included HWS in their estate plans.

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

39


Southwest AZ, NM, OK, TX

Admissions High School Visits Admissions Applicants

7

2012-2013 Statistics ALL ALUMS

285 191 54 80 14 18

Age Range 22 35 45 55 65

to 34 to 44 to 54 to 64 and Over

13% 18% 15% 19% 35%

Most Popular Majors of Southwest Alums

476

Hobart Alums William Smith Alums Graduates of the Last Decade1 50th PLUS2 Current Students from Region Legacy Alums3

24

Biology

29

Political Science

30

Psychology

45

Economics

48

English

64

22-34 65+ 35-44

55-64

45-54

Donors

4

First Time Donors5 Past 5 Year Donors6 Ever Donors7

24% 2% 40% 85%

Wheeler Members8

14

Arthur Dove 1903 Regional Connection Acknowledged as America’s first abstract painter, Arthur Dove from the Class of

1903 spent his career developing his own idiosyncratic style of formal abstraction in painting based on his ideas about nature, feeling, and pure form, and characterized by experimentation with color, composition, and materials. He was a part of Alfred Stieglitz’s circle of modern American artists that also included Georgia O’Keeffe, who credits Dove with inspiring her to experiment with abstraction while painting in the Southwest. The two maintained an artistic dialogue throughout their lives. In 1962, O’Keeffe recalled: “It was Arthur Dove who affected my start, who helped me to find something of my own.”

Interesting Jobs Held by Alums in the Southwest…. • Life coach

Stuyvesant Square, 1907. Arthur Dove

• Interpreter, Russian/English Blue and Green Music, 1921. Georgia O’Keeffe

40 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

• Reiki Master • Tobacco T Rep

• Associate Professor of Neuro Opthamology • Air Carrier Inspector

• Tribal Health Director • Senior Research Geologist for Oil Company


Regional Network Spotlight Richard Moses ’89 Class Agents

Southwest Regional Vice President Dallas, Texas

2

• HEADstrong Lacrosse Texas

Career Volunteers

Volunteers Current Parents Parents of Grads

17 18

73

81

• Hobart Lacrosse Major/minor: English Why did you choose Hobart and William Smith Colleges? After graduating from a high school class of just 95 students, I liked the idea of a small liberal arts school where you could truly get to know a high percentage of your classmates and professors. The feel of the campus and the great tradition of Hobart Lacrosse was a major influence as well.  What makes the Colleges special? I believe the Colleges are special because of the commitment to the liberal arts and the pervasive feeling that everyone is a valuable part of the community.  Why do you give back to HWS? I always felt that my experience at HWS helped define and make me a well-rounded individual and citizen. It was a great experience for me and I’d like to see the Colleges continue to grow and be able to provide those same opportunities to future students.  The collegiate landscape is very competitive and I want to do my part to keep HWS in a strong position. 

Top 5 Professions

What are your goals as a Regional Network volunteer? To help in the recruiting effort in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. Getting a student to head to upstate N.Y. from Texas is a tough sell, but I’d like the opportunity to sit down and discuss HWS with any prospective students and speak about the type of quality experience they would have at the Colleges.  I’d start by telling them that you get used to the cold pretty quickly! 

of Southwest Alums

1. Healthcare

Peggy McGee ’81

2. Higher Education 3. Business to Business Consulting 4. Secondary Education 5. Elementary Education

Southwest Programming Coordinator Houston, Texas • Realtor Associate and Top Producer, Heritage Texas Properties • • • •

Events

HWS Alum Athletes

165

are being planned in your Region!

www.hws.edu/ regional

Southwest Leadership • Hobart Regional Vice President, Rich Moses ’89, Dallas, Texas • William Smith Regional Vice President, Carol Hayden Warren ’60, Santa Fe, N.M. • Admissions Coordinator, Cristina Mulcahy ’08, Santa Fe, N.M. • Development Coordinator, Phillip Winston ’93, Houston, Texas • Graduates of the Last Decade Coordinator, Jordunn Joubert ’13, Houston, Texas • Programming Coordinator, Peggy McGee ’81, Houston, Texas • Trustee, Richard Wasserman ’70, Dallas, Texas

Club Soccer William Smith Squash Team Student Worker, SAGA, Office of the Provost Art Events

Major/minor: Urban Studies/Art History Why did you choose Hobart and William Smith Colleges? I fell in love with the campus, small class sizes, study abroad programs, and the interdisciplinary approach to learning. How do you stay connected to the Colleges? I visit occasionally, attend reunions, read e-mails and publications, and keep up with many friends. What makes the Colleges special? Support for the student as a whole person, from the entire community and lifelong friendships. Why do you give back to HWS? I give to express gratitude for the immeasurable gifts I received as a student: a quality education, personal growth and friendship. What are your goals as a Regional Network volunteer? To expand the HWS family regionally and keep students, parents and alumni and alumnae better connected; to increase awareness in the Southwest USA about HWS; and to plan more regional events.

Data key: All data from 2012-2013 1. Graduates from the Classes of 2003-2012. 2. HWS living graduates from the Classes of 1962 and earlier. 3. Alums who have a child and/or parent who also attended HWS. 4. Percentage of regional alums and parents who made a gift. 5. Alums and parents who made their first gift to HWS in 2012-2013 fiscal year. 6. Alums and parents who made any gift to HWS in the last five years. 7. Alums and parents who have ever made a gift to HWS. 8. Wheeler Society members who have included HWS in their estate plans.

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

41


West Coast AK, CA, HI, OR, WA

Donors

First Time Donors5 Past 5 Year Donors6 Ever Donors7

2012-2013 Statistics ALL ALUMS

Age Range to 34 to 44 to 54 to 64 and Over

18% 23% 19% 16% 24%

24%

Wheeler Members8

1% 40% 81%

42

1,404

Hobart Alums William Smith Alums Graduates of the Last Decade1 50th PLUS2 Current Students from Region Legacy Alums3

22 35 45 55 65

4

65+

760 644 187 180 46 65

HWS Alum Athletes

473

22-34

Internships Completed in the Region

35-44

55-64

20

45-54

Regional Connection Cornelius Cole 1847 Pioneer, citizen and statesman, Cornelius Cole led a distinguished political career, serving as Sacramento’s District Attorney and as both a U.S. Representative and U.S. Senator. Instrumental in founding California’s Republican Party, Cole was a close friend of President Abraham Lincoln and advanced the interests of the Pacific Railroad both personally and politically, which led to the construction of the intercontinental railroad.

42 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

Interesting Jobs Held by Alums on the West Coast…. • Congressman • Voice Actor • Well Drilling Manager • Pastry Chef • Sculptor

• Wine Education Director • Special Agent, FBI • Scuba Diving Instructor • Firefighter/Paramedic • Screenwriter

Most Popular Majors of West Coast Alums Political Science

95

History

98

Psychology

114

Economics

143

English

219


Regional Network Spotlight Laura Mallozzi Leoni ’07 Class Agents

4

West Coast Regional Vice President San Francisco, Calif.

425

Alums with Advanced Degrees Alums with Latin Praise

296

Career Volunteers

Volunteers

151

316

• Inventory Analyst, Gap, Inc. • Campus Ministry • Volunteer, Geneva City Schools Majors: Economics and Public Policy Why did you choose Hobart and William Smith Colleges? I chose HWS because of the favorable student to faculty ratio, which was important to my academic growth, and to have a personal relationship with my professors. How do you stay connected to the Colleges? I attend all of the alumni and alumnae events and read the Pulteney Street Survey.  What makes the Colleges special?  The continuous efforts to stay ahead of the trends, especially with green initiatives. In addition, the broad range of campus opportunities so that each student is included in some form of an extracurricular activity. 

Top 5 Professions

Why do you give back to HWS? I know how important it is to give back to a close knit and strong growing community and how fortunate I am to be a part of this unique group. The endless support and various opportunities I had during my four years were an essential dimension of my life. The Colleges provided me with financial support, and for that I am ever grateful.

of West Coast Alums

1. Healthcare 2. Higher Education 3. Entertainment 4. Legal 5. Finance/Banking

Events

are being planned in your Region!

www.hws.edu/ regional

Jeff Eaton ’83 West Coast Development Coordinator Danville, Calif. • Director, Mergers & Acquisitions, The Americas, KONE Inc.

2012-2013 Regional Events

3

• • • •

Hobart Lacrosse Team Kappa Sigma Fraternity, (President in junior year) Intra-Fraternity Council Student Phonathon Coordinator

Major/minor: Economics/History 

Regional Event Attendance

127

West Coast Leadership • Hobart Regional Vice President, Read Jackson ’66, Hidden Hills, Calif. • William Smith Regional Vice President, Laura Mallozzi Leoni ’07, San Francisco, Calif. • Admissions Coordinator, Lavina Poorswani ’96, Bellevue, Wash. • Career Services Coordinator, Sean Kipperman ’06, La Mesa, Calif. • Development Coordinator, Jeff Eaton ’83, Danville, Calif. • Graduates of the Last Decade Coordinator, Sarah Nargiso ’07, West Hollywood, Calif. • Programming Coordinator, Christine Ingebritsen ’84, Seattle, Wash. • Parent Coordinators, Bill and Shelley Bisesto P’14, San Francisco, Calif. • Trustee, Bill Whitaker ’73, Los Angeles, Calif.

How do you stay connected to the Colleges? I stay connected through friends from HWS, by following news and sports results and attending alum events. Why do you give back to HWS? I believe that HWS benefits from our input of time and money. I believe that HWS is and will continue to be a better place than when we were there.  What are your goals as a Regional Network volunteer? Improve awareness about HWS on the West Coast as a viable alternative for undergraduate education and improve alumni and alumnae contributions of time and financial support. 

Data key: All data from 2012-2013 1. Graduates from the Classes of 2003-2012. 2. HWS living graduates from the Classes of 1962 and earlier. 3. Alums who have a child and/or parent who also attended HWS. 4. Percentage of regional alums and parents who made a gift. 5. Alums and parents who made their first gift to HWS in 2012-2013 fiscal year. 6. Alums and parents who made any gift to HWS in the last five years. 7. Alums and parents who have ever made a gift to HWS. 8. Wheeler Society members who have included HWS in their estate plans.

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

43


International There are 310 HWS alums living outside the United States and the National Regional Network. The Colleges benefit from alums and parents living in 54 countries who regularly support initiatives in admissions, career services and advancement.

HWS Alum Athletes

Admissions International Applicants

474

2012-2013 Statistics

310

ALL ALUMS

Hobart Alums William Smith Alums Graduates of the Last Decade1 50th PLUS2 Current Students

Age Range 22 35 45 55 65

to 34 to 44 to 54 to 64 and Over

Most Popular Majors Political Science History Psychology English Economics

143 167 79 12 119

65+

33% 23% 19% 14% 11%

22-34 55-64

45-54

Donors

4

First Time Donors5 Past 5 Year Donors6 Ever Donors7 Wheeler Members8

35-44

17 17 18 30 62

13% 1% 26% 50% 2

See data key on previous page.

Explore the world with

Hobart and William Smith Colleges! Past trips to Vietnam, Peru, Italy and Ireland have booked quickly so make your reservations now by going to: www.hws. edu/alumni/activities/ travel.

Upcoming Trips include: Hidden Ireland: The History and Culture of the West of Ireland May 1 - 11, 2014

English Culture on Stage and Screen June 12 - 21, 2014 Led by Professor of Media and Society Les Friedman Participants will be immersed in the theatre and film of England. Through performances and tours of the BBC, Ealing Studios and numerous museums and cultural centers you’ll discover the dramatic and visual culture of England’s capital of London as well as its picturesque cities of Norwich and Cambridge.

Led by Professor Emeritus of Economics Pat McGuire and his wife Sandy Explore the history of Ireland’s South and Southwest with Pat and Sandy. Beginning with a visit to the cities of Waterford and Cork, learn of the characteristics of these communities as you tour with city residents. In the Southwest, you’ll view coastal scenery and discover the history of the Ring of Kerry and the Dingle Peninsula.

44 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

Robert Genovese ’08

International Career Services Volunteer Shanghai, China • Director Client Services, CapitalVue • Hobart Basketball Team T (senior captain) • Hobart Lacrosse Team (one season) • Student Director, Statesmen Athletic Association (SAA) • Economics Department Committee • Druid Senior Honor Society Majors: Economics and International Relations Why did you choose Hobart and William Smith Colleges? I’ll change the question a bit and answer, “Would I choose HWS again?” Yes. For some, the thought of going to college in your hometown is quite unique; in my experience HWS opened a world of opportunities: a summer abroad program in China, internships in New York City and Silicon Valley, competitive academics and athletics, and inclusion to a community of smart and hard-working individuals. In the end, it was an easy choice. How do you stay connected to the Colleges? As a proud Geneva native I make a point to visit the Colleges during my all-too-infrequent trips back to the States. While I am away, I always make an effort to “check-in,” whether it be checking the website for updates, or receiving email notes from coaches and faculty members.

Led by Professor Emeritus of Economics Pat McGuire and his wife Sandy There are many ways Ireland has been described including: a land of saints and scholars, poets and playwrights, of happy wars and sad love songs, and, more recently, the Celtic Tiger. Join Pat and Sandy to create your own description of this beautiful and friendly island with a focus on the West of Ireland.

The Hidden Ireland II: Early Civilizations, Famine, Emigration, and Struggle for Independence September 11 - 21, 2014

107

What makes the Colleges special? While the Colleges have physically evolved substantially over the years - new buildings, upgraded facilities, etc. - the culture of inclusion remains the same. I find it very welcoming to return to campus after several years, walk up to a Dean, the President, or a faculty member, and reintroduce myself and feel as if I never left. Why do you give back to HWS? It is important to maintain the sense of community, even after graduation, and I am proud of the HWS association. Giving is a way of saying thank you and promoting wider involvement, whether it is a monetary donation or working with current students through Career Services.

www.hws.edu/alumni/activities/travel


Hobart Lacrosse | ca. 1991

ATHLETICS

Bill Miller Hall of Fame Unquestionably one of the greatest Statesmen lacrosse players, Bill Miller ’91 was inducted into the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame on Oct. 26, 2013. A champion at every level he played the game, Miller won a state high school title, four NCAA championships at Hobart, wore the NLL crown as a member of the Philadelphia Wings, and a World Championship with Team USA.

Bill Miller ’91

46

Sally Scatton wins 400th

46

Teams of Distinction

47

Heron Ice Hockey

47

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

45


WILLIAM S M I T H H E RO N S

US Lacrosse/John Strohsacker

H OBART S TAT E S MEN

Bill Miller ’91 (far left) with Dave Urick and G.W. Mix at the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame induction celebration.

Bill Miller ’91 joins lacrosse pantheon By Ken DeBolt

L

egendary Statesman Bill Miller ’91 was the team’s offensive MVP. As a senior, he was inducted into the National Lacrosse Hall presented with the Judge Kane Memorial of Fame in October 2013. Hobart’s career Award as the team’s MVP and the Francis L. goals scoring leader is the sixth former Hobart “Babe” Kraus ’24 Memorial Award as Hobart’s player to join the hall. most outstanding senior athlete. Miller and seven other “It was an incredible inductees were each introduced opportunity to play at Hobart, by a short video that summarized in that system and for those their career highlights and included coaches, while being mentored by comments from a presenter. Each so many All-Americans,” Miller inductee was greeted by a standing said. “Back then, we played more ovation as they made their way than half of our schedule against forward to address the gathering. Division I teams, battling against Miller is recognized as one of Syracuse, Cornell and Penn the top players in the history of State.” NCAA Division III, having twice been Following college, Miller selected as the USILA’s Division III played professionally in the NLL Bill Miller ’91 National Player of the Year during for the Philadelphia Wings, and his career at Hobart. He led the Statesmen was MVP of the NLL’s championship game in to four straight national championships from 1998. He was also a two-time member of the 1988-91 while earning All-America honors each U.S. Men’s National Team, helping Team USA season, including first team recognition in 1989, to world championships in 1994 and 1998. 1990 and 1991. He finished his career with 173 “Going into the National Lacrosse Hall goals and ranks second in assists (145) and of Fame hits you pretty hard,” he said. “While points (318). I was playing, I never thought about it. But Miller’s consistent excellence was as you get a little older and have a chance to rewarded with a lengthy list of awards at think about it, this is now a reminder to me as Hobart’s annual Block H Dinner. He earned to why you make those sacrifices. This is the the Lacrosse Rookie Award in 1988. In each payoff.” of the next two seasons, Miller took home In 1997, Miller was inducted into the William H. Dobbin ’40 Memorial Award as the Hobart College Athletic Hall of Fame. ●

46 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

William Smith Head Field Hockey Coach Sally Scatton

Scatton hits 400 wins

E

veryone experiences the feeling of déjà vu from time to time, but rarely is it as memorable or monumental as the feeling William Smith Head Field Hockey Coach Sally Scatton experienced this fall. On Sept. 22, the Herons closed out the annual William Smith Classic with a dominating 5-0 victory over Lebanon Valley College. The triumph raised Scatton’s career record to 400-132-4 in 27 seasons as a head coach (26 at William Smith, 1 at Wells). A rare achievement, Scatton is just the sixth Division III field hockey coach to reach that plateau and one of only 14 in all three NCAA divisions. Two weeks later, William Smith defeated Union 4-1 to improve to 10-0 on the season and hand its coach her second 400th victory of the year. This time Scatton improved to 400-121-3 as the Herons’ head coach. “It seems like just yesterday that I started here,” Scatton said after the Union game. “When you enjoy doing something time flies by very quickly. I’ve had the great fortune to coach some really wonderful women, and be assisted by some really wonderful people and have a support system in place that allows me to help our team reach excellence.” William Smith finished the season with a 15-5 record and tied for second in the Liberty League regular season standings. The Herons reached the Liberty League tournament championship match and earned an NCAA Championship at-large bid. ●


ATHLETICS

Hobart honors 4 Teams of Distinction

T

he Statesmen Athletic Association honored four Hobart Teams of Distinction this fall. The 1992 baseball team, the 1993 football team, the 1993-94 squash team, and the two-time IRA Championship-winning pair of Chris Desino ’94 and Rob Desino ’94 raised the total number of Hobart Teams of Distinction to 20.    The Desinos were three-time medalists at the Intercollegiate Rowing Association Championships. After capturing a bronze medal in the coxless pair in 1992, the brothers won back-to-back gold medals at the national championships. In addition to winning their first IRA gold in 1993, they also won championships in the pair at the Canadian Ontario Regatta and the Canadian Henley Regatta, and competed in the Henley Royal Regatta. They closed out their Hobart careers in an eight, competing at the 1994 Henley Royal Regatta.   The 1992 Statesmen nine set a school record with a 25-12-1 overall record and earned the program’s first NCAA Championship bid. Head Coach Rick Ferchen’s team was led by second baseman Bryan Carter ’94 and outfielder Bill Minnich ’92. Both players earned All-State and All-ECAC honors while Minnich earned the additional distinction of becoming the program’s

The 1992 baseball team, the 1993 football team, the 1993-94 squash team, and the two-time IRA Championship-winning pair of Chris Desino ’94 and Rob Desino ’94 raised the total number of Hobart Teams of Distinction to 20. first All-American. Four Statesmen hit over .300 that season, led by Minnich’s .395. The slugger also boasted team-highs in doubles (13), triples (8), home runs (9), and RBIs (50). Carter hit .368 and swiped a team-high 27 bases. On the hill, seniors Scott Ruggles ’92 (7-3, 2.03 ERA), Will Margiloff ’92 (5-3, 2.39, 48 Ks), and Chuck Chawgo ’92 (7-1, 3.35 ERA) were the work horses of the staff, combining to pitch 179 2-3 innings.   The 1993 football team was the first Hobart gridiron gang to earn a postseason invitation. Led by the late Bill Maxwell, the Statesmen compiled a 7-3 regular season record and an ECAC Bowl bid. At the time, the Colleges were still on a trimester schedule and the bowl game would have required the team to travel to Maine during finals, so the invitation was declined.   The team overcame a 1-2 start with a six-game winning streak. The run got started with a pair of extremes. On Oct. 2, Hobart rang

up a 32-7 win at St. Lawrence. The 32 points and 25-point margin of victory marked seasonhighs. The following Saturday at Rochester, the Statesmen managed a paltry 2 points, but it was enough as the defense pitched the first of its two shutouts. The six-game run was capped off with a 10-0 blanking of Buffalo State. Four Statesmen were named All-ECAC: offensive lineman Dave Gibbons ’94, linebacker Rich Memeger ’95, and defensive backs Pete Afrooz ’95 and Bill Palmer ’94. Additionally, three garnered a spot on the Champion USA AllAmerica teams: Palmer, who recorded a Hobart record nine interceptions, Afrooz, who led the Statesmen with 102 tackles, and Memeger, who rang up a team-high 13 sacks.   The 1993-94 squash Statesmen produced a 13-5 record and won NISRA Jack Barnaby Trophy as the nation’s most improved team. The team entered the NISRA Championships on a tear, winning nine of its final 10 regular season matches, including a 5-4 win over Dartmouth and a 7-2 triumph against Rochester. The Big Green turned the tables in the championship opener, but the team rebounded with a 5-4 victory over MIT and a 5-4 victory over Cornell. Hobart was ranked 11th in the nation in the final NISRA ranking. Playing out of the middle of the lineup, Drummond Bell ’94 and Peter Burke ’96 shared team-high honors with twin 15-3 records. ●

Follow HWS Athletics: Get all the latest HWS Athletic news, scores and highlights at HWSAthletics.com and follow us on Twitter at @hwssid, or find us on Facebook at facebook.com/HobartStatesmen and facebook.com/WilliamSmithHerons.

Totten tabbed to lead Heron Ice Hockey

photo by kevin colton

R

ecruiting is an important part of any college coach’s job, but no coach puts more importance on it than the coach without a team. Former Northeastern All-American Jaime Totten has spent the past three months recruiting William Smith’s inaugural ice hockey team, which begins play in 2014-15. Heron Director of Athletics Deb Steward announced in July that Totten would be the program’s first head coach. She came to the Colleges after spending 13 seasons as an assistant coach at the University of Connecticut.   No stranger to building a program from scratch, Totten joined the UConn coaching staff in 2000, helping the Huskies transition from a club team to full varsity status. The Huskies’ coaching staff needed just five seasons to put together the program’s first winning season, a 16-12-8 campaign that saw UConn climb as high as No. 8 in the national poll and finish third in the Hockey East conference. In 2006-07, Connecticut began a string of four consecutive winning seasons, William Smith Ice including a 22-8-5 season in 2007-08. The Huskies finished second in the Hockey Hockey Head Coach East that year. The 2009-10 team went 21-9-7 and climbed all the way to No. 7 in Jaime Totten the national rankings. In addition to her work at UConn, Totten has served as an assistant coach with the Hockey East All-Star Team that played Team USA prior to the 2010 Vancouver Olympics. In 2008, she was an assistant coach for the U.S. Women’s National Under-22 team for a three-game series against Canada. Totten also has worked numerous USA Hockey camps over the past decade. A 2000 graduate of Northeastern, Totten earned a bachelor’s degree cum laude in cardiopulmonary science with a concentration in exercise physiology. On the ice, Totten played in a Huskies’ record 141 games during her career, helping her team win three Beanpot titles and the 199697 ECAC Championship, twice garnering All-America honors. ●

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

47


Classnotes

Photos Hobart alums reunited at the wedding of Bob Cleveland’s ’74 daughter. Pictured from left to right are: Rob Heath ’75, Dan Tieger ’74, Jack Buonocore ’74, Chris Smith ’74, Bob Nelson ’74, Bob Seidler ’74, and Rick and Doug, high school classmates of Seidler and Cleveland.

Carolyn Bensley ’98 married W. Matthew Muszala on Sept. 22, 2012 at Morris County Golf Club in Morristown, N.J. HWS graduates in attendance were (front row): Zach Bensley ’94; (second row): Will Livingston ’96, Alex MacInnes ’97, Gail Carpenter Palmer ’91, L. Thomas Melly ’52, LHD ’02, Katherine Adler MacInnes ’98, Joanna Honig Pascal ’98, Laurance Guido Pascal, W. Matthew Muszala, Carolyn Bensley Muszala ’98, Bruce N. Bensley ’51, LHD ’01, Jessica Quinones Rogers ’98, Laurence von Barta ’99, Rebecca Hyde von Barta ’98, Christine Cooper Tunick ’98, Allison Babb Christopher ’97, Karra Clark Detrick ’98, Nicholas Tunick ’98, Katie Perry Bensley ’93.

Michael Athas ’07 married Lauren Coshatt on May 4, 2013 in Seaside, Fla. HWS alums in attendance were: (front row) Neil Sjoblom ’75; (second row): Jeremy Horan ’07, Samuel Lacasse ’07, Michael Athas ’07, Lauren Coshatt, Susan Albert ’75, P’07, P’09, Marisa Athas Beck ’09, Michele McVayCrowley ’75; (back row): Alden Hawkins ’08, Stanton Kensinger ’07, Cameron Ross-MacComack ’07, Eliza Spear ’07, John Brittan Nelson ’07.

Lee Connelly Hackett ’62 and Pat Hackett ’59 traveled from Berkeley, Calif. to Martha’s Vineyard this August to celebrate the 75th birthday of Pat’s college roommate, Leslie J. Stark ’59 (left).

60 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

HWS friends Dereck Norville ’06, Tamisha Marshall ’08, Kara Doyle ’06, Cherisse McMillan Phillip ’06, Tina Lee ’06, Loretta Carty ’06 and Lenin Guzman ’06 celebrate Cherrisse’s marriage on August 24, 2012.

Bernadette Clifford ’97 and Sarah Dillon ’07, both Blair Academy alums, run into each other quite often at high school and college reunions.

KA Brothers G. Jarvis Coffin ’79, David Hogan ’85 and Charles “Chuck” Smithers ’78 pose after an intense croquet match at The Hancock Inn in Hancock, N.H. The inn is owned by Jarvis and his wife, Marcia.


Classnotes

Kyra Tobin ’07, Carter Ramsey Sonstein ’07, Lindsay Button ’07 and Rachel Sukeforth ’07 celebrate Carter’s wedding in Siesta Key, Fla.

Vince King ’02 and his wife Ashleigh, welcomed a son, Griffin Michael King, on April 1, 2013.

Maranda Bliss ’03 and Mark Musacchio ’00 were married in August 2012 on Block Island, R.I. HWS alums in attendance were: (bottom row) Stephanie Skorman Cicero ’03, Amanda Kerwin Dyer ’01, Marc Sutter-Remy ’02, Jonathan Shank ’03, Leah Musacchio ’99; (middle row): Seth Rogers ’00, Caleb Rogers ’02, Robert Drake ’04, Kevin Conlon ’02, Michael Platt ’01; (top row): Michael Cicero ’01, Paige Ryan Shank ’05; (not pictured): Henry Henderson ’02.

Tom Evans ’07 and Stephanie Sadlon Evans ’06 welcomed a baby boy, Colden, in October 2012.

Blair Dubak Connolly ’02 and Christopher Connolly ’01 were married on July 20, 2013 at Blair’s parents’ home on the Westport River in Westport, Mass. Hobart and William Smith friends in attendance were (left to right): Sidney Pietrak Seubert ’03, Mike McCarthy ’01, Alyssa Kierkegaard ’02, Ishmael Ubiles ’03, Albee Schimanski ’01, Deirdre Rynne ’01, Christopher Connolly ’01, Jack Hendrickson ’00, Blair Dubak Connolly ’02, Jill Young ’13, Jamie Spates ’00, Tia Trivisonno ’99, Kerry Gannaway ’02, Lisa Tarpey Jones ’02, Tatiana Marecki Marshall ’00, Megan Williams Jones ’02, Danielle Bello ’01, Chris Faraone ’01, Adam Mandell ’01. Not pictured: Ben Jones ’01.

The Honorable Ludwig Gaines ’88, Mark “Skip” Darden ’87, P’17, Kelly L. Wynn ’83, and William Lee ’88 pose for a photo with a Pudgies Pizza delivery man during a mini-reunion at Darden’s house in Dayton, Md. Pudgies, an Upstate New York pizza franchise, was a favorite for the Hobart men while students.

John and Jessica Evangelista Balduzzi ’05 welcomed twin daughters, Gabriella and Gianna on July 2, 2013.

Laura Mallozzi Leoni ’07 and Hugh Leoni ’01 were married on August 25, 2012 at Fiddler’s Elbow Country Club, Bedminster, N.J. HWS alums in attendance included (back row): Ryan Delaney ’01, Chris Bellapianta ’01, Ross Montgomery ’02, Sara Richards Mastro ’08, Brittany Richards ’08, Anne Hellebush ’07, Jamie Spates ’01, Nick Smith ’01, Jeff Hodde ’69, P’91; (front row): Adam Raffa ’06, Dennis D’Agostino ’03, Greg Williamson ’01, Kristina Nangle ’07, Laura Mallozzi Leoni ’07, Hugh Leoni ’01, Chris Connolly ’01, Brad Karl ’01; (not pictured): Jason Stull ’00 and Alexandra Volp Stull ’01 and Clare McLean Hedley ’03. Hobart and William Smith Colleges

61


Classnotes

Scott Mason ’81, P’13, Chris Walsh ’81, Trustee Craig Stine ’81 and Chris Donahower ’81 get together for a photo on the beach. Joe McDonald ’07 and Caitlin Gallagher McDonald and were married on May 25, 2013 in Hanover, N.H. HWS alums in attendance were: Brian Schubmehl ’07, Rob Reinheimer ’07, Preston Rich ’07, Sarah Weinstein Rich ’07, John Keating ’07, Lou Guard ’07, Kirra Henick-Kling Guard ’08, MAT’09, Caitlin Gallagher McDonald, Joe McDonald ’07, Branden Elsner ’07, Ben Crosky ’07, Todd Wolf ’07, Michelle Peters ’07, Jamey Mulligan ’07, Nick Cream ’07, Paul Wasmund ’07, Emily Gordon ’07, Matt Sweitzer ’08, Jane Erickson ’07, and Susan Hendrickson ’07. The couple are at home in Niwot, Colo.

Nate Smith ’00 poses with United States Senate Chaplain Barry Black in January 2013, a week before President Barack Obama’s second inauguration. Smith was in Washington, D.C. to meet with the President and other key leaders to discuss issues facing Bronx youth.

Rachel Caplan Gansner ’03 and husband Jeremy, welcomed a son, George in May.

Matthew Monbouquette ’05 married Elizabeth Gintz on June 20, 2013 in Husum, Wash. Pictured in the photo above are Matthew, Elizabeth, Dan Gilbert ’06 and his wife, Molly.

62 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

On June 19, 2013 Andrea Rizzo Pinero ’06 and Rick Pinero ’05 welcomed their second child, Roman Laurence Pinero into the world.

Abby Jordan ’13, Augusta Williams ’13 and Hobart lacrosse alumnus Bill Miller ’91 (second from right) Jenny Troyer ’13 meet up in New York City’s is joined by other lacrosse alums David Creighton ’72, AJ Russo ’72 and Bob Raleigh ’73 at the National Lacrosse Hall Central Park for a mini-reunion. of Fame for the Class of 2013 induction ceremony in Hunt Valley, Md. Miller was inducted into the Hall’s Class of 2013.


Classnotes

Chi Phi brothers Drew Oliveira ’13, Henry Farrand ’14, Andrew Guild ’13, Adam Law ’12, Kevin Gannon ’13 and Colin Desko ’13 gather for a photo atop Mount Washington in New Hampshire. Meghan Welsh ’05 married Marc Van Keuren on July 13, 2013 at the York Harbor Reading Room in York Harbor, Maine. Hobart and William Smith alums in attendance were: Matt Sullivan ’05, Meghan Spelman Vigne ’05, Billy Vigne ’05, Nick Grimshaw ’04, Debbie Minarick Grimshaw ’05, MAT ’06, Justin Macklin ’04, Laura Parker Macklin ’05, Meghan Welsh Van Keuren ’05, Marc Van Keuren, Christine Curry Fitch ’05, Kathleen Frazier ’05, Breanna Greene ’05, Ashley Varrato ’05, Shelly Smith ’05, Caroline Wenzel Chapman ’05, Mia Rabinowitz Cote ’05, and Matt Cote ’05.

Steve Hutchinson ’79 (left) and Jay Pitocchelli ’79 caught up on Martha’s Vineyard this summer.

Recent graduates Shanita McLeod ’13, Yuliana Baez ’13, Kian Williams ’13, Kelly-Ann Smith ’13 and Shane Samuel ’13 meet in New York City for a mini-reunion.

Christopher Warren ’12 and Christie DeLigny ’12 hold a sign that reads “Making History at Ross” on the first day of classes. Warren, who teaches third grade, and DeLigny, who teaches kindergarten, began teaching at the Ross Lower School in Bridgehampton, N.Y. this year.

Jennifer Bermel Kelleher ’00 and husband Brendan, welcomed sons Thomas Patrick (“Tucker”) Kelleher and Edward Scott (“Teddy”) Kelleher on April 11, 2013.

Jamie Childs ’97, Drummond Bell ’94, Former Coach Chris Pentz, Jake Garmey ’94 and Ted Childs ’97, members of the 1993-94 Statesmen Squash Team, play a reunion game at Bristol Field House. The team was recently recognized as a Team of Distinction.

Rebecca Splain ’04 and husband Richard Grant welcomed a son, Russell Evans Grant on August 18, 2013.

While on a cruise of the Baltic region, Eric Hall Anderson ’59 poses for a photo with Russia’s St. Petersburg harbor behind him.

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

63


Classnotes

Regional Events

Supporters of the Hobart and William Smith rowing teams gather on the bank of the Charles River in Boston, Mass. to cheer on both crews at the Head of the Charles Regatta. The Hobart rowing team’s varsity eight placed seventh – ranking in the top 10 for the eighth consecutive year.

New Head Lacrosse Coach Greg Raymond (left) is introduced to the HWS community in Boston. The event was hosted by Trustee Craig Stevens ’85 and Trustee Chris Welles ’84, P’12, P’15 at The Met Back Bay.

Alums gather for an evening of baseball with the Chiefs at NBT Bank Stadium in Syracuse. Special guests included Chair of the Board of Trustees Maureen Collins Zupan ’72, P’09, Professor of Sociology James Spates P’00, P’09, Hart Seely ’74, author of “The Juju Rules,” and Professor of Political Science Iva Deutchman.

Erin Weir ’03, joined by her parents Maureen P’03 and Don Weir P’03, waits for William Smith field hockey to take the field in their game against Montclair State University in Montclair, N.J. Weir was a member of the Herons field hockey team during her time on campus.

64 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

Tim Riley ’01 and Kristen Schram Riley ’03, of Cape Elizabeth, Maine, join the Colleges for an evening at the ballpark. HWS hosted alums at Fenway Park in Boston as the Red Sox took on the Seattle Mariners.


Classnotes

Assistant Vice President for Alumni Relations and Annual Giving Jared Weeden ’91, Hobart Alumni Association President JB Robinson ’96, Honorary Trustee Rod Ross ’52, LL.D. ’79 and Bob Ohl ’59 gather in Philadelphia, Pa. to cheer on Hobart lacrosse at the inaugural Fall University City Classic.

Members of the Cook Parents Circle gather for a group photo before dinner at The Links in New York City. Established in honor of Honorary Trustee Langdon L.H.D. ’12 and Lyn Cook P’99, P’05, the Circle recognizes members of non-alum parents who make a long-lasting philanthropic connection to the Colleges.

Gordon Sweely ’86, Joseph Stein ’86 and Eric Stein ’89 meet the new head coach of Hobart lacrosse Greg Raymond (second from right) at an alum event held in New York City in his honor.

HWS alumnae and alumni stop for a photo while on a 10-day artistic and culinary tour of Rome, Italy. The program, offered by the Colleges, was led by Professor of Art and Architecture Emeritus Elena Ciletti and Professor of English Emeritus Jim Crenner. Charlotte Lysohir ’12, Alex Khaddar ’10, Professor of Sociology Jim Spates P’00, P’09, Lindsay Kent ’14 and Kevin Kent ’12 attend the HWS alum event at Yankee Stadium in the south Bronx in New York City.

Members of the Hobart rowing team, alums and coaches pose with President Mark D. Gearan (right) following their four Lowell Levine ’59, Susan Albert ’75, P’07, P’09, Bernard Armstrong victories in the HWS Challenge on the Canal. The Statesmen and Herons also dedicated three new shells and honored the and Millicent Scrivan Armstrong P’95, P’99 gathered for the annual HWS “Day at the Races” event. first Hobart rowing Team of Distinction. Hobart and William Smith Colleges

65


Classnotes

Regional Events

Connect with alums in your area by attending an HWS Regional event! Visit www.hwsalumni.com for upcoming event information.

Daphney Etienne ’12, Emily Hamburger ’13, Makenzie Leukart ’12 and Youdlyn Moreau ’13 joined President Mark D. Gearan for a Graduates of the Last Decade breakfast and update on the Colleges. The event was held at the Cornell Club in New York City. Alums, parents and friends celebrated the summer at Café Genevieve in Jackson, Wyo. The event was hosted by Café Genevieve owners, Fred and Daryl MacGregor ’97 Peightal.

Mike Athas ’07, Phil Recchio ’06, GOLD Coordinator for the Mid-Atlantic region, and Trustee Ed Cooper ’86 P’16, joined fellow alums at a reception for Graduates of the Last Decade held in Washington, D.C. Mike Athas was a member of the host committee that sponsored the event. Alums Watson W. Galleher ’79 and Patti DeFilipps Galleher ’79, Steve Hubbard ’91, Ira Goldschmidt ’77 and Joel Stevenson ’83 gathered for an evening with special campus guest, Professor Emeritus of Economics Pat McGuire HON ’10, L.H.D. ’12 at Bogey’s on the Park in Denver, Colo.

Alums joined President Mark D. Gearan for a luncheon in Chicago. Held at Goldman Sachs & Co., the event was hosted by Timothy C. Frazier ’06.

66 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

The William Smith Chapter of Rochester welcomed new members of the William Smith Class of 2017 during its annual summer picnic. The gathering was hosted at the home of Chrissy Bennett-West ’94, president of the William Smith Alumnae Association.


Obituaries

Obituaries The Colleges appreciate notification of the death of any member of the Hobart and William Smith community.   In order to include notice in the Pulteney St. Survey, we must receive notification that is printed and verifiable. If possible, please send a printed obituary or legal notification (as from an estate) of the death. Personal testimonials and remembrances, in written form, are also welcome. Their use in the Survey, though, is subject to length restrictions.   Deadlines for obituary submission are the same as for Classnotes.

Hobart Burton L. Barcliff ’33, of Penn Yan, N.Y., died on April 29, 2012. Burton graduated magna cum laude with a B.A. in chemistry. He went on to work at Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, N.Y. He was predeceased by his wife, Marian. He is survived by his children, Marla and Gary; four grandchildren; and seven great grandchildren. The Rev. Edward T. Atkins ’42, of Macon, Ga., died on July 16, 2013. Edward graduated with a B.A. in history and was a member of the band. He earned a M. Div. from Virginia Theological Seminary. Edward began his service at Grace Episcopal Church in Kirkwood, Mo., and then as rector of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Overland, Mo. He later became the executive secretary for adult education of the Episcopal Church with offices in New York City. Edward retired last serving as rector of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Mystic, Conn. He was predeceased by his wife of 66 years, Elizabeth. He is survived by his sons, Richard and Roger; four grandchildren and four great grandchildren. Irwin J. Breslauer’44, of New York, N.Y., died on Nov. 16, 2013. Irwin attended Hobart for two years and was a member of Navy V-12. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II on the carrier USS Mission Bay. He later graduated from Allegheny College and the University of Missouri School of Journalism. He worked as a reporter in Bluefield, W. Va., and as a news editor for a radio station in Poukeepskie, N.Y. He spent more than 50 years in the newspaper industry, marketing syndicated features for United Media, the Los Angeles Times, Scripps-Howard and General Features. He was married to Roberta, and they had two children, Jillouise and Todd. Kenneth R. Dunham ’44, of Kent, Wash., died on July 6, 2013. Kenneth graduated with a B.A. in chemistry, was a member of the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity and the boxing team. He established a career as a research associate at Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, N.Y. He was predeceased by his wife, Mary. Kenneth had two daughters, Nancy and Susan. Donald E. Cullen ’46, of Canandaigua, N.Y., died on Aug. 24, 2013. Donald received a B.A. in sociology and economics and was a member of Phi Phi Delta fraternity. He also served on the board of control, was a member of the international relations club, football team, Navy V-12, and was inducted into the Phi Beta Kappa honor society. During his time at Hobart, he interrupted his

76 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

studies to serve in World War II in the U.S. Navy. He later earned a Ph.D. from Cornell University, and established a 37-year career as a faculty member at the New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations. In addition, Donald was an arbitrator in labor disputes in both the public and private sectors. In 1966, he was a member of President Lyndon Johnson’s Council of Economic Advisers. He served as editor of the Industrial and Labor Relations Review. Donald was predeceased by his wife, Jacqueline; brother, Robert L. Cullen ’37; and a son, David. He is survived by his brother, John A. Cullen ’48; children, Tracey, Geoffrey and Christopher; stepchildren, Moira, John, Cathleen and Jacqueline; nine grandchildren; nephew, Terence M. Cullen ’64; and grandnephew, T. Michael Cullen ’99. Wallace E. R. Clements ’48, of Livermore, Calif., died on June 1, 2013. Wallace graduated with a B.A. in mathematics. On campus, he worked for the yearbook. Prior to attending Hobart, Wallace served in World War II as a pilot in the U. S. Army Air Corps, attaining the rank of first lieutenant. After graduation, he did graduate work in education at Harvard University. Wallace worked as a seismologist on oil crews before taking a position as a technical editor for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In retirement, he volunteered with the Boy Scouts of America and the Big Brothers Association. Wallace was predeceased by his wife, Mary Helen. He is survived by his children, Gregory and Amanda; and four grandchildren. Henry H. Wiley ’48, of Edgartown, Mass., died on June 26, 2013. Henry served in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II and received a Bronze Star for his act of bravery for rescuing wounded soldiers under fire at the Battle of Aabach on the Danube River near Regensburg. At Hobart, he earned a B.A. in political science and was a member of the debate team. Following graduation, he received an LL.B. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School and was admitted into the New Jersey Bar. Henry became a partner in the law firm Berry, Whitson, and Berry and served as president of the Ocean County Bar Association before being appointed a judge of the Ocean County Court. He was later appointed to the Superior Court of New Jersey, Chancery Division. One of his most notable opinions was a ruling allowing a terminally ill patient to request withdrawal of life support. The opinion was upheld by the New Jersey Supreme Court and later cited by the U.S. Supreme Court. Henry was predeceased by his grandfather, Charles M. Wiley of the Hobart Class of 1861. He is survived by his wife of 64 years, Jane; children, Bruce, David, Thomas, Charles and Barbara; 12 grandchildren; and 10 greatgrandchildren. Nathan M. Weiss ’49, of New York, N.Y., died on July 31, 2013. Nathan graduated with a B.A. in political science, was secretary of Temple Club, president of Young Republicans Club and Debate Society, member of the International Relations club, and of Tau Kappa Alpha and Sigma Iota honor societies. Nathan received an LL.B. from the University of Virginia Law School and establish a career as an attorney and mentor to many major musical talents, and was a one-time business partner of Brian Epstein. He is survived by two nieces, two adopted sons and many friends. Darrell C. Hamel ’50, of Syracuse, N.Y., died on July 18, 2013. Darrell enlisted in the U. S. Army 284th Field Artillery Brigade during World War II and served through four campaigns in the European Theatre of

Operations from 1942-1946. His honorable decorations included four Bronze Stars, Combat Medical Badge 1st Award, Army of Occupation Medal Germany Clasp, Expert Marksman Badge with Carbine Bar and the World War II Victory Medal. After discharge, he attended Hobart for two years and was a member of Kappa Sigma. Darrell worked for Ingersoll Rand, E&W Clothing, Corning Building Company and Corning Glass Works. He was predeceased by his wife of 50 years, Gladys. He is survived by his daughters, Nancy, Kay and Terry; seven grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. E. William Miller ’50, of Tonawanda, N.Y., died on Feb. 22, 2013. William graduated with a B.A. in economics, where he was the treasurer of the Kappa Alpha fraternity. William worked in the field of hospital administration for 25 years and was later appointed Deputy Town Supervisor of the Town of Tonawanda. Additionally, he served as president of the Thomas Jefferson Parent Teacher Association. He was predeceased by his wife, Barbara and daughter, Jane. He is survived by his children, Lynda and Gary; and eight grandchildren. John E. Sayre ’50, of Bedford Hills, N.Y., died on July 6, 2013. John graduated with a B.A. in history, played in the band and worked at WEOS-FM. He served in the U.S. Army and earned a M.A. in social studies from Columbia University Teachers College. John held a career as a social studies teacher at the Fox Lane High School in Bedford, N.Y. He is survived by his wife, Ebba; children, Lisa and John; and a grandson. Thomas E. Thayer ’50, of Lancaster, Ohio, died on Sept. 2, 2013. Thomas graduated with a B.A. in economics. On campus, he was a member of Phi Phi Delta fraternity, Little Theater and the football team. Following graduation, Thomas joined the U.S. Army, serving as a first lieutenant during the Korean War. After obtaining a MBA in corporate finance from New York University, he held a career in banking and finance and enjoyed several entrepreneurial ventures and management consulting opportunities. As an alumnus, Thomas served as the division leader of the Campaign for the Colleges, worked as a career counselor and served as the special gifts chair for the Buffalo Alumni Fund. He was predeceased by his wife, Betty B. Thayer ’51. Thomas is survived by his children, Jeffrey C. Thayer ’77, Louise and Constance; five grandchildren; and five great grandchildren. Louis I. Maas ’51, of Scotia, N.Y., died on July 20, 2013. Louis served in the U.S. Army during World War II before graduating with a B.A. in economics, where he was vice president of the Delta Chi fraternity, commodore of the Yacht Club and member of the sailing team. Louis was co-founder of Spruce Industries in Garwood, N.J. He served on the borough council in Mountainside, played a significant role in fundraising for a playground for the Boys & Girls Club and earned the Point of Light Award for community service. He was also part of an Honor Flight for veterans to Washington, D.C. As an alumnus, Louis volunteered for career services and Campaign for the Colleges. He is survived by his wife of 64 years, Marjorie Heyman Maas ’50; brother, Richard J. Maas ’52; cousin, Harry L. Hollander ’56; children, Susan, Lisa, David, Peter and Julie; nine grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Robert L. Teamerson ’51, of Webster, N.Y., died on Oct. 13, 2013. Robert graduated with a B.A in economics , was a member of

the Phi Sigma fraternity, Glee Club, football and sailing teams, Gamma Omicron Tau honor society and served as business manager of Echo. Later, he earned a J.D. from Cornell University Law School. After two years in the U.S. Army, Robert practiced law in Rochester with the firm Liebschutz, Sutton, DeLeeuw, Clark and Darcy, where he was named partner in 1965. He was also town attorney for the Town of Webster and was named the initial Citizen of the Year by the Webster Herald. A charter and life member of the Webster Kiwanis Club, Robert served as president of the Webster club and Lt. Gov. of the Finger Lakes Division of Kiwanis. He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Doris; children, William and Julie; and three grandchildren. Braxton Allen Bladen ’53, of Atlanta, Ga., died on Oct. 23, 2013. Braxton graduated with a B.A. in English and was a member of Delta Chi fraternity. Following graduation, he served in the U.S. Army in Korea prior to earning a LL.B. from American University College of Law. Braxton established a 40-year career as an attorney for the Travelers Insurance Company. He is survived by his wife, Leslie; children, William and Leslie; two grandchildren; and four great grandchildren. Dr. Stephen C. Finestone ’53, of Vero Beach, Fla., died on Aug. 7, 2013. Stephen graduated with a B.A. in biology and chemistry. On campus, he was an honors student who served as president of the camera club, was a member of the science and Temple clubs, and participated with WEOS-FM and Echo. He earned a M.D. from New York University School of Medicine. Stephen practiced his specialty of anesthesia for more than 40 years and served as chief of anesthesia at Montefiore Hospital in Pittsburgh for 32 years. He was vice chair of anesthesia at the University of Pittsburgh. In addition, he served as president of the PA Society of Anesthesia and received their Distinguished Service Award. He also was medical director of the University Of Pittsburgh School of Anesthesia for Nurses, graduating more than 200 nurse anesthetists. As an alumnus, Stephen volunteered as a career counselor and as a library campaign special gifts volunteer. He was predeceased by his grandson, Zachary. He is survived by his wife of 55 years, Eileen; sons, Mark, Scott and Ross; and four grandchildren. Carl Gibbs Jr. ’53, P’79, P’89, of Vero Beach Fla., died on May 7, 2013. Carl graduated with a B.A. in economics and was a member of the Kappa Sigma fraternity. He was a member of Chimera, Orange Key, Kappa Beta Phi, the baseball team and served as junior class vice president. After graduation, Carl served in the U.S. Marine Corps for seven years before forging a career in the steel industry. He spent many years at Washburn Wire Company in New York, N.Y. The remainder of his career was spent as president of the AT Wall Company in Warwick, R.I. As an alumnus, Carl served as an admissions volunteer. He was predeceased by his wife of 57 years, Jean Ballantyne Gibbs ’52 and in-law’s, Ward J. Doonan ’79 and Barbara Ballantyne Ferris ’52. He is survived by his daughters, Cynthia Gibbs Doonan ’79, Cathryn A. Gibbs ’89 and Susan; four grandchildren; and family members, Gilbert H. Ferris ’63 and Walter V. Ferris ’52. John S. Kenny ’53, P’84, of Camillus, N.Y., died on Oct. 9, 2013. John graduated with a B.A. in economics, was vice president of Delta Chi fraternity, and a member of New-


Obituaries man Club and Gamma Omicron Tau honor society. He served in the U.S. Army and retired as major in the Air Force Reserves. He earned a J.D. from Syracuse University College of Law. John was a member of the board of directors of the Onondaga County Bar Association and chaired many of its committees including Syracuse City Court Committee and was active in establishing the indigent clients program. In 1993, he established the firm Kenny & Kenny, PLLC with his son, Michael P. Kenny ’84. As an alumnus, John volunteered for Campaign for the Colleges. John was predeceased by his first wife, Mary. He is survived by his wife of 32 years, Rosalie; children, Teresa, Patricia, Jennifer, Tamara, Michael, John, Thomas and Craig; 15 grandchildren; and relatives, Stephen J. Kenny ’99 and Christopher M. Kenny ’00.

Harris G. Mirkin ’57, of Kansas City, Mo., died on May 30, 2013. Harris graduated with a B.A. in political science and English, was president of the Tau Kappa Alpha honor society, and member of the debate team, Temple Club, International Student Club, Outing Club, and worked for the Herald. He earned a M.A. in political science from the New School for Social Research, and a Ph.D. in political science from Princeton University. Harris also served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Ethiopia for two years. He held a 45-year teaching career as an associate professor of political science at University of Missouri Kansas City, where he served as co-director of the university’s honors program, secretary and chair of the faculty senate, and chair of the political science department. He is survived by his wife, Kathleen; children, Timothy and Abby; and two grandsons.

Donald M. Stuart ’55, of Murrells Inlet, S.C., died on May 31, 2013. Donald graduated with a B.A. in American history. On campus, he was an honors student, treasurer and house manager of the Sigma Chi fraternity, worked for the Herald and WEOS-FM, served as vice president of Interfraternity Council, and was a member of ROTC and Board of Control. Donald served as an intelligence officer in the U.S. Air Force. He retired after 37 years as a division manager with AT&T and the New York Telephone Company. He volunteered with the United Way, South Presbyterian Church and Hudson Valley Presbytery. He was predeceased by his wife of 39 years, Barbara; and stepson, McNeil. He is survived by his second wife, Martha; children, Victoria and Mark; stepson, Blanding; and five grandchildren.

Carroll J. “C.J.” VerSteeg ’58, of Cumming, Ga., died on Aug. 21, 2013. C.J. graduated with a B.A. in history, was a member of the Kappa Sigma fraternity, the baseball and football teams and served on the intramural board. He served in the U.S. Army as a specialist fourth class. C.J. held a career in the energy industry and became vice president of personnel at the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations in Atlanta, Ga. He was an active member of the Episcopal Church of The Holy Spirit in Cumming. As an alumnus, C.J. was inducted into the Hobart Hall of Honor in 2006 for being a member of the record-setting 1954 football team. He also served as a career services volunteer. He is survived by his wife of 55 years, Carol Stoldt VerSteeg ’58; children, Glenn, Bill, Jon and Kim; and nine grandchildren.

William W. Carlough Jr. ’56, of Summit, N.J., died on Oct. 8, 2013. William graduated with a B.A. in history and economics and was a member of Phi Phi Delta fraternity, Newman Club and the football team. A banker by trade, William served as senior vice president in charge of commercial lending at The Summit and Elizabeth Trust Company for 24 years and later at the First National Bank of Toms River, where he was president of their subsidiary bank in Penns Grove. He volunteered for many organizations including Watchung Area Boy Scout Council, United Way and Summit Arts Center. As an alumnus, William was elected to the Hobart Football Hall of Fame as a member of Hobart’s first undefeated team in 1954. He also served as a volunteer for Campaign for the Colleges and Career Services, and was a member of the Hobart Club of New York and as chair of Phase II New Jersey area. He is survived by his wife, Betsy; children, William, Karen and Craig; and a granddaughter.

Elmer Van Wagner Jr. ’58, P’84, P’88, of Hyde Park, N.Y., died on June 25, 2013. Elmer graduated with a B.A. in economics, was president of the Theta Delta Chi fraternity and a member of the Kappa Beta Phi honor society. For more than 50 years, Elmer was the president and owner of Van Wagner Bard Builders, Inc., a general contracting business and also, of Van Wagner Reality, a real estate development business. He was a member of the Hyde Park Chamber of Commerce for more than 40 years and served on its board of directors for 30 years. He was predeceased by family members Augustus H. Hillman ’25 and Robert E. Hillman ’32. He is survived by his wife, Mary Hillman Van Wagner ’58; children, Elmer Van Wagner III ’84, Kyle Van Wagner ’88 and Mary Van Wagner Kubar ’84; in-laws, Harry A. Hillman ’61 and Mark H. Kubar ’83; and seven grandchildren.

Dr. Frederick M. Appleton ’57, of Hanover, N.H., died on July 30, 2013. Fred graduated with a B.A. in biology and chemistry, was a member of the Kappa Sigma fraternity, Canterbury club, Chimera, Schola Cantorum, marching band, Echo, choir, lacrosse, cross country and served as the junior class president. Fred earned a M.D. from Albany Medical College graduating at the top of his class. For nearly 30 years, he served as assistant and then associate professor of medicine at Dartmouth Medical School. During his tenure, he was voted Outstanding Teacher of the Year in 1986 and 1995 by his students. At Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, he served as director of the dialysis unit and treated thousands of patients. Fred was active in the community, volunteering on the Hanover school board and working as a patient assistant at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. He is survived by his wife of 55 years, Patricia; children, Michael, Kevin, Julie and Paul; and 10 grandchildren.

The Rev. Franklin A. Mahlau ’61, of Hampton, Va., died on Oct. 27, 2013. Franklin served in the U.S. Army and rose to the rank of Major. He graduated with a B.A. in philosophy, was a member of Sigma Chi fraternity, the football team, Little Theater and Phi Beta Kappa honor society. Franklin earned a M.Div. from the General Theological Seminary. He served as rector of St. James Episcopal Church in Hyde Park, N.Y. and in several Massachusetts parishes in Boston, Charlestown, North Attleboro and Needham. In retirement, he opened a business, the Nutrition Shack in Cape Cod. As an alumnus, he served as president of the Mid-Hudson Hobart and William Smith Club, a Reunion volunteer and on the Alumni Council. Franklin is survived by his first wife, Cynthia McKay Mahlau ’60; second wife, Mary C. Mars ’64; children, Marina, Sam, Patricia, Kristen and Charles; foster child, Judith N. Lane ’74; and 11 grandchildren. R. David Horka ’62, of Lansing, Mich., died on Sept. 27, 2012. David earned a B.A. in philosophy, was a member of St. John’s

Guild, WEOS-FM, Echo and photography editor for the Herald. Following graduation, David joined the U.S. Air Force where he attained the rank of captain. After his service, David worked for the State of Michigan, first as a social worker and then as a systems analyst. During his career he was elected president of the State of Michigan Executives. David was a member of Trinity Episcopal Church in Grand Ledge. In retirement, he volunteered his time to the Court Appointed Support Advocate in the Foster Care Program sponsored by the Ingham County Probate Court. He was married to Jane deVyver ’62 and will be missed by many devoted friends. Anthony N. Romaine ’63, of Brooklyn, N.Y., died on April 22, 2013. Anthony graduated with a B.A. in American history and was treasurer and vice president of the Kappa Alpha fraternity. He held a career as a history teacher at the Polytechnic Preparatory Country Day School in Brooklyn, N.Y. Clayton P. Knowles Jr. ’63, of New York, N.Y., died on Aug. 5, 2013. Clayton graduated with a B.A. in psychology, was a member of the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity, ROTC and WEOS-FM. Following graduation, he served as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army First Air Calvary during the Vietnam War and was awarded the Bronze Star and Air Medal. He attended New York Law School and held a career as an entertainment attorney. He is survived by his wife, Renata; and siblings, Jeffrey and Laurie. Dr. Andrew I. Cederbaum ’64, of Eastham, Mass., died on Sept. 18, 2012. Andrew graduated with a B.S. in chemistry, was the treasurer and president of the Beta Sigma Tau fraternity, a member of the basketball team, Interfraternity Council, Judicial Board and physics club. He earned a M.D. from New York University, was trained as a hematology/oncology fellow at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill and served as a doctor in the U.S. Army in Honolulu, HI. He finished his career in Massachusetts, practicing for 17 years in Worchester and another 17 years in Cape Cod. As an alumnus, Andrew served as a career services volunteer. He is survived by his wife, Anne; children, Lori, Adam, Lisa and Kate; and four grandchildren. Harry “Hank” W. Bowman ’65, of Lake Forest, Ill., died on June 11, 2013. Hank graduated with a B.A. in psychology, was president of the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity, member of the Arnold Air Society, ROTC, band, and the baseball and basketball teams. Hank served for four years in the U.S. Air Force and studied in the executive MBA program at the University of Notre Dame. He worked for Whirlpool Corporation for 24 years, culminating as executive vice president and as president of Whirlpool Europe BV. He later served as president, chief executive officer and chair of Outboard Marine Corporation and president and chief executive officer of Stiffel Lamp Company. He was a lifelong Episcopalian and member of the Church of the Holy Spirit in Lake Forest where he served on the vestry and as warden for several years. During retirement, Hank served as an afterschool tutor and confirmation mentor. As an alumnus, he established the Bowman Internship Fund for Leadership and Civic Engagement, designed to provide financial support during internships for Hobart and William Smith students interested in developing a career in leadership and/or civic engagement. At HWS, Hank also served as a career services and reunion volunteer. He is survived by his wife, Raelene; and sons, David, Kevin and Craig.

Michael K. Vanderbilt ’70, of Englishtown, N.J., died on Aug. 10, 2013. Michael attended Hobart for two years, was a member of the Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity, and the drill and soccer teams. He entered the construction industry, working for Vanbro Corporation, a family construction business. He later went into business with Jiffy Lube Franchises. He is survived by his daughter, Lillian; stepdaughter, Jessica; and siblings, Cornelius “Neil” Vanderbilt ’67, Susan and Penny. Robert Schechter ’72, of New Canaan, Conn., died on May 21, 2013. Robert graduated with a B.S. in psychology, was a member of the Pi Lambda Phi fraternity, Little Theater, and the swimming and track teams. Robert went on to earn a MBA in marketing from the University of Connecticut. He forged a career as an advertising executive before establishing and serving as president of Equity Communications Inc., a financial public relations company. He also served for more than 12 years as board president and chair of Green Chimneys Children’s Services, Brewster, N.Y., and was a volunteer Boy Scout leader in New Canaan. As an alumnus, Robert served as an admissions volunteer. He is survived by his wife, Francine; children, Ethan, Leah and Sarah; and mother, Shirley. Gerard P. Waselik ’75, of Mt. Pleasant, S.C., died on June 5, 2013. Gerard earned a B.A. in psychology, was a member of the Kappa Sigma fraternity and the football team, and captain of the baseball team. Following graduation, Gerald became director of the Ashville Tourists Baseball Club. He later served as general manager of the Montgomery Rebels Baseball Club and of the Savannah Braves, and retired from years in the field of sales and advertising. He is survived by his wife, Susan Jones, MD. David H. Dean ’76, of Henrico, Va., died on Aug. 11, 2013. David earned a B.A. in economics and was a member of the Delta Chi fraternity. He earned a Ph.D. from Rutgers University. David held a career as an associate professor of economics for the Robins School of Business at the University of Richmond, where he was a two-time recipient of the University Distinguished Educator Award and three-time recipient of the Robins School’s Outstanding Teaching Award. He built a national reputation for his research in the economics of disability. He was predeceased by his wife of 29 years, Leslie Clemmer Dean ’76. He is survived by his wife, Holly; and sons, Brian and Sean. In Memory of David Dean ’76 In my long career as a faculty member of the Economics Department at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, I have taught many students and have always looked forward to hearing of their lives of consequence. I have held a special place in my heart for the Hobart men and William Smith women who pursued a career in teaching economics in higher education after completing their time at the Colleges. I have a dozen such graduates and I follow their careers with both excitement and pride. We lost one of these special economists on Aug. 11, 2013. David Dean graduated from Hobart College with a degree in economics in June, 1976. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Rutgers University and he was an associate professor of economics in the Robins School of Business at the University of Richmond. He had a national reputation for his research in disability economics and he will be remembered as an outstanding teacher, two-time winner of

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

77


Obituaries the University Distinguished Teacher Award and three-time winner of the Robins Business School’s Outstanding Teacher Award. Students often referred to him as “my favorite professor” regardless of the course, the level or the grade. I felt honored and proud of David’s accomplishments as a teacher and renowned researcher, perhaps even more privileged to be a small part of his obvious love of economics. When one of my students chooses to move into teaching as a career, it has a profound effect upon me personally. It is not an easy choice and one that requires a unique blend of ability, dedication, commitment and a self confidence to survive the rigors of the academic life. He survived and thrived and I am so proud of David and greatly sadden by our loss, a loss especially felt by his family and his past, present and future students. David and I were in touch over the past many years and he was renowned for his sense of humor and his love of sports as well as his economics. We played several rounds of golf over the years, and yes, discussed economic issues as well as sports. He approached all of his activities with a level of enthusiasm that amazed colleagues and friends. His comment to me on my retirement illustrates his sense of humor and generous friendship. He wrote “Pat, When I think of you as the economist, I think of John Maynard Keynes, when I think of you as a golfer, I think of Charles Barkley!!!” David’s family, the Hobart and William Smith community, the community of the University of Richmond and his hundreds of friends and former students benefited from his light and energy. His light will continue to shine for all who knew David and the loss to future students is sad but others will learn from his example and will continue to shine the light of knowledge and learning on future generations of students and teachers. God Bless you David. Professor Emeritus of Economics Pat McGuire HON ’10, L.H.D. ’12 Stephen M. Dwyer ’78, of Okemos, Mich., died on Oct. 4, 2013. Stephen graduated with a B.S. in chemistry and was captain of the swimming team. Following graduation, he earned a M.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Connecticut. Stephen established a career as a chemical engineer, receiving several distinguished honors and developing four plastic patents that are widely used today. He was most recently working on an assignment in Warsaw, Poland, as chief executive officer and president of the management board of Basell Orlen Polyolefins. As an alumnus, he was a career counseling volunteer. He is survived by his wife of 33 years, Leslie; children, Courtney, Michelle and John; and parents, William and Margaret. William J. Quinn ’78, of Canonsburg, Pa., died on Aug. 15, 2013. William graduated with a B.A. in history, was a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity, and the football and lacrosse teams. William established a career in construction management and developed the construction and real estate development corporation, Quinn Construction Corp. He is survived by his wife, Angela; and son, Roman.

William Smith Jeanne Whitaker Tomlinson ’43, of Rochester, N.Y., died on Sept. 23, 2013. Jeanne graduated with a B.A. in sociology and psychology, and was a member of the Big Sister Committee and yearbook. A philanthropist, she was a supporter of local artists, as well as environmental and animal organizations. As an alumna, she was a member of the William Smith Club of Rochester. She was predeceased by her husband, Daniel. She is survived by her children, Jeffrey, James and Julie; step-children, Mary Lou and Sarah; five grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. Marilyn Heath Bright ’45, of Boulder, Colo., died on Sept. 23, 2013. Marilyn graduated with a B.A. in business administration, was a member of Little Theater, Schola Cantorum and served as sophomore class president. She earned a M.Ed. from New York University and worked as an elementary school teacher in Los Alamos, New Mexico, and later moved to Boulder, Colo. She was a member of the First United Methodist Church of Boulder. Marilyn was predeceased by her husband, William. She is survived by her children, Susan and Margaret; five grandchildren; and three great grandchildren. Nancy Lewis Warshow ’49, P’76, of Port Washington, N.Y., died on July 3, 2013. Nancy graduated from with a B.A. in psychology. On campus, she was involved in Little Theatre, Big Sister Committee, International Relations Club, the Herald, baseball team, and served as president of the Christian Cabinet. Nancy held a career as an elementary school teacher and later volunteered for the Port Washington Public Schools and the Health Education Department at the North Shore University Hospital. As an alumna, Nancy was awarded a citation by the William Smith Alumnae Association in 1979. She also served as co-chair of the Long Island Alumni Reception. She is survived by her husband, Alan; children, Leslie F. Warshow ’76, John and Susan; and three grandchildren. Mary Ann Carmen Short ’54, P’78, of Fairport, N.Y., died on Oct. 7, 2013. Mary Ann graduated with a B.A. in biology and chemistry. At William Smith, she served as president of the Student Association, and a member of the Big Sister Committee, the Judicial Board, Pine, Newman Club, the Herald and Hai Timiai honor society. Along with her husband, she started a manufacturing business—JJ Short Associates, specializing in manufacturing custom made rubber products. She is survived by her husband of 59 years, John J. Short Sr. ’53; children, John J. Short Jr. ’78, Nancy and Peter; siblings, Celia Carmen Gallo ’56, Robert and Richard; in-law, Susan Foerster Short ’78; and eight grandchildren. Elizabeth Marsden Snyder ’55, of Sacramento, Calif., died on March 4, 2013. Elizabeth graduated with a B.A. in Spanish and American history. On campus, she was a member of Schola Cantorum, opera workshop and was house president. Elizabeth worked as a legal assistant at the First Interstate Bank and the Sacramento Valley Farm Credit Union. Additionally, she volunteered at the Martin Luther King Jr. branch of the Sacramento Public Libraries. Elizabeth is survived by her son, Michael; two granddaughters; and three great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband, William. Carol Hilary Letendre ’58, of Columbia, Md., died on Aug. 22, 2013. Carol graduated with a B.S. in biology and chemistry. On campus, she was a member of the Judicial Board,

78 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

student council, president of the Big Sister Committee, junior class president, sophomore class secretary, senior class treasurer, president of Campus Chest, secretary of Epsilon Pi Sigma, and a member of Schola Cantorum. She earned a M.S. in nutritional science and a Ph.D. in biochemistry from Cornell University. Carol then completed four years of postdoctoral study at the Institute of Physico-Chemical Biology in Paris and served as a research associate at the University of Virginia. She was a research biochemist at the National Institutes of Health, serving as deputy director of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute’s Division of Blood Diseases and Resources. She worked for 32 years at NIH and guided research on the management of hemophilia and sickle cell disease, stem transplants and the role of blood clots in heart attacks. In 1999, Carol received the NIH director’s award. She was predeceased by her second husband, Myron. She is survived by her sons, Robert and Kenneth; a granddaughter; and her ex-husband, Robert. Anne W. Cooney ’63, P’04, of Rochester, N.Y., died on Sept. 8, 2013. Anne graduated with a B.A. in English and mathematics, where she was a member of Little Theatre, Mutet Choir, student council, Schola Cantorum, Judicial Board, Phi Delta honor society, and served as co-editor of the Ridge. Anne earned a M.A. from the State University of New York at Binghamton, and a M.Ed. from New York University. She established a career as a Professor of English, teaching at Monroe Community College for 35 years. Anne was also a leader at the Christ Church in Rochester. As an alumna, she served as a class correspondent, class agent, and volunteered with admissions, reunion and career counseling. In 1988, Anne received a William Smith Alumnae Citation for service to her alma mater. She was predeceased by her mother, Helen Doran Cooney ’31. She is survived by her son, Jeremy A. Cooney ’04; and siblings, Stephen P. Cooney ’64 and Sheila Swigert. Sydney Martin Wertenberger ’74, of Poplar Bluff, Mo., died on May 19, 2013. Sydney attended William Smith for two years before earning a B.S. in history and nursing from Syracuse University. She went on to receive a MSN from Russell Sage College. Sydney worked as a nurse for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs for 36 years. She retired as associate director of patient care/ nursing services at the John J. Pershing VA hospital in Poplar Bluff, Mo. During her career, she was a member of a subcommittee for the 109th Congress and testified before Congress regarding telemedicine in care of veterans in rural settings. Sydney was published in various medical and nursing journals and received awards for her contributions to the VA Healthcare System. She was predeceased by her father, Arthur J. Martin ’47. She is survived by her husband, Douglas; five stepchildren; and several step-grandchildren. Courtney R. Wilson ’08, of San Mateo, Calif., died on Sept. 9, 2013. Courtney graduated magna cum laude with a B.A. in public policy studies and environmental studies. She was an honors student, a member of the crew team, participated in the semester program in Washington, D.C., and was a student staff member of the Environmental Science Summer Youth Institute. She completed an internship as part of the GIT Ahead program at the Finger Lakes Institute, a project funded by the National Science Foundation, and also served as GIT Ahead teaching assistant. After graduation she worked as a curriculum development specialist for the Crossing Boundaries

Project. She was based at Cornell’s Laboratory of Ornithology and was funded as the first Crossing Boundaries intern in Brazil. There, she worked at IMAZON, a non-profit organization promoting sustainable development in the Amazon rainforest. Courtney co-published an article exploring biodiversity that appeared in the journal Science Teacher. She later earned a master’s degree at the University of Michigan’s School of Natural Resources and the Environment. At the time of her death, Courtney had just begun her doctoral program at the school. On the HWS campus, a tree was planted in her memory in front of Smith Hall. She is survived by her parents, Dr. Lloyd and Bonnie Wilson P’08.

HWS Community Richard “Dick” Vogt, of Geneva, N.Y., died on Aug. 15, 2013. Dick worked at the check-in desk in Saga since 2005. A lifelong resident of Geneva, Dick served in the U.S. Army from 1957-63, and served his local community as a member of Winnek Post #396 American Legion and VFW Post # 2670. Before joining HWS, he was the owner of Don A. Vogt Welding in Geneva. He is survived by his son, Andrew; two daughters: Mary Beth and Peggy; sister, Lois Warner; former wife, Mary Lou Vogt; seven grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews including Dorothy “Dot” Vogt, faculty secretary in Smith Hall. He was predeceased by his son, Richard, and several brothers and sisters.


Viewbook |ca. 1945

BOOKSHELF

Greek Life

Bookshelf 80

“Informal gatherings before the fraternity fireplace are natural parts of college life,” states the Colleges’ viewbook in 1945, celebrating the fraternal brotherhood on campus. Hobart College has possessed a rich fraternal history since the College was founded in 1822.

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

79


BOOKSHELF

W

ith so many books authored by or about alumni, alumnae, faculty and staff, we gathered a few of our favorites for this issue’s Bookshelf. For details on all of the books pictured here, go to hws.edu.

Written for school-aged children Three 19th Century Women Doctors: Elizabeth Blackwell, Mary Walker, and Sarah Loguen Fraser (2007) profiles three women with Upstate New York connections who persisted in entering the all-male medical profession. The life of Dr. Blackwell was written by Mary LeClair, director of communications.

80 Pulteney Street Survey | Winter 2014

One of the nation’s most soughtafter interior designers, in Cohler on Design (2013), Eric Cohler ’81 has created a volume that marries his own work with historic interiors, contemporary design, iconic images and architectural masterpieces in a style that is uniquely his own. Lush with vibrant photographs and thoughtful examinations, Cohler’s first book is a detailed look at his artistic expression.

Inspired by his experiences during World War II alongside two Hobart students, celebrated American writer Kurt Vonnegut (1922-2007) authored Slaughterhouse-Five (1969), one of the most important anti-war novels of the 20th century. In 1944, Vonnegut was with Gifford Doxsee ’46 and Edward Reginald Crone Jr. ’45 when the three were taken prisoner and brought to Dresden, Germany, where the infamous Bombing of Dresden occurred.

When Monique Brinson Demery ’98 realized she had never seen an obituary for South Vietnam’s former first lady Madame Nhu, she set out to find the enigmatic leader. Through personal interviews and careful study of Nhu’s unpublished memoirs, Brinson Demery paints a picture in Finding the Dragon Lady: The Mystery of Vietnam’s Madame Nhu (2013), of a ruthless social and political life leading up to the war in Vietnam, as well as her retreat from the public eye.

Re-released in 2011, Service Learning and the Liberal Arts: How and Why It Works includes chapters from 11 HWS faculty members and several staff members. As editor, Professor of Public Policy Studies and Political Science Craig Rimmerman says the work highlights the opportunity for students and faculty to apply a rigorous pedagogical framework from individual courses to see how those courses connect to the Geneva community.


Associate Professor of English and American Studies Eric Patterson’s On Brokeback Mountain: Meditations about Masculinity, Fear, and Love in the Story and the Film (2008) examines the film in relation to the cultural construction of masculinity, attitudes toward gay men, attitudes toward homosexuality, and the impact of homophobia on men who love men.

As the sun sets, the Hobart rowing team practices on the Cayuga-Seneca Canal. Photo by GREGORY SEARLES ’13

Written by William F. Scandling ’49, LL.D.’67, The Saga of SAGA: The Life and Death of an American Dream (1994) chronicles the history of SAGA Corporation from its humble start in a campus cafeteria at HWS to its rise as a multimillion-dollar food services empire. As one of SAGA’s founders, Scandling, who served as chair of the HWS Board of Trustees, shares his entrepreneurial vision for SAGA and firsthand business experiences in this candid memoir.

Dr. Jeremy Cushman ’96 and Professor of Biology Jim Ryan teamed up to publish iAnatomy (2013), an eBook comprised of 20 case-based, interactive exercises that reinforce human anatomy and physiology concepts. While engaging readers with the clinical relevance of anatomical details, iAnatomy complements traditional human anatomy texts by bridging the gap between anatomical concepts and clinical applications.

Written by Christie Lowrance ’65, Nature’s Ambassador: The Legacy of Thornton W. Burgess (2013), presents an in depth overview of one of the most beloved children’s authors and conservationists of all time. Through engaging text and historical pictures, the biography explores Burgess’s life and legacy, from his Cape Cod childhood to the present.

Released by Lynne Rienner Publishers, one of the foremost publishers on African studies and African politics, Inside African Politics (2013) introduces readers to a rich exploration of contemporary politics in Africa. This is the sixth book from Associate Professor of Political Science Kevin Dunn.

In her first novel, To Whom Much is Given (2013), lawyer and author Cecila Capers ’92 explores the price of success. Avery Benjamin, a young corporate attorney in New York City, is confronted with her desire to once again pursue her dreams when her relationship with her significant other is challenged by the reappearance of an old flame. With a support system of dynamic, multicultural women, Avery must learn to confront her past and decide her own destiny.

HOBART AND WILLIAM SMITH COLLEGES

81


WINTER 2014 Non profit org. U.S. Postage PAID Rochester, New York Permit No. 357

HOBART AND WILLIAM SMITH COLLEGES 300 Pulteney Street Geneva, New York 14456 This publication was printed using FSC Certified paper which enables the environmental savings equivalent to the following: 205 trees preserved for the future 591 lbs waterborne waste not created 83,964 gallons wastewater flow saved 9,622 lbs solid waste not generated 18,946 lbs net greenhouse gases prevented 145,011,615 BTUs energy not consumed

Jud Hartmann ’70

Andrew Hellmund ’14

His series of bronze sculptures, “The Woodland Tribes of the Northeast,” represent one of the most comprehensive explorations of eastern native peoples ever undertaken. One commission, a pair of seven and a half foot tall Iroquois lacrosse players, is installed in front of the Lacrosse Hall of Fame Museum in Baltimore, Md. His work can be found in private and corporate collections internationally.

1. Donatello or Michelangelo, who dominates in 3-D? Michelangelo

1. Donatello or Michelangelo, who dominates in 3-D? Donatello

2. What fires the imagination and inspires a new piece? Historical research of the Woodland Tribes of the Northeast inspires me, fires my imagination!

2. What fires the imagination and inspires a new piece? Meeting with other creatives and designers, as well as the different forms of the metal and recycled metal shapes themselves.

3. What is challenging to sculpt or convey through your pieces? The greatest challenge and the goal is to capture the soul, bring them to life.

3. What is challenging to sculpt or convey through your pieces? To show relationships among different styles and modes of exploration. 4. Where do you see your work displayed in your wildest dreams? Storm King Art Center, Mountainville, N.Y.

4. Where do you see your work displayed in your wildest dreams? Monumental work in public spaces and in the great museums (I have some in each). 5. What music gets you out of bed and going in the morning? Classical music of the baroque era. 6. What is your ideal artist’s work environment? A peaceful, serene environment – close to nature. 7. Your HWS “Ah ha moment”? I was a student during the Vietnam War era, so those years at Hobart helped absolutely to shape who I am: liberal, progressive and passionately an environmentalist. 8. Favorite HWS faculty member and why? Alva Kelly, my squash coach, a warm and sensitive human being who I loved very much.

5. What music gets you out of bed and going in the morning? ’80s Rock 6. What is your ideal artist’s work environment? A large space with a crane 7. Your HWS “Ah ha moment”? A rocking architectural studies dept. and access to a place to create sculpture. 8. Favorite HWS faculty member and why?  Several faculty members have had a profound impact during the last few years.  Currently I am working most closely with my advisor Ted Aub, who has been someone to bounce ideas off, get critiques from, and who has provided the encouragement and access to space to do sculpture from the get go (not to mention he has a great sense of humor).

9. Are you more likely to take to the outdoors or have pictures of it? I’m virtually always outside. I’m a Nordic ski racer (marathons – 50 Km races) so that is a year-around commitment.

9. Are you more likely to take to the outdoors or have pictures of it? Outdoor adventures provide for an inner calm.

10. If you could spend a month anywhere in the world, where would it be? Tahiti, Tuscany, the British Isles

10. If you could spend a month anywhere in the world, where would it be? Backpacking around the Andes with a group of friends.

12. Was there a turning point in your career (professional/ academic) where you committed to art over something else? About six months after graduating, I was living on an island in the Caribbean when I struck a chisel with a mallet into a piece of mahogany. In that moment, the path I was to follow was revealed to me. I’ve been following it ever since.

Herons Win Soccer National Championship!

The architecture major was among only 20 artists whose work was included in the 2012 Biennial Sculpture Invitational at the Krasl Arts Center in St. Joseph, Mich. A 2013 Julius G. Blocker Fellow, he was awarded the 2012 Technos International Fellowship to Japan. He is a member of the Genocide Symposium Board, peer ministry and the architecture society.

PARALLELS PARALLELS

• • • • • •

12. Was there a turning point in your career (professional/academic) where you committed to art over something else? I had to choose between spending more time with sculpture/architecture/art or continue rowing. The lessons learned in rowing were exponential, but it was right to dedicate more time to my studies.

Inside: National Regional Network Launches • Tommy the Traveler • Update on Performing Arts Center

PSS Winter 2014  

Pulteney Street Survey, Winter 2014